How to sell baseball cards

A price guide for cards

I’ll show you how to look up your baseball card values using Mavin. Get real market prices… see what your cards ACTUALLY sell for.

We’re going to be using Mavin.io to look up baseball card values. It shows you what the card sold for. It can also show you what it’s currently selling for… but the true value is what someone paid for it. Grab your card and enter these details:

  1. Enter the year. Look at the back for the copyright date, or the last year of stats.
  2. Enter the brand. For example: Topps, Upper Deck, Bowman, etc.
  3. Enter the player’s name.
  4. Enter the card number. Found on the back of the card.

Looking up a Baseball Card’s Value

The search results will show cards that have recently sold (hopefully just like yours). The “worth” is the average of the results on the page, including shipping. I like using the “sold” results to get a true estimate of the baseball card’s value… but you can also check out the “selling” link to see what people are listing the card for.

If you didn’t get an accurate price estimate, try refining your search by entering more card details, or pick a few comparable items by using the checkboxes to pick your “comps”. This gives you a much more accurate estimate of what your baseball card’s value.
How to sell baseball cards

What to do Next

Once you’ve gone through and searched for the value of your baseball cards using our price guide, you have several different options:

If they’re valuable: You can either hold onto the cards, perhaps get them graded if not already, and see if they appreciate in value over time. Alternatively, you sell it to a local card shop without getting ripped off since you know it’s worth. Lastly, you can sell it yourself on eBay to get a competitive price. Read our guide to selling on eBay.

If not: A card doesn’t have to be worth money to be considered valuable. Card collecting has been a beloved hobby that has been passed through generations. Each card has sentimental value to someone: where they found it, how they traded for it, who gave it to them. If your cards aren’t worth money, they could be worth some memories to a relative or a stranger. Put them on Craigslist, take them to a card shop, donate them, or hold onto them to give to the next generation.

2 thoughts on “Baseball Card Values – Free Price Guide”

I am going to be getting rid of my baseball card collection. The cards that I have are:
1952 Topps
1953 Topps
1952 Bowman
1953 Bowman Color
1955 Bowman
1955 Topps (complete and mint)
1956 Topps
Is this collection, or part of it, of interest to you? Thanks.

Hey Stuart – I’m jealous of your vintage Topps and Bowman baseball cards… there are some awesome cards from those years. You can’t sell cards on Cardmavin… but you can on eBay! Here’s a good article that tells you how to sell your baseball cards. Good luck!

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When is the best time to buy and sell my cards? This is one of the most frequent emails we receive so we thought we would provide some advice along with an easy-to-read flow-chart on when the best time to buy and sell your baseball, football, hockey, and basketball cards.

It’s one of the hardest things to judge if you’re trying to flip collectible cards. When’s the perfect time to buy or sell, and is there any way to increase the potential for profit.

How to sell baseball cards Best Time to Buy and Sell Sports Cards: The Definitive Guide

‘Buying low and selling high’ is a simplistic way of seeing things, but it is the key to maximizing revenue.

It’s worth remembering that cards are a great investment for a number of different reasons. They’re uniquely portable, and prices can change rapidly depending on how the season is going.

Just make sure you’re not the first to sell a rare card in case you price it too cheaply. Your personal experiences may vary, but we’ve listed the best times to buy and sell various collectible cards, as well as why it’s ideal to do so.

Best Time To Sell Football Cards

How to sell baseball cards

NFL cards are always popular, but you’ll see an uptick in prices if you can wait until September to offload your collection. The five-month period between September and January is the best time to sell, matching the progression of the NFL season, and there’s an extra boost during the run-up to Christmas.

Opening day is also notable, with cards being snapped up in anticipation of a good year. It’s best to sell on hype, but you could miss out on future profits if a player exceeds expectations later on in the season.

NFL best time to buy: May, June, July

NFL best time to sell: Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec, Jan

The summer months of May, June, and July are optimal if you’re aiming to buy, with June the best if you’re looking for rock-bottom prices. Cards will still be cheap during the preseason in August, but they’re only going to go up afterward.

Best Time To Sell Baseball Cards

How to sell baseball cards

While it’s always a good idea to keep an eye out for expensive editions, all MLB cards will ebb and flow depending on the player/team throughout the season.

Summer is the ideal time to list your MLB cards, as interest peaks with the playoff race. We’d also recommend picking up rookie cards as early as possible, as a successful season will see them multiply in price due to hype.

MLB best time to buy: Nov, Dec, Jan, Feb, March

MLB best time to sell: Apr, May, June, July, Aug, Sep, Oct

Spring training will see prospects’ prices rising rapidly as the exhibition games are a good way to check out early form, so you’ll have to take advantage of the short window of opportunity for any cards you have an eye on. It’s best to buy anytime after the New Year, with prices starting to pick up again in April.

Best Time To Sell Basketball Cards

How to sell baseball cards

NBA cards are highly contested for the majority of the year, but there’s a three-month period during autumn when they should be more affordable (July to September).

The NBA season is a long one, and prices will fluctuate between October and June. Some cards will drop off during midseason, and it’s a good time to pick them up if you think a player still has the potential to turn a profit in the latter half.

NBA best time to buy: July, Aug, Sep

NBA best time to sell: Oct, Nov, Dec, Jan, Feb, March, April, May, June

If you have a mint copy of an incredibly rare card it’s a smart idea to list it up for a price you’d be willing to let it go for. Otherwise, keep an eye on fluctuations, and make sure to buy in during the slowest periods.

Prices begin to rise with the beginning of the preseason schedule in October.

