How to use a punch down tool

The Klein Tools Punchdown Tool Combo Tool is the best punching tool as it has a 66/110 combo blade with excellent workmanship and excellent handling. Using this tool compared to other drilling tools is really easy.

  • # 1. Klein Tools Punchdown 66/110 tool combination
  • # 2. TRENDnet punching tool
  • # 3. Vastar Network Wire Punch Down Impact Tool
  • # 4. The cable hammer makes a difference
  • # 5. Epsilont EPS2000PD punch tool

Kelin Tools Punchdown Tool is by far the best punching tool if you need a 66/110 combo blade. This tool allows you to cut cables into cross connection panels, blocks and keystone jacks. We also like the fact that it’s spring loaded, which ensures very quick and effortless installation and termination.

In terms of overall quality, Klein Tools is a league above the competition. The rubber toe and boot grips really give you more control and comfort while working. We like the high and low impact setting that meets industry standards. There is also a blade storage.

The TRENDnet punch press is perhaps the most popular punch press on the market. The reason is that it is reliable, easy to use and very affordable. There are precision blades that can go from standard 110 to crown ones. We also like the compartment to prevent the blade from getting lost.

Also, we love how it is inserted and cut in one simple operation, it is very handy and comfortable to hold. Overall, this product is incredibly strong and well balanced for the price. In terms of value, it is one of the best on the market.

Vastar Net Tool The piercing tool has extremely precise blades that are reversible from 110 to BK. The leveling comes with an additional wire stripper which makes cutting the wire easy and convenient.

Perhaps our favorite feature is that it has adjustable high and low travel settings to meet termination requirements. Finally, there is a 18 month warranty on this product, so don’t worry about it breaking down on you during operation.

We think it’s safe to say that if you want the best drilling tool based on price, Cable Matters is for you. This is probably the best value for money on the market. This impact tool has high and low impact settings to terminate a cable in a block, patch panel, or 110 IDC terminal plug.

The keystone jack is fine for Cat 3, Cat 5, Cat 5e, Cat 6 and Cat 6A networks or voice cable. The blade is also removable and can be stored in the tool. Overall, we would say the quality is definitely not the best, but for the price, you just can’t beat it.

The Epsilont EPS2000 punching tool is great if you want to swap the 110 and corona standards. In addition, it has a high-quality design and is made of durable materials. Overall, the Epsilont has a very compact design and comes with easy-to-grip handles. It is also beautiful and sturdy thanks to the all steel construction.

We like that both 110 and 66 blades have a sharp and non-sharp side. There is also a nice integrated blade holder. All in all, it is a very reliable tool and definitely outperforms the competition in terms of ease of use and quality. It also has a decent price.

The punch block 110 is also referred to as a cross link block, termination block or jumper block for network cables. It is a tool that connects a group of wires to another group of wires by means of a system of metal plugs to which the wires are attached. The punch-down block 110 is often used in telecommunication cabinets that combine station cabling with trunk cabling from IDF to MDF. Being the predecessors of patch panels, 110 punch blocks were commonly used to support low-bandwidth Ethernet and Token Ring networks.

How to use a punch down tool

What is the shock block 110?

Punch Block 110 is an upgraded version of the Punch Block, it is a key part of a call management system used to connect telephone system cabling, data network cabling, and other low voltage cabling applications. Type 110 wiring block is a flame retardant injection molded plastic for basic equipment making and is connected to the terminal wiring system.

Punch Block 110 is designed for 22 to 26 solid cables. It is the termination used in the wall mount for Cat5e patch panel, Cat 6 patch panel and RJ-45 jack. They are also formed into small block type tips of 66 blocks. Block 110 is designed for a bandwidth of 500 MHz (1 Gb / s) or more. 110 blocks are acceptable for use with AES / EBU digital audio at a sample rate greater than 268 kHz, as well as gigabit networks and analog audio.

