How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

I have fenders on two bikes and have a Yakima rack with the hook that goes over the front tire.
It works OK. I adjusted the fenders up as high as they go and I can work the arm under the fender.
They want you to get the hook back against the fork as much as possible, and I can’t get it that far back, but its close.

Also the fenders chew up the plastic cover a bit, but it doesn’t bother me.

davethedyer

New Member
  • Nov 29, 2020
  • #3

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B Mac

New Member
  • Mar 3, 2021
  • #4

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
  • Mar 3, 2021
  • #5

gtpharr

Member
  • Mar 3, 2021
  • #6

The 1UP USA rack is perfect for my step through frame with fenders. There is one contact point on each tire and none on the frame itself. The spool that contacts the tire is adjustable (7 different positions) so that you can select the position that it contacts the tire.

1UP USA also offers foam rollers that cover the spools so that you can position the spool against the fender if you choose. I did that for the first 18 months and it held my bike very securely and did no damage to fender. I only recently lowered the rear spool so that it contacts the tire below the fender and I like this position a little better.

My rack is the 2" Super Duty Single rated for up to 75 lbs and weighs 28 lbs. It comes in a reusable shipping box that is nice to store the rack in when not in use. You can put up to 2 add ons onto the single for a total of up to 3 bikes.

I have the optional ramp that makes loading heavy ebikes easier. This is my second rack from 1UP USA and I am 100% satisfied with the racks and the company. 1UP USA racks are lightweight, fold up compactly for easy storage, extremely quick & easy to load & unload, and hold bikes very securely.

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crst4s

New Member
  • Mar 3, 2021
  • #7

Add two Drops

electricbikereview.com

B Mac

New Member
  • Mar 3, 2021
  • #8

The 1UP USA rack is perfect for my step through frame with fenders. There is one contact point on each tire and none on the frame itself. The spool that contacts the tire is adjustable (7 different positions) so that you can select the position that it contacts the tire.

1UP USA also offers foam rollers that cover the spools so that you can position the spool against the fender if you choose. I did that for the first 18 months and it held my bike very securely and did no damage to fender. I only recently lowered the rear spool so that it contacts the tire below the fender and I like this position a little better.

My rack is the 2" Super Duty Single rated for up to 75 lbs and weighs 28 lbs. It comes in a reusable shipping box that is nice to store the rack in when not in use. You can put up to 2 add ons onto the single for a total of up to 3 bikes.

I have the optional ramp that makes loading heavy ebikes easier. This is my second rack from 1UP USA and I am 100% satisfied with the racks and the company. 1UP USA racks are lightweight, fold up compactly for easy storage, extremely quick & easy to load & unload, and hold bikes very securely.

B Mac

New Member
  • Mar 3, 2021
  • #9

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
  • Mar 3, 2021
  • #10

B Mac

New Member
  • Mar 3, 2021
  • #11
New Member
  • Mar 3, 2021
  • #12

B Mac

New Member
  • Mar 4, 2021
  • #13

Ebiker53

Member
  • Mar 4, 2021
  • #14

The 1UP USA rack is perfect for my step through frame with fenders. There is one contact point on each tire and none on the frame itself. The spool that contacts the tire is adjustable (7 different positions) so that you can select the position that it contacts the tire.

1UP USA also offers foam rollers that cover the spools so that you can position the spool against the fender if you choose. I did that for the first 18 months and it held my bike very securely and did no damage to fender. I only recently lowered the rear spool so that it contacts the tire below the fender and I like this position a little better.

My rack is the 2" Super Duty Single rated for up to 75 lbs and weighs 28 lbs. It comes in a reusable shipping box that is nice to store the rack in when not in use. You can put up to 2 add ons onto the single for a total of up to 3 bikes.

I have the optional ramp that makes loading heavy ebikes easier. This is my second rack from 1UP USA and I am 100% satisfied with the racks and the company. 1UP USA racks are lightweight, fold up compactly for easy storage, extremely quick & easy to load & unload, and hold bikes very securely.