Best Time To Sell Hockey Cards

How to sell baseball cards

As with the NBA, NHL cards are sought after for most of the year. They’re mainly wanted by other investors, as they’ve always been seen as a good commodity to flip.

Thankfully, there’s a lull during the same trio of months in Autumn (July to September), so it could be worth checking out player prices for both sports if you’re determined to make a good profit on multiple cards or players.

Hockey cards are always popular, and they tend to sell easily. As with the others, a playoff place will see prices skyrocket, and some positions tend to be worth more than others.

Upper Deck cards are some of the most unique collectibles, as the company has held exclusive NHL trading card rights for the majority of the last decade.

NHL best time to buy: July, Aug, Sep

NHL best time to sell: Oct, Nov, Dec, Jan, Feb, March, April, May, June

They’ve recently moved into e-Packs, which allow people to buy, open and store cards before they’re sent out physically by the company. It’s a nice touch, but it’s easier to make money by flipping cards instead of ripping packs.

Best Time To Sell Sports Cards: Conclusion and Advice

Any part-time collector knows how to acquire new cards, but there are things you can do to add extra value before selling them on. Grading your best cards is a good way to bump up their price, and it’s worth listing them up if a website like eBay has an ongoing promotion.

Think of the time and day that your potential auction will end, and make sure to plan accordingly. Sunday night at 10 pm EST tends to be favored if you’re looking to snag a large number of American buyers on an auction site, or you could sell just after a major game if a player had a notable performance.

It’s also worth thinking about the timing of tax rebates or holidays, as cards make ideal gifts for any fan. Supply will outweigh the demand for the most desirable variations, but fewer alternatives on the market will make it easier to sell.

There’s always a good time to buy or sell any sports cards, and it usually depends on factors like player form and whether the season is still running. If you can, wait until interest is at its lowest before you commit, and sell on hype when possible.

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I spend a lot of time writing and reading at a cafe in the heart of Brooklyn. I love the strong coffee and homemade muffins. I’m also fond of a regular named George. Twice a day he comes for a small pot of hot tea, walking around the corner from his house, as fast as his frail 81-year-old legs will take him.

George supplements his modest Social Security and pension by picking at flea markets and stoop sales. Brooklyn’s equivalent of yard sales. While focusing mainly on old American and foreign coins, he has dedicated a room in his house to a mountain of bric-a-brac that would be a hoarder’s dream.

His biggest score ever, $600, occurred recently with an assist from me. He traded a few coins for nine 1955 Topps baseball cards of Hall of Fame players which belonged to an acquaintance who cleans out Brooklyn homes.

Since George knows nothing about baseball cards, I offered to sell them for him if he let me share the experience with readers. In return, George asked that I not divulge his full name or post a current picture of him.

The good news is, at a time when mint cards are setting auction records, there remains a market for old baseball cards with soft corners and multiple creases. Such “raw” specimens aren’t worth grading by a third-party company because of their low value. But as I reported on a Babe Ruth card missing his face , which sold for $510 in December, not everyone can afford to spend tens of thousands of dollars on old bubblegum cards.

In fact, several dealers at the show told me that most sales are between $200 and a $1000. The star power of all-time greats like Willie Mays and Duke Snider never dims. And Sandy Koufax’s rookie card, wrinkles and all, is always hot. Plus there are still set collectors looking to plug holes with reasonably priced cards.

I also underestimated the appeal of fresh merchandise. Unlike much of the tired inventory on the show floor, George’s cards had never been seen before in the collecting world. Few things excite dealers more than sellers walking the aisles with shoe and cigar boxes containing cards. (George wrapped his with paper towels and a rubber band.)

It pays to get offers from more than one dealer. The first patiently wrote down on the back of an advertising flyer what each card was worth and offered about 80 percent of their value, or $500. The second dealer offered $550. By the time I reached Steve Gadziala, the co-owner of Champion Sports Cards & Collectibles in Boston, I was ready to get on with my life and take his $600.

None of the dealers tried to take advantage of me. Yes, I knew all of them from my covering previous shows. But these are hard-nosed businessmen who pay as much as $875 for a weekend show booth. To stay in their good graces, I made sure not to play one off the other and I thanked them after selling them to Gadziala.

With George’s $600 in my pocket, I watched Gadziala lay the cards out on his table. Pretty soon other dealers got wind of the new find and began circling like a school of fish around chum. Gadzilia plucked out the best card in the lot, a Harmon Killebrew rookie in mid grade condition and a couple of others. He would later submit the Killebrew to PSA for grading, and sold the rest for $650. He ended up selling the Killebrew, which came back a strong PSA 6, on eBay for $228.

The dealer who paid $650 planned to give them to his father who sets up at a flea market in Maine. Affordable cards, I learned, sell well at flea markets.

George was thrilled with his $600 which paid some bills and got his wife off his back for his hoarding habits. A few days later, he returned to the cafe with 100 more 1955 cards that had also seen better days. They included a bedraggled Yogi Berra, two Monte Irvins, and a rookie Ken Boyer. The rest were nobodies like the immortal Reno Bertoia.

Nobodies, or commons, have value, too. It also turned out that George’s were high-series. These carry a premium because they were printed later in the baseball season in lower quantities. Gadziala paid $60 for this lot and within minutes flipped it for $90.

This time the buyers were the show’s promoters. Jim Ryan and Brian Coppola put the cards in their bargain bin. Plenty of customers still pay a few bucks a pop —even in this age of million dollar cards. I went to another bargain table and acquired a 1955 Topps card of the Brooklyn Dodger World Series championship hero Sandy Amoros for $15, my weekend’s biggest buy.

Tired of grandpa’s baseball card collection rotting away in your attic? Well, unlike his pop bottle collection, baseball cards could yield a