How to use a punch down tool

110 Wiring diagram of the punching block

The specifications for junction block 110 are as follows: 25 pairs of type 110 wiring blocks, 50 pairs of type 110 wiring blocks, 110 pairs of type 110 wiring blocks, 300 pairs of type wiring blocks 110. The distribution box package with type 110 wiring blocks should also contain 4 or 5 blocks. , Junction Block, Blank Labels, Tag Folder and Base. The Type 110 Wiring Block System uses plug-hop loops that are easy to install and easy to rearrange, providing a convenient cross connection with an unprofessional and technical personnel management system.

How to hit block 110 with a tool?

The punch tool is used to force solid wire into metal slots in punch block 110. Current homes typically have telephone lines that enter the house in a single block 110, and these are then distributed via local wiring to outlets throughout the house in a star topology.

How to use a punch down tool

How to hit block 110?

Both styles of a punch block use a punch tool to terminate the threads of the block. To terminate the cable, place it in the clamp, then press it until it contacts the punch tool. The punching tool fits into a lock terminal 66 or a punch block terminal 110. One side of the blade is sharpened to cut the wire evenly, which is usually marked on the tool with the word cut. Make sure this side is oriented so that you are cutting the free end of the thread and not the end that goes to the other block. Hide extra cable behind the block in case you ever have to re-terminate a pair so that you don’t have to re-terminate the entire cable. For more information on punch tools and how to punch 110 blocks, see How to use the punch tool for 110 block

Regardless of the size of the punching tools, their use is the same. Many tools have a double blade that can be flipped depending on the style of block used.

The performance and reliability of the network are the basis of a robust and robust communication system. Therefore, to ensure a proper connection between computers and data centers, network engineers need the appropriate support tools, among which the drilling tool is extremely essential for the smooth functioning of the network. In this article, we will provide some tips on how to use the punch tool effectively.

Description of the punching tool

Also called the krone tool, the punch tool is a small handheld tool most commonly used by telecommunications and data network technicians to install cables for phones, computers, and various audio networks. This tool allows for quick and effective cross connection of cables through the use of type 66 or 110 connection blocks.

How to use a punch down tool

The punch tool is commonly used for finishing work incopper mesh. It is used to terminate Ethernet cables (Cat5 / 5e / 6 / 6a) by inserting the cable conductors into the Insulation Displacement Connectors (IDC) in perforated blocks, patch panels, keystone modules and surface mount boxes. The name then comes from a method in which a tool pushes a solid copper wire between metal blades on a terminal block and cuts off the excess by piercing the tool, pushing the tool blade through the wire.

How to use a punch down tool

How to use the punch tool

When there comes the need to repair or install cables, you’ll inevitably need to cut and secure wires. However, exposed wiring can be dangerous and can short connections. A knock-in tool is then needed to keep the cables safe and in the meantime help you cut and hold the cables in the main socket. So how do you use a piercing tool? Here we offer a guide for your reference.

Note that you should always leave about 6cm (6cm) at the end of the cable. Insert the cable into a wire stripper or modular crimping tool and twist it several times. So take off your jacket. Removing the cable will help you remove the cover to expose enough cable to separate it.

How to use a punch down tool

After removing the cable cover, you will have several inches of exposed cable. Then, gently pull the wire pairs away from the center of the cable to disperse. Separate the wire pairs by turning them counterclockwise. Try to straighten the ends as much as possible and this may make it easier to trim them.

How to use a punch down tool

Remove the protective cover from the top of the socket and insert the cord into the socket block. Plug each wire into a separate socket, making sure the wire fits configuration A or B. The wires should protrude from the socket.

Note: Consider choosing between the T568A or T568B wiring diagram. The T568B is becoming more and more popular as it can be used with old and new color codes.

How to use a punch down tool

Take a punch and press on the threads to cut them. The bent (trimmed) part of the blade should make contact with the long, sturdy side of the riser. This will also ensure that the cut threads are flush with the socket.

