How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

Letters of recommendation from teachers and counselors are common for college admission, but some colleges require or encourage the submission of a letter of recommendation as well.

Davidson now requires peer recommendation, and Dartmouth strongly encourages you to apply, which is basically the same requirement in such a selective school.

If you are considering applying to Dartmouth or Davidson, or have been asked to write a letter of recommendation for a friend, read on to learn more about this unusual college application requirement.

What is a Partner Partner Recommendation Letter?

A letter of recommendation from colleagues is just what it sounds like: a letter from someone who knows you well, providing information about who you are outside of academia. Letters of recommendation from colleagues play a vital role in the overall recruitment process, which treats the student as a whole, not just a set of grades and test scores. A letter of recommendation from a friend can talk about your personality, character, and interests outside of school. It can also shed light on how you’ll fit in and contribute on campus.

A persuasive letter can help you separate yourself from other applicants in such competitive schools. Formal letters of recommendation from teachers typically focus on your academic performance and potential, while letters from counselors focus on past achievements and future potential. Advice from partners is generally more personal. Simply put, a peer recommendation letter is a friend explaining why the university would want you on its campus.

Pros and cons of sending a letter to peer Rec

There are many benefits of a friend’s recommendation letter. Friends see each other in daily life more than teachers and counselors, who may see each other daily or weekly for a short period of time. This allows your friends to paint a more vivid picture of you, including your attitude, unique qualities, and how you interact with others. While teachers can speak to how you’ll fit in a college classroom, friends can share how you’ll fit on a college campus.

Friends and teachers also prioritize different characteristics of people. For example, teachers tend to focus on learning outcomes and outcomes, while friends value qualities such as leadership, motivation, credibility, and trustworthiness. Even if the teacher appreciates qualities such as leadership, she often sees you show them only in a small and confined environment. A friend can tell a college about all your positive attributes that teachers don’t get to see.

Teachers are also prone to personal bias, which is especially bad for students of color. For example, a 2016 Stanford University study found that teachers were less likely to expect black and Hispanic students to complete more high school than white students. Similarly, another Stanford study found that black students are more often labeled as troublemakers and subjected to harsher punishment than their white peers. Peer recommendation allows the student to choose someone who is not so much influenced by these biases.

Just as there are advantages to a letter of recommendation, there are also disadvantages. Just like a great letter of recommendation from a friend can increase your chances of being accepted, a weak letter can hurt you. This makes it important for students to choose the right person to support them: a creative and clear communicator who knows you well and has your best interests in mind.

Letters of recommendation from friends can work even against low-income, less competitive school students. Students in these schools are less likely to have a peer group capable of writing a very convincing letter than students in more profitable private high schools.

Who should be asked for a peer recommendation?

Both Davidson and Dartmouth offer clear instructions on who should write peer recommendations.

Davidsonincarica i candidati di far completare la loro lettera "da un compagno di classe o da un amico intimo che conosce bene il candidato e può valutare i punti di forza del candidato".

Dartmouthinstruct candidates to have their letter written by "everyone the candidate considers equal. It should not be someone who is in a supervisory or oversight role in the applicant’s life. Examples include a classmate or teammate; brother, sister or cousin; partner; a friend met at a summer school or summer camp; laboratory or debate partner. "

Digging deeper, there are some characteristics you should look for in the person you’re asking to write a peer recommendation. Should be:

  • Strong, engaging and convincing writer
  • Someone who can share personal anecdotes or examples that show their strengths
  • Someone who knows you well and can speak to your character and personality
  • Support your college ambitions
  • Someone who has time to spend writing you an attractive recommendation
  • Willingness to know the schools you enroll in and what they are looking for from candidates

Smoking is perhaps one of the worst habits humanity has developed. Smoking, rooted in Native American traditions and practiced mainly on special occasions, gradually became a form of mass addiction. Thanks to the efforts of tobacco companies to increase sales, people have started smoking more and more; It took a while for the more traditional cigarette pipe to evolve, but eventually tobacco became cheaper and easier to use (now you just have to light it instead of always carrying a tobacco bag with you, refill the pipe , puff) and so on). As a result, tobacco-related deaths and health problems have become a global problem.

It is commonly believed that nicotine is the killer. This is only partially true: While nicotine is bad for your health (especially as it affects the cardiovascular system), tar, carbon monoxide, hard particles in cigarette smoke, and a host of toxic emissions and heavy metals do the most damage.Nicotine is addictive and smoking takes care of the rest.