I recently purchased the Ibera Bike Rack since I commute to work and school. I need some bungee chords to tie down a duffel bag. Any suggestions? Bike Rack: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AA8GFSI/ref=ox_sc_sfl_image_7?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

I just bought this to secure my backpack to a rack.

I ended up switching to using straps (I got NRS ones, for attaching boats to cars and stuff). Bungees work well but they definitely stretch out over time, and the hooks bend with too much strain. I actually have way more confidence with the straps. I mean, obviously, secure the extra length well.

Biggest reason I switched— messed up mounting a bungee, and it shot the hook towards my face. Looked it up, bungees cause a huge amount of eye injuries. So, nah, switching to something that stores less potential energy.

Can confirm, unloading a picnic basket secured with a bungee cord left a nasty gash over my eye. There was so much blood, my wife was able to follow my trail around the garage and through the yard. 1/4 of an inch lower and it would have taken it out. I switched to long, thin, velcro straps instead of bungees after that one.

I've used bungee countless times to lock things down on a rack. Make sure to buy various lengths. I bought mine from an auto store, not sure the brand, but make sure to get something with a strong hook.

I made some netting from 1/8th in. shock cord and hold it to my rack with 6 carabiners. It has remained flexible and strong for two years of daily commuting. Best part is you can move the carabiners to different squares in the netting to tightly hold large or small cargo. I used this method

Go to any camping/survival/army store and get some straps/belts for securing cargo. It works better than bungee cord things. Pick up a couple compact carabineers while you are there. You'd be surprised how useful that can be for attaching stuff to your bicycle or your belt while cycling.

Ooh, I can offer a suggestion here.

As someone that went through 10 different types/lengths of bungee straps before finding the right solution, I urge you to get a cargo net.

I spent nearly £30 on so many different straps and bungees before someone suggested a cargo net. Got the above one for a fiver and had zero problems.

Do you use it directly on the rack? I thought they were for baskets.

I really like these rok straps. Work like bungees, but without the hooks.

I originally used the bungee nets, then made my own net out of rope and bungees.

Now I'm using hook and loop tape from Amazon. Its super cheap and infinitely adjustable.

Some folks have a problem with bungees and claim they are dangerous, don't hold the load securely, etc.. In my experience (30+ years of bicycle touring) its a load of crap. I have always held my sleeping bag and tent onto my rack using bungee cords, usually two that criss-cross each other (one hooked onto the rack from front left to rear right and one hooked from front right to rear left). So far I have never lost a load or hurt myself with them. How that would occur I can't even imagine. It may help that the load is also always on top a pair of panniers. If the load is hanging over the sides of the rack with nothing to support it beyond the edges of the rack then the result might be different.

When you’re on a budget and don’t have much woodworking experience, cheap and simple are the name of the game. But, that doesn’t mean you can’t create a cool shabby-chic bike hook to store your bike in small spaces or in the garage!

This design uses pipe fittings that you can find at your local hardware store to make a hook that allows you to hang your bike vertically by the wheel.

Don’t miss our video collaboration with Lowes Home Improvement on YouTube! 

Why We Love It

The only tool you need to create this awesome vertical bike rack is a drill, no sawing or complicated assembly required! The hook is made out of items that you can easily find in the plumbing section of the hardware store and is large enough that you could hang any type of bike from it, no matter the size of the tire. Plus, the wooden plank will keep your wall from getting scuffed and dirty from your bike’s tires! 

Tools

  • Cordless Drill
  • Adjustable Pliers
  • Sharp Scissors or a Knife
  • Ruler
  • Stud finder or Toggle Bolts
  • Level

How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

Supplies

Pick up the following items, or download this shopping list with part numbers to take to your local Lowes Improvement Hardware Store.