  • Remember to hit straight, not at an angle. This will prevent the jack from folding.
  • A loud click with a downward impact means that the thread is terminated correctly.

How to use a punch down tool

Take a look at each wire to make sure it doesn’t bend on the side of the socket. Also, make sure the edge of the cable sheath is near the base of the socket and the wires you just finished. The cables must be firmly in place. If you notice wires sticking out the side, take a wire cutter and carefully trim the wire so that it’s flush with the jack.

How to use a punch down tool

Attach the dust caps to protect the cables. This will ensure that the connection is secure and can prevent stress on the wires. The dust cap is also very easy to remove: simply remove the cap with a blade screwdriver inserted into the side recess.

Note: Failure to install the dust caps on the door means that the cables may not be routed correctly. Better to double check the threads and make sure they are fastened and cut.

How to use a punch down tool

Sheldon

The punch tool, also called the krone tool, is a small but essential tool for network engineers to install cabling for phones, computers, and various audio networks. It is widely used for terminating Ethernet cables by inserting cable conductors into insulation displacement connectors (IDCs) in perforated blocks, patch panels, keystone modules, and surface mount boxes. It works by inserting the wire into a corrosion resistant termination and then cutting off the excess wire for quick and accurate connections with less effort.

Common features of the drilling tool

The most popular punching tools on the market include the standard impact tool, the universal auto impact tool and the corrosion resistant finishing tool. A typical drilling tool consists of a handle, an internal spring mechanism and a removable grooved blade. Punching tools are typically 6-8 inches long with a blade at one end. The top and bottom of the tools are generally in different colors to help users identify which side is used to cut the thread. Most models have a replaceable blade and a pressure adjustment screw or knob.

How to use a punch down tool

Punch dimensions are not standardized. Some tools measure 5.35 ” x 1.06 ” x 1.06 ”. Others are 5.25 ” x 1.26 ” x 1.26 ”, 7.00 ” x 2.02 ” x 2.02 ” and so on. Their weight also depends on the size. Regardless of the punch size, the application is the same.

Types of blades for punching machines

To accommodate different types of connectors, punching tools have different types of blades with 66 or 110 blades. Different blades are used depending on whether you are finishing a 66 or 110 block, which will be explained below.

66 Punch parry

Block 66 is a type of punch block used to connect groups of cables in a telephone system. They were produced in three sizes, A, B and M. A and B have six terminals in each row, while M has only 4. Each row 66 of the block is adapted to connect one pair of wires to another pair. however, any pair of terminals can be used to connect any two wires.

Blocks A separated the rows further and have been obsolete for many years. Style B is mainly used in distribution boards where multiple destinations (often 1A2 keyed phones) need to be connected to the same source. M blocks are often used to connect a single instrument to such a distribution block. 66 blocks are designed to terminate 22 to 26 AWG solid copper wire. There are 66 pre-assembled blocks with a female RJ-21 connector for quick connection to the 25 pair male terminal cable. These connections are made between the block and the equipment at the customer site (CPE).

Block of 110 shots

As an updated version of block 66, punch block 110 is a key part of a call management system used to connect telephone system cabling, data network cabling, and other low-voltage cabling applications. Type 110 wiring block is a flame retardant injection molded plastic for basic equipment making and is connected to the terminal wiring system.

Block 110 is designed for solid cables with diameters from 22 to 26. It is the termination used on cat5e patch panels, cat 6 patch panels and RJ-45 sockets. They are also formed into small block type tips of 66 blocks. Block 110 is designed for a bandwidth of 500 MHz (1 Gb / s) or higher. 110 blocks are acceptable for use with AES / EBU digital audio at a sample rate greater than 268 kHz, as well as gigabit networks and analog audio. The Type 110 Wiring Block System uses plug-hop loops that are easy to install and easy to rearrange, providing a convenient cross connection with an unprofessional and technical personnel management system.