Today, there are alternatives to analog tobacco smoking: the hugely popular electronic cigarettes. Although it is hotly debated whether e-cigarettes are harmful to smokers’ health or not, it is hard to argue that substituting cigarettes with these devices does more good than bad, since they possess a number of advantages that cannot be neglected easily. And while smoking remains a dangerous and unacceptable addiction, e-cigarettes can be a good way to get rid of it.

E-cigarettes provide nicotine to the smoker not by burning (which obviously means inhaling noxious and toxic smoke), but by evaporating liquids containing nicotine. The electronic cigarette heats the liquid in a special container called an atomizer; the liquid evaporates and through this vapor the smoker receives a dose of nicotine. Therefore, the process of consuming nicotine in this case should be called “vaping” and not “smoking”. These fluids usually contain glycerol, propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, propandiol and a few other ingredients (NCBI). Although some of them are not entirely harmless, the chemical composition of e-liquids is definitely safer than that of a normal cigarette. However, careful control of the composition of these fluids should be ensured, and ingredients such as ethylene glycol and propanediol are likely to be banned. However, if a smoker is not planning to quit, they might consider using e-cigarettes instead of real tobacco.

Another good reason a smoker starts using e-cigarettes is that the liquids mentioned may contain different amounts of nicotine.A heavy smoker can start using liquids containing up to 24 milligrams of nicotine, and the good news is that you can gradually reduce the dose down to zero milligrams.

While some smokers may experience physical symptoms when trying to quit smoking, in most cases it is a strong psychological component that prevents the smoker from quitting. It can be assumed that there are five main components of this psychological addiction: 1) the belief in the relaxing / stimulating effects of nicotine in helping the smoker deal with stressful situations; 2) a smoker’s need to “keep hands busy” when bored, waiting for something, feeling nervous, and so on; 3) social contacts with “co-smokers”; 4) unconsciously and “automatically” following a habit; 5) fear that if a smoker stops losing something precious, a source of psychological support or pleasure. Additionally, some smokers find it aesthetic to inhale / exhale smoke or have other reasons for continuing to smoke. In general, smoking is a repetitive behavioral pattern and a reaction pattern. Without neglecting or questioning these reasons, it can be said that the electronic cigarette is probably a safer alternative for a person who does not want to give up nicotine. They still deliver nicotine to a smoker’s body (thus fulfilling the reasons 1 and 5); interfere with automatic smoking described in points 2 and 4 (because e-cigarettes work differently from their traditional counterparts); they allow people to continue socializing with other smokers during breaks from work or on other occasions, as mentioned in section 3. However, while they perform the same functions as regular cigarettes, electronic devices are safer and more socially acceptable.

Also, this is a purely aesthetic reason for preferring e-cigarettes to their counterparts – once evaporated, liquids taste and smell better than tobacco. They are sold in a variety of flavors: melons, apples, cherries, tropical fruits, mint, blueberries, and so on. At the same time, ordinary tobacco smells and tastes terrible not only for non-smokers, but also for the smoker. So why not stop poisoning yourself with toxic smoke, or at least replace it with pleasant smelling vapor?

Addiction to nicotine in any form, from smoking or vaping, is a big problem for addicts. It leads to many serious chronic diseases and even death. At the same time, there may be a healthier alternative for those smokers who are aware of the harm they are doing to themselves but have yet to quit smoking. E-cigarettes are now considered safer than regular cigarettes. The fluids used in these e-cigarettes contain fewer toxic elements and do not include products that are commonly burned in cigarettes. Most e-cigarette vapors are harmless to non-smokers; tastes and smells better, which makes e-cigarette smoking a less reprehensible habit. Finally, many smokers may find that e-cigarettes do not stop them from continuing to smoke, allowing them to reduce the amount of nicotine they consume and eventually quit smoking. Therefore, without advertising or advertising e-cigarettes, it can still be concluded that they are the most preferred alternative to smokers.

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Ciascuno dei cinque brevi video clip in questa cruciale seconda fase di alfabetizzazione "inizio della lezione", adatto per i gradi 3-6, fornisce agli studenti un incentivo a utilizzare una gamma di tecniche di scrittura convincenti.

