How to substitute baking soda

Substituting might affect the taste, but that might not be a problem

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How to substitute baking soda

  • Ph.D., Biomedical Sciences, University of Tennessee at Knoxville
  • B.A., Physics and Mathematics, Hastings College
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Baking powder and baking soda both are leavening agents, which means they help baked goods to rise. They aren’t the same chemical, but you can substitute one for another in recipes. Here’s how to work the substitutions and what to expect.

Key Takeaways: Baking Powder and Baking Soda Substitutions

  • If you’re out of baking soda, use baking powder instead. Double or triple the amount of baking powder because it contains less baking soda.
  • If you’re out of baking powder, make your own using baking soda and cream of tartar. One part baking soda plus two parts cream of tartar makes baking powder.
  • Homemade baking powder acts and tastes much like commercial baking powder. However, using baking powder instead of baking soda may change the flavor of a recipe.

Substitute for Baking Soda: Using Baking Powder Instead of Baking Soda

You need to use two to three times more baking powder than baking soda. This is because baking powder contains baking soda, but it also includes additional compounds. The extra ingredients in baking powder will affect the taste of whatever you are making, but this isn’t necessarily bad.

  • Ideally, triple the amount of baking powder to equal the amount of baking soda. So, if the recipe calls for 1 tsp. of baking soda, you would use 3 tsp. of baking powder.
  • Another option is to compromise and use twice the amount of baking powder as baking soda (add 2 tsp. of baking powder if the recipe calls for 1 tsp. of baking soda). If you choose this option, you might wish to omit or reduce the amount of salt in the recipe. Salt adds flavor but it also affects rising in some recipes.

Substitute for Baking Powder: How to Make It Yourself

You need baking soda and cream of tartar to make homemade baking powder.

  • Mix 2 parts cream of tartar with 1 part baking soda. For example, mix 2 tsp of cream of tartar with 1 tsp of baking soda.
  • Use the amount of homemade baking powder called for by the recipe. No matter how much homemade baking powder you made, if the recipe calls for 1 1/2 tsp., add exactly 1 1/2 tsp. of your mixture. If you have leftover homemade baking powder, you can store it in a labeled, zipper-type plastic bag to use later.

Cream of tartar increases the acidity of a mixture. So, you can’t always use baking soda in recipes that call for baking powder without adding another ingredient. Both are leavening agents, but baking soda needs an acidic ingredient to trigger the leavening, while baking powder already contains an acidic ingredient: cream of tartar. You can switch baking powder for baking soda, but expect the flavor to change a little.

You might wish to make and use homemade baking powder even if you can purchase commercial baking powder. This gives you complete control over the ingredients. Commercial baking powder contains baking soda and, usually, 5 to 12 percent monocalcium phosphate along with 21 to 26 percent sodium aluminum sulfate. People wishing to limit aluminum exposure might do better with the homemade version.

Do Baking Soda and Baking Powder Go Bad?

Baking powder and baking soda don’t exactly go bad, but they do undergo chemical reactions sitting on the shelf for months or years that cause them to lose their effectiveness as leavening agents. The higher the humidity, the faster the ingredients lose their potency.

Fortunately, if you’re concerned they’ve been in the pantry for too long, it’s easy to test baking powder and baking soda for freshness: Mix a teaspoon of baking powder with 1/3 cup hot water; lots of bubbles means it’s fresh. For baking soda, dribble a few drops of vinegar or lemon juice onto 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda. Again, vigorous bubbling means it’s still good.

Baking powder and baking soda aren’t the only ingredients you might need to substitute in a recipe. There are also simple substitutions for ingredients such as cream of tartar, buttermilk, milk, and different types of flour.

Substituting might affect the taste, but that might not be a problem

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How to substitute baking soda

  • Ph.D., Biomedical Sciences, University of Tennessee at Knoxville
  • B.A., Physics and Mathematics, Hastings College
  • Facebook Facebook
  • Twitter Twitter

Baking powder and baking soda both are leavening agents, which means they help baked goods to rise. They aren’t the same chemical, but you can substitute one for another in recipes. Here’s how to work the substitutions and what to expect.