How to use the punch tool

When it comes to repair or install Ethernet cable, you’ll inevitably need to cut and position wires. Exposed wiring can be dangerous and can break connections. A knock-in tool is then needed to keep the cables safe and in the meantime help you cut and hold the cables in the main socket. So how do you use a piercing tool? Just follow these steps.

Step one: remove the cable cover

Note that you should always leave about 6cm (6cm) at the end of the cable. Insert the cable into a wire stripper or modular crimping tool and twist it several times. So take off your jacket.

Step Two: Reveal the Strands

After removing the cable cover, you will have several inches of exposed cable. Then, gently pull the wire pairs from the center of the cable to disperse. Separate the wire pairs by turning them counterclockwise. Try to straighten the ends as much as possible to make it easier to cut.

Step Three: Insert the wires of the cable into the socket

Remove the protective cover from the top of the socket and insert the cord into the socket block. Plug each wire into a separate socket, making sure the wire fits configuration A or B. The wires should protrude from the socket.

How to use a punch down tool

Note: Consider choosing between the T568A or T568B wiring diagram. The T568B is becoming more and more popular as it can be used with old and new color codes.

Step Four: Terminate the conductive wires

Take a punch and press on the threads to cut them. The folded portion of the blade should make contact with the long, sturdy side of the riser. This will also ensure that the cut threads are flush with the socket.

How to use a punch down tool

Step five: check the wires

Check each cable to make sure there are no dips on the side of the socket. Also, make sure the edge of the cable sheath is near the base of the socket and the wires you just finished. The cables must be firmly in place. If you notice wires sticking out the side, take a wire cutter and carefully trim the wire so that it’s flush with the jack.

How to use a punch down tool

Step Six: Place the dust cover on the socket.

Attach the dust caps to protect the cables. This will ensure that the connection is secure and can prevent stress on the wires. The dust cap is also very easy to remove: simply remove the cap with a blade screwdriver inserted into the side recess.

Note: Failure to install the dust caps on the door means that the cables may not be routed correctly. Better to double check the threads and make sure they are fastened and cut.

The knockout tool is commonly used by data and telecommunication network technicians to install cables on computers, phones and audio networks. This tool allows you to connect cables quickly and efficiently using type 110 or 66 junction blocks. In this article you will learn how to use this tool correctly and safely.

How to use a punch down tool

Things you will need

1) Safety glasses
2) Telecom wire or copper meshing
3) Collector block type 66 or 110

Guide and tips for using the punch tool

1) Become familiar with the functions of the punch While there are many manufacturers and models of punching tools out there, most are typically six to eight inches long with a blade at one end. The bottom and top of the tool are colored differently so that users can easily know which side is intended for thread cutting. Most drilling tools have a pressure adjustment knob or screw and a replaceable blade.
2) Prepare to pierce the wire While standing in front of the junction block, grasp the punch with one hand making sure the cutting blade is facing down. With the other hand, hold the wire and then wind it through the selected terminal on the connection block.
3) Press the thread down Holding the end of the cable firmly, place the punch blade on the selected connection clamp and press forward until it reaches the bottom of the clamp. While still holding the end of the wire, firmly pierce the tool in a straight motion. If done correctly, the excess wire will be carefully cut and the remaining wire will be easily connected to the clamp.
4) Verify the connection Make sure the connection is secure and that there are no broken or loose wires in the terminal block. Pull the cable to check that it is actually firmly attached to the right clamp. Advice 1) Always wear safety glasses or safety glasses when using an impact tool. 2) Do not use a perforator to tighten the flathead screws as this may break or shatter the blade. 3) Although most of the models are made of plastic, drilling tools can still conduct electricity. Keep this in mind when working with electrical circuits.

Step 1: Make sure the stripper is properly adjusted on a piece of cable. The stripper should be adjusted to only cut the jacket for ease of removal and not to cut the twisted pairs. Using a concentric drawstring approximately 1 inch from the jacket. Be careful not to cut the wires as this will break the wire or short the connection, causing problems along the way. Verify that all cables are not damaged before proceeding to step 2.

