How to take apart a bogen 3047 tripod head

I recently bought an old Bogen 3047 head – I wanted to clean it, tighten some screws and lubricate it. However, I ran into a couple of problems:

1) This screw will not come out and I partially disassembled it trying to extract it. Any ideas on my next try? I wanted to try to heat it above 100 degrees so that the metal would expand slightly and eventually loosen the screw

2) I have disassembled a large part of the head and all my life I am not sure how to reassemble this part. There is a metal strap that wraps around the thermal cycler – this provides some resistance for better spin / smoother spin. The fit is so tight that I can’t put it on again. Some advice?

3) Any advice on the type of lubricant to be lubricated? I’ve checked many threads online, including people who emailed Bogen (no response). No real consensus: I mean automotive bearing lubrication.

If the heating doesn’t work, you may need to drill it along with a screw extractor.

Silicone grease would be a good choice as a lubricant.

If the heating doesn’t work, you may need to drill it along with a screw extractor.

Silicone grease would be a good choice as a lubricant.

Thanks – I think I’ll deliver the bolt puller. I would have to split the head further to do this, and I just don’t want to break them again lol.

Hope the heat works.

Initially, I tried to take it off because the tripod was rotating slightly (like 5 degrees) and I thought the problem was in this area. It turns out, however, that the head was not completely locked on the pole. I fixed it once, the rotation disappeared BUT now the degree indicator is off 5 degrees. To rotate the degree indicator, I have to take out this screw. If the heat doesn’t work, I’ll leave him alone. The degree index is not critical.

Is there any reason to use silicone grease instead of something like lithium grease?

I ended up solving the insert problem. Turns out I was putting this piece from the back. The post I tried to insert must have a very small taper or something. Once flipped, it was much easier to insert them correctly:

I put a metal strip in the hole. expands as it presses against the edge. So I gently aligned it with the pole and slid it in. It is snug and you should wear heavy gloves. This metal strap has sharp edges.

Once the edges were in place, I pressed gently but firmly with a block of wood. Be careful, it is difficult to align the edges, and if you do, you can bend the metal strip, making it even more difficult to position.

If the heating doesn’t work, you may need to drill it along with a screw extractor.

Silicone grease would be a good choice as a lubricant.

Thanks – I think I’ll deliver the bolt puller. I would have to split the head further to do this, and I just don’t want to break them again lol.

Hope the heat works.

Initially, I tried to take it off because the tripod was rotating slightly (like 5 degrees) and I thought the problem was in this area. It turns out, however, that the head was not completely locked on the pole. I fixed it once, the rotation disappeared BUT now the degree indicator is off 5 degrees. To rotate the degree indicator, I have to take out this screw. If the heat doesn’t work, I’ll leave him alone. The degree index is not critical.

Is there any reason to use silicone grease instead of something like lithium grease?

The silicone grease does not break down very easily and is quite thick which gives it good strength / damping of the head.

Find parts – do-it-yourself repairs

Use the parts list to find your model, determine the version (often multiple) and select a part and order.

Most orders ship the next business day if parts are in stock.

Find parts

sale

Check out our selection of promotions for tripods, heads and other old-school equipment.

sale – up to 50% Off

I need help? – Send it to us for repair

If you can’t find correct parts or versions; you can send your equipment for repair. Generally, we can repair any model listed on this page.

A repair can take several weeks if the part is out of stock.

Get repairs

Who we are:

Manfrotto tripod components. com is an independent website owned and operated by Spartan Photo Center, Inc., a senior distributor in Manfrotto Distribution, USA. SpartanPhotoCenter sells a full line of brand new products fully warranted by Manfrotto Distribution USA, as well as used Bogen mounts, heads and accessories. The site and store are not otherwise part of Lino Manfrotto Co., Manfrotto Distribution US, Vitec Corp, Bogen Corp or Bogen Distribution.

© 2005 – Spartan Photo Center, Inc. All rights reserved

How to take apart a bogen 3047 tripod head

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How to take apart a bogen 3047 tripod head

How to take apart a bogen 3047 tripod head

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USER OPINIONS

everything..this is a manfrotto, its heavy weight made it the best medium format head for the money .. trust me

I use it quite often with a basic bogen / manfrotto 190 tripod and a hefty Pentax p67 medium format camera and a 150mm lens in the front; this camera is famous for making it “blurry”! (con la mia borsa Delsey all’interno come un peso pesante e stabile.) questa combinazione produce risultati nitidi e sorprendenti sui miei negativi o diapositive .. e i miei clienti sono soddisfatti. no blur. you don’t need to buy these incredibly expensive carbon fiber super tripods for sharper shots … or a very expensive tripod head made in Guatamala! * Buy this instead, be creative … save money … be happy. I will have it forever