Key Takeaways: Baking Powder and Baking Soda Substitutions

  • If you’re out of baking soda, use baking powder instead. Double or triple the amount of baking powder because it contains less baking soda.
  • If you’re out of baking powder, make your own using baking soda and cream of tartar. One part baking soda plus two parts cream of tartar makes baking powder.
  • Homemade baking powder acts and tastes much like commercial baking powder. However, using baking powder instead of baking soda may change the flavor of a recipe.

Substitute for Baking Soda: Using Baking Powder Instead of Baking Soda

You need to use two to three times more baking powder than baking soda. This is because baking powder contains baking soda, but it also includes additional compounds. The extra ingredients in baking powder will affect the taste of whatever you are making, but this isn’t necessarily bad.

  • Ideally, triple the amount of baking powder to equal the amount of baking soda. So, if the recipe calls for 1 tsp. of baking soda, you would use 3 tsp. of baking powder.
  • Another option is to compromise and use twice the amount of baking powder as baking soda (add 2 tsp. of baking powder if the recipe calls for 1 tsp. of baking soda). If you choose this option, you might wish to omit or reduce the amount of salt in the recipe. Salt adds flavor but it also affects rising in some recipes.

Substitute for Baking Powder: How to Make It Yourself

You need baking soda and cream of tartar to make homemade baking powder.

  • Mix 2 parts cream of tartar with 1 part baking soda. For example, mix 2 tsp of cream of tartar with 1 tsp of baking soda.
  • Use the amount of homemade baking powder called for by the recipe. No matter how much homemade baking powder you made, if the recipe calls for 1 1/2 tsp., add exactly 1 1/2 tsp. of your mixture. If you have leftover homemade baking powder, you can store it in a labeled, zipper-type plastic bag to use later.

Cream of tartar increases the acidity of a mixture. So, you can’t always use baking soda in recipes that call for baking powder without adding another ingredient. Both are leavening agents, but baking soda needs an acidic ingredient to trigger the leavening, while baking powder already contains an acidic ingredient: cream of tartar. You can switch baking powder for baking soda, but expect the flavor to change a little.

You might wish to make and use homemade baking powder even if you can purchase commercial baking powder. This gives you complete control over the ingredients. Commercial baking powder contains baking soda and, usually, 5 to 12 percent monocalcium phosphate along with 21 to 26 percent sodium aluminum sulfate. People wishing to limit aluminum exposure might do better with the homemade version.

Do Baking Soda and Baking Powder Go Bad?

Baking powder and baking soda don’t exactly go bad, but they do undergo chemical reactions sitting on the shelf for months or years that cause them to lose their effectiveness as leavening agents. The higher the humidity, the faster the ingredients lose their potency.

Fortunately, if you’re concerned they’ve been in the pantry for too long, it’s easy to test baking powder and baking soda for freshness: Mix a teaspoon of baking powder with 1/3 cup hot water; lots of bubbles means it’s fresh. For baking soda, dribble a few drops of vinegar or lemon juice onto 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda. Again, vigorous bubbling means it’s still good.

Baking powder and baking soda aren’t the only ingredients you might need to substitute in a recipe. There are also simple substitutions for ingredients such as cream of tartar, buttermilk, milk, and different types of flour.

One of these swaps may help!

How to substitute baking soda

Say you wake up with the urge to bake a batch of cookies—these are strange times and self-care is essential—so you shuffle to your kitchen, still clad in pajamas, and begin pulling ingredients to get your fix. (FYI, Ree Drummond’s Chocolate Chip Cookies come in at about 30 minutes!) Chocolate chips, flour, eggs, sugar, butter. suddenly, the cookie dream comes to an abrupt halt when you realize you’re out of baking soda. What’s the best baking soda substitute? Is there even such a thing as a baking soda substitute? Did the cookie dream just come to an end?

Well, it depends. Baking soda is a true household necessity for any at-home baker, mainly because of what it does to baked goods, which is give them a little or a lot of lift. There aren’t many true substitutes, aside from a little something something called potassium bicarbonate. Unless your household includes a family member monitoring their sodium intake, combatting chronic acid reflux, or just happens to be insanely prepared, it’s understandable if you don’t have good old potassium bicarbonate—essentially salt-free baking soda—lying around. So if you find yourself in the unprepared category, what’s a baker to do?

