How to survive the first month of new motherhood

Pregnant mothers-to-be are often not prepared for what lies ahead in the first month of their baby’s life.

Life may seem upside down, but you can rest assured that after the first few weeks most new mothers start to wobble.

However, preparing and understanding that things may not go exactly as planned can help you get through those first few weeks.

It’s important to remember that you’re not alone. Most new mothers feel nervous and even terrified in the first few weeks after leaving the hospital.

If you are having a very difficult time, you may want to check with your doctor for postnatal depression.

Joining a support group is also a great way to find women who feel like you.

This is the first time we have

It’s vital to remember to be gentle with yourself. No matter how many books you’ve read on the subject, nothing can prepare you for what it’s like to be the new parent.

The moment you look at your beloved baby and realize that you are now someone’s mother can be both an exciting and a scary time.

Many young mothers are even afraid to leave the hospital and are not sure if they will know how to care for their newborn.

Do not worry. While certain parts of baby care aren’t exactly instinct you’ll quickly get the hang of it. Remember not to be afraid to ask for help.

Too many guests

For the first time, many mothers assume they will need as much help as possible from family and friends.

In fact, if this is your first baby and you don’t have anyone else to look after, you probably don’t need much help, if at all.

Many mothers claim that bullying parents telling them what to do with their newborn can actually be very frustrating and annoying rather than being helpful.

If your partner can take a break from work, consider spending the first few weeks with the three of you.

Getting to know a new baby and adjusting to a new family member doesn’t really require anyone else’s help.

Even new mothers who have undergone a caesarean section can look after their babies on their own.

If you decide to host guests at home, try to establish some ground rules before having your baby. That way, you won’t feel overwhelmed with fun and visitors.

This first month at home is an important time for mom, dad and baby.

Breastfeeding

Many new mothers are terrified of breastfeeding problems. In the hospital, some babies have suckling problems and some nurses may insist on formula feeding.

If your hospital has a lactation consultant, be sure to see her, even if breastfeeding seems to be fine.

It can answer any questions or concerns you may have and help guide you and your baby in the right direction to develop a healthy breastfeeding relationship.

Many moms feel pressured to breastfeed or refill formula depending on a variety of circumstances.

Just know that the most important thing is to feed your baby, whether it’s breast milk or formula.

Even if your baby is having trouble sucking and you are determined to breastfeed, you don’t have to give up.

Most doctors’ offices have a lactation consultant there or at least one they can refer you to. They’ll be able to help solve almost all breastfeeding issues.

You don’t need much

When you get home, you may worry that you don’t have everything you need for your new baby.

Babies don’t need much in the first month of life, especially if you’re breastfeeding.

Keep plenty of diapers on hand, the right clothes for the weather, a conditioner if you need them, and of course a car seat.

Many parents place an emphasis on having every baby product at home before the baby is even born.

Parents spend hundreds of dollars on the best baby swing only to find their baby hates it.

If you have other friends with your kids, borrow baby items like bouncy chairs and swings to see if your newborn likes them at all before investing in yours.

Advice for new mothers: Enjoy your new baby

The most important thing to remember is to relax and enjoy the new baby. The neonatal phase is fleeting and before you know it your new bundle of joy will crawl onto your furniture and end up in all sorts of trouble.

Sleep can be difficult to satisfy in a newborn, but unless you have older children, sleep while your baby is asleep, whether it’s 3:00 or 15:00.

If you’re stressed out about having guests over in your messy house then don’t have guests over. Everything else can wait.

Whether it’s sleep, routine, feeding your baby, or just surviving the first year of parenting, these moms have shared some great tips and tricks!

Rules for visiting a newborn 00:15:35

I neonati e i loro genitori potrebbero aver bisogno di attenzioni extra da parte della famiglia e degli amici. Here are some rules to follow when visiting a family with a newborn.

  • 08 February 2019
  • 2 years

If you’re in your first month of motherhood and can’t see past a thick fog of sleepless nights and aching body parts, you can be sure you’ll probably remember very little about it anyway.

But how do you get over it? A certain mom-to-be came to us with this exact question, and we asked our female readers who are on the other side but not so far away that they can’t remember what she was like.

“In a month, I will be a mother for the first time and I am stressed out,” the woman said. “What’s the advice for the first month or year as a new mom that I won’t get from anyone else? I’m more afraid of sleep, nutrition and routine “.