Customer service

Similar used products:

so much … so much money wasted on tripods

everything..this is a manfrotto, its heavy weight made it the best medium format head for the money .. trust me

I use it quite often with a basic bogen / manfrotto 190 tripod and a hefty Pentax p67 medium format camera and a 150mm lens in the front; this camera is famous for making it “blurry”! (con la mia borsa Delsey all’interno come un peso pesante e stabile.) questa combinazione produce risultati nitidi e sorprendenti sui miei negativi o diapositive .. e i miei clienti sono soddisfatti. no blur. you don’t need to buy these incredibly expensive carbon fiber super tripods for sharper shots … or a very expensive tripod head made in Guatamala! * Buy this instead, be creative … save money … be happy. I will have it forever

Customer service

Similar used products:

so much … so much money wasted on tripods

Strength, stability, spirit levels, QR system, adjustment range.

Massive handles need a large tripod to express their potential.

I originally bought this 144 tripod head and it worked fine, but it’s more suited to the 075 it comes with now. He’s a tall, strong head and I’ve found he can copy anything to comfortably view cameras. Spirit levels are very useful for my objects where alignment is key. I like the QR system as it includes an extra wheel to tighten the camera plate. This means that you don’t need to screw a single mount firmly into the camera, which can cause injury or (in some cases) ineffectiveness by briefly mounting the camera tripod (I have several cameras of this type). It’s all a bit large and industrial, but perfect for its intended use and not overly expensive.

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  • Bogen 3046 with 3047 head – enough for 8×10?

    I’m looking for a bigger tripod to stabilize my big green 8×10 Calumet and I’m the king of the Bogen 3046 tripod with 3047 head. Anyone on the list use this pairing? Any advice for or against?

    As always. Thanks in advance! Account

    Bogen 3046 with 3047 head – enough for 8×10?

    I use this combination for my 4×5 and it is overkill for me. The leg will surely house your camera. The head of the 3047 (16.5 lbs) is not designed to withstand as much weight as the legs (26 lbs), so if there is a weak point, it’s the head. The 3039’s head carries the same 26-pound load as the legs, but remember there’s a big jump in price between the 3047 and the 3039.

    I find it to be a cheap and solid combination if backpacking isn’t your goal. The 3046 has nearly the best, if not the best, weight-to-weight ratio of Bogen aluminum tripods, and I liked it because it was tall enough to use without extending the center column. (If I were a weight loss fanatic, I’d like to cut out part of the center column.)

    My only problem is to prevent the camera from twisting on the tripod plate. However, I have not put any effort into finding a solution.

    Bogen 3046 with 3047 head – enough for 8×10?

    The 3047 head is not strong enough for this camera. I tried a 3047 with a B&J 8×10 (similar weight as the Calumet C1). The settings were slipping under the influence of force. The problem is getting enough clamping force to balance the torque due to gravity.

    Try 3057 (up to 22lbs) or 3039 (up to 26.5lbs). Both are recommended up to 8×10 by Bogen / Manfrotto. I just bought a 3057 head for my 8×10 (newer calumet / Cambo), even though I haven’t fitted it yet. If you can sacrifice your head at 8×10 or 8×10 + 4×5, I think the 3057 is the best choice. The 3039 can handle a little more weight, but the plate is smaller and the controls look more like MF cameras. If you must have 1 for large, medium and small formats, the 3039 might be a slightly better compromise.

    I have 3046 and a complete set of Ries wooden legs. I don’t think you’ll have any problems with the 3046, but I like the wooden tripod better. It is much more pleasant to use in cold weather and much more powerful.

    Remember that in 3046 you cannot set each leg at a different angle. If you have rough terrain, this can be a limitation. I recommend 3036 legs for Bogen instead. Same load capacity, but each leg can be adjusted independently. But, pound for pound, a wooden tripod will always weigh more than an aluminum tripod.

    Bogen tripods are manufactured by Manfrotto. I haven’t used it for several years, but I’m talking about a solid tripod. Wow, this baby is heavy and built like a tank.
    The legs were originally worth $ 150, while the closest head is a Manfrotto 229 Super for around $ 225. The camera card is still available from Manfrotto for around $ 20. You can put a fluid head on this for a very stable video tripod. It is in really great condition. 8 + / 10 I would say with few votes. If you want a solid tripod. This is for you. If you want a lightweight laptop for hiking, this is not for you. So I’d say it’s almost a new $ 400 tripod. However, it’s not new, so I’m offering it today at p. price of $155 with shipping & Paypal included only to CONUS. You will not be disappointed. this baby is strong. Legs outstretched to take pictures at a very low angle, the column will turn, rise to about 6 feet 5 inches It has levels on itself. Any question? I will try to answer. Only PayPal and I will eat the fee.

