How to store christmas lights

Decorating for the holidays is a blast, but what’s the best way to store Christmas lights after the festivities are over? The post-holiday cleanup can be a total drag, but it’s especially important to handle Christmas lights with a certain degree of care, so as not to cause a tangled mess that you’ll have to deal with next year.

We’re happy to report that the most practical ways to pack up those twinkling strands are also laughably inexpensive. In fact, everything you need is probably sitting in your house right now! Our experts reveal their hacks for organizing Christmas lights below.

The best ways to store Christmas lights

If there’s one thing we can all agree on, it’s that you should refrain from yanking the lights down and stuffing them in a box.

“By not properly storing Christmas lights, you run the risk of the cords becoming tangled, and that can lead to shortages in the wire,” says Josh McCormick, vice president of operations at Mr. Electric. “Also, if the bulbs are not properly protected, they can break or blow out.”

After you take the lights down—but before you pack them up—unplug each strand. This will prevent tangling and make them easier to separate next year.

Now that the strands are ready to be tucked away in your attic, basement, or spare closet, try one of the following easy (and totally free!) methods for storing Christmas lights.

Hanger method

( Kelly Barlow Creations/YouTube)

Grab a hanger from your closet and wrap those strands. Organizing experts swear by the hanger method for storing Christmas lights.

“It will keep you from spending hours of your holiday time unraveling a tangled mess,” says Leanne Stapf, vice president of operations at the Cleaning Authority. However, she recommends using heavy-duty plastic hangers because they’re thicker, more durable, and will prevent the strands from coming unfastened.

“Ideally, a plastic hanger is the best choice—even more so if it has the hooks on each side of the top to prevent the lights from falling off,” says Brandon Stephens, president of Christmas Décor, a lighting and decorating company based in Lubbock, Texas.

Start at the end of the light strand and carefully wrap it around both ends of the hanger, until you reach the last few inches of the strand. Then loop or tie the end of the strand around the hook of the hanger.

“This will make it easy for you to plug in next year when testing to see if your lights still work,” Stephens says. Genius!

Stapf recommends using one hanger per strand of lights.

Then, wrap the lights on hangers in tissue paper, plastic wrap, or an old towel, to keep the bulbs from breaking.

Wrapping paper tube method

Don’t have any extra plastic hangers on hand? You can also wrap your Christmas lights around a spent tube of wrapping paper.

Laura McHolm, co-founder of NorthStar Moving Co. in Los Angeles, recommends spooling up the lights, cutting a hole in one end of the tube, sticking the plug end through the hole, and taping it to keep it secure.

Cardboard method

A similar but equally effective solution is to use a square piece of cardboard as a spool for your lights. We’re guessing you have some leftover gift boxes that haven’t been mangled.

“Cut notches into either end to hold the lights in place,” says Tom Lund, owner and manager at Permian Storage in Odessa, TX. “Once you have your lights spooled, wrap them in paper towels and place them in a plastic grocery bag to prevent any significant impact on the bulbs.”

How to store christmas lights

Try these tricks for storing Christmas lights tangle-free

You’ve picked out the perfect tree and invested in some new ornaments. So you pour a few mugs of hot cocoa, turn on the holiday tunes and get ready for a festive night decorating with the family. An hour later you’re still wrestling with the tangled mess of lights that were stuffed in the bottom of a storage bin while your kids have lost interest and you’re about to lose it altogether.

If this nightmare before Christmas sounds familiar, we may be able to help — next year, that is. We can save you from the stress with some super simple ways to pack those lights so that when you open them in 2020 they will be ready to go — no untangling required.

Here are three options for storing your lights with items you already have around the house:

Clothes hanger

Anchor one end of the lights on the tiny hook (used for small straps). Then begin wrapping the strand all the way around hanger, working your way down one side, and then back past the hook itself and towards the other end, being sure to keep it tight against the body of the hanger. Once the strand is entirely wrapped, secure the other end of the light string on the second small hook. You can store the lights by placing the entire hanger inside a storage box, or by hanging it in a closet.