Here’s what you shared.

Do you want to become part of your family? Sign up for our Kidsspot newsletter for more stories like this one.

Don’t give everything away

“Don’t be a mom who offers her guests all the love, hugs and fun. I did this with my first one and I felt like my husband and I lost a lot of him letting the guests take all the pampering for fear of getting used to being kept in custody. You and your partner need time with your baby. There is plenty of time for everyone else to drink in the first year.

Immerse yourself in these soft toys. Photo: iStock.

Accepting the dream will be difficult

“Accept that you will never go to sleep again. I had two terrible dreams and when I finally stopped stressing about sleep (mine) it was so much easier. Start Netflix. It turned out that my newborns slept a lot during the day, if I “wasn’t sleeping, not cooking (I’m not a cook), then I never stressed about preparing meals”.

Un’altra persona ha menzionato due dei migliori consigli che ha: "Non svegliare mai un bambino che dorme (anche se ha dormito per quattro ore) e dormire mentre il bambino dorme".

Barriers to nutrition are normal

“Breastfeeding doesn’t always come naturally. Nipple shields won’t confuse your baby, use them if you need them. Breastfeeding isn’t established until six weeks and everything can feel wrong in that time, which is normal. After a few weeks you may feel like your supply disappears. Completely normal, don’t judge it by your breasts but by your baby’s weight gain. If you can’t continue breastfeeding? Completely normal.”

Ask for help

“Ask for help if you need it. We put too much pressure on ourselves thinking it ‘should come naturally’ and always take yourself away for five minutes just to breathe if you get overwhelmed. They grow up quick, just be kind and patient with yourself and enjoy.”

Grandparents can be a great asset. Photo: iStock.

Recognize what you are doing

"Quando ti senti come se non avessi fatto nulla per tutto il giorno, ricorda che stai insegnando a tuo figlio com’è essere amato e non c’è dovere/lavoro più importante di questo."

It’s not always love at first sight

“Don’t be afraid, if you don’t feel like you’re going to fall in love first, you definitely love your son and you will do anything for him, but it’s like any relationship, it takes time to get to know each other. Jako ich osobowości rozwijasz się, zakochujesz się i to jest magiczne, po prostu na początku może tak nie być."

Don’t get stressed out about the routine

“Children can’t read the time and routines develop naturally when you find out what works for you and your child. However, children cut out the routines. grow up without you without even trying. Im bardziej sztywny jesteś w ich tworzeniu, tym bardziej będziesz zestresowany."

Un’altra mamma ha anche suggerito di scegliere quale consiglio considerare e quali ignorare: "Qualcuno ti dirà sempre che lo stai facendo nel modo sbagliato, ma devi trovare quello che funziona per te e il tuo bambino!"

Get what works for you. Photo: iStock.

Relax and enjoy your baby

“If you don’t do something today, it will be there tomorrow, don’t stress yourself trying to be the perfect mom / wife, it’s not worth it. Pierwsze miesiące są trudne, ale będzie łatwiej."

And this was our favorite.

Enjoy it while you can

“My grandmother gave me the best advice. Keep your first baby for as long as possible. Let him sleep in your arms for as long as you want. You will never have this time with future siblings.

Hey, you’re new! I love new people, hi.

You can subscribe to Baby-Log via RSS or e-mail. Thanks for visiting!

I know for a fact that many young and old couples rely on family (especially grandparents) to take care of their children and help them with their children. I also know that the couple can do it on their own without any extra help – Rob and I did. Make no mistake, it’s not easy – but certainly doable.

My friends said they couldn’t move to another city because they were terrified of losing the support that Nan and Pop are giving, and I thought:you cannot let such fears rule your life. So, this post is about how a couple can have a baby and survive – alone, in a strange town where they barely know 5 people.

Here’s how we did it:

We’ve done some research, found out what kind of main baby things we would need – a cot, a bath, a changing table, a pram. A month before the baby’s due date we went and bought them. We weren’t sure about the car seat, what type would be the best, so we ended up renting a capsule for the first 6 months.

I went on maternity leave a week earlier than expected. This gave me enough time to prepare a home for the baby, buy baby clothes, and read what exactly people do with a newborn. I needed to be prepared because there wasn’t anyone I could ask.