The first film takes animals as a starting point: three children show us their pets, tell us why they are wonderful and give us some flaws in taking care of them. The next two clips focus on the local neighborhood where we interview shopkeepers talking about the neighborhood from a favorable and less favorable perspective shown alongside the images of the neighborhood. There are two clips showing the two sides of the local area. School Uniform – Brief interviews with fifth grade children about the pros and cons of wearing a school uniform. The last clip features three young people involved in the NHS campaign – Smokefree Camden – in North London. We hear their thoughts and feelings about quitting smoking which can lead students to design and write flyers and leaflets.

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

If you are planning a persuasive writing lesson,I want an iguana is the book you need! Karen Orloff writes letters between Alex and her mother to discuss the pros and cons of getting an iguana. In today’s post, I’m going to share with you how this text can provide your students with the model they need for persuading their own parents to get a pet of their choice. As an added bonus, you’ll see at the end of my post that this is a link up post meaning their are seventeen other mentor text lessons for you to check out and enjoy!

Introduction to persuasive writing

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

We all know that reading and writing go hand in hand. Strong readers are usually strong writers. Why do you think this is so? Well, I believe it’s because avid readers see professional authors using language to create images, attract attention, organize text, add detail to maintain attention, conduct meaningful storyline, and many other writing activities.Stop for a moment and think about your favorite books.

Which titles do you love the most? What was it about the titles you thought were etched in your memory? Could you bring out these traits and use them to model specific writing and / or reading skills? I bet the answer was “Yes!”

With my choice for this lesson, I want an iguana, I suggest analyzing it first as a reader. Lester Laminack’s book, Writers are readersit’s a great resource for making that connection, and as you work on certain comprehension skills, you’ll find that the process helps students come up with the best examples of an author’s craft as an example as they write their own paired assignment.

With this book, I’ve created pre-during-after activities to pair with a second through third grade book. I recommend using it initially for reading so that you can analyze the author’s craft, and with the full bundle, you’ll have all of these options.

Modeling of persuasive writing with tutoring texts

Choosing the right book takes practice. If you’re teaching a specific skill, you must look for a book that has enough examples of the chosen skill that you can use it for modeling. You have to carefully choose the title that best suits the specific goal you are working on. I’d suggest archiving your skills worksheet, book titles you can use, and even links to resources if you store them on Google Drive or Dropbox. This can make planning text lessons much easier for a mentor.

To help you get started with titles, seeA board on Pinterest we have created our own group dedicated to text tutoring lessons. Many of the lessons provided are free and accompany blog posts explaining the lesson from the mentor’s previous text links.

Explain compelling language with textual examples

Once you’ve worked with the text, it’s time to move on to writing. In this book, a compelling encouragement to write is: “Che tipo di animale domestico dovrei comprare?" I recommend extracting from the text the phrases with which Alex convinces his mother. I have listed them in the anchor chart on the right. You may need to zoom in to read them all or flip through a book and save them. Then you can read the compelling vocabulary list I shared on my resource to talk about other words and phrases students can use in their own texts.

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

Another important feature of this book is the way the author presented the arguments. Alex and his mother write letters to each other and then your students write suggestions. You ‘ll review Alex’s arguments for the iguana and use the organizer provided to brainstorm the pros and cons for three different animal options the students choose from for the pet they’d like. You can match students for discussion when they complete this section. I think it’s important to emphasize this point with your students:

Convincing text design

Organize your thoughts

Persuasive writing has a specific structure. This includes expressing your opinion or desire, sharing three or more reasons with supporting evidenceand a call to action. There are two task organizer options in this file. I’ve created an organizer with more writing space for grades 2-3 and one with less space for older students. While this book is aimed more at entry-level readers, I think it could extend to a higher entry level as well, especially with the provided wordbanks.

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

Composition, review and publication

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

Once your kids have completed their plan, it’s time to compose their drafts. If your students have planned well, this part is quick. I would suggest giving students two things: an OREO anchor chart and a persuasive writing checklist to help them keep persuasive writing requirements in mind when writing. You can use the pages on the left to write compelling letters that your students will be able to write in the future. As we know, it will take many attempts to keep it under control.

If you want to use letter writing, a great supplemental book you can use isDear Mrs. LaRue. You can also work from a point of view with this book. ?

By publishing your persuasive letter

The last step in this lesson is to ask your kids to publish their work. You can bind the letters in a class notebook using the cover provided and place the book in the class library. Class books provide a great way to celebrate your students’ work and emphasize the need for quality.

As you can see, your students will write a letter and add a photo of the pet they would like to receive.

