How to teach sustainable happiness

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The debate has been resolved and science has spoken: happiness is a skill that can be learned and cultivated. But what does this mean, and how can these principles apply to you and your class? You may think that all skills sound cute, but are they really practical?

Focusing on simple ways to cultivate the six skills of sustainable happiness, both for your own life and for the class, will fill the class with energy, more empathy, and create better students. Indeed, CASEL found that students involved in developing these skills performed “better than their peers on a number of indicators: positive behavior and social attitudes, skills such as empathy and teamwork, and academic studies.”

So, what’s the best way to cultivate the happiness skills? Likewise, you cultivate all skills! Various studies show that cultivating a habit takes anywhere from 21 days to over 200 days, but daily practice and focused attention are key.

Here is a breakdown of how I have used these happiness skills in my life:

Awareness

Awareness doesn’t have to be scary! Once I understood this, I began to realize that awareness is something I can use at any time of the day. A quick way to test awareness? Ask yourself: what am I thinking about now? So take care of yourself without judgment. You may be surprised at what you learn about yourself!

The interpersonal bond

There are so many ways to nurture a bond. Anywhere, from taking the extra moment to figure out why someone might be having a bad day, to eye contact and smiling at strangers, to physical contact and even asking better questions. I went with “How are you?” to “What’s the best thing that’s happened to you Today?”

Gratitude

We’ve all heard of gratitude journals, but in my busy life, that just wasn’t practical. On my way to work, I started to mention at least one thing I was grateful for. The first thing I thought about? My car! Other simple ways to cultivate gratitude? If you think something nice about someone, say it! Write them or let them know the moment you think about it.

Positive look

Have you ever noticed that when you focus on something, it grows? The same thing happens with a positive attitude! Look for the good and you will see it. Pause, and ask yourself,“What’s the BEST case scenario?” When I started thinking that, everything changed. It didn’t mean that I was without negative external circumstances happening to me. It just meant that I could hold them while still being present, but knowing it was much bigger than the usual negative moment.

Intention

Often a target can be an overwhelming idea, but it can be much smaller, much more digestible. They say the goal is the crossroads of skill and passion; I used this formula and started looking for ways to create a goal for the day ahead, nothing else. I would tell myself, for example, Today’s purpose – the way I will find meaning Today,Now – is by updating and reviewing a friend’s resume. Simple ways to give back can be a theme in your classroom, using your student’s strengths and passions.

Generosity

Look for simple ways to help someone else in your daily life. This can be as simple as smiling at a stranger, holding the door open for someone, or taking someone’s grocery cart back for them. The possibilities are endless and can go from a small daily service to larger time commitments. Either way, notice how this makes you feel when you’re done.

Use your skills

Soon you’ll start to see all of the sustainable happiness skills bleed into each other. You’ll see that your outlook changes positively when someone smiles back at you (positive outlook, mindfulness, generosity),and you find a sense of purpose in making someone’s day brighter, which in turn makes you feel grateful and more connected. Oh!

How to teach sustainable happiness

We would love to hear the ways you’re incorporating the skills into your classroom, and into your daily life! Share how you use your social media skills #Discover your happiness.

Originally posted on Discovery Education: http: // blog. discoveries com / blog / 11.05.2018 / i-sei-sustainable-happiness-abcourse-in-action /

About Brook Dorff

Always interested in the confluence of health education and social causes, Brook holds a Masters in Social Justice and Human Rights, a Bachelor’s degree in Public Health Education, and is a Certified Health Education Specialist. During her travels, she saw firsthand that, despite the divisive factors including race, religion, politics and caste, human emotion is universal and happiness is a basic human right. Brook is happier in nature, has a nice conversation in a nice bar, teaches Pure Barre and creates a new Spotify playlist.

Discover Your Happiness is LG’s exciting new Discovery Education program that aims to equip young people with the skills they need to cope with stress and create sustainable happiness in their lives.

Discover your happiness

Research shows that two out of three American teenagers are stressed and many don’t know how to deal with it. The inability to reduce and cope with stress and anxiety can negatively impact several aspects of a teenager’s life, including health, friendships, relationships with parents, and academic performance.