First, accept that the end result may come out different than you’d expect from the intended recipe, possibly with less of an airy oomph or requiring you to brush up on fractions and measuring. Second, stick to recipes where fluctuation tends to be a bit more forgiving: Think blueberry muffins and Greek yogurt pancakes. Maybe skip that Instagram sensation of a cake you’ve been eyeballing, which could turn out dense and unpalatable if missing the proper leavener. If you’re about to embark on a serious baking project, change out of those PJs and hit the grocery store. If you’re just trying to give in to an early morning cookie fix, check out these baking soda substitutes and give ’em a whirl.

How to substitute baking soda

If you confuse baking powder and baking soda, you’re not alone: Both are white powders that serve as leaveners. The difference between the two, however, is that baking powder has baking soda in it. In order for baking soda to do its job and leaven a dough or batter, it requires an acid like molasses, lemon juice, or buttermilk, for instance.

Baking powder, on the other hand, contains its own acid, so only a non-acidic liquid—like water—is needed to activate its leavening properties. Translation? Use about 1 teaspoon of baking powder for every 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda called for in the recipe. And if you want to get super technical, once you make that swap, consider replacing any acidic liquids in the recipe with non-acidic liquids to prevent the extra acid found in the baking powder from causing a separate reaction.

Baking powder will also produce more of refined texture in baking recipes than the more coarse rise normally produced from baking soda.

How to substitute baking soda

All-purpose flour’s more reactive cousin comes with baking powder and salt mixed right in. Every cup of self-rising flour should have about 1 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder and 1/4 teaspoon salt. So if you’re out of baking soda, you could try swapping in self-rising flour for the all-purpose variety called for in the recipe—but you’ll also want to do some serious fraction math to be sure you have the ingredient amounts under control.

How to substitute baking soda

The fluffy structure of beaten egg whites will help incorporate air into a batter or dough and act as a leavener. Swap in some egg whites for an equal amount of some of the liquid called for in a recipe, beat the egg whites until foamy or stiff, then fold it into the batter; or, if a recipe calls for eggs, whip the egg whites until stiff, add the yolks to the batter, then fold in the whipped whites.

Be gentle when folding in egg whites to prevent breaking up too many of the air pockets which do the work of leavening.

How to substitute baking soda

The carbon dioxide used to make bubbly club soda will also lighten up a simple pancake batter for light and fluffy pancakes. Work fast though, as the sparkling magic of club soda can go flat quickly—just as it would if you left it sitting out.

How to substitute baking soda

Consider this sub a fix somewhere between club soda and egg whites. It’ll add some aeration, but it’s the kind of baking soda substitution best reserved for simple baking recipes like pancakes and maybe some cookies where the leavener won’t make or break the recipe, only change it.

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  • What Can Be Used as Substitutes for Baking Soda?

What can be used as substitute for baking soda? Not many but here are two things that’ll definitely live up to you. Bonus, more ways to help when baking!

We are all quite familiar with baking soda which is used mainly for baking purposes, which is often used in recipes that contain acidic ingredients, such as sour cream yoghurt, butter milk, vinegar, honey, molasses, etc. If you need your baking item to “rise”, you have to use baking soda. This process occurs when combined moisture and the acidic ingredient in your baking product cause a chemical reaction that produces carbon dioxide bubbles. These bubbles are responsible for literally “pushing up” your batter to give the raise and expansion in the baked product. This happens under proper oven temperatures.

Baking soda works in such an unique way that baking soda substitutes are hard to find. But here’s the good news. We’ve searched thorough the internet and find 2 great substitutes for you. But you must make note that these substitutes may cause your foods to differ in taste and texture. However, if, for some reason, you are unable to find baking soda, you can always replace it with the following 2 things.

1. Substituting Baking Soda with Baking Powder

Baking soda can be substituted with baking powder. As with baking soda, baking powder is also a leavening agent. This means, if you add baking powder instead of baking soda to your product, the chemical reaction will cause the product to “rise”. Baking powder does contain baking soda and also contains an acidifying agent, as well as, a drying agent.

How it works: Baking powder comes in two ways: single-acting and double-acting baking powder. Most baking powder, today, is double-acting which means it reacts in two ways. The first reaction is when the powder is added to the dough before baking and it helps release a gas at room temperature. The second reaction occurs in the oven when the temperature rises.

How to use it: If you are substituting ½ tsp. of baking soda with baking powder, you should do so with 2 teaspoons of double-acting baking powder. When doing so, you should also substitute the acidic liquids in the recipe with non-acidic ones. This baking soda substitute is best with pancakes, cakes and cookies.