We have everything planned for the first 3 months of the baby’s life:

  • The route to the hospital when you need to go and also where the car will be parked (the hospital was in the city center so parking was a problem).
  • Rob took a week off to help me with the baby.
  • I made a contract of employment that I had to take 3 months of vacation and then work part-time at home.
  • For the first 3 months, Rob started early and finished work around 3pm. Then he would go home and take over everything he could. I slept a lot during the day so I could spend the night. Eric and I were awake a lot at night, he wasn’t a good sleeper at all so every time he slept – I slept with him. Of course the housework suffered, but I decided to lower my standards for everyone’s sake.
  • As for the food, we survived the takeout. We didn’t order junk food – but we were buying pre-cooked food that only needed to be heated. For breakfast, we ate oatmeal or easy 1-minute microwaved granola with juice or yogurt, ready-made soups for lunch and take-out dishes for dinner. Rob used to cook sometimes, but to be honest none of us had the time (or the strength) to cook. Cleaning (like mopping floors and vacuuming carpets) was every two weeks, as was mopping (except for baby items that I washed every other day).

    It’s not over, more are coming. Be careful!

    2 answers

    […] As promised, the story continues. This passage is for us (Emma’s mom, Rob’s dad and Eric’s baby) who are 2 to 6 months old. Here you can read how we went through the toughest first two months. […]

    […] Viviamo con un nuovo bambino, tutto quello che è successo tra il suo 6° e il 12° mese. You can read the first two months here and from 2 to 6 months […]

    Sarah Walker Caron

    You could have cried. Very. Maybe you have suffered. Maybe you thought you’d never be one of those women who did one of these things. But the fact is, it’s hard to leave your baby behind and getting back to work is even more difficult.

    I expected that leaving the children in kindergarten would be difficult. Was. But I hadn’t expected to feel so lonely in the early afternoons, a time when I would usually be nursing my newborn or playing with my toddler. But I survived and you can too.

    A picture is worth a thousand words

    When I returned to work after nearly four months of maternity leave, I was shocked by the extremely warm welcome from my colleagues. They were shocked that I hadn’t brought pictures that first day. Why not? I was so focused on enjoying the last moments at home with my kids that I just forgot about it.
    What to do: A week before returning to work, you should collect your photos and choose one or two to take to work. Go to your local shop and find a nice frame to put your photos in and put them in your bag to get back to work. That way it’s already there and you cannot forget the way I did. Better yet, when you start to miss your baby, they look at you.

    Milking him

    I was very insecure about pumping at work and very uncomfortable asking anyone. For the first two months I was in a series of difficulties: until September last year our offices were located in a different part of the building. When I returned from maternity leave, I used one of the vacant offices as my private pump room. Unfortunately, it was liquidated when construction crews blocked the area and started demolishing the walls.
    I called HR and was told to use our medical center’s exam room (you know, where sick people go to lay down!). Luckily my recently restored pumping colleague also shared my dilemma and provided us with a new clean and private location.
    What to do: Ask human resources for a pumping station. Do not accept any suggestions that the sofa in the women’s bathroom might be perfect. A clean private room or office with a chair and electrical outlet is essential.

    Acclimatization to the hours

    My colleague was lucky to get back on the lighting schedule. I? Not so much. My coworkers and I were in the middle of a crunch time and I couldn’t just start off light. The hardest part was spending long hours in the office and at home, where my breastfed daughter gets up even more times at night.
    What to do: the best solution I found was to teach my daughter a side feeding position. Whenever I sat down to feed myself, I couldn’t stay awake, which seemed pretty dangerous to me. In the sidelying, I don’t have to worry about her rolling off the pillow and I can continue to rest.

    Express your problem

    When something goes wrong, like forgetting a breast pump or missing a baby, never be afraid to say it. Admitting a problem can help bosses and colleagues understand a little better. . . Or maybe even guide them to help.
    What to do:Just say what you mean.

    More information for mothers:

    Take control of your family’s finances with the Mom in Charge series!
    Life After Having a Baby: Will You Go Back to Work for You?
    Breastfeeding and returning to work or school
    Mother’s fault: when you want to go back to work

    When you’re home all day long with a new baby, your mental wellness depends on interactions with other adults to prevent feeling isolated and alone. A UCLA study found that women respond to stress with a cascade of chemicals in the brain that lead us to seek friendships with other women. Supportive friendships can lift us up and prevent isolation in the home. Even if you don’t get out every day, try to plan occasional get-togethers with other moms. Research has also shown that social bonds lower blood pressure and heart rate, which we desperately need when we have a newborn!