Along with The Greater Good Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley and the LG Experience Happiness initiative, Discover your happiness is highlighting six skills that sustain one’s ability to recognize that life’s good: mindfulness, human connection, positive outlook, purpose, generosity and gratitude.

Discover your happiness aims to create awareness that happiness is more than a fleeting feeling, that sustainable happiness is achievable, and that there are a set of skills that can be taught, learned and practiced to help anyone in their journey toward happiness.

How to teach sustainable happiness

Amplifier

Life’s Good: Experience Happiness: With the aim of enriching the lives of young people in the United States, LG Electronics USA has launched a new unique social responsibility initiative called “Life’s Good: Experience Happiness”. Happiness skills can be learned, according to the Greater Good Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley, which has identified six skills that support one’s ability to recognize that life is good: awareness, human connection, positive outlook, purpose, generosity and gratitude. LG’s science platform aims to engage research institutes and nonprofit partners who help equip young Americans with the skills they need for lasting happiness. www. LG Experience Happiness. com.

As the global leader in standards-based digital content for K-12 classrooms around the world, Discovery Education is transforming teaching and learning with award-winning digital textbooks, multimedia content, professional learning and the largest community of professional learning of its kind. Serving 4.5 million educators and over 50 million students, Discovery Education’s services are available in approximately half of U. S. classrooms,50 percent of all primary schools in the UK, and more than 50 countries around the globe. Inspired by global media company Discovery, Inc., Discovery Education works with districts, states, and allied organizations to captivate students, empower teachers, and transform classrooms with customized solutions that boost academic achievement. Explore the future of education in DiscoveryEducation. com

Collaborators

Life is Good: Experience Happiness works with leading scientists to learn more about sustainable happiness, and works with organizations to deliver lasting happiness skills directly to young people.

The UC Berkeley Greater Good Science Center

The UC Berkeley Greater Good Science Center studies the psychology, sociology, and neuroscience of well-being and teaches skills that foster a thriving, resilient, and compassionate society.

Inner explorer

The Inner explorer program is a series of daily 5–10 minute audio-guided mindfulness practices that is easily implemented in any classroom. The program focuses on key development areas to help students and teachers reduce stress and prepare for study.

Happiness project

Born from scientific research on human happiness, Happiness project provides educational programs and resources that teach anyone how to learn the habits and skills of sustainable happiness.

Immerse your students in dynamic virtual experiences that bring critical topics to life and fascinate students. Zgodne ze standardami zajęcia towarzyszące zachęcają uczniów do głębszej eksploracji kluczowych tematów w szkole i w domu.

Virtual field trip

Six Skills Related to Sustainable Happiness

Happy people are healthier, live longer, earn more and do better in school and in life. Learn how happiness affects our physiology and psychology from experts at the Greater Good Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley.

Then, see how students and educators activate happiness using these skills through programming from LG Experience Happiness partners Inner explorer and Happiness project.

Join us on our journey to understand how regular practice of the Six Skills Related to Sustainable Happiness—mindfulness, human connection, positive outlook, purpose, generosity, and gratitude—can help set anyone on the path to sustainable happiness.

Join the conversation

Share how your classroom is pursuing happiness using the Six Skills Related to Sustainable Happiness. Post your experiences to Twitter @LGUS and @DiscoveryEd using the hashtag #Discover your happiness.

How to teach sustainable happiness

Resources for teachers

Prepare Your Students with our standards-aligned companion activities to dig deeper into the concepts explored in the Virtual field trip. Strengthen student interest with in-depth conversations and hands-on activities.

Virtual View Event Guide

Extend the impact of the Discover your happiness Virtual field trip by connecting your students with classrooms across the country through a live online conversation.

Pre-VFT classroom activities: measuring happiness

If someone asked you how to measure happiness, what would you say? Is happiness the same for everyone? Identify which behaviors, habits, and thought patterns help people experience happiness. Then, work with your students to develop a Happiness Plan in action.

Hello 👋 Join our community for daily happiness habits!

Your shopping cart is empty.

The debate has been resolved and science has spoken: happiness is a skill that can be learned and cultivated. But what does this mean, and how can these principles apply to you and your class? You may think that all skills sound cute, but are they really practical?

