How to visit japan on a budget

How to visit japan on a budget

While Japan is a dream destination for many, its notoriously expensive prices keep plenty of budget travelers from even considering a trip. But like most places, the Land of the Rising Sun really can be done on a budget — doing so just requires a bit of savvy planning and flexibility. If you’ve been considering a visit to Japan but don’t want to dump your life savings in the process, here are a five tips that will really help you out.

1. Steer clear of peak travel times

It’s no secret that you can cut a significant chunk out of your trip budget if you’re willing to travel outside of peak season. Tickets from North America to anywhere tend to be more expensive during the summer months and again over the winter holidays, but Japan has a few additional peak travel times of its own to keep in mind. Japanese travelers tend to take their holidays during three public holiday-heavy times of the year: New Years, Golden Week (late April to early May), and the Bon festival season (mid-August).

The highest concentration of Japanese public holidays takes place during Golden Week, which starts on April 29 with Showa Day (in honor of the late Hirohito, aka Emperor Showa). The week continues with festivities honoring the Japanese Constitution and nature, culminating in Children’s Day on May 5 which, as the name suggests, celebrates children.

The Bon Festival (also known as Obon) takes place on August 15 in most parts of Japan (July 15 in the Kanto region, which includes Tokyo); its a celebration meant to honor revelers’ ancestors. Japan recently announced an additional August public holiday honoring the mountains; the aptly named Mountain Day, which will be held on August 11 starting this year, will likely make the season even busier.

2. Choose your lodging wisely

There are plenty of ways to sleep on the cheap in Japan, most of which won’t require you to sacrifice too much in terms of comfort. Some hardcore budget travelers opt to sleep at manga cafes, or “kissas,” which are essentially all-night manga libraries/Internet cafes with extras such as showers, snacks, and booths where you can, theoretically, spend the night — and many people do. Alternative options include youth hostels, some of which have private rooms for guests who don’t want to sleep in dorms, but would still like access to shared cooking facilities.

Capsule hotels are another option; these are essentially rows of tiny sleeping pods with separate lockers for storing luggage, and most don’t let you bring your belongings into the sleeping areas. Showers/bathroom facilities are, unsurprisingly, shared, though usually segregated by gender. Outside of major urban centers, “ryokans,” or traditional guest houses, are a hit-and-miss option for budget travelers — some are on the spendy side, but plenty, particularly those known as “minshuku,” offer affordable, simple lodgings, mostly in the form of tatami-mat rooms, sometimes with shared bathing facilities. Breakfast, and oftentimes dinner, is included in room rates.

3. Avoid fancy resaurants

Japan has lots of excellent, and expensive, restaurants, but you can also get plenty of high-quality meals on the cheap, especially if you’re willing to stick to local favorites and stock up at convenience stores or supermarkets. Most minimarts and many grocery stores have large refrigerated sections full of fresh items such as cold noodles, rice dishes, sandwiches, and sushi, so you won’t just have to rely on living off of junk food items such as green-tea chocolates and dried seaweed. Cities also have plenty of food shops with quick to-go options, ranging from noodles to bento. And if you really have a hankering for Western-style food, there are plenty of reasonably priced food counters in train and subway stations offering everything from bagels to burgers.

4. Be strategic with transportation

Transportation costs can put a significant dent in your Japan travel budget, but there are plenty of ways to get around cheaply. First, look at how you are getting to and from the country, and see if you can route your international flights to go into one city and out of the other. For example, if you plan to visit both Tokyo and Osaka, it might be in your best interest to fly into Tokyo and out of Osaka. Even if this might be a tad more expensive than, say, flying round-trip to Tokyo, the money you save on transportation between the two cities and potential lodging before your flight might make up the difference.

While Japan is world famous for its super-fast trains, tickets can come at a premium. If you have more time than money, consider taking busses from city to city instead — Japan’s landmass is small enough to make this a comfortable and feasible option in many cases. And if you absolutely must take trains, consider purchasing a Japan Rail Pass, or JR Pass, which allows visitors from overseas access to a variety of express and local trains and busses throughout the country over a one-, two-, or three-week period. Children’s passes are also available for half price.

Getting around within cities and towns can also be expensive, particularly if you rely on taxis. Rely on public transportation whenever possible, and look for hotels that offer perks such as free train station or airline pick-ups or shuttle service to local attractions.

5. Check out free or discounted attractions

Finally, if you are flexible with what you do and see in Japan, you can save a lot of money by limiting your sightseeing to free and discounted attractions and experiences. Many markets, shrines, and gardens are free for all, including Tokyo’s famous Sensoji Temple and Kyoto’s Fushimi Inari Shrine. Others offer discounted rates to students, children, and senior citizens. Some attractions are heavily subsidized and thus inexpensive — for example, the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum only costs a couple hundred yen to enter. Visitors to Tokyo who want to see a lot of the sites may want to consider purchasing a Grutt Pass, which is available from the beginning of April through the end of the following January. This ¥2000 pass entitles visitors to free or discounted admission to attractions throughout the city, including most of the major museums, parks, and zoos.