    TO ACHIEVE

    If you’re the first one to have a baby among your friends, it may be on you to reach out first. It’s common for people to assume you can’t do much anymore, and it can feel lonely and frustrating when your closest friends don’t understand or relate to your new world. It is usually enough to let them know that you still value their friendship and the opportunity to talk about different things from your child. And who knows, you might be lucky enough to recruit new “aunts” or “uncles”!

    FRIENDLY PROTECTION

    If you already have friends with babies, you’ll find yourself gravitating towards each other even more. Getting together for coffee and exchanging stories, or just strolling around the mall with the kids, is surprisingly therapeutic. It’s also comforting to know that you understand each other and the quirks of new motherhood (like needing to eat dinner by 6 p. m. because you’re wiped out by 9 p. m.!).

    MEET NEW MOMS

    It might be a bit like dating again and requires getting out of your comfort zone, but jump right in. Quando inizi a parlare con un’altra neomamma (al parco o a uno spettacolo), chiedi il suo numero di telefono; chances are, she’ll welcome the chance to connect with someone in the same “world.”

    “Other moms are the best source of information you can have. I didn’t have many friends around who had babies, so I joined a group of mothers. Usually, I’m not the type of person to go out and look for groups, but I did and I’m so thankful I did. It’s a great place to get advice and hang out, and only when other moms tell you it gets better is it very helpful. “

    “The first couple of months, I felt like I couldn’t even get myself together to go meet with somebody if I wanted to. You have to be showered, get yourself presentable. You feel isolated and like nobody understands what you’re going through. And even your friends who have babies a couple of months older, they forget what it’s like. A friend who just had a baby called me the other night, sobbing,’Is it going to be like this all the time?’ And I was like,’No, it’s not.’ And I didn’t even remember what it was like and that was just four months ago.”

    How to survive the first month of new motherhood

    take care of ourselves

    Self-care looks different for each person, but it’s one of those keystone habits that affect all areas of your life: your ability to parent, your relationship with Dad, stress in your home, and much more. Intellectually, you’ll know this is true, but it won’t necessarily be easy.

    Usually, one of the main things that interferes with taking care of yourself is the voice that comes from within. You’ll find yourself placing more demands on yourself than anyone else. And contrary to how it may feel, taking time for yourself is anything but selfish: The better you feel, the better you’re able to care for your baby and family.

    So try to set aside 15 to 20 minutes each day for “me time” (or more if you can!). If you begin the self-care routine early into new motherhood, you’ll get a jump start at building that muscle. It doesn’t have to be huge: An ongoing stream of little things will have more of an impact than one or two big things. (Plus, it’s easier to make the small things happen when you have a new baby.)

    Ultimately, when you respect your own needs and those of your family, you set the best example for your child.

    Hey, you’re new! I love new people, hi.

    You can subscribe to Baby-Log via RSS or e-mail. Thanks for visiting!

    I know for a fact that many young and old couples rely on family (especially grandparents) to take care of their children and help them with their children. I also know that the couple can do it on their own without any extra help – Rob and I did. Make no mistake, it’s not easy – but certainly doable.

    My friends said they couldn’t move to another city because they were terrified of losing the support that Nan and Pop are giving, and I thought:you cannot let such fears rule your life. So, this post is about how a couple can have a baby and survive – alone, in a strange town where they barely know 5 people.

    Here’s how we did it:

    We’ve done some research, found out what kind of main baby things we would need – a cot, a bath, a changing table, a pram. A month before the baby’s due date we went and bought them. We weren’t sure about the car seat, what type would be the best, so we ended up renting a capsule for the first 6 months.

    I went on maternity leave a week earlier than expected. This gave me enough time to prepare a home for the baby, buy baby clothes, and read what exactly people do with a newborn. I needed to be prepared because there wasn’t anyone I could ask.