  • 1/2 inch (15 mm) Black Iron Pipe Fittings
    • Floor Flange Fitting
    • 90-degree Starter Elbow Fitting
    • (2) 90-degree Elbow Fittings
    • 3 ½ inch (90 mm) Nipple Fitting
    • 4 1/2 inch (115 mm) Nipple Fitting
    • Cap Fitting
    • 1 in X 6 in X 6 ft (2.5 cm X 15 cm X 180 cm) Select Pine Board
    • 1 inch (2.5 cm) Clear Vinyl Tubing (about 5 inches/13 cm long)
    • (4) #12 X 3/4 inch (6 mm X 19 mm) Flat-Head Interior/Exterior Wood Screws
    • (2) Cabinet screws with large diameter head
    • Scrap wooden plank
    • Wood stain or paint (optional)

    How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

    Make It!

    1. Using soapy water, clean the pipe fittings to remove any grease.
    2. Grab a spare piece of wood long enough for you to kneel on and secure the black iron floor flange pipe fitting to it with the wood screws.
    3. Secure the 90-degree starter elbow fitting to the floor flange until hand tight, then use the adjustable pliers and tighten thoroughly.
    4. Follow with the small nipple fitting, 90-degree elbow fitting, medium-sized nipple fitting, second 90-degree elbow fitting, and large nipple fitting with the same method to create a hook-shape. How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack
    5. Take your clear vinyl tubing and hold it up to the last secured piece of pipe. Mark the tubing where the threads on the iron pipe begin and cut with sharp scissors or a knife.
    6. Slide the tubing over the iron nipple fitting, screw cap fitting onto the end of the pipe and tighten. The tubing will ensure your wheels do not get scratched by the rough pipe when you hang your bike.
    7. Remove finished hook from the scrap piece of wood.
    8. Sand any rough edges and add desired finish to your pine board (stain, paint, etc.) and let dry.
    9. Using the finished hook, center the hook at the top of the finished board and mark the holes with a pencil.
    10. With the pencil marks as your guide, drill pilot holes using a 1/8 inch (3 mm) drill bit. Do not go all the way through the wood.
    11. Secure hook to finished board with wood screws and drill. How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack
    12. Use a ruler to find the center of your pine board and make a mark with your pencil below the hook. Measure the mark’s distance to the edge of the wood above the hook and make a matching mark on the other side of the board.
    13. Drill pilot holes using a drill bit that is the same size as the shank of the screw all the way through the pine board as guides for your cabinet screws to secure your rack to the wall.
    14. You can mount your rack two different ways: 1.) You can use a stud finder to mount your rack securely to the wall. 2.) If you can’t find a stud where you want to mount your rack, you can use toggle bolts. Toggle bolts will allow you to securely fasten your rack to the wall without a stud, just follow the instructions on the package.
    15. Whether you are using a stud finder or toggle bolts, use a level to ensure your rack is straight vertically before marking your wall and mounting your rack.
    16. Secure your rack to the wall using cabinet screws and hang your bike by either the front or rear wheel. Nice job!

    How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

    Avid bicyclists all seem to share one problem when traveling with their bikes. It is all centered around bike racks and the damage it can cause to your car.

    Whether it is mounting the rack, traveling with, or dismounting your bike there are all kinds of risks to your paint job if you don’t take precautions.

    The roof rack, the hitch rack, and the infamous trunk rack all come with their own unique issues when it comes to traveling but here are some ways to keep your vehicle damage free when using your bike rack.

    Common Problems when using a bike rack.

    alt=”Bike Rack Problem” /> Bike Rack Problem

    Most of the time the problems begin when you first mount the rack. If the car is not clean or there is dirt where you are planning on mounting it the rack will scratch the paint.

    Another problem lies in the fact that when you drive the bikes tend to move around if not secured properly. So make sure that every time you mount a bike rack that it is firmly secured to your vehicle.

    If your bikes are not locked into place it can lead to pedals scratching your paint or dinging your car. However, most of the time damage occurs when we simply forget that the bike rack is there and accidents happen.

    Setting up little reminders where you can see them can help reduce these kinds of accidents. Place a post-it note on your dash or put your garage key in one of your small biking backpacks.

    Each type of bike rack comes with its own set risks but most can be averted if you follow these simple tips.