Japan is famous for its ability to balance tradition with technical innovation. For a student traveler, the choices between o.

Japan is famous for its ability to balance tradition with technical innovation. For a student traveler, the choices between old and new are never-ending, with accommodation options ranging from buddhist monasteries to capsule hotels.

Many international students in Tokyo experience the hardship of exploring the country while they try to save money. According to CNN, Tokyo ranked ninth among the 2018 World’s most expensive cities. Ranking number one in the world for most three-star Michelin restaurants and having endless entertainment options, life in Tokyo can be very expensive.

Despite these accolades, Tokyo can be quite an affordable place to live in depending on one’s lifestyle. If properly researched, there are many ways for those on a budget to experience all that Japan has to offer.

The three basic travel expenses are accommodation, transportation and food. While there are also a number of secondary expenses such as museum admissions, souvenirs If basic travel costs are carefully planned, there may be more room for secondary expenses, and thus it is important to understand how to achieve that.

Accommodation : Japan has a strong hostel culture. Hostels are the cheapest solution for students traveling solo or with friends. The Hostel atmosphere provides visitors with many chances to meet new people, especially other students.

In Kyoto, for example, hostels can be booked from ¥1500 per night, which is considerably cheaper than any other accommodation type. Similar rates can be found in Tokyo as well.

Another cheap solution is CouchSurfing, a hospitality social network founded in 2003, with over 31,000 hosts in Tokyo, and around 3,400 in Kyoto. Guests can be hosted by local residents throughout Japan, and occasionally the hosts will show them around, give valuable tips and make the overall stay more enjoyable.

Transportation : Transportation in Japan can be expensive, especially taxis. Public transportation, such as trains and buses, are almost always on time, and are considered the most convenient way of getting around. However, Japan’s famous bullet trains can be very expensive. A two-way bullet train ticket from Tokyo to Kyoto costs around ¥26,000, while at the same time traveling by night bus will get you there and back for around ¥6,000 while only taking a few extra hours to get there.

Alternatively, the Japan Bus Pass allows students to travel anywhere in Japan by bus for a cheap fare ; the three-day unlimited travel pass can be used Monday to Thursday costs ¥10,000, while the seven-day unlimited travel pass that can be used Monday to Thursday costs ¥15,000.

Food : No matter where you’re traveling to, Japan has a wide selection of food choices. Whether you’re going to convenience stores, street food stalls or larger restaurants, most offer lunch and dinner deals, which allows traveling students to enjoy good food and manage their travel budgets at the same time.

As for secondary costs, there is a surprisingly vast amount of free activities, including parks, museums, and guided tours. Although Japan is not the cheapest travel destination, there are ways to save money, just as shown in this article.

Japan is famous for its ability to balance tradition with technical innovation. For a student traveler, the choices between o.

Japan is famous for its ability to balance tradition with technical innovation. For a student traveler, the choices between old and new are never-ending, with accommodation options ranging from buddhist monasteries to capsule hotels.

Many international students in Tokyo experience the hardship of exploring the country while they try to save money. According to CNN, Tokyo ranked ninth among the 2018 World’s most expensive cities. Ranking number one in the world for most three-star Michelin restaurants and having endless entertainment options, life in Tokyo can be very expensive.

Despite these accolades, Tokyo can be quite an affordable place to live in depending on one’s lifestyle. If properly researched, there are many ways for those on a budget to experience all that Japan has to offer.

The three basic travel expenses are accommodation, transportation and food. While there are also a number of secondary expenses such as museum admissions, souvenirs If basic travel costs are carefully planned, there may be more room for secondary expenses, and thus it is important to understand how to achieve that.

Accommodation : Japan has a strong hostel culture. Hostels are the cheapest solution for students traveling solo or with friends. The Hostel atmosphere provides visitors with many chances to meet new people, especially other students.

In Kyoto, for example, hostels can be booked from ¥1500 per night, which is considerably cheaper than any other accommodation type. Similar rates can be found in Tokyo as well.

Another cheap solution is CouchSurfing, a hospitality social network founded in 2003, with over 31,000 hosts in Tokyo, and around 3,400 in Kyoto. Guests can be hosted by local residents throughout Japan, and occasionally the hosts will show them around, give valuable tips and make the overall stay more enjoyable.

Transportation : Transportation in Japan can be expensive, especially taxis. Public transportation, such as trains and buses, are almost always on time, and are considered the most convenient way of getting around. However, Japan’s famous bullet trains can be very expensive. A two-way bullet train ticket from Tokyo to Kyoto costs around ¥26,000, while at the same time traveling by night bus will get you there and back for around ¥6,000 while only taking a few extra hours to get there.