How to use a punch down tool How to use a punch down tool How to use a punch down tool

Step 2: Fully straighten the pairs and lay them over the keystone socket, paying attention to the color scheme of the 568b wiring. Note: Each keystone jack is slightly different in terms of color coding and placement. The 568B standard is the most commonly used and the ends of the cables must have the same standards for communication. We have introduced 3 of the most popular styles of keystone jacks here. The first plug shown has 2 standard pairs on the right and 2 variable pairs on the left. Standard A is the center column and standard B is on the left. Both standards A and B apply to the right side of the lift. The single-colored box with the lower right corner missing represents a single-colored thread with a white stripe. The white box with the colored tip represents a white thread with a colored stripe.

The second socket shown here has both A and B standards on both sides of the socket, with a color code running through the center. The solid color rectangle represents the solid color wire with a white stripe, while the half white and half white rectangle represents the white wire with the color stripe. The third slot shown here has the standard A and B codes marked on the outside of the slot. With standard A at the top and standard B at the bottom. The filled box represents a solid string with a white stripe. The box with a white diagonal stripe in the center represents a white thread with a colored stripe.

How to use a punch down tool How to use a punch down tool How to use a punch down tool

Step 3: Keeping the pairs as intertwined as possible, press the thread with your thumbs into the correct groove. If you completely straighten the cables to route them through the outlet, you risk crossing the pairs.

How to use a punch down tool

Step 4: Use the punch tool to punch the wires into the blades built into the keystone socket. The blades in the socket are designed to work with a solid cord and may not work with the cord. Make sure the blade (as shown in the image) points out of the keyhole slot. If you turn it, you will cut the wires inside the keystone jack, rendering them unusable. The punch tool should cut the remaining pieces of wire on the outside, but sometimes you may need to hammer them a second time and shake the wire to break it. Once done, you can install the dust covers if you have a keystone jack with them. This keystone jack had no covers. Lids should never be used to perform a punching operation.

How to use a punch down tool How to use a punch down tool How to use a punch down tool

Punching-down a cat cable into a patch panel may seem like tricky business, but once you’ve got the basics down it becomes as easy as the proverbial pie. This top-notch guide is here to help you.

How to use a punch down tool

What you will need

  1. CAT cables (Ethernet cable)
  2. Patch panel
  3. Punching tool
  4. Cable pullers
  5. Screwdriver

Step 1: Prepare the Cat

How to use a punch down toolTo begin with, we recommend that you start by preparing the cat leads you intend to insert into the patch panels. You can do this by removing the outer sheath with a cable puller. If you don’t have a wire stripper on hand, you can also do this with a sharp knife, but be careful as this method can injure you and damage the internal copper wires.

Ideally, you should remove approximately 1 inch (25mm) of the outer jacket for a nice, clean fit on the patch panel without the risk of exposing too much cable and damaging it. After removing the outer cover, you will notice 4 pairs of copper wires for a total of 8 wires. To properly insert the cables into the patch panel, you will need to gently separate the pairs so that the 8 cables can work individually.

Step 2: Prepare the patch panel

How to use a punch down toolIn most cases, complete patch panels consist of different parts. That being said, it can prove very useful in most situations to break apart the patch panel into it’s small components. This allows you to work with only the parts of the panel you need and makes the whole project easier to manage.

Take a screwdriver and start by unscrewing the part of the panel you will be working with and set the rest aside. Pay attention to the label inside the panel with the color code printed on it. This will be explained in the next step

Step 3: Place the Cat cable in the patch panel

How to use a punch down toolTo properly insert the Cat cable wires into the patch panel, you need to carefully look at the color code printed on the label attached to the panel. Let’s take a closer look.

First, you will notice that there are actually 2 types of pins, usually labeled A and B respectively. In general, most installations would use pin B, but be sure to check which one is right for your application.