When writing a persuasive essay, the focus should be on excuses. This means that it is related to PR situations and is an excuse for someone’s action. For example, suppose one of them was giving a speech to former British Prime Minister David Cameroon but mistakenly added the name Theresa May. This means that the type of trigger used in a persuasive essay refers to excuses. When someone wrote it, they apologize. This will help you understand how to write a compelling essay. Secondly, it is a passion. When writing a persuasive essay, the trigger should be passion. Passion means that when a writer receives passion, writers try to take unfair advantage of the situation.

Readers may sometimes find that the writer overuses the essay. By writing more about an essay, it can happen that a writer’s passion has increased and had a negative impact. Thus, a good positive passion should be maintained, there are various blogs about writing essay reviews, useful articles for students are published. Here’s what you can learn by writing a compelling essay. Third, there are features of the language. In any compelling essay, the writer requires that you pay attention to the characteristics of the language. As much as you know how to write a persuasive essay, it is imperative to write it in the present. He should have technical knowledge and powerful verbs and adjectives. This means you need to learn how to make your essay useful. Using three adjectives in your essay will make it better. We encourage you to write this. Always support the writer in writing in a positive way.

The essay should have a good meaning. Another form of essay are the pros and cons. The advantages are the advantages of this argument. The disadvantages are disadvantages. Thanks to these pros and cons, the writer learned and wrote more about a persuasive essay. This essay is essential. It also represents how it mainly focuses on the different ways of presenting essays. The essay shows that there should be pros and cons for the reader to understand that it should be important and why the writer mentioned it. It’s about the theory of the pros and cons of writing essays. Writers know very well how to write a compelling essay. some of the vocabulary is also important.

A good essay is always enriched by a good vocabulary. The dictionary part includes synonyms and antonyms. Please use them carefully. It should be understood that there should be an appropriate and meaningful meaning in it. It is also the emotions that should speak to the public. It is the audience that shares their knowledge with the writer. They make them aware that they should be aware of the arguments and some rhetorical questions, for example if you really think the phrases are used by writers to express their point of view.

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

If you are planning a persuasive writing lesson,I want an iguana is the book you need! Karen Orloff writes letters between Alex and her mother to discuss the pros and cons of getting an iguana. In today’s post, I’m going to share with you how this text can provide your students with the model they need for persuading their own parents to get a pet of their choice. As an added bonus, you’ll see at the end of my post that this is a link up post meaning their are seventeen other mentor text lessons for you to check out and enjoy!

Introduction to persuasive writing

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

We all know that reading and writing go hand in hand. Strong readers are usually strong writers. Why do you think this is so? Well, I believe it’s because avid readers see professional authors using language to create images, attract attention, organize text, add detail to maintain attention, conduct meaningful storyline, and many other writing activities.Stop for a moment and think about your favorite books.

Which titles do you love the most? What was it about the titles you thought were etched in your memory? Could you bring out these traits and use them to model specific writing and / or reading skills? I bet the answer was “Yes!”

With my choice for this lesson, I want an iguana, I suggest analyzing it first as a reader. Lester Laminack’s book, Writers are readersit’s a great resource for making that connection, and as you work on certain comprehension skills, you’ll find that the process helps students come up with the best examples of an author’s craft as an example as they write their own paired assignment.

With this book, I’ve created pre-during-after activities to pair with a second through third grade book. I recommend using it initially for reading so that you can analyze the author’s craft, and with the full bundle, you’ll have all of these options.

Modeling of persuasive writing with tutoring texts

Choosing the right book takes practice. If you’re teaching a specific skill, you must look for a book that has enough examples of the chosen skill that you can use it for modeling. You have to carefully choose the title that best suits the specific goal you are working on. I’d suggest archiving your skills worksheet, book titles you can use, and even links to resources if you store them on Google Drive or Dropbox. This can make planning text lessons much easier for a mentor.

To help you get started with titles, seeA board on Pinterest we have created our own group dedicated to text tutoring lessons. Many of the lessons provided are free and accompany blog posts explaining the lesson from the mentor’s previous text links.

Explain compelling language with textual examples

Once you’ve worked with the text, it’s time to move on to writing. In this book, a compelling encouragement to write is: “Che tipo di animale domestico dovrei comprare?" I recommend extracting from the text the phrases with which Alex convinces his mother. I have listed them in the anchor chart on the right. You may need to zoom in to read them all or flip through a book and save them. Then you can read the compelling vocabulary list I shared on my resource to talk about other words and phrases students can use in their own texts.