2. Substituting Baking Soda with Potassium Bicarbonate

If you are baking cookies, you can try substituting baking soda with potassium bicarbonate. This is often recommended for people with sodium intake problems. Potassium bicarbonate contains the same properties as baking soda, but no sodium. This ingredient may not be easily available at the grocery store. However, you may be able to purchase it at the drugstore.

How to use it: If you were baking cookies, you can substitute 3 tsps. of potassium bicarbonate, instead of 3 tsps. of baking soda. If you are worried about your salt intake, do not add salt. If not, you can add 1 tsp. of salt to your mixture.

3. Other Baking Soda Substitutes

You can also try substituting other ingredients for baking soda. However, these may not work as well as baking powder or potassium bicarbonate. For example, you can beat and whisk air into eggs if making pancakes, or use self-rising flour and beer to make beer pancakes.

Keep in mind that you should experiment with these in small quantities. This way, if it does not work, you may not feel so bad. Whatever ingredient you use, using it in the right quantities can provide you with baked goods that taste good and have a soft and airy texture.

How to substitute baking soda

While making the most of cakes as well as pastries and puddings, we use baking soda as it can make anything get soft within a less amount of heat and can even make the ingredients fluffy and spongy, but it has been seen that sometimes baking soda is not available at the moment and we have to seek for other ingredients in the kitchen that can be bought in use as a substitute to baking soda and if you also are going through the same jeopardy, you should follow the tips that we are mentioning here:-

How to substitute baking soda

What to Use Instead of Baking Soda

1. Use egg yolk:-

In case you have to bake something in the oven like a cake or pastry or something else like this, you can for sure add yolk out of two eggs in it for every single spoon of baking soda. Baking soda helps to make the cake fluffy and spongy. The same can be done with the help of egg yolk as well.

2. Double acting baking powder:-

In place of baking powder you can also choose to go for adding 4 spoons of double acting baking powder for every one spoon of baking powder. This change can be applied with pancakes, cookies and biscuits etc., and thus if you are planning to make one such dish in your kitchen, the double acting baking soda will be a better option.

3. Potassium bicarbonate:-

You can also add 1teaspoon of Potassium Bicarbonate with 1/3 tsp salt in place of Baking soda is you are making cookies. Cookies don’t need to be made much fluffy and rather cookies should be made crispy and thus potassium carbonate is enough to act as a substitute in this case.

4. Beware of the Acidic Contents:-

In changing Baking soda with some other substitute, there is always a risk that if you use something as a substitute to it without knowledge, it can even make you experience food poisoning because of the content that gets acidic and thus you should beware of the acidic contents if you wish to get sorted against the same.

5. Use Fruit Salt While Making Dhokla:-

If you are making some dish like Dhokla etc. You can simply use the yolk out of an egg or even fruit salt or a pouch of Eno would be enough to make you sorted. Remember not to add it more than enough as fruit salt is always recommended to be taken in a limit.

6. Sodium Bicarbonate:-

Baking soda is actually another name of baking soda and thus everything rich in sodium bicarbonate content can act as a substitute to it, but this always puts you at a risk of life and thus we advise you only to follow the first five approaches and not the sixth one as even we care about your health.

How to substitute baking soda

Baking requires precision (via Wired) because it relies, in part, on chemical reactions (via Education). Accordingly, although baking allows for some leeway when it comes to swapping out one ingredient for another, the swapping out itself also requires precision. A perfect example would be when you’re faced with the possibility of having to substitute baking soda for baking powder, or vice versa. Although the names are close, and although they look almost indistinguishable, these two leavening agents are distinct and serve different purposes. And it all boils down to chemistry, and, more specifically, their relative acidity.

Baking soda, which is 100 percent sodium bicarbonate, is a “weak base,” according to Georgia State University’s Hyperphysics, which means that it’s not particularly acidic. However, when mixed with an acidic liquid such as buttermilk, lemon, or vinegar, baking soda reacts by releasing carbon dioxide gas bubbles (like soda does). In the baking context, those bubbles add lightness to your baked goods, causing them to rise.

By contrast, baking powder is a mixture of baking soda and cream of tartar (at a 1:2 ratio) which is a “weak acid.” Since the baking soda and cream of tartar are in dry form, no chemical reaction occurs. However, when you add a neutral liquid like water, the two substances combine to form those carbon dioxide gas bubbles that bring lightness and a “rise” to your baked goods. With that in mind, here’s how to swap baking soda and baking powder when baking.