    Protect your car and bike by doing the following:

    Roof Racks

    • Remember your bikes are there!
    • Remove front wheel on bike when using roof racks to allow you to go through lower over passes.
    • Be careful when loading and unloading your bike so you don’t scratch your car.
    • Do not overload your bike rack.

    Hitch racks

    • Secure bikes so they do not hit your car.
    • Make sure your wheels are kept away from the exhaust system so it doesn’t melt your tires.
    • Be careful when reversing.
    • Make sure all bikes are locked so they don’t shake loose while driving.
    • Check to make sure you mount the hitch high enough so the bikes don’t hit the road

    Trunk Racks

    • Be careful when using the straps because :
      • when they are new they will spring back on you if not secured correctly.
      • they tend to stretch over time so make sure your bikes are tightly secured.

      How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack Hitch Mount Bike rack Crash!

      Car damage can cost thousands of dollars if you are not careful. So be mindful of your bike rack as it is very important if you want to keep both your car and bike damage free.

      When mounting a bike rack you can add an extra layer of protection like Scotchguard paint or a protection film like Rack Guard. This can help with reducing scratches caused by roof racks as well as trunk racks.

      Sometimes bike racks come with mounting accessories that help protect your car. For example, some roof racks come with little clear protective stickies that you can attach where the feet meet your vehicle.

      If you do find these little clear protectors be sure to use them as they will reduce scuff marks caused by the bike rack itself. Remember to mount your bike rack onto a clean surface, inspect your bike rack before you go from one place to another, and always remind yourself where your bicycles are located.

      Here is some day to day tips on how to protect your vehicle when using a bike rack.

      Hi all new owners of the x3 pro I’ve been pondering the idea of getting a bike rack for my car I have a 2018 audi s5 sportback which is a hatchback, while the bike does fold and dose actually fit in my car it’s a very tight squeeze and I’m getting mud and crap all over the inside , so I’ve be wondering about a rack , but as you all know its not your regular shaped bike . So what would work ? Anyone with the same thoughts
      Thanks

      Xplore Wallke

      Member
      • Oct 14, 2020
      • #2

      Hi all new owners of the x3 pro I’ve been pondering the idea of getting a bike rack for my car I have a 2018 audi s5 sportback which is a hatchback, while the bike does fold and dose actually fit in my car it’s a very tight squeeze and I’m getting mud and crap all over the inside , so I’ve be wondering about a rack , but as you all know its not your regular shaped bike . So what would work ? Anyone with the same thoughts
      Thanks

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      reed scott

      Well-Known Member
      • Oct 14, 2020
      • #3

      That stinger ( male part of rack that inserts into the receiver ) is in no way adequate for the weight the rack is supporting. Those little welds will break.

      Maybe I’m missing something. Can’t see much with the angle of the close up pic.

      Xplore Wallke

      Member
      • Oct 14, 2020
      • #4

      reed scott

      Well-Known Member
      • Oct 14, 2020
      • #5

      Xplore Wallke

      Member
      • Oct 14, 2020
      • #6

      98 SNAKE EATER

      Member
      • Oct 14, 2020
      • #7

      Hi all new owners of the x3 pro I’ve been pondering the idea of getting a bike rack for my car I have a 2018 audi s5 sportback which is a hatchback, while the bike does fold and dose actually fit in my car it’s a very tight squeeze and I’m getting mud and crap all over the inside , so I’ve be wondering about a rack , but as you all know its not your regular shaped bike . So what would work ? Anyone with the same thoughts
      Thanks

      Have you considered a plastic bin to keep your interior clean?

      That’s what I did for my van and it actually makes loading up much easier.

      Attachments

      Madpaddy73

      Member
      • Oct 15, 2020
      • #8

      Have you considered a plastic bin to keep your interior clean?

      That’s what I did for my van and it actually makes loading up much easier.

      The old adage goes, “It’s like riding a bike.” Meaning of course that cycling becomes so integrated into your muscle memory that you never lose the skill. So why not integrate bicycles into your home as well?