    We have everything planned for the first 3 months of the baby’s life:

  • The route to the hospital when you need to go and also where the car will be parked (the hospital was in the city center so parking was a problem).
  • Rob took a week off to help me with the baby.
  • I made a contract of employment that I had to take 3 months of vacation and then work part-time at home.
  • For the first 3 months, Rob started early and finished work around 3pm. Then he would go home and take over everything he could. I slept a lot during the day so I could spend the night. Eric and I were awake a lot at night, he wasn’t a good sleeper at all so every time he slept – I slept with him. Of course the housework suffered, but I decided to lower my standards for everyone’s sake.
  • As for the food, we survived the takeout. We didn’t order junk food – but we were buying pre-cooked food that only needed to be heated. For breakfast, we ate oatmeal or easy 1-minute microwaved granola with juice or yogurt, ready-made soups for lunch and take-out dishes for dinner. Rob used to cook sometimes, but to be honest none of us had the time (or the strength) to cook. Cleaning (like mopping floors and vacuuming carpets) was every two weeks, as was mopping (except for baby items that I washed every other day).

    It’s not over, more are coming. Be careful!

    2 answers

    […] As promised, the story continues. This passage is for us (Emma’s mom, Rob’s dad and Eric’s baby) who are 2 to 6 months old. Here you can read how we went through the toughest first two months. […]

    […] Viviamo con un nuovo bambino, tutto quello che è successo tra il suo 6° e il 12° mese. You can read the first two months here and from 2 to 6 months […]

    Sarah Walker Caron

    You could have cried. Very. Maybe you have suffered. Maybe you thought you’d never be one of those women who did one of these things. But the fact is, it’s hard to leave your baby behind and getting back to work is even more difficult.

    I expected that leaving the children in kindergarten would be difficult. Was. But I hadn’t expected to feel so lonely in the early afternoons, a time when I would usually be nursing my newborn or playing with my toddler. But I survived and you can too.

    A picture is worth a thousand words

    When I returned to work after nearly four months of maternity leave, I was shocked by the extremely warm welcome from my colleagues. They were shocked that I hadn’t brought pictures that first day. Why not? I was so focused on enjoying the last moments at home with my kids that I just forgot about it.
    What to do: A week before returning to work, you should collect your photos and choose one or two to take to work. Go to your local shop and find a nice frame to put your photos in and put them in your bag to get back to work. That way it’s already there and you cannot forget the way I did. Better yet, when you start to miss your baby, they look at you.

    Milking him

    I was very insecure about pumping at work and very uncomfortable asking anyone. For the first two months I was in a series of difficulties: until September last year our offices were located in a different part of the building. When I returned from maternity leave, I used one of the vacant offices as my private pump room. Unfortunately, it was liquidated when construction crews blocked the area and started demolishing the walls.
    I called HR and was told to use our medical center’s exam room (you know, where sick people go to lay down!). Luckily my recently restored pumping colleague also shared my dilemma and provided us with a new clean and private location.
    What to do: Ask human resources for a pumping station. Do not accept any suggestions that the sofa in the women’s bathroom might be perfect. A clean private room or office with a chair and electrical outlet is essential.

    Acclimatization to the hours

    My colleague was lucky to get back on the lighting schedule. I? Not so much. My coworkers and I were in the middle of a crunch time and I couldn’t just start off light. The hardest part was spending long hours in the office and at home, where my breastfed daughter gets up even more times at night.
    What to do: the best solution I found was to teach my daughter a side feeding position. Whenever I sat down to feed myself, I couldn’t stay awake, which seemed pretty dangerous to me. In the sidelying, I don’t have to worry about her rolling off the pillow and I can continue to rest.

    Express your problem

    When something goes wrong, like forgetting a breast pump or missing a baby, never be afraid to say it. Admitting a problem can help bosses and colleagues understand a little better. . . Or maybe even guide them to help.
    What to do:Just say what you mean.

    More information for mothers:

    Take control of your family’s finances with the Mom in Charge series!
    Life After Having a Baby: Will You Go Back to Work for You?
    Breastfeeding and returning to work or school
    Mother’s fault: when you want to go back to work

    Sleep deprivation and motherhood don’t have to go hand in hand.

    Oh baby! Motherhood is a little different than what you intended. You obviously love your baby more than you can imagine. But you haven’t slept well in weeks, maybe months. And this lack of sleep probably won’t end anytime soon!

    Caring for a baby – not to mention the rest of the family – isn’t easy when you’re sleep deprived. It is also dangerous. It causes about 100,000 traffic accidents each year, such as taking your baby to the pediatrician while awake or awake, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. And, losing sleep can also increase the risk of mood problems after giving birth to a new mom.