    Hello
    I have a Bogen 3020 tripod and I have it about 20 years but about 15 years ago I replaced the original head with a liquid head which is mainly used for videos but cannot be rotated in any way other than up / down or 360 degrees no and Portrait, the head you show on yours is the original head that appeared on these 3020 models? I live in Zephyrhills, Florida, my personal email address is [email address protected]
    Vertical

    Introduction: Bogen Tripod Broken Leg Repair (P / N 3021)

    How to take apart a bogen 3047 tripod head

    How to take apart a bogen 3047 tripod head

    How to take apart a bogen 3047 tripod head

    How to fix the die-cast aluminum that holds the legs on a Bogen tripod. Fixing things is green!

    Basically, drill and tap a hole for the machine screw. Glue and twist the parts. Ready. It is not necessary to use a 6-32 machine screw. This is what I had at home.

    It took about 2 hours, but I made mistakes. You can avoid these errors by reviewing these instructions. I think it’s about an hour or so if you have the tools and get it right the first time around.

    You will need a lot of tools. If you don’t already have a drill, metal drill bits, hacksaw, file, screwdrivers, etc., it will be a very expensive project. If you don’t have the tools or the experience, you should seriously consider asking a friend to do it for you.

    You can simply buy a spare, but you will still have to disassemble the tripod. The replacement part does not come alone; is delivered with the upper leg. You also need to determine the year of your tripod. Bogen has been making this model for years and there are subtle differences. (If you buy a new part, at least recycle the broken part.) These are only practical difficulties.

    The reason I chose not to buy a replacement is because I am philosophically opposed to thinking that everything is disposable. Single-use items make sense for certain applications, such as medical supplies. But do we really need something disposable to clean the kitchen countertop? Or eat?

    Repairing the things you already have is eco-friendly as it reduces the amount of things in landfills and promotes responsible thinking. (This is better than recycling as recycling is often promoted by plastics companies – to quell the guilt of buying plastics. Also, recycling plastics is more difficult than you might think. – Collateral recycling programs can offset any small benefits of glass recycling.)

    Step 1: Disassemble and drill

    Remove the tripod legs. If you don’t know how, try it. Disassembling a tripod is different from disassembling a camera lens, which is sure to end in disaster. The parts are large, there aren’t many, and the whole thing is pretty solid.

    Now join the broken parts and make a hole. Make sure you are using the correct size drill bit. The top hole should allow the 6-32 machine screw to pass through and the bottom hole should be the correct size for tapping.

    It is not a good idea to drill a one-size hole in the whole, as the threads must fit perfectly between the two pieces. The parts are very likely to come apart when you try to cut the threads, so I wouldn’t recommend that you do that.

    The depth of the hole should be sufficient to accommodateat least 1 cm machine screw. If you don’t have a blind tapping kit, you will need another 5-10mm per tap. It is tapered, which means there will be no thread at the end of the faucet.

    Step 2: Cut the threads

    Use a 6-32 tap to cut the threads at the bottom of the hole.

    The idea is that a small broken tip slides freely on the machine screw so that it can be tightened to the main part of the jet without creating a gap between them due to misalignment of the thread.

    It is better not to break the tap.

    You can cut the threads by hand. I have never had problems centering and leveling the faucet sufficiently. That said, larger projects involving harder metals may require a little more attention. But for this design, you should be able to cut pretty good threads without any problems.

    If you feel resistance (or see the faucet bend), you can pull the faucet back and get rid of the metal chip parts. So come back to it. A lot of pressure is needed in some cases, but it’s better to be careful than to keep the project until the hardware store opens the next morning.

    Use a drizzle of light tap oil if you have one.

    Step 3: assemble and tune

    Assemble the dry parts. It should look simple and less broken. Make sure to scrape the adhesive off the damaged surfaces so that they adhere perfectly to each other.

    The machine screw head will get in the way, so another modification is required. If the screw is a pan head, file some space to accommodate the machine screw head. Make it as perpendicular to the bolt axis as possible. Other types of head can be equipped with countersunk or countersunk head holes.

    Apply some epoxy to surfaces and threads (female side) and assemble the parts. Tighten the machine screw and let the glue harden.

    Step 4: Feel so smart

    Take a step back and see what you’ve done.

    Put the tripod back on and go take some pictures with it.

    How to take apart a bogen 3047 tripod head

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    and rate it.

    (Tap the star to vote)

    How to take apart a bogen 3047 tripod head

    How to take apart a bogen 3047 tripod head

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    and rate it.

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    Medium weight tripod with removable center column.

    USER OPINIONS

    A good set of medium strength tripod legs, but could definitely be better. It looks permanent when taken care of.