      There are all kinds of broken bikes available in classifieds and at garage sales—perhaps you even have one in your garage already. Also, many cities have bicycle repair co-ops and recycling centers that make parts quite easy to come by.

      With so many components (wheels, gears, handle bars, etc.) so readily available and affordable (if not free), old bicycles are great fodder for making all sorts of recycled projects.

      1. BICYCLE PLANTER

      How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

      First up, take some inspiration from this bicycle planter, which you could purchase from Pottery Barn (for $250; it’s still available). But you, good reader, are the kind of person that makes stuff, and you could easily recreate something like this at home using an old bike, some inexpensive wire baskets, and a little paint.

      2. BIKE-WHEEL POT RACK

      How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

      The radial spoke structure of a bicycle wheel makes for a fantastic way to organize and store your pots and pans and other kitchen gadgets. The spinning wheel brings all the utensils within easy reach. Get the full how-to from ReadyMade.

      3. BICYCLE VANITY

      How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

      Talk about full integration. This bicycle ‘vanity’ from designer Benjamin Bullins houses a sink and small countertop—as well as towel storage in the basket. Genius. Learn more at Apartment Therapy.

      4. BIKE-WHEEL LAZY SUSAN

      How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

      The bike wheel’s center axle allows it to spin along a road, but it can also spin other kinds of goodies… like your breakfast? This Lazy Susan project would require a somewhat large dining table, but if you’re looking for something functional to break up that large space, this one is all kinds of fun.

      5. HANDLEBAR MOUNTING RACK

      How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

      Lastly, what better way to use old bike parts than for storing… a bike? Inexpensive and secure, this solution would work especially well in a smaller home or apartment, or as a way of keeping multiple bikes aloft on a garage wall. A project guide is available from Kyle Wilson.

      There are a few pictures on the internet of people towing canoes with bicycles, there are even complete solutions that you can purchase for the task. But what is really involved, what are the challenges and the solutions?

      How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

      5 Answers 5

      This answer is based on a 17-foot plastic Coleman canoe with an aluminium frame. The length and the plastic increase the challenges. I have over 100 miles experience now, with legs of 14 to 15 miles.

      After much online research I purchased a Seattle Sports All Terrain Canoe Center Cart; there is an option that includes a tow bar to connect it to your bike, but that is for a max of 16 foot canoe. The Seattle sports hitch is a low mount hitch; most of the home made solutions you find on Google are high mount: see What are the safety concerns of a high vs a low mount trailer hitch?

      Pretty much all the commercially available carts are designed with a couple of padded rest points that your canoe or kayak will rest on. This might be OK for short distances or with an empty hard-shell (fiberglass type) boat with nothing in it, but for a relatively soft plastic canoe, loaded with gear, traveling more then a mile or so, in warm (or hot) weather, the issues start to build up.

      How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

      Problem two: keep the canoe on the cart. The strap that comes with dolly is not going to work, I tried several variations and a single strap is problematic for any distance. Every time you hit a pothole the dolly moves a bit. Pretty soon the dolly has slid back and is partly sideways; your 3-foot wide canoe is making a 5-foot wide swath behind you. I tipped the canoe over on my first outing, brushing against a pole, had to stop every mile and recenter it.

      Solution is four straps; the image shows 5, but the center strap turned out not to be required (and is more likely to wear (break) when you brush against things. Two straps pulling the dolly back and center, two straps pulling the dolly forward and center. I used 15-foot ratchet straps in the front, and wrapped around the trailer hitch before hooking to the seat. You don’t need much pressure; it just needs to be snug.

      How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

      Problem three:The plastic hull is resting on the padded bars of the cart; this was okay at first, but the warm weather and time started causing the canoe to be come deformed. I tried using a strap between the bars for the keel to rest on, but I started to notice the canoe rubbing on the cart wheels (and damaging the canoe).

      Solution build a wood deck on the dolly. There is a space for the keel; now most of the weight is carried by the keel. The large flat area (shaped to minimize pressure points) provides balance and are helps to reshape the hull. It is easier to get and keep the boat centered on the cart. This added a couple of pounds, but it has been more then worth it. The canoe can’t rub against the tires. I actually picked up about 2 miles per hour on the first outing with the wood deck.