Related

Recycling 101 Cut down on holiday waste with these recycling tips

Wrapping paper tube

Instead of tossing the tube when the wrapping paper is all gone, put it to work! Simply thread one end of your Christmas lights down the tube (so that it reaches about halfway down the tube), then begin wrapping the strand around the outside of the tube. (We found that standing and rolling makes this a bit easier than sitting.) Once you have reached the bottom of the tube, be sure to leave about 6 inches of the strand free, so that you can thread it down the other side of the tube to help hold the lights in place. Feel free to place a small piece of tape on the inside to keep it even more secure.

Piece of cardboard

Save some of those shipping boxes that are piling up on your doorstep this month and give them a second life. Cut a cardboard flap from the shipping box. Starting at one end, cut 1-inch slits into the board, working your way down the side. Repeat on the other side, being sure to line the slits up across from one another. Tuck one end of the light string into the first slit and wrap across the board securing on the other side. Continue to wrap the string around the board. With smaller boards, you may need to double up the strand in each slit, which is fine. When the entire string is wrapped, push the plug prongs into the board to secure.

MORE CLEANING & ORGANIZING TIPS

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We’re sorry, we don’t want to sound grinchy, but it’s time to say goodbye to Christmas. Just look at your Christmas tree. The poor thing doesn’t have any needles on it anymore.

If the tree’s sad look isn’t reason enough, maybe the fact that everyone is removing it is. Since the Victorian Era, people across the UK are removing decorations on the Twelfth Night of Christmas.

How to store christmas lightsThere’s a superstition that you’ll have bad luck all year round if you don’t take off Christmas decoration on the right date

That info can be confusing as some consider January 5 as that day while some think its January 6 as it’s the 12th day after Christmas.

January 6 is the Epiphany, the day when the Three Kings came to baby Jesus with gifts, guided by the star.

Whatever day you pick for storing Christmas decoration, that’s absolutely fine (although the superstition says you’ll have bad luck if you don’t take it off on the right date).

Superstitious or not, the best way to store your Christmas decorations is to store it so you can use all of them next year.

Basic tips for storing Christmas decorations

  1. Sort everything – Christmas baubles, lights, and whatever else you might have.
  2. Clean the ornaments from artificial snow if there is any.
  3. Remove batteries from any lights or ornament you might have.
  4. Use transparent plastic bags for storing plastic baubles.
  5. For fragile Christmas ornaments, you can use old egg cardboard boxes to store them.
  6. When putting ornaments in a box, use bubble wrap or tissue paper to avoid damage.
  7. Label everything.
  8. Store them in a dry place to prevent mould from appearing on the decorations.

Your Chrismas decorations should be perfectly fine when you store them like that, but we have more insights on storing the festive stuff.

How to store Christmas lights?

Store your Christmas lights separately from other ornaments. There are two reasons to do so:

  • You can use your Christmas lights for any party you will be organising, especially if your Christmas lights are outdoors. Summer evening garden parties look really nice decorated with tiny lights.
  • Lights are electronics, and storing electronic devices has its own rules and principles.

How to store christmas lightsYou can use Christmas lights for an outdoor party

Whenever you’ll use the lights again, whether it’s the garden party you don’t want to occupy yourself with detangling. It’s the worst-case scenario, and it can ruin your decorating mojo.

To be sure you’ve done everything right:

  1. Remove the batteries from your Christmas lights if there are any.
  2. Check if all the light bulbs are working and try to fix them by twisting or wiggling them.
  3. Wind them up. It’s vital to wind the lights neatly, so they are ready for use when you unbox them.

You probably got a plastic winder with the light which you probably threw away. So, find a coat hanger or a piece of cardboard and wrap the lights around it. Wrap the lights around it neatly, and you’re ready for the next season. Of course, use a separate piece of cardboard or a coat hanger for every Christmas light.

  1. Put the lights in a cardboard box, add some newspapers bubble wrap in between.
  2. Store in a dry place.

Store your artificial Christmas tree like this

Having an artificial Christmas tree has its benefits – the needles don’t fall off and, even though it’s made out of plastic, you can use it again and again.