When you’re out of baking powder, here’s how to swap in baking soda

How to substitute baking soda

Swapping baking soda and baking powder when baking is pretty simple once you understand the way each works as a leavening agent. According to Georgia State University’s Hyperphysics, baking soda can serve as a leavening agent when mixed with an acidic liquid such as buttermilk, lemon juice, or vinegar. By contrast, baking powder already contains an acidic ingredient (cream of tartar), so it can serve as a leavening agent in baking without the addition of any other acidic ingredients. All that’s necessary is water to create the bubbling reaction that gives rise to the dough. That might help explain why Irish soda bread, one of the ingredients of which is buttermilk, requires only baking soda in order to rise, while these sugar cookies require baking powder to rise (the baking powder is the only acid ingredient in the recipe).

Accordingly, if you’re baking, say, sugar cookies, and you realize you’re out of baking powder, but you do have baking soda and cream of tartar, simply combine one-quarter teaspoon baking soda with one-half teaspoon cream of tartar. This makes the equivalent of one teaspoon of baking powder without altering the taste, according to What’s Cooking America. And if the recipe also calls for baking soda, add it in addition to your homemade baking powder.

Read this before swapping baking powder for baking soda

How to substitute baking soda

If you’ve got baking powder on hand, but what you need is baking soda, you’ll want to read this before you decide to try to execute a swap. Every teaspoon of baking powder contains about a third of a teaspoon of baking soda. So, if your recipe calls for one teaspoon of baking soda, and you only have baking powder, you could substitute three teaspoons of baking powder for every teaspoon of baking soda your recipe calls for. The catch, however, is that the cream of tartar in the baking powder isn’t tasteless. In fact, some describe its flavor as metallic or soapy (via Sally’s Baking Addiction). And there’s no known “antidote” for that flavor.

In fact, the only solution to having too much cream of tartar in a recipe, according to Spiceography, is to add more of every other ingredient. However, if you were to try to do that, you would have to add more baking powder in order to have sufficient “baking soda” content in your baked goods. Therefore, swapping baking powder for baking soda isn’t necessarily going to net you the best finished product. On the other hand, if your baking powder contains cornstarch, as many commercial baking powders do, you can add it to soups, stocks, and sauces to add thickness and body (via Modern Mom).

It’s confusing, we know, but it works

There’s no feeling of panic quite like the one when you realize that a recipe calls for baking soda, and you only have baking powder available in your pantry. Even though they look pretty similar, baking soda and baking powder are two different ingredients, and if you just make a one-for-one substitution—like using one teaspoon of baking powder in place of a teaspoon of baking soda—your baked good will turn out all sorts of wonky. So how exactly do you substitute baking soda?

It turns out that if a recipe calls for baking soda, you can swap in baking powder without adding any additional ingredients, but if a recipe calls for baking powder, it’s more difficult to swap in baking soda, because you’d also need to add cream of tartar or another acid. That’s because baking powder is made from baking soda; it’s technically a combination of baking soda and a dry acid. So if you’re replacing baking soda with baking powder, you’re playing with proportions rather than adding more ingredients.

To substitute baking powder for baking soda, simply use three times the amount of baking powder as you would baking soda. This counteracts the addition of the dry acid and creates the right chemical reaction in your batter or dough. So if a recipe calls for a teaspoon of baking soda, use three teaspoons of baking powder instead.

It’s not that easy, though—because nothing these days is. As Bri McKoy explains on her blog Our Savory Life, there is usually a bit of salt in baking powder, so she recommends that you, “omit any salt the recipe calls for” when you’re making this substitution. But if you forget to forget the salt, it’s not that big of a deal; your baked goods might be a tad on the salty side, but they probably won’t be inedible. If you really want to be sure you’re doing it right, though, just get a box of baking soda the next time you go to the store so you can avoid making any substitutions.

How to substitute baking soda

Baking soda is a commonly used ingredient to increase the volume and soften the dough.

Sodium Bicarbonate is the basic ingredient in baking soda. For health reasons and taste, many of us like to use natural substitutes for baking soda.