Focusing on simple ways to cultivate the six skills of sustainable happiness, both for your own life and for the class, will fill the class with energy, more empathy, and create better students. Indeed, CASEL found that students involved in developing these skills performed “better than their peers on a number of indicators: positive behavior and social attitudes, skills such as empathy and teamwork, and academic studies.”

So, what’s the best way to cultivate the happiness skills? Likewise, you cultivate all skills! Various studies show that cultivating a habit takes anywhere from 21 days to over 200 days, but daily practice and focused attention are key.

Here is a breakdown of how I have used these happiness skills in my life:

Awareness

Awareness doesn’t have to be scary! Once I understood this, I began to realize that awareness is something I can use at any time of the day. A quick way to test awareness? Ask yourself: what am I thinking about now? So take care of yourself without judgment. You may be surprised at what you learn about yourself!

The interpersonal bond

There are so many ways to nurture a bond. Anywhere, from taking the extra moment to figure out why someone might be having a bad day, to eye contact and smiling at strangers, to physical contact and even asking better questions. I went with “How are you?” to “What’s the best thing that’s happened to you Today?”

Gratitude

We’ve all heard of gratitude journals, but in my busy life, that just wasn’t practical. On my way to work, I started to mention at least one thing I was grateful for. The first thing I thought about? My car! Other simple ways to cultivate gratitude? If you think something nice about someone, say it! Write them or let them know the moment you think about it.

Positive look

Have you ever noticed that when you focus on something, it grows? The same thing happens with a positive attitude! Look for the good and you will see it. Pause, and ask yourself,“What’s the BEST case scenario?” When I started thinking that, everything changed. It didn’t mean that I was without negative external circumstances happening to me. It just meant that I could hold them while still being present, but knowing it was much bigger than the usual negative moment.

Intention

Often a target can be an overwhelming idea, but it can be much smaller, much more digestible. They say the goal is the crossroads of skill and passion; I used this formula and started looking for ways to create a goal for the day ahead, nothing else. I would tell myself, for example, Today’s purpose – the way I will find meaning Today,Now – is by updating and reviewing a friend’s resume. Simple ways to give back can be a theme in your classroom, using your student’s strengths and passions.

Generosity

Look for simple ways to help someone else in your daily life. This can be as simple as smiling at a stranger, holding the door open for someone, or taking someone’s grocery cart back for them. The possibilities are endless and can go from a small daily service to larger time commitments. Either way, notice how this makes you feel when you’re done.

Use your skills

Soon you’ll start to see all of the sustainable happiness skills bleed into each other. You’ll see that your outlook changes positively when someone smiles back at you (positive outlook, mindfulness, generosity),and you find a sense of purpose in making someone’s day brighter, which in turn makes you feel grateful and more connected. Oh!

How to teach sustainable happiness

We would love to hear the ways you’re incorporating the skills into your classroom, and into your daily life! Share how you use your social media skills #Discover your happiness.

Originally posted on Discovery Education: http: // blog. discoveries com / blog / 11.05.2018 / i-sei-sustainable-happiness-abcourse-in-action /

About Brook Dorff

Always interested in the confluence of health education and social causes, Brook holds a Masters in Social Justice and Human Rights, a Bachelor’s degree in Public Health Education, and is a Certified Health Education Specialist. During her travels, she saw firsthand that, despite the divisive factors including race, religion, politics and caste, human emotion is universal and happiness is a basic human right. Brook is happier in nature, has a nice conversation in a nice bar, teaches Pure Barre and creates a new Spotify playlist.

Why bet on true or permanent happiness?

The real key to sustainable happiness is based on skills, not circumstances. If you rely on circumstances (environment, relationships, activities) only temporary happiness that lasts as long as the circumstances are favorable. Perspective and mindset can be developed using practical skills and create a sustainable happiness in which the lowest emotional state a person plunges into, even when circumstances are not good, is hope. Hope is beyond the area where most of the world lives. Life can be great. It’s up to you.