      How to use a bicycle tire frame as a pot rack

      Although not shown on any of the images above, I also used a bungee cord to support/lift the hitch a way up the seat post. Without it the hitch would occasionally drag on the rear tire.

      Pulling the Canoe

      Actually towing the canoe is not as bad as I had expected.

      It is heavy, and the cart tires are relatively wide. Racing bikes have skinny tires for a reason: less friction. Here, I have all terrain tires on the bike and the canoe dolly. All of which means it is harder to go fast. It also means you go over rough terrain easier and have more control, so it is trade-off.

      It is long, I mean really long. The national move yourself trailer rental company (US) does not even rent a trailer as long as the canoe. AND because the dolly is in the center of the canoe, it pivots in the center of the canoe when you turn. When taking a sharp corner the back of the canoe can swing out 8½ feet (nearly 3 meters): if you are on the center line of a road, and turn sharp, the canoe could hit a car parked on the side of the road. I recommend you practise turning, well away from things that might get damaged (e.g. in an empty parking lot).

      With some practice, you can tow on roads without difficulty and on most areas of bike paths fine. Slow down for corners; get off and walk everything around narrow corners. Sometimes the bike must be carried or disconnected from the canoe to make it through tight corners or narrow areas.

      My canoe is about 3 feet (1 meter) wide; many bike paths in the US have posts to prevent motor vehicles from going on the path, These seem to mostly have about 3½ to 4 feet of space between them so the canoe does fit. You will want to walk through while learning but now I am able to bike through about 95% of them. Get lined up well before you get to the posts and don’t turn until the entire canoe is through (the tail will swing and hit a post).

      Expect the canoe to rub in tight spots even if you are moving it by hand; bring extra straps to connect it to the dolly.

      Use extreme cation when corning if there are people, cars or anything damageable around.

      Introduction: Bike Rack for Full Suspension Mountain Bike

      When I bought my full suspension mountain bike a few years back, I had a seriously hard time finding any bike racks that met the following realistic criteria:

      1. Were suitable for full suspension bikes.
      2. Cost less than about $40.
      3. Were actually worth their weight in terms of loadbearing. Most full suspension bike racks — even the super pricey ones — are rated only for 10 kg or so.
      4a. Most of the weight should NOT be loaded onto the saddle post, but rather downward to the tire.
      4b. Vertical supports along the sides to make them compatible with clip-on Ortlieb pannier-bags like the Office Bag. Racks without side supports (there are several out there) would either let the bag flail into the tire, or otherwise — since usually only one bag was applied — could lead to torsion forces.

      Health:
      I used to carry textbooks and groceries in a backpack or courrier bag. I often had back pain. I’ve never again had back pain since using this bike rack, since I carry no extra weight whatsoever on my body while biking.

      Longevity:
      While I do not intend to do failure testing by loading my bike rack until it gives, I can say that I use it with my Ortlieb Office Bag filled alternately with vegetables and juice from the farmer’s market or massive textbooks around town, as well as repeatedly traversing rough terrain with ALL my heavy rock-climbing stuff (60 meter alpine rope, 2 harnesses, carabiners, webbing, 1kg water, food, etc.), and there has been no failure, and no sign of instability or bending, in two years now.

      Final comment:
      I totally love instructables!! Since reading an article here about coffee roasting long ago, I’ve been roasting my own fair-trade organic beans for years now! Instructables is my favorite website ever (sharing first with indymedia) — so I’ve decided it was time to participate!

      Step 1: Materials

      You’ll need some stuff.