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

Another important feature of this book is the way the author presented the arguments. Alex and his mother write letters to each other and then your students write suggestions. You ‘ll review Alex’s arguments for the iguana and use the organizer provided to brainstorm the pros and cons for three different animal options the students choose from for the pet they’d like. You can match students for discussion when they complete this section. I think it’s important to emphasize this point with your students:

Convincing text design

Organize your thoughts

Persuasive writing has a specific structure. This includes expressing your opinion or desire, sharing three or more reasons with supporting evidenceand a call to action. There are two task organizer options in this file. I’ve created an organizer with more writing space for grades 2-3 and one with less space for older students. While this book is aimed more at entry-level readers, I think it could extend to a higher entry level as well, especially with the provided wordbanks.

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

Composition, review and publication

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

Once your kids have completed their plan, it’s time to compose their drafts. If your students have planned well, this part is quick. I would suggest giving students two things: an OREO anchor chart and a persuasive writing checklist to help them keep persuasive writing requirements in mind when writing. You can use the pages on the left to write compelling letters that your students will be able to write in the future. As we know, it will take many attempts to keep it under control.

If you want to use letter writing, a great supplemental book you can use isDear Mrs. LaRue. You can also work from a point of view with this book. ?

By publishing your persuasive letter

The last step in this lesson is to ask your kids to publish their work. You can bind the letters in a class notebook using the cover provided and place the book in the class library. Class books provide a great way to celebrate your students’ work and emphasize the need for quality.

As you can see, your students will write a letter and add a photo of the pet they would like to receive.

Email / Share / Print this page / Print all materials (Note: Information materials must be printed separately)

How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

See allStrategic guidesin this series

ABOUT THIS STRATEGY GUIDE

NOTES (2)

This strategy guide focuses on persuasive writing and offers concrete methods on how to help students use it to improve their writing and critical thinking skills.

Research base

Students often score poorly on compelling written assessments because they don’t have a genuine audience or purpose; therefore their counter-arguments and refutations are weak. However, if they see writing as a personally meaningful and useful way to express their needs and wants, they will want to improve their skills in writing style, content, spelling and other mechanisms.

Research shows that young children are capable of anticipating their readers’ beliefs and expectations when writing for familiar readers to get something they want and when prompted to think about their audience’s perspective while writing. 1 Teachers can also guide students to analyze examples of persuasive writing and understand the author’s purpose.

Before writing a persuasive piece, students should understand how persuasion is used orally in everyday life by practicing making short, convincing speeches about something that’s important to them. 2

1 Wollman-Bonilla, J. (2000). Family News Journals: Teaching Writing Through Family Engagement. Urbana, IL: National Council of English Language Teachers.

2 Wollman-Bonilla, J. (2000). Family News Journals: Teaching Writing Through Family Engagement. Urbana, IL: National Council of English Language Teachers.

Strategy in practice

back to top

Here are some ways you can help your students master persuasive writing:

    Have students listen to and analyze various persuasive speeches and writings in the media (e. g., newspapers, magazines, television, and the Internet), looking for words, phrases, and techniques (e. g., reasons, repetition, counterarguments, comparisons) that are designed to persuade. This improves critical reading and thinking skills. Persuasive Strategies PowerPoint offers some of the more common techniques.

Break down the elements of a persuasive speech or passage of a letter: an introduction that clearly defines the position, at least three pieces of evidence to support the position, and a conclusion that reintroduces the argument and summarizes its main points. The interactive persuasion map provides a framework to help students organize their ideas before writing.

Challenge students to respond to what people currently believe on the subject so they can persuade them to change through counter-arguments. Have them interview 5–10 people (with varying perspectives) about their current beliefs on an issue and create a graph to see patterns in people’s arguments. Students can mention these different beliefs at the beginning of their work before presenting their arguments.

Find authentic opportunities for students to write letters, speeches, classifieds, and other compelling text for the family or community. For example, after the recycling unit, students could write a compelling letter to their families to get them to recycle more. Or, students can write to the school librarian and try to get them to buy something specific for the library. The Speechwriting Website offers a student tutorial, tips from the pros, and audio samples of other students’ writing.

Incorporate peer review techniques so students analyze and improve each other’s persuasive arguments (oral or written). For more tips, see Teaching Writing: Peer Review. Use the Peer Review Guidelines for Persuasive Letters to guide students’ review of persuasive letters.