    This is my BIG GRIP. Thumb restraints (this one has a left-right type, not a flap type) don’t hold that tight. When placing the tripod on soft ground and applying light pressure to the legs to force them into place, the leg tends to slide / slide downward, requiring you to loosen the leg and reposition the tripod. extremely burdensome. Not sure if it would completely collapse and flip the camera over or not, but that’s my concern. The heaviest load I had on my own was the captured 6D and normal zoom which kept it in order. It just pisses me off that a tripod that looks solid can have this slip. I considered a different tripod (I’ve had this for 15-20 years) but the glide issue made me drop cold water when I have a different Manfrotto.

    I can’t really recommend this tripod unless you have a lightweight camera and are going to use it mostly in studio / indoor.

    Similar used products:

    I have an old damaged tripod that a friend gave me. it’s light (who knows what brand). He was kicked out of the state news agency in Montgomery, Alabama. Even if the B-pillar wobbles a bit, it still works well and the legs (twist grip collar) don’t slip.

    A good set of medium strength tripod legs, but could definitely be better. It looks permanent when taken care of.

    This is my BIG GRIP. Thumb restraints (this one has a left-right type, not a flap type) don’t hold that tight. When placing the tripod on soft ground and applying light pressure to the legs to force them into place, the leg tends to slide / slide downward, requiring you to loosen the leg and reposition the tripod. extremely burdensome. Not sure if it would completely collapse and flip the camera over or not, but that’s my concern. The heaviest load I had on my own was the captured 6D and normal zoom which kept it in order. It just pisses me off that a tripod that looks solid can have this slip. I considered a different tripod (I’ve had this for 15-20 years) but the glide issue made me drop cold water when I have a different Manfrotto.

    I can’t really recommend this tripod unless you have a lightweight camera and are going to use it mostly in studio / indoor.

    Similar used products:

    I have an old damaged tripod that a friend gave me. it’s light (who knows what brand). He was kicked out of the state news agency in Montgomery, Alabama. Even if the B-pillar wobbles a bit, it still works well and the legs (twist grip collar) don’t slip.

    Incredible freedom of movement. This tripod has a reversible central shaft which can also be positioned horizontally and moved 360 degrees.
    Good value for money and features.
    Easy home service.
    Very well balanced.
    Almost solid construction (see weaknesses).

    When I first used this tripod for macro work, I encountered a problem with the center bar in a horizontal position.
    I had a Manfrotto308RC head and mounted my EOS 50 battery with BP-50 battery, EOS 100mm macro lens and EZ540 flash. This rather strong build is shown around. 45 degrees.
    After about 3 shots of the same object, I noticed that the weight of the camera was rotating the center bar when pressed.
    I went a little tighter to tighten the grip and suddenly the pressure just wasn’t holding up at all.
    I took the whole assembly apart to see if it could be fixed temporarily so that I could keep spinning.
    When I opened it, I saw that the mechanism that exerted pressure on the upper locking jaws was broken.
    Upon closer inspection, it seems very clear to me that this part is very poorly built and will eventually fail with heavy use.
    Looking at the rest of this tripod, it’s hard to imagine why they placed this weak link in the mounting system.
    I didn’t want to take the tripod away so I could replace the faulty part with another one, just like yours. Instead, I found my solution to the problem and it has worked great since then.
    (and I managed to fix it in the field!)

    Have you ever had to take a tripod photo from over the edge of a railing or shelf without attaching the legs of the tripod you are using?
    Seems like an impossible shot, huh?
    The 3401 can do this and more. With the ball head on this tripod, there are almost no limits to the composition of your tripod.

    A lot of tripod for the money.
    This is the perfect equipment for the advanced beginner.
    It is hard to imagine anyone exceeding their functionality and range of motion.
    It has a weak design in a very critical area: the clamp mounting.
    If it weren’t for this inconvenience, I would have rated the overall performance of this tripod at 5+.

    Customer service

    I haven’t used it.
    I guess I should see what they are, I heard they are pretty good.

    Find parts – do-it-yourself repairs

    Use the parts list to find your model, determine the version (often multiple) and select a part and order.

    Most orders ship the next business day if parts are in stock.

    Find parts

    sale

    Check out our selection of promotions for tripods, heads and other old-school equipment.

    sale – up to 50% Off

    I need help? – Send it to us for repair

    If you can’t find correct parts or versions; you can send your equipment for repair. Generally, we can repair any model listed on this page.

    A repair can take several weeks if the part is out of stock.

    Get repairs

    Who we are:

    Manfrotto tripod components. com is an independent website owned and operated by Spartan Photo Center, Inc., a senior distributor in Manfrotto Distribution, USA. SpartanPhotoCenter sells a full line of brand new products fully warranted by Manfrotto Distribution USA, as well as used Bogen mounts, heads and accessories. The site and store are not otherwise part of Lino Manfrotto Co., Manfrotto Distribution US, Vitec Corp, Bogen Corp or Bogen Distribution.

    © 2005 – Spartan Photo Center, Inc. All rights reserved