      Part #1:
      A plain old bike rack with conventional mounting hardware. I had one laying around in my attic that is rated to 40kg. It has holes along the flat horizontal panel that makes up most of the rack, if your rack doesn’t have holes you’ll need to drill some or decide on another way to affix the rack to the top junction of the vertical support. [price: already had mine, costs about $15 bucks new]

      Part #2:
      Some M6 screws and nuts (about 10 of each), and about 3 extra nuts one size larger (M7). Larger screws might add stability, but mine works fine with M6. [price: 2 clams]

      Part #3:
      Some type of steel to make the vertical supports. I used flat L-shaped steel intended for holding up curtains (I think). It is about 2 to 3 mm think and roughly 2 cm wide. I decided not to use aluminum to save weight — I wanted supports that could stand up to real loads and offroad abuse. [price: 4 clams]

      Part #4:
      2 small angle brackets, about 2cm x 2cm. These will form the lower junction between brake post and vertical support. Mine were also intended for curtains and made of the same steel. [price: about 1.50]

      Part #5:
      If you have disc brakes like me, you’ll need TWO brake posts that screw into the empty holes on the rear suspension element. These MUST have an M5 or M6 threading at the top, which usually allows you to secure your caliper brakes in place (though not in my case). Somebody please add a comment about what these are formally called. [price: about 4 clams for both]

      TOOLS:
      (I didn’t buy these, but rather used them at our local bike cooperative, which has a space for about 6 people to repair their bikes themselves on premises while paying about $1 per hour to use all the tools and get advice for complicated repairs)

      — Powerdrill, with about a 5mm bit.
      — A cute little hand tool to apply a threading to the holes you drill, with a 6mm bit.
      — A little hand saw (optional, for trimming the angle brackets if needed).

      Step 2: Bottom Junction

      To make the bottom junction:

      First, screw the brake post into the suspension element on the left and right sides of the bike.

      Next, attach the angle bracket to the top of the brake post using a screw (M6).

      Modifications:
      It might be possible to attach the angle bracket to the frame directly by screwing some kind of large screw into the brake post hole, thereby obviating the need for buying brake posts and probably increasing stability. It may eventually wear down the finish where the angle bracket is attached, however (maybe add a layer of rubber from an inner tube between finish and angle bracket?).

      Step 3: Rear Support to the Axel Area

      This step is pretty straightfoward, possibly with a twist.

      This step will depend on what kind of frame you have.

      Attach the bottom part of the bike rack to your rear suspension element according to the instructions for that particular frame.

      My frame has a long threaded rod with an eyelet at the end of it. The eyelet had to be attached somehow to the frame, it was intended for extra brazed-on nuts near the axel present on some bikes. I had wanted to attach directly to the axel itself for maximal strength (like some of the high end frames for suspension bikes), but decided against this approach, because it would complicate my removing the tire to fix a flat.

      I drilled holes into my bikes rear suspension element bilaterally. It impressed the guys at the bike store that I was willing to void my warranty after one month for a DIY experiment.

      Attaching the right side was no problem — jus tscrewed it into the hole I drilled and threaded.

      On the left side, however, the rod with the eyelet had to somehow clear the disc brake apparatus to attach to the frame. I didn’t want to bend the rod, and so, following a suggestion by the local bike store, I built a “tunnel” of 2 M7 nuts, and passed my M6 screw through this and into the rear suspension element of the bike. Attach a nut and make really sure all this is securely tightened.

      Step 4: Assembly — Final Touches

      This part is easy.

      First, attach the short segment of the L-shaped vertical support to the bottom of the bike rack with a few screws and nuts.

      Then, once the bike rack is already attached to the bike (by the supports leading to the axel area), affix the long part of the L-shaped vertical support to the small angle bracket, and you have yourself a solid bike rack in place.

      Remember, this rack rides on the rear suspension element, not the bike frame. This means it does not itself enjoy the benefits of suspension — don’t put your laptop, fine china, or kitten on it. It is ESSENTIAL to test make sure the front of the rack won’t collide with the back of the bike frame at any point. You can test this by adjusting your suspension choke to be way soft and then lean down on the bike while eyeballing the rack. If it comes close to colliding, you’ll have to loosen the screws on the angle bracket and angle the rack posteriorly away from the frame and re-tighten it in that position. Mine doesn’t come close to colliding.