Permanent happiness defined:

The state of true happiness does not require a constant state of bliss. It is a deep sense of inner stability, peace, well-being and vitality that is consistent and sustainable. The awareness of having the knowledge and skills to return to a happy state, even when not in that state, is a fundamental component of sustainable happiness. True happiness is permanent because the individual deliberately and consciously chooses perspectives that create positive emotions and nurtures this habit of thinking until the natural and habitual response focuses on the positive aspects of each situation.

Anyone can achieve sustainable happiness because it is skill-based, practical and easy to apply to your life.

Our programs teach you how or if you’re good at learning from a book, our founder’s books show you how. Look for Jeanine Joy’s offerings at your favorite book seller.

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Immerse your students in dynamic virtual experiences that bring critical topics to life and fascinate students. Zgodne ze standardami zajęcia towarzyszące zachęcają uczniów do głębszej eksploracji kluczowych tematów w szkole i w domu.

Virtual field trip

Six Skills Related to Sustainable Happiness

Happy people are healthier, live longer, earn more and do better in school and in life. Learn how happiness affects our physiology and psychology from experts at the Greater Good Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley.

Then, see how students and educators activate happiness using these skills through programming from LG Experience Happiness partners Inner explorer and Happiness project.

Join us on our journey to understand how regular practice of the Six Skills Related to Sustainable Happiness—mindfulness, human connection, positive outlook, purpose, generosity, and gratitude—can help set anyone on the path to sustainable happiness.

Join the conversation

Share how your classroom is pursuing happiness using the Six Skills Related to Sustainable Happiness. Post your experiences to Twitter @LGUS and @DiscoveryEd using the hashtag #Discover your happiness.

How to teach sustainable happiness

Resources for teachers

Prepare Your Students with our standards-aligned companion activities to dig deeper into the concepts explored in the Virtual field trip. Strengthen student interest with in-depth conversations and hands-on activities.

Virtual View Event Guide

Extend the impact of the Discover your happiness Virtual field trip by connecting your students with classrooms across the country through a live online conversation.

Pre-VFT classroom activities: measuring happiness

If someone asked you how to measure happiness, what would you say? Is happiness the same for everyone? Identify which behaviors, habits, and thought patterns help people experience happiness. Then, work with your students to develop a Happiness Plan in action.

Originally appeared in the summer 2011 issue

Environmental educators are generally nice people. We’re the first to encourage a child to join us on a hike, and the last to leave a party when there are recyclables that need to be sorted from the garbage. The love of life has drawn many of us to this profession: the love of insects and birds, as well as morning kayaking and mountain hiking in close contact with the muscles.

The irony, of course, is that much of what we teach is depressing. Global climate change, especially endangered species, habitat destruction, plastic pollution: our job is to tell about the destruction of the very things we care about most deeply and to sound the alarm to others. Too often we end up being unaware portents of doom and gloom. Is this the most effective way to drive engagement? What if we could go back to our jovial roots? What if exploring happiness and all those things that make our hearts sing, rather than the threat of death, turns out to be the best way to inspire greener lifestyles among our students and other educators?

We’ve been investigating these questions as new findings from environmental psychology, positive psychology and resiliency research provide fresh understandings about the way we engage with sustainability issues. The result is an innovative field that combines happiness and sustainable development: Permanent happiness.

To view the revised version full of photos, click here.

Originally appeared in the summer 2011 issue

Environmental educators are generally nice people. We’re the first to encourage a child to join us on a hike, and the last to leave a party when there are recyclables that need to be sorted from the garbage. The love of life has drawn many of us to this profession: the love of insects and birds, as well as morning kayaking and mountain hiking in close contact with the muscles.

The irony, of course, is that much of what we teach is depressing. Global climate change, especially endangered species, habitat destruction, plastic pollution: our job is to tell about the destruction of the very things we care about most deeply and to sound the alarm to others. Too often we end up being unaware portents of doom and gloom. Is this the most effective way to drive engagement? What if we could go back to our jovial roots? What if exploring happiness and all those things that make our hearts sing, rather than the threat of death, turns out to be the best way to inspire greener lifestyles among our students and other educators?

We’ve been investigating these questions as new findings from environmental psychology, positive psychology and resiliency research provide fresh understandings about the way we engage with sustainability issues. The result is an innovative field that combines happiness and sustainable development: Permanent happiness.

To view the revised version full of photos, click here.