If you want to make a positive impact on the environment, environmental experts say, you have to use it for, at least, 10 years.

But to use it for a decade and more you have to store it with care, so it resembles the tree you picked up at the store.

1. Remove the sections first, unplugging them one by one and gently laying them on the floor.

2. Gently clean the dust off. Make sure that everything is dry.

3. Fold up the branches, so they are pointed upward.

4. If you don’t have a bag or a plastic container take some plastic wrap (the kitchen one will do) and put it around the folded branches. That way you secure it.

5. Store your tree in a dry place. Even though it’s plastic, it can get a mouldy smell if stored in a damp place. You really don’t want your magical Christmas tree to smell like an old basement once you open it up next year.

Where to put your Christmas decoration?

When you live in a big house with a big garage, you don’t ask yourself that question. If you live in London, you’re one of the lucky people who have space, and you can put it in your attic or shed. Most of us live in apartments.

The most important thing is to put your Christmas decoration and the tree in a dry place or protect it from moisture.

Try to move the boxes under the bed or deep in the pantry, where you don’t usually go in.

When the bauble box becomes yet another annoying box that you trip over, it’s time to send it to storage.

Access Box Storage can pick it up whenever you want & we’ll return it right before your next Christmas. It’s hassle-free storage.

December 2, 2019

When it’s time to decorate with holiday lights, nothing can be more frustrating than needing to untangle a web of light strings before you can begin. When this happens, the problem, of course, usually originated at the end of the previous holiday lighting season when the lights were taken down and put away.

Here are a few tips to make your life much easier next lighting season:

Check light strings for broken or faulty bulbs at the end of the season, when they’re still stretched out. Just plug them in and look for dead bulbs. If you find an occasional non-working bulb, try wiggling and twisting it slightly to get it to work again. If this doesn’t do the trick, put a short piece of tape on the wire next to each dead bulb to identify its location. Then unplug the light strings and replace faulty or missing bulbs. You can buy an inexpensive Christmas light tester on Amazon.

If entire lengths of light strings are not working, the problem is with a fuse or wire. If you can’t repair your light strings, give them to charity. Don’t pack them away to be dealt with next year!

Wind up the light strings—don’t just coil them and stuff them back into their original boxes. Several products are available online to make this job easier, or you can make your own winders.

For example, you can wind indoor lights around clothes hangers, or make a simple winder by cutting a V-shaped slot into opposite sides of an 8-by-10-inch piece of cardboard. Just unplug any end-to-end connections and wind one string per cardboard winder.

For both indoor and outdoor lights, you can buy commercial plastic winders, spools, and reels. For instance, the simple plastic winder shown here costs less than $7 online at Amazon and makes quick work of a string of lights. How to store christmas lights Canvas carrier holds three spools for lights. This is a tidy answer if you just have a few light strings. Treekeeper

For a more complete answer, you can buy cardboard or plastic winders and spools that fit into storage containers. A couple of examples are shown on this page—just click the photos if you want to shop for them at Amazon. For really long strings, you can even use a small garden hose reel.

Be careful with light strings. They are not very durable. It doesn’t take much to render them unworkable. Take care not to break or loosen bulbs or break wires as you wind them.

Table of Contents

Once the season is over, it’s time to put away your Christmas tree and trimmings for another year. Storing Christmas decorations can be tricky, but the right materials and a little planning can turn it into a quick, trouble-free task. Learn how to store your decorations through this comprehensive guide.

How to Store Artificial Christmas Trees

Preserve the lifelike beauty of your Balsam Hill™ artificial Christmas tree by keeping it in sturdy storage bags. Each of our trees comes with standard bags for convenient storage. We also offer ROLLING TREE STORAGE BAGS so you can transport your tree from one place to another without heavy lifting. Choose a cool, dry place to stow away your tree during the off-season.

For more tips on how to store your Christmas tree, check our STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE.

How to Store Christmas Decorations

Proper storage helps maintain the condition of your holiday décor. A well-organized collection also eliminates the need to buy new items every year and makes it easy to find the right accents when it’s time to decorate again. See our Christmas decorations storage tips below.

How to Store Christmas Ornaments

Step 1 | Prepare Your Storage Containers

Gather the original packaging of your Christmas ornament sets if they are designed for reuse. Also consider commercially-available storage boxes that are designed to hold and protect ornaments. Balsam Hill’s STORAGE ITEMS include rolling ornament chests that can keep up to 120 pieces.

As an alternative, use clear plastic containers that let you see the ornaments without having to open the lid. This will reduce time spent looking for Christmas decorations when the next holiday season rolls around.

Step 2 | Remove the Ornaments

Place towels around the base of your Christmas tree to catch any fragile ornaments that might fall while you’re taking down decorations. Start removing ornaments from the bottom of the tree and work your way up. Reaching for the topmost ornaments first may cause you to accidentally dislodge those in the lower sections.

Step 3 | Organize Your Ornaments

Sort your Christmas ornaments according to your preferred system. Storing by style, size, or color helps make it much easier to decorate based on a specific look. Label the containers and list the contents of each box for faster retrieval. For containers without individual compartments, purchase or create your own cardboard dividers.

How to Store Ribbons and Garlands

Step 1 | Remove the Strands

Once you’ve taken down all your ornaments, unwrap garlands and ribbons from the tree and carefully straighten them out.

Step 2 | Store the Strands Individually

Wrap each strand around a rigid cardboard to prevent tangling. Then, place the individually-wrapped strings inside a durable Ziploc or plastic bag to protect them from getting scratched. Avoid storing multiple garlands in a single container as this could cause tangles and damages.

How to Store Other Christmas Decorations

Christmas decorations with irregular shapes, such as tree toppers and floral picks, may require separate containers if they don’t fit standard ornament storage boxes. Bring out their original packaging or secure them in individual containers. If you don’t have time to wrap each item individually, line the bottom of your box with shredded paper. Place the décor inside and add more shredded paper to keep the pieces from moving around.

Use bubble wrap or plastic foam to protect snow globes and other fragile accents. Store fabric decorations like stockings and tree skirts in vacuum-sealed plastic bags to keep them safe from insects, dust, and dirt.

How to Store Wreaths, Garlands, and Other Greenery

Lasting beauty is one of the many benefits of faux foliage. Through proper care and storage, you can keep your artificial Christmas wreaths, garlands, potted trees, and other greenery in great shape season after season.

Step 1 | Clean Your Greenery

Remove dust and dirt build-up from the branch tips using a feather duster or a hair dryer set on low. With a microfiber cloth, gently wipe the larger decorations such as leaves and ornaments.

Step 2 | Remove Other Decorations

Pull out any ornaments, picks, and ribbons that are not attached to the greenery. Store these accents together with your Christmas tree decorations.

Step 3 | Compress the Foliage

Flatten the tips of your faux greenery to better fit your storage bags. Simply press the foliage in the direction it is pointing to.

Step 4 | Pack Away Your Greenery

Store your Christmas wreaths and garlands in their original boxes or invest in storage bags that are specially designed to protect your greenery. Balsam Hill’s WREATH & GARLAND ROLLING STORAGE CHEST provides enough space to hold multiple wreaths and garlands in an optimal position that preserves their form and beauty. It also features versatile containers for ornaments and other Christmas decorations.

How to Store Christmas Lights

Avoid damaged lights and tangled wires with proper Christmas lights storage. Neatly wrapped light strings will save you time and effort spent detangling and unwinding. Here are easy storage options for you to choose from:

Plastic Bags

Wrap a light strand around your forearm to form a loose circle. To do this, hold one end of the strand, guide it down around your elbow, and bring it back up to your hand. Secure the resulting bundle with twist ties, then store each bundle in its own plastic zipper bag. Label the bag according to the color or type of light strand. Finally, place all the bags in a durable plastic bin.

Tension Rod

Wind a light strand around your hand and transfer it onto a tension rod. Fit the rods lengthwise in a plastic storage bin along with other lighting accessories, such as extension cords, foot pedal switches, and remote controls.

Cardboard Sheet

Cut small slits at both ends of a cardboard sheet and wrap individual light strands around the sheet. Use the slits to secure the plugs on either end of the strand. Label each sheet, then stack them in a plastic storage bin.

Wire Spool

Wind separate light strands around individual wire spools, and label them accordingly. Avoid winding multiple strands in a single spool, as light strings tend to get buried under other strands and could make unspooling a challenge.

Say goodbye to sorting through tangled webs of holiday lights.

How to store christmas lights

How to store christmas lights

Are you tired of wrestling with a tangled mess of Christmas lights each year? Well, here are some simple storage tricks that can keep them untangled for good — and help bring order to chaos next year.

‘With festivities mainly happening at home in 2020, decorations are going up earlier than ever, and for every smile at a star there’ll be a scream at a knot of bulbs and wires,’ say the team at ElectricalDirect.

‘We’ve got a sack full of secrets to help make things easier next year. Keep your lights safe and sorted with our top Christmas untangling tips.’

Not sure where to begin? Take a look at the tips below and save yourself a headache next year.

1. Use cardboard

Keep hold of any spare cardboard boxes at home as they could come in handy for storing your Christmas lights — and stop you from having to untangle hundreds of lights next year.

The team at ElectricalDirect explain: ‘Either chop a large rectangle of card with a little notch in each end, and wrap your lights around them so they stay nice and neat. Or do the same thing with an old kitchen roll tube. The notches keep your lights in place, the sturdy cardboard keeps them safe.’

2. Use twist or cable ties

Plastic twist ties — which work by wrapping one end of the wire over the other — are brilliant for keeping your lights together. As well as holding lights in place along bannisters, the ties can work wonders when it comes to storing them.

The team advise: ‘First, wrap the lights around your fist so they form loose loops about 30cm long. Then tie one twist or secure one cable tie at each end and another in the middle. Store them in a bin bag until next year and give yourself a mince pie to say well done.’

How to store christmas lights

3. Wrap the whole tree up

Feeling lazy? The easiest way to store lights is to simply leave them entwined around the tree after the festive season has ended. The team suggest wrapping your tree up in cling film, but you can also put your tree in a large zip-up bag to keep it safe. Then, when next Christmas rolls around all you have to do is put your tree up and plug it in. Voila!

4. Place lights in a box

It’s always worth keeping the original box for your lights, as you can simply pop them back inside after use. Ensure you secure it well before placing in the loft or garage.

‘Wrap the lights around it with a bit of tape at each end to keep them in place. A simple storage solution that recycles something instead of throwing it away,’ they explain.

How to store christmas lights

5. Repurpose clothes hangers

Give a new lease of life to your old clothes hangers by cleverly using them to store your lights. Simply take your lights, wrap them around the hanger and tie the ends over the hook to keep everything in place. You can either hang them in a spare wardrobe or pop them in a large, sealed box.

6. Bunch your lights up

This trick might seem a little complicated, but it can work efficiently once you know how. ‘First, grab hold of one light, then a second light two lights away. Bring those two together and repeat the process until they’re all tightly packed in. Wrap the remaining cord around the middle to keep everything compact,’ ElectricalDirect explain.

How to store christmas lights

7. Use a cord reel

While these are more typically used for long extension cables, cord reels can also come in handy when it comes to packing up your tree lights. How does it work? Simply attach one end of your lights to the reel and wind them up. Pack away and next Christmas will be a breeze!

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Love bringing out those icicle lights during Christmas? You also need to store them properly so you can use them again. For that, here’s how to store icicle lights.

Icicle lights are a staple in every household’s Christmas decor. Of course, you’ll need to store them properly when the holidays are over so that you can use them again next Christmas.

So, how do you store those lights when the holidays are over, anyway?

In this guide, we’ll teach you how to store icicle lights so that you can easily bring them out during next Christmas.

How to store christmas lightsAs the yuletide season comes to an end, it’s time to learn the tips on how to store icicle lights

Take a look at some of our tips below:

What Is Icicle Light?

While most people have used icicle lights to decorate their homes already, there are some who still haven’t. For the benefit of those who don’t know what icicle lights are, we’ll explain what they are and when to use them.

In a nutshell, icicle lights are those small lights that are strung up in such a way that you’ll have a row of lights. They’re usually used for covering the house’s exterior and interior with lights.

How To Store Icicle Lights Properly: Tips And Tricks

Wrap Around Cardboard Box

Your first instinct is most likely to wrap the string lights around your arm and pull it out. Sure, this may work, but it also causes a lot of entanglements.

So, what’s the alternative solution?

Use a cardboard box instead of your arm. Just cut out a cardboard box and cut a slit somewhere in the middle. Start from the slit and wrap the lights around the box. You can just keep it there until you want to use them again.

Store In The Box

If you’re the type of person who has absolutely no patience when it comes to wrapping up cords, then the easiest thing to do is to simply store it in the box. You can just leave it there and put the box in your storage room. More often than not, the lights won’t really tangle up since you won’t do anything with it anyway.

Wrap Around a Clothes Hanger

If you can’t find any cardboard box, the next thing you can use is a clothes hanger. Start with one end of the hanger and wrap it around until you reach the end of the hanger. From there, you can just store away the clothes hanger until next year.

Wrap Around a Cord Reel

Another really cool icicle Christmas lights storage method is using a cord reel. These are usually used for bunching those really long wires, so it can be really useful. Using the cord reel can also prevent the tangling of the cords.

When you buy a cord reel, all you have to do is connect one end of the string lights to the reel and start rolling it until the whole string lights cover the cord reel. Then you can store it away until next year. This is one of our favorite methods on how to store icicle lights without tangling because it’s the easiest and most effective.

Tie With A Rubber Band

What most manufacturers do when they package their lights is to bunch them properly and tie them together with a rubber band. That’s why they’re pretty organized when you open the box. You can also use the same storage method to store them away. Just make sure you have a bunch of rubber bands that you can use for tying your icicle lights together.

Roll In Plastic Sheet

The last method is usually used for strand lights that are stiffer than the usual string lights. This method entails using a plastic sheet. All you have to do is open up the plastic sheet, put the string lights inside, and start wrapping the plastic sheet along with the lights. Once the plastic is all wrapped up, you can store the lights in your cabinet.

Conclusion

One of the most annoying things that you may experience when bringing out your string lights is having them in an entangled mess. To prevent that, you need to learn how to store icicle lights the right way, so they won’t get bunched up. These methods work perfectly well and allow you to properly bring out your icicle lights anytime you want.

Are the holidays done already? Then make sure you store your icicle lights properly by following our guide above.

Table of Contents

Once the season is over, it’s time to put away your Christmas tree and trimmings for another year. Storing Christmas decorations can be tricky, but the right materials and a little planning can turn it into a quick, trouble-free task. Learn how to store your decorations through this comprehensive guide.

How to Store Artificial Christmas Trees

Preserve the lifelike beauty of your Balsam Hill™ artificial Christmas tree by keeping it in sturdy storage bags. Each of our trees comes with standard bags for convenient storage. We also offer ROLLING TREE STORAGE BAGS so you can transport your tree from one place to another without heavy lifting. Choose a cool, dry place to stow away your tree during the off-season.

For more tips on how to store your Christmas tree, check our STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE.

How to Store Christmas Decorations

Proper storage helps maintain the condition of your holiday décor. A well-organized collection also eliminates the need to buy new items every year and makes it easy to find the right accents when it’s time to decorate again. See our Christmas decorations storage tips below.

How to Store Christmas Ornaments

Step 1 | Prepare Your Storage Containers

Gather the original packaging of your Christmas ornament sets if they are designed for reuse. Also consider commercially-available storage boxes that are designed to hold and protect ornaments. Balsam Hill’s STORAGE ITEMS include rolling ornament chests that can keep up to 120 pieces.

As an alternative, use clear plastic containers that let you see the ornaments without having to open the lid. This will reduce time spent looking for Christmas decorations when the next holiday season rolls around.

Step 2 | Remove the Ornaments

Place towels around the base of your Christmas tree to catch any fragile ornaments that might fall while you’re taking down decorations. Start removing ornaments from the bottom of the tree and work your way up. Reaching for the topmost ornaments first may cause you to accidentally dislodge those in the lower sections.

Step 3 | Organize Your Ornaments

Sort your Christmas ornaments according to your preferred system. Storing by style, size, or color helps make it much easier to decorate based on a specific look. Label the containers and list the contents of each box for faster retrieval. For containers without individual compartments, purchase or create your own cardboard dividers.

How to Store Ribbons and Garlands

Step 1 | Remove the Strands

Once you’ve taken down all your ornaments, unwrap garlands and ribbons from the tree and carefully straighten them out.

Step 2 | Store the Strands Individually

Wrap each strand around a rigid cardboard to prevent tangling. Then, place the individually-wrapped strings inside a durable Ziploc or plastic bag to protect them from getting scratched. Avoid storing multiple garlands in a single container as this could cause tangles and damages.

How to Store Other Christmas Decorations

Christmas decorations with irregular shapes, such as tree toppers and floral picks, may require separate containers if they don’t fit standard ornament storage boxes. Bring out their original packaging or secure them in individual containers. If you don’t have time to wrap each item individually, line the bottom of your box with shredded paper. Place the décor inside and add more shredded paper to keep the pieces from moving around.

Use bubble wrap or plastic foam to protect snow globes and other fragile accents. Store fabric decorations like stockings and tree skirts in vacuum-sealed plastic bags to keep them safe from insects, dust, and dirt.

How to Store Wreaths, Garlands, and Other Greenery

Lasting beauty is one of the many benefits of faux foliage. Through proper care and storage, you can keep your artificial Christmas wreaths, garlands, potted trees, and other greenery in great shape season after season.

Step 1 | Clean Your Greenery

Remove dust and dirt build-up from the branch tips using a feather duster or a hair dryer set on low. With a microfiber cloth, gently wipe the larger decorations such as leaves and ornaments.

Step 2 | Remove Other Decorations

Pull out any ornaments, picks, and ribbons that are not attached to the greenery. Store these accents together with your Christmas tree decorations.

Step 3 | Compress the Foliage

Flatten the tips of your faux greenery to better fit your storage bags. Simply press the foliage in the direction it is pointing to.

Step 4 | Pack Away Your Greenery

Store your Christmas wreaths and garlands in their original boxes or invest in storage bags that are specially designed to protect your greenery. Balsam Hill’s WREATH & GARLAND ROLLING STORAGE CHEST provides enough space to hold multiple wreaths and garlands in an optimal position that preserves their form and beauty. It also features versatile containers for ornaments and other Christmas decorations.

How to Store Christmas Lights

Avoid damaged lights and tangled wires with proper Christmas lights storage. Neatly wrapped light strings will save you time and effort spent detangling and unwinding. Here are easy storage options for you to choose from:

Plastic Bags

Wrap a light strand around your forearm to form a loose circle. To do this, hold one end of the strand, guide it down around your elbow, and bring it back up to your hand. Secure the resulting bundle with twist ties, then store each bundle in its own plastic zipper bag. Label the bag according to the color or type of light strand. Finally, place all the bags in a durable plastic bin.

Tension Rod

Wind a light strand around your hand and transfer it onto a tension rod. Fit the rods lengthwise in a plastic storage bin along with other lighting accessories, such as extension cords, foot pedal switches, and remote controls.

Cardboard Sheet

Cut small slits at both ends of a cardboard sheet and wrap individual light strands around the sheet. Use the slits to secure the plugs on either end of the strand. Label each sheet, then stack them in a plastic storage bin.

Wire Spool

Wind separate light strands around individual wire spools, and label them accordingly. Avoid winding multiple strands in a single spool, as light strings tend to get buried under other strands and could make unspooling a challenge.