Challenge students to distinguish facts and opinions from the article. Start by discussing short examples to see if students understand the difference. Use Education Oasis’ Facts versus Opinion information material to reinforce this concept.

Show students examples of how community discussion on an issue can lead to alternative positions that take different people’s needs into account, perhaps by looking in the editorial section of the local newspaper. Problems such as adding bike lanes or improving parks may be of interest to students. You can encourage them to participate by encouraging them to write a letter to the editor.

  • Encourage students to participate in online role-playing games, reply to YouTube videos or blogs, or create their own websites so that students can discuss the real problem with a wider audience.
  • Vary types of assignments to suit students’ different learning needs, styles and interests. If students feel that expressing their views can lead to change, it can motivate them to formulate effective arguments in favor of their positions and propose possible solutions.

    Email / Share / Print this page / Print all materials (Note: Information materials must be printed separately)

    How to write a persuasive letter using pros and cons charts

    See allStrategic guidesin this series

    ABOUT THIS STRATEGY GUIDE

    NOTES (2)

    This strategy guide focuses on persuasive writing and offers concrete methods on how to help students use it to improve their writing and critical thinking skills.

    Research base

    Students often score poorly on compelling written assessments because they don’t have a genuine audience or purpose; therefore their counter-arguments and refutations are weak. However, if they see writing as a personally meaningful and useful way to express their needs and wants, they will want to improve their skills in writing style, content, spelling and other mechanisms.

    Research shows that young children are capable of anticipating their readers’ beliefs and expectations when writing for familiar readers to get something they want and when prompted to think about their audience’s perspective while writing. 1 Teachers can also guide students to analyze examples of persuasive writing and understand the author’s purpose.

    Before writing a persuasive piece, students should understand how persuasion is used orally in everyday life by practicing making short, convincing speeches about something that’s important to them. 2

    1 Wollman-Bonilla, J. (2000). Family News Journals: Teaching Writing Through Family Engagement. Urbana, IL: National Council of English Language Teachers.

    2 Wollman-Bonilla, J. (2000). Family News Journals: Teaching Writing Through Family Engagement. Urbana, IL: National Council of English Language Teachers.

    Strategy in practice

    back to top

    Here are some ways you can help your students master persuasive writing:

      Have students listen to and analyze various persuasive speeches and writings in the media (e. g., newspapers, magazines, television, and the Internet), looking for words, phrases, and techniques (e. g., reasons, repetition, counterarguments, comparisons) that are designed to persuade. This improves critical reading and thinking skills. Persuasive Strategies PowerPoint offers some of the more common techniques.

    Break down the elements of a persuasive speech or passage of a letter: an introduction that clearly defines the position, at least three pieces of evidence to support the position, and a conclusion that reintroduces the argument and summarizes its main points. The interactive persuasion map provides a framework to help students organize their ideas before writing.

    Challenge students to respond to what people currently believe on the subject so they can persuade them to change through counter-arguments. Have them interview 5–10 people (with varying perspectives) about their current beliefs on an issue and create a graph to see patterns in people’s arguments. Students can mention these different beliefs at the beginning of their work before presenting their arguments.

    Find authentic opportunities for students to write letters, speeches, classifieds, and other compelling text for the family or community. For example, after the recycling unit, students could write a compelling letter to their families to get them to recycle more. Or, students can write to the school librarian and try to get them to buy something specific for the library. The Speechwriting Website offers a student tutorial, tips from the pros, and audio samples of other students’ writing.

    Incorporate peer review techniques so students analyze and improve each other’s persuasive arguments (oral or written). For more tips, see Teaching Writing: Peer Review. Use the Peer Review Guidelines for Persuasive Letters to guide students’ review of persuasive letters.

    Challenge students to distinguish facts and opinions from the article. Start by discussing short examples to see if students understand the difference. Use Education Oasis’ Facts versus Opinion information material to reinforce this concept.

    Show students examples of how community discussion on an issue can lead to alternative positions that take different people’s needs into account, perhaps by looking in the editorial section of the local newspaper. Problems such as adding bike lanes or improving parks may be of interest to students. You can encourage them to participate by encouraging them to write a letter to the editor.

  • Encourage students to participate in online role-playing games, reply to YouTube videos or blogs, or create their own websites so that students can discuss the real problem with a wider audience.
  • Vary types of assignments to suit students’ different learning needs, styles and interests. If students feel that expressing their views can lead to change, it can motivate them to formulate effective arguments in favor of their positions and propose possible solutions.