Sodium Bicarbonate is not agreeable to many individuals as it may produce side effects such as :

  • Congestive heart failure
  • Muscle spasm
  • Increased level of body ph
  • High levels of sodium in the blood
  • Seizures
  • Swelling in feet, ankles, and lower legs.

There are a few good substitutes for baking soda for those who want to avoid sodium bicarbonate for health reasons, taste, or lack of availability. Here are 5 wonderful alternatives:

1. Baker’s Yeast

Baker’s yeast is a fantastic replacement for baking soda.

It converts the fermentable sugars present in the dough into carbon dioxide and ethanol.

Baker’s yeast is either active dry yeast (where the east remains dormant due to lack of moisture) or compressed fresh yeast (where the yeast is alive and susceptible to perish soon).

Yeast produces different acids that aid in the fermentation of the dough.

Baker’s yeast is available in different forms according to the various levels of moisture content in them.

The various types of baker’s yeast are cream yeast, compressed yeast, active dry yeast, instant yeast, and rapid-rise yeast.

Nutritionists recommend the baker’s yeast as a healthy substitute for baking powder. Bread and other baked goods fermented with yeast taste better and do not possess the bitter flavor of baking soda and powder.

According to the needs of the recipe and rising time, you may use as little as 1 teaspoon or up to 2 1/4 teaspoons (sometimes more) of instant yeast per pound (about 4 cups) of flour.

2. Baking Powder

Instead of baking soda, you can use baking powder.

Using baking powder instead of baking soda is advantageous. It contains a proper blend of both sodium bicarbonate and acid needed for a strong leavening effect.

Baking powder needs to be used 2-3 times more than baking soda; if your recipe needs 1 tsp baking soda, then you have to use 3 tsp baking powder instead.

Some brands of baking powder also come with added flavor that gives a better taste to the baked goods.

Do not use salt in the dough mixture together with baking powder as it will hinder the leavening effect of the baking powder. If needed, you can add salt while baking the leavened dough.

For more details, also check out the article Baking Powder Vs Baking Soda.

3. Potassium Bicarbonate

If you are wondering what to use instead of baking soda, then you can try potassium bicarbonate.

It is also a healthy option for people who have health issues with sodium intake and heart.

Potassium bicarbonate can be used for low sodium applications.

You can use exactly the same amount of potassium bicarbonate (1:1) instead of the sodium bicarbonate required for baking.

However, potassium bicarbonate does not go well with acidic liquids like sour cream, vinegar, buttermilk, yogurt, or citrus fruit juices. You can use water or plain milk instead of acidic ingredients.

4. Club Soda

Club soda is a carbonated beverage that contains sodium bicarbonate.

You can use club soda in your recipes as a leavening agent instead of baking soda and baking powder.

However, the amount of sodium bicarbonate present in club soda may not be sufficient for preparing some of the recipes.

Bakers usually do not use milk or water in the recipe while using club soda.

Club soda is also beneficial for adding extra volume and lightness to the baked goods; suitable for making fluffy and moist pancakes.

5. Use Self-Rising Flour

If you do not want to take the trouble of mixing baking soda or powder with batter for baking, you can use the self-rising flour.

Self-rising flour is specially processed with a required amount of baking powder and added flavor to make your baking process easy.

Instead of using sodium bicarbonate, simply replace your regular flour with self-rising flour.

Tips On Choosing The Best Substitute For Baking Soda

Most of the baking soda substitutes will alter the taste and color of the baked goods.

While choosing the alternative to baking soda, you must pay attention to the flavor of the baked cakes or other goods.

For example, using molasses can make baked goods sugary, and thus it cannot be used for savory bread. But it can go well with sweet desserts and pancakes.

Using vinegar can give a sour taste to the baked products. It is not suitable for use in sweetened cakes. White vinegar may go well with the baking mixture that requires a very little amount of baking powder.

You also have to pay attention to other ingredients used in the recipe while choosing an alternative to baking soda. Make sure that the ingredients in the recipe are bendable with the baking powder substitute you are using.

It is important to adjust the liquid requirements of the dough mixture if you are using a liquid form replacement for baking powder.

The Bottom Line

Baking soda is a necessary ingredient commonly used by bakers for leavening.

In place of baking soda, there are a few chemical or organic substitutes you can use.

However, using replacements for sodium bicarbonate or acidic substances may change the taste and color of the final products.

When using any of the alternatives to baking soda, you may have to make a few reductions or additions to the recipes.

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