Alternatively, the Japan Bus Pass allows students to travel anywhere in Japan by bus for a cheap fare ; the three-day unlimited travel pass can be used Monday to Thursday costs ¥10,000, while the seven-day unlimited travel pass that can be used Monday to Thursday costs ¥15,000.

Food : No matter where you’re traveling to, Japan has a wide selection of food choices. Whether you’re going to convenience stores, street food stalls or larger restaurants, most offer lunch and dinner deals, which allows traveling students to enjoy good food and manage their travel budgets at the same time.

As for secondary costs, there is a surprisingly vast amount of free activities, including parks, museums, and guided tours. Although Japan is not the cheapest travel destination, there are ways to save money, just as shown in this article.

How to visit japan on a budget

Japan is one of the most popular countries on people’s bucket lists.Most of us would love to see its vast landscapes, culture, buildings, and state-of-the-art facilities. This article will give you the first-hand experience of the author and photographer Lola Akinmade Åkerström, who shared her tips about the country.

Exploring the cultural sights and culinary scenes in Tokyo is not cheap, especially when you travel with family. Most travelers opt to have a side trip to Kyoto, too. While people believe that Kyoto has wonderful scenery, it is also a bustling city. The expert then recommends passing through Nikko, a mountain town that has easy access from Tokyo via train. In Niko, you could explore historic temples and quiet gardens.

Money Management and Itinerary Tips in Japan:

Upon arrival, tourists tend to take a taxi from the airport immediately. In this case, taking a cab from both Tokyo’s international airport, which is Narita and Haneda, may eat up your vacation budget. However, taking a train that is often fully packed may add hassle with your luggage. The expert recommends booking a shared shuttle service.

To kick off your tour, head on to the Skytree complex, especially if you have kids. This could be a good investment for your family time. You could have lunch at the Solamachi Kunimi restaurant with an excellent view of the tower and then explore the Pokémon center for souvenirs. From there, you could visit Sumida Aquarium and the Skytree Observation Deck to watch the sunset.

If you are going with your family, an overnight stay or even several nights trip to Nikko is also advisable. It is less than a two-hour train ride through the electricity-powered Tobu Railway from Tokyo’s center. The Tobu Railway also offers a discounted pass to Nikko. It includes train tickets, unlimited public transport as well as visits to the key attractions in the location.

When you are in Nikko, you can visit the city’s national park and the World Heritage. There, you can see the Kegon Falls, which is the country’s highest waterfall. You could take the traditional canoes down the Kinugawa River and wander around the Toshogu Shrine. You could also experience a flashback in time at Edo Wonderland. You and your family can learn about the history as well as enjoy some arts and crafts. You can also see live ninja storytelling shows, as well as wear traditional folk attires such as Kimonos, or dress up as geishas.

How to visit japan on a budget

Credit Cards and Food Tips in Japan:

You should be aware, though, that you can easily find affordable accommodation if you book in advance through your credit cards. An expert recommends staying at the Tobu Levant Hotel in Tokyo. The place will give you a great view of the Skytree Tower. If you or your kids are Hello Kitty fans, you also could check out the Keio Plaza Tama and its Hello Kitty-themed rooms. It is just a walking distance from the Sanrio Puroland, famously known as the Hello Kitty World. Also, while you are in Nikko, be sure to take a dip in the natural hot springs and thermal pools at the historic Chuzenji Kanaya Hotel.

When it comes to food, Japan has vast choices. From the all-time favorite tempura and sushi to teppanyaki and vegan choices, your taste buds will rejoice in Japan. If you are a fan of savory and salty food, the country is a playground of your palate. One of the famous restaurants is the Sushi place called Heiroku. They serve sushi on conveyor belts, which makes the restaurant affordable and fun. If you have a budget or a higher credit score, you could go to Harajuku Kawaii Monster Café, which offers you a vibrant peek into Japanese subcultures. However, this place is not considered cheap. But it’s also worth dining in, especially if you are a fan of crazy-crafted technicolored foods.

Key points to consider when traveling to Japan:

You might want to download some mobile maps prior to your flight. In this case, you could navigate and get around the country easily. Pick-up a SIM card with a data pan at the airport. Make sure that it would cover the duration of your trip. Take note that not all hotels and restaurants accept foreign credit cards, so have enough cash on hand. Also, not all ATMs would work on foreign bank withdrawals as well.

You could withdraw cash if you come across a 7-Eleven with an ATM.
Furthermore, the expert advises that if you are staying in more than one hotel, or if you want to try different accommodations during your trip, then there are services that offer same-day luggage transfer. They will deliver your bags to your next accommodation at an affordable rate. In this case, you will not have to worry about your luggage while you are out exploring the country. Just make sure you book in advance through your credit card as much as possible.