    So what can you do about it? A lot, WebMD experts say. Follow these 10 expert tips to improve your sleep as you raise your baby.

    1. Talk about your sleep needs.

    Do it early before you take your baby home. “After she gets pregnant, she talks to your partner about coping with lack of sleep,” said Dr. Margaret Park, assistant sleep specialist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. Her experience is both personal and professional: she is the mother of a 3 month old baby and a 2.5 year old baby. You can think about saving now to get help as a night nurse or babysitter.

    2. Use the hospital nursery.

    It’s there for a reason: don’t feel guilty. “It’s your time to recover from birth,” Park says. “Let a trained professional take care of your baby for a night or two while you are in the hospital. “

    3. Po prostu powiedz “nie” dodatkowej odpowiedzialności.

    If you feel guilty about spending less time with your eldest child, you can take a voluntary trip with his class or take him on a special trip to the museum. He thinks twice. “Do not take on any extra responsibilities when you have a newborn at home, “advises Susan Zafarlotfi, PhD, clinical director of the Institute for Sleep and Wake Disorders at Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey.

    4. Sleep while your baby sleeps.

    Any experienced nurse will tell you that the key to managing sleep deprivation after delivery is sleeping while your baby is asleep. “If your baby takes a nap, put everything aside and take a nap too, “Zafarlotfi says.” Wszystko może poczekać – z wyjątkiem dziecka. “

    Uninterrupted

    The park agrees. “Wykonywanie prac domowych, zmywanie naczyń, pranie i czyszczenie podłóg, gdy dziecko śpi, jest bardzo kuszące. But accept that your house is dirty and messy and go to sleep because once baby is up, you have to be up too,” she says .

    Do not use this time to make calls or watch episodesGray’s anatomy,24,or any other favorite shows you have recorded.

    “I don†™ t care of you have piles of laundry all over the house – if you are too tired to drive your child to the pediatrician, you have a problem on your hands, "says Michael Breus, PhD, author ofThe beauty of sleepand the clinical director of the sleep division for Arrowhead Health in Glendale, Arizona.

    5. Say yes to help.

    “Accept any help that you can get, “Park says. “Many people are resistant, but whether it is a family member, friend, or babysitter, accept help, so you can get a few hours of sleep,” she says. “People think of sleep as a luxury, but it’s a medical requirement.

    “When you do get to nap, avoid television, radio, and looking at your clock so you don†™ t focus on how much time you have left, "she says. Even a cool, dark environment is great for taking a nap.

    6. Don’t worry about not hearing your baby cry.

    “A baby is a natural alarm clock and mothers tend to be attuned to their baby†™ s crying, "Park says. keep it close to you Remember that your baby is safe and if he cries for a few minutes before you hear him, he will be fine.

    7. Outsource tasks.

    If your baby takes a bottle, ask your partner to take a few feedings. If you’re breastfeeding, Park says, “she considers pumping the milk and giving someone else a shift to breastfeed. “Try to divide up all your household responsibilities as best you can.

    8. Keep an eye on the reward.

    One day – maybe tomorrow, maybe when your baby is 8 months old – he’ll sleep through the night. And you too. Some babies sleep earlier at night than others. If your baby cries all night, he talks to your pediatrician because there may be a medical reason, such as acid reflux or too much gas, that can be treated.

    9. Don’t ignore the baby blues.

    Sleep loss can lead to mood swings, and new mothers are at risk for the baby blues or more severe postpartum depression. “If you are experiencing some of these symptoms, talk to your doctor to address them, “Park says. Lack of sleep can make mood swings worse.

    10. Rule out basic sleep disorders.

    “Short naps should revive you somewhat, but if you don†™ t feel like they do, see a professional as there may be an underlying sleep disorder that can be treated, "Park says. Sleep disorders such as sleep apnea – pauses in breathing during sleep – are very common among people who gain weight and can develop due to weight gain during pregnancy. A sleep study, in which you are monitored while you sleep, can identify sleep apnea. Treatments are available.

    Sources

    Susan Zafarlotfi, PhD, clinical director, Institute for Sleep and Wake Disorders, Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ

    Mark Mahowald, MD, director of the Minnesota Regional Center for Sleep Disorders, Hennepin County.

    Michael Breus, PhD, clinical director of the sleep division, Arrowhead Health, Glendale, Arizona.

    Margaret Park, MD, assistant sleep specialist, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago.

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    Categorized as IT