Once you have selected a pin-out type you will see that each one has it’s own color code, with 4 solid colors and 4 stripes. Just combine the solid color cables with the solid color sockets and do the same with the strips. All you need to do is push the wires gently into the sockets. Once all the wires have been inserted correctly, it is time to tap correctly.

Step 4: Hit

How to use a punch down toolFirst, you will notice that there are actually 2 types of pins, usually labeled A and B respectively. In general, most installations would use pin B, but be sure to check which one is right for your application.

Once you have selected a pin-out type you will see that each one has it’s own color code, with 4 solid colors and 4 stripes. Just combine the solid color cables with the solid color sockets and do the same with the strips. All you need to do is push the wires gently into the sockets. Once all the wires have been inserted correctly, it is time to tap correctly.

In order to correctly punch down the wires into the patch panel you will need to make use of a Punching tool. The tool itself is quite simple as it has a pointed side and a flat size. The pointed side is the side that cuts the ends of the threads to leave a clean cut.

Start by placing the tool on the cable you intend to guide, then press down on the handle of the tool with as much force as possible. This will force both the thread into place and cut the ends at the same time, continue like this for any remaining threads. You may also notice that some ends of the thread remain from time to time, this can usually be fixed by gently removing them by hand as the tool may not have cut the threads during the initial punching.

Do you want to watch it?Check out the video below for a quick tutorial covering most of what we’ve covered in this guide.

How to use a punch down tool

Irving

DIY for the home network is a trend in the IT community and worth a try even for non-professionals. You may have already managed to route the cross-wiring on your telecommunication network by yourself according to some online instructions, or you may not have done so yet. This article discusses the basics, materials needed, and elimination techniques specific to Cat5e / Cat6 cabling. If you’d like to connect your network cables (Cat5e cable or Cat6 cable) to the keystone jacks yourself, check out this easy-to-follow tutorial on termination.

Introductory information on Keystone sockets

To complete and install Cat5e / Cat6 keystone jacks on yourself, you need to make sure that every connection is reliable to ensure a reliable network. Before implementing the termination method and process, it is essential to have a basic understanding of the keystone jack.

What is a keystone jack? A keystone jack is a female connector used in data transmission, particularly in local area networks (LANs), usually mounted in a wall plate or patch panel. T568A and T568B are the two wiring standards for the 8-pin modular connector permitted by the TIA / EIA-568-A Wiring Standards document. The only difference between T568A vs T568B is: the orange and green wire pairs (Pair 2 & Pair 3) are interchanged. The T568A and T568B wiring diagrams are labeled for keystone sockets. The cat5e and cat6 wiring diagrams with the appropriate colors are twisted into the network wiring and should remain twisted as much as possible when terminated on the socket.

How to use a punch down tool

The main advantage of keystone connectors is their versatility. Several types of keystone jacks can be mounted on a patch panel. They are available unshielded and shielded and can accommodate wires and cables with a different number of conductors. Each keystone jack is slightly different in terms of color coding and placement. Below are the three most common keystone jacks:

Diagram Explanation
How to use a punch down tool 2 standard pairs on the right and 2 variable pairs on the left. Standard A is the center column and standard B is on the left. Both standards A and B apply to the right side of the lift.
The single-color box with the lower right corner missing represents a single-color thread with a white stripe; the white box with the colored tip represents the white thread with the colored stripe.
How to use a punch down tool Standard A and B on both sides of the socket, with a color-coded flowing in the center.
Standard A and B codes marked on the outside of the slot, with standard A at the top and standard B at the bottom.
How to use a punch down tool Standard A and B codes marked on the outside of the slot, with standard A at the top and standard B at the bottom.
The sturdy box represents the solid wire with a white stripe, while the box represents; the white diagonal stripe in the center represents a white thread with a colored stripe.

Materials and tools required for Cat5e / Cat6 cabling

Gathering the materials and tools is what you need to do after gaining some technical knowledge about keystone jacks. The essential tools you will need are listed below before you begin completing Cat5e / Cat6: