How to solder

How to solderThe correct soldering temperature is something that many don’t think about.

But have you ever used one of these variable temperature soldering irons?

If so, you may be wondering the same about Jyri. Jyri sent me an email about soldering and asked, “I’ve always wondered: what is the right soldering temperature for different situations?”

This is a very good question.

My answer is that you need to heat the solder joint enough to melt the solder.

Most solder melts in the range of 180 to 190 degrees Celsius or 360 to 370 degrees Fahrenheit. So we need to make the solder joint hotter than this.

Selection of the soldering temperature for the iron

There are a few things that will affect the soldering iron temperature that you need on your soldering iron.

If you have a high-performance soldering iron and a large soldering tip that transfers heat efficiently, you don’t need such a high temperature.

Maybe 250 degrees Celsius is enough.

But if you’re using a low-efficiency iron with a tiny soldering tip that conducts heat poorly, you need a higher temperature.

Maybe you need 400 degrees Celsius.

If you have a large solder joint, you will need a higher temperature than a small, tiny solder joint.

Learning by doing

The soldering temperature is also something you will know when you try.

If you are having trouble melting the solder, it means you should raise the temperature slightly.

If you are burning your components, it may be time to consider lowering the temperature.

Usually balance at 350 degrees Celsius to 400 degrees Celsius (660 to 750 Fahrenheit).

What sealing temperature do you use? Reply in the comment box below.

Reader interactions

Comments

THE FIRST THING TO DO IS SET THE TEMPERATURE OF THE WELDER

You can weld in two ways.
Use a very hot iron and solder very quickly – for EXPERTS or
Use a lower temperature – NORMAL WELDING METHOD

But what is the right temperature?

Here are two ways to set the sealing temperature:

Set the lowest temperature:
All of the temperature controlled soldering irons on eBay (for $ 12.00) have a temperature knob, but the easiest way to set the correct temperature is:
Set the knob to the lowest temperature and turn the iron on.
Touch the solder at the tip – nothing happens.
Now raise the temperature by one division and wait a minute.
Please try to solder again. She continues to do this until the solder melts very slowly.
Now raise the temperature from 20 ° C to 30 ° C (about one split) and you will have the perfect temperature for light soldering. It will melt the solder quickly, but it won’t burn the rosin very quickly.
You will find that the temperature on the dial will be very close to 370 ° C (700 ° F).

Set the next higher temperature:
This temperature allows you to remove the enamel from the wires and solder it very quickly.
Increase the temperature slightly by turning the knob over the temperature used in the example above.
Add a small amount of solder to the tip of the iron and place the tip on a piece of enameled wire and touch the tip of the bare copper wire with the tip of the iron to ensure good conductivity. Wait 10 seconds for the nail polish to dissolve. If the enamel does not melt, raise the temperature slightly and repeat the process.
Once the enamel is melting, you have the right setting to solder and quickly remove the enamel from the strands.
The temperature on the dial will be very close to 400 ° C (750 ° F).

Some service technicians also raise the temperature to perform a VERY FAST WELDING, but this is for EXPERTS ONLY.

HERE IS AN INCREDIBLE FACT
High temperature brazing allows for a very quick connection and the component does NOT get hotter than lower temperature brazing.
But a soldering iron without temperature control is TOO HOT and it can easily damage the components, especially LEDs, transistors and IC’s. Temperature controlled soldering irons are SO CHEAP. For $ 12.00, you will receive an item to replace the $ 240.00 Soldering Station.

FACT NUMBER 2
Brazing is entirely related to PURITY.
Solder does not stick to dirty wire. It simply “sits” and the thread can be pulled out.
Soldering does not clean the wire.
It is the resin or rosin within the solder wire that releases the joint.
But the resin doesn’t work until it’s heated and melted.
When you are soldering, you don’t want the solder. YOU WANT RESIN.
But the life of the resin is only 1 to 3 seconds before it evaporates.
This means that you CANNOT carry the resin on the iron.
When the iron reaches the connection, the resin will evaporate.
The resin only works when heated ON THE SITE where the connection is to be made.
Therefore, the iron must be kept as clean as possible by pushing it through the copper wire ball shown above.
The ball will remove the old solder and clean the tip. Scrubbing the tip with a damp sponge DOES NOT CLEAN THE TIP. It leaves only a thin layer of debris on the tip which is the result of contact with the plastic sponge.
Place the iron on the solder joint and immediately apply 0.8mm or 0.6mm of solder so that it touches the iron from the opposite side of the joint.
Right now, you just want the rosin to do its job. Melt the rosin and clean the pieces.
NOW YOU WANT TO WELD. . .
Add a little more solder and let it melt through the joint for a smooth, shiny result.
Take out the iron and do not move the connection for 3 seconds.
Cut or trim the wire with side cutters where the wire exits the weld. DO NOT cut the solder and DO NOT cut the wire before soldering.
Using a 0.5mm solder will prevent excess solder from remaining on the joint or iron.
Since I used 0.5mm solder, I never had to remove excess solder from a joint or iron. That’s why a spool of 0.5mm solder lasts much longer than 1mm solder.
There is no waste!

October 28, 2017

Amazing, much more useful and interesting than the article, thank you very much.

How to solder

Learning to solder wires is more important than ever. Homeowners are increasingly repairing household appliances such as dishwashers and refrigerators. Once you know how to solder, small appliances like electric kettles and simple electronic components no longer have to be thrown away when they fail. With patience and a little practice, you can learn how to solder wires for repairs, as well as for fun projects.

In this simple design, you’ll solder the exposed ends of two plastic-coated copper wires together. No special skills are required to complete this task. Since the materials are so inexpensive, you will have plenty of opportunities to practice scrapped wires before making your final solder joint.

Project metrics

  • Working hours: 5 minutes
  • Total time: Twenty minutes
  • Skill level: Beginner
  • Cost of materials: $ 25 to $ 50

Tools and materials you will need

  • welder
  • welder tips
  • Sponge and water
  • welder stand
  • 60/40 rosin core solder
  • Rosin paste fondant
  • Heat shrink tubes
  • Thermal gun
  • Insulating wire stripper
  • Eye protection

Instructions

Anziché acquistare componenti di saldatura separati, è possibile acquistare una stazione di saldatura che includa un welder, un supporto e un detergente per punte. Since the entire station is connected to one socket, the soldering wire is less stressed as the wire does not need to run directly into the socket. This is important for the gentle hand movements you make when soldering.

60/40 lead solder, consisting of 60% tin and 40% lead, has long been used for soldering and is safe when handled. For maximum safety, choose lead-free solder with 99.3% tin and 0.7% copper.

Prepare a safe workspace

Make sure your work area is well ventilated, especially when working with lead-based solder. Poiché le punte del welder possono essere comprese tra 600 e 800 gradi Fahrenheit, lavorare su una superficie non infiammabile poiché la saldatura fusa può gocciolare. If you are working with lead-based solder, be sure to wash your hands thoroughly after handling the solder. Use eye protection when working with welding.

Remove the wires

Remove 1/2 inch of the plastic sheath from the wires with a wire stripper. Try not to leave too much or too little plastic coating. Removing an insufficient amount of plastic coating will make brazing difficult. Removing too much plastic coating will expose the excess copper wire and require the use of more heat shrink tubing. Make sure that the correct size stripping tool is used so that you do not accidentally cut the wire strands.

Add heat shrink tubing

Find the smallest diameter tube that fits the plastic-lined tube. If you choose a tube that is too large, it will not shrink to the correct size. In terms of length, the tube should cover the wire plus another 1/2 inch at each end. Slide the heat shrink tubing over the wire and lay it on the wire around the foot for now.

Join the threads

Gently peel the individual strands of thread. Join the threads intrecciando i fili. Loosely twist the net with threads. If you twist the wires too much, the solder won’t be able to break through. However, the connector should still be smaller in diameter than the heat shrink tubing.

Place the wires

Arrange the cables so that they are above the work surface. Flat wires can adhere to the surface by welding. Alligator clips or even homemade metal spring clips can be shaped to lift the wires.

Add the rosin flux

Carefully rub a small amount of rosin paste over the joined strands until all the copper is covered. The rosin flux will help attract the solder into the braided wires.

Get ready to weld

Collegare e accendere il welder. Unroll about six inches of solder so that the end is exposed and ready to use.

Man mano che il welder si scalda, strofinare la punta con una spugna umida per rimuovere ogni precedente ossidazione. Questo non è necessario quando un nuovo welder si riscalda per la prima volta.

Solder the wires

Toccare la punta calda del welder al connettore del filo. Hold the tip firmly in place for a few seconds to heat the wire. Lightly touch the exposed end of the solder to the wire connector. The heat should immediately melt the solder and pull it into the braided wires.

Shrinkage of the tube

After the solder has completely cooled, slide the heat shrink tubing over the joint. Make sure it’s level. Slide the heat gun over the tube until it is fully seated.

How to solder

The ball valve serves a useful purpose in most plumbing projects. In those projects where you would normally have to turn off the water to work on pipes, fittings, or other plumbing fixtures, a ball valve allows you to do the job without having to turn off the water throughout the house. Instead, close the single ball valve, leaving the rest of the house with the normal flow of water. Sometimes one of these balls can be detached from the stem or shaft. When this happens, you will need to solder it or purchase a new ball valve. To reconnect a ball valve using the welding process, you need to have a good understanding of the welding process, how the ball valve works and how to weld it. The following five steps will provide this information.

Step 1: Understand the operation of the ball valve

There are copper pipes on both sides of the valve. When the ball valve is open, the hole aligns with the hole in these pipes, allowing water to flow freely through the holes. When the valve is closed, these openings are no longer aligned and therefore do not allow the passage of water. When the ball is detached, these holes cannot line up and the water cannot flow. To fix this, you’ll need to reattach the ball to the holder that held it in place.

Step 2: Clean the valve tube

To clean the copper tube of the valve, first remove the tube. Use emery cloth to clean the outside surface. Polish the pipe until its surface is shiny and copper-colored. Clean the valve by inserting a wire brush into the top and bottom ends of the valve, then rotate the brush to clean the inside surface.

Step 3: Apply the flow

Apply the fondant paste both inside and outside the tube. This promotes a more even distribution of the solder as it is heated and becomes liquid.

Step 4: Set up the ball valve

Before brazing make sure the valve is in the “open” position with the ball valve handle parallel to the pipe. Rotate the tube until this alignment is achieved.

Step 5: Solder the ball valve

Remember to wear gloves when heating the ball valve with a torch. Light your butane torch. Then, holding the solder wire in one hand, place the tip of the wire near the valve seam to be soldered. Start heating the tube where it enters the valve. When the flux begins to boil, the tube is hot enough to melt the solder wire. On the weld you’re welding, touch the surface of the pipe with the tip of the weld wire until the weld melts and spreads evenly around the weld. Do this again on the back of the valve. Then let the solder cool and solidify.

How to solder

The ball valve serves a useful purpose in most plumbing projects. In those projects where you would normally have to turn off the water to work on pipes, fittings, or other plumbing fixtures, a ball valve allows you to do the job without having to turn off the water throughout the house. Instead, close the single ball valve, leaving the rest of the house with the normal flow of water. Sometimes one of these balls can be detached from the stem or shaft. When this happens, you will need to solder it or purchase a new ball valve. To reconnect a ball valve using the welding process, you need to have a good understanding of the welding process, how the ball valve works and how to weld it. The following five steps will provide this information.

Step 1: Understand the operation of the ball valve

There are copper pipes on both sides of the valve. When the ball valve is open, the hole aligns with the hole in these pipes, allowing water to flow freely through the holes. When the valve is closed, these openings are no longer aligned and therefore do not allow the passage of water. When the ball is detached, these holes cannot line up and the water cannot flow. To fix this, you’ll need to reattach the ball to the holder that held it in place.

Step 2: Clean the valve tube

To clean the copper tube of the valve, first remove the tube. Use emery cloth to clean the outside surface. Polish the pipe until its surface is shiny and copper-colored. Clean the valve by inserting a wire brush into the top and bottom ends of the valve, then rotate the brush to clean the inside surface.

Step 3: Apply the flow

Apply the fondant paste both inside and outside the tube. This promotes a more even distribution of the solder as it is heated and becomes liquid.

Step 4: Set up the ball valve

Before brazing make sure the valve is in the “open” position with the ball valve handle parallel to the pipe. Rotate the tube until this alignment is achieved.

Step 5: Solder the ball valve

Remember to wear gloves when heating the ball valve with a torch. Light your butane torch. Then, holding the solder wire in one hand, place the tip of the wire near the valve seam to be soldered. Start heating the tube where it enters the valve. When the flux begins to boil, the tube is hot enough to melt the solder wire. On the weld you’re welding, touch the surface of the pipe with the tip of the weld wire until the weld melts and spreads evenly around the weld. Do this again on the back of the valve. Then let the solder cool and solidify.

I’m trying to make an LCD shield from my Arduino and I’m having trouble attaching the solder to the Freetronics protoshield PCB. I cleaned it as best I could.

I use a decent Proxxon solder screw with solder that has worked well for me in the past. How can I attack it?

Doesn’t connect to PCB, just cables.

4 replies 4

Heat! (One word answer)

The classic reason solder doesn’t stick to something is because it’s not heated enough. Interns come to me with this problem all time.

Make sure the tip of your iron is nice and shiny. Touch it with the solder and it should melt almost immediately.

Put a nice drop of solder on the tip of the iron.

Press a weld bead into the metal to be welded.

Initially, the solder will not be too sharp, but when the metal is at the right temperature, the solder will suddenly be attracted to it and you will see it move slightly.

Now that the pad has reached temperature, you can touch the solder anywhere on the pad and it should melt almost immediately. I often add solder this way, so I know I add it to a nice hot pad.

Flow! (One word answer)

[Attached:]
Cleaning the table with, for example, alcohol or Windex is not enough – you don’t worry too much about finger grease here. You are worried about oxidation. The weld binds to the metal but not to the metal oxides. Gold does not oxidize easily, but other compounds found on printed circuit boards, such as copper and nickel, do so easily. I assume your solder contains flux, but stubborn connectors often require a little more flux than is built into your solder (usually

Some great advice has already been given, so here is some additional information on ProtoShields’ surface finish (and any other PCBs Freetronics has done so far) and the rationale behind that decision. Unfortunately, there is no single “best” surface finish for PCBs and all finishes have good and bad sides, so it’s a matter of making a decision based on the most appropriate trade-offs for your intended application.

Our printed circuit boards use the “ENIG” surface treatment, as guessed by @reemrevnivek. It is “electro-nickel immersion gold” and consists of an underlying layer of nickel with a thin layer of gold on top. The gold layer is very thin and is not intended to form the main structure of the track, it only acts as a protective coating for the nickel to prevent it from tarnishing before brazing. Gold is extremely resistant to corrosion, so ENIG has several advantages: it can be touched with bare fingers without tarnishing, it has a very long shelf life and the pads / tracks are very flat and angled (important for fine pitch SMD). A disadvantage is that a little more soldering is required to make the joint as the surface has not yet been pre-tinned and since there is no existing solder layer that would melt with the iron and increase the initial contact area (hence increasing the heat transfer rate) it may take some time for the joint to heat up about a second.

The most common surface finish seen on PCBs is “HASL” or “hot air solder leveling”. The HASL plates are dipped into the molten solder and then the excess is removed with hot air knives to leave the thinnest solder layer possible. The solder itself then protects the underlying track from corrosion making it extremely easy to solder as the entire pad is pre-tinned. It is generally the cheapest finish available and a great choice for general purpose boards. The disadvantage of HASL is that even after removing as much of the excess hot air knife as possible, the weld meniscus will still cause a slight rounding of the edges of the pads. This prevents surface mount parts from being flat like on the ENIG plate.

So you’d expect HASL to be the obvious solution for a board like the shield prototype. But there’s a problem. We try our best to be RoHS compliant, which would mean we couldn’t use regular HASL – it should be lead-free HASL. Lead-free solder has a higher melting point than regular solder, so if we opt for lead-free HASL, it would be a problem for customers who don’t have lead-free equipment. We would probably get a lot of complaints from customers using common soldering irons and soldering irons having trouble heating lead-free solder sufficiently.

Another possible finish is “dip silver” which provides a surprisingly good finish but has terrible durability. For plates that need to be machine assembled right after manufacturing, silver is a great option. The problem is that it tarnishes quickly and negatively affects touch, so it’s not suitable for boards meant to be handed out to hobbyists for (potentially) long storage and manual assembly.

Finally, we chose ENIG for the benefits of long life, tarnish resistance, RoHS compliance and easy weldability compared to other surface finishes. My personal experience with it has been excellent and I have not encountered any specific problems so far, but obviously I am not an expert in PCB manufacturing and am very happy to be able to advise you on better ways to do things.

By becoming a soldering and bonding master, you can start building your own electronics.

How to solder

For hobbyists who want to create their own electronics from scratch, there comes a time in every project where two metal surfaces have to come together. Welding, which transforms from a flexible solid into a liquid and then back to a solid in a few seconds, is the magical metal glue that makes it possible.

Feb can also be a frustrating mess. For both aesthetic and functional reasons, you’ll want to learn how to work with it neatly and neatly as messy welds mean your design may not work.

Commercial tools

How to solder

You don’t need anything special. welder ołówkowa o mocy od 15 do 40 watów jest w porządku. This holder cleans the iron and prevents it from rolling in your lap when you’re not soldering (no fun).

How to solder

The good one is easy to use and can fit many size threads.

How to solder

You need a small one, about 4 inches, that can cut the board.

How to solder

To avoid a sticky mess, don’t buy solders that are too thick – around 0.32 inches in diameter are best for working with electronics.

How to solder

For an afternoon project, look for a kit that includes components and a PCB.

Explore the materials

How to solder

Printed circuit boards (PCBs) connect electronic components (capacitors, resistors, LEDs, microcontrollers, sockets, etc.) to each other. Brazing provides these components with structural and electrical supports where they are mounted, called pads. It is important that these surfaces are initially clean, so clean the PCB with a non-abrasive cloth.

Component cables

How to solder

The threads that protrude from the elements are called threads. Some parts, like microcontrollers, have rigid leads that line up with the pads on the PCB and others, like resistors, have longer leads that flex to fit. Some parts have one advantage, others two, 28 or more.

Add components to the array

How to solder

To connect a component to the board, insert the cables through the holes in the pad – only one insert goes into each pad – and bend them at a 45-degree angle to prevent the component from falling out. Then hold the iron like a pencil and press it against the block and pencil for 1 second. Then, push 1 to 3mm of solder between the lead and the spacer where it will melt with the heated parts.

Hold the tip steady for a second or two to allow the solder to flow around the lead. The key is to heat the components themselves, not the solder directly, which can cause a cold connection; Components that are not hot enough will not bond properly to the solder, leaving a poor connection.

💡 Prevent metal from dripping onto your hands – not only is the solder hot, but lead is toxic too. Wash your hands after welding to avoid leaving traces on the skin.

Check your connections

How to solder

The perfect combination will look like a small bulge around the leash and completely cover the protector. If some of the shim is still exposed or the joint is flat, it means you haven’t used enough weld and you may end up with an incomplete joint. The solution is to simply add more solder, but not too much – this can create a connection where you don’t want it, shorting the circuit and directing the current in the wrong path.

Cut the cables

How to solder

The final step is to cut the leads. If left on for too long, they can bend and touch each other, potentially causing a short. Use wire cutters to cut each wire just above the weld pile. Attach to the end of the leash to make sure you don’t get stuck in the eye by the flying wire.

How to connect two wires?

How to solder

Connect the wire with the wire

Soldering is also great for solder wires. Match the thickness of each wire to the marks on the stripper and strip about 3mm of insulation from the end of the stripper.

How to solder

Riscalda i fili scoperti con un welder e ricopri le estremità con un sottile strato di saldatura – un processo chiamato stagnatura – per garantire una connessione corretta. Then connect the threads by pressing the iron on both ends of the thread, fusing them together. Once the solder has melted, remove the iron and keep the wires steady until the metal has cooled. Allora tu e i tuoi cavi siete pronti.

Don’t forget to clean

How to solder

Quando il welder si riscalda fino a quasi 400 F, la punta si ossida rapidamente, creando ruggine di saldatura che blocca il flow di calore. Therefore, before soldering each joint, use a wet sponge to clean the tip of the iron (it is clean when on) to remove any buildup.

Skill level

From start to finish

Tools

  • Brush
  • propane torch
  • wet clothes
  • eyeglasses

Materials

  • welding wire
  • copper pipes and fittings,
  • flow
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Step 1

How to solder

clean and apply flow to pipe

Pulisci e applica il flow

The copper pipe must be cleaned before brazing. First, use sandpaper to clean the inside and outside of the pipes and fittings to be joined.

Next, use flow to remove impurities from the inner and outer surfaces of both pipes. Spread the flow over the entire surface with a Brush. Then slide both pieces together.

Step 2

How to solder

solder the connector

Solder the connector

While wearing eyeglasses, fire up the propane torch. All three parts of the flame should be blue; if the flame is orange, turn the gas down.

Hold the flame at the end of the tube to warm up. The flow will turn to liquid and the pipe will change color slightly. When the pipe is heated, touch the welding wire to the joint. If done correctly, the weld will be drawn into the joint.

Once the joint is soldered, use a wet clothes to clean up the area.

Soldering is a useful skill – you can quickly fix things around the house, instead of calling a handyman and spending money. Per saldare due pezzi, è necessario sapere come utilizzare un welder, alcune tecniche di pulizia e manutenzione, ecc.

In this guide, you will learn what welding is, what you will need, safety measures, cleaning techniques and maintenance.

How to weld (Watch the video)

Introduction to welding

Brazing is a process in which two or more pieces can be joined by melting a small amount of metal called a filler or solder into a joint. As the molten solder cools, it hardens and acts as an adhesive to hold the pieces together.

What can be welded?

The welding technique was invented to join metals. Precious metals such as gold, silver, tin, etc. offer stronger brazing bonds than other metals due to their low reactivity and high melting points. Noble metals, on the other hand, are expensive and therefore the most commonly used solder is an alloy with 60% tin and 40% lead.

The most difficult metals to braze are aluminum, high-alloy and stainless steels, titanium and magnesium. These metals can be brazed with some pre-coating and pre-tinning.

Brazing is typically used in the electronics industry to connect cables, repair damaged circuits, repair radios, televisions, antennas, etc. However, brazing can also be used to connect plumbing, refrigeration, and even jewelry!

Why weld?

Welding is a technique for joining two elements. Would it be better with glue or better to solder? Find out with the following benefits.

  • Low influence of heat: solder often has a lower melting point than other components and is therefore not affected by heat.
  • Permanent and Temporary Connections: After hardening, the solder forms a very strong bond that is not brittle. However, it can be unsoldered without damaging other elements. Temporary and permanent connections in one!
  • Joining Different Materials: Brazing can be used to join different metals, as long as the solder has a lower melting point.
  • Quick DIY: Soldering is easy to learn and can be mastered quickly by anyone. What’s more, it’s a very quick technique to join stuff together and is great for DIY projects.

What Tools Do You Need?

Below is a simple list of things you’ll need to weld your projects.

  • welder
  • Weld
  • Welding Tip
  • Welding Station
  • Welding Stand
  • Cleaning pad
  • Eyeglasses

Precautions to be taken

Welding involves the use of extreme temperatures and toxic substances. Therefore, safety should be a priority during the welding process. Here are some precautions to keep in mind.

  • Read all instructions and guides for the hardware you are using
  • Make sure you are in a well-ventilated room
  • Use eyeglasses to prevent the fumes from getting into your eyes
  • Don’t breathe in the fumes. Use a fume extractor if necessary
  • Wash your hands when you’re done
  • Store your gear safely

Before Welding

Now that you know the basics of soldering, here are some things you need to know before soldering.

The first thing you need to check is that you have chosen the right tip for the job. Here’s a guide to selecting the right soldering iron tip. The next thing to check is that the tip is clean.

Many metals react with oxygen and form an oxidation layer. The oxidation layer on the soldering tip would reduce the heat transfer efficiency.

To clean it, you have to rub it against the cleaning pad. If it is heavily oxidized, you may need to use a pointed reactivator. If the tip glows after cleaning or reactivating, you can perform the next step: tin plating.

To ‘tin’ the tip, you have to coat it with a layer of solder. This prevents oxidation and improves heat transfer. Tin the tip immediately before and after brazing; you should also tin the tip after every two solder joints. This will help maintain the longevity of the tip.

Step by Step Instruction Guide To Welding

  1. Determine the appropriate temperature for your project, which depends on the materials you weld and the solder you use. Basically choose the lowest possible temperature to get the job done.
  2. Quando il ferro viene riscaldato alla temperatura selezionata, tieni un pezzo di saldatura in una mano e un welder nell’altra.
  3. Hold the hot iron for a second where the two ingredients meet. Remember that it is enough to heat the metals a little.
  4. Now touch the solder on the heated parts. The solder will melt and fill the space between the two components. The amount of weld required varies by project. If you are a beginner, practice on metal pieces before starting your project.
  5. Let the solder cool. A good combination will look even and strong. There shouldn’t be any gaps or big blobs of solder. If there are any gaps, you will need to fill in some solder. If there are stains it is necessary to unsolder to repair the connector.

Desolder

Some connections may need to be unsoldered. Or maybe you accidentally applied too much solder! Don’t worry, heat the iron to the required temperature and melt the solder. You can use a solder suction cup that looks like a syringe to suck up excess solder. Another device you can use is the desoldering braid.

In conclusion

You will need to clean and store your gear after you finish repairing it. All you need to do is use a cloth or metal wool to clean and whiten the tip as mentioned above. Keep it in a closed container. Allo stesso modo, conservare il welder in un contenitore ermetico per prevenire l’ossidazione e prolungare la vita del ferro.

We hope you enjoyed this content. Stay tuned for more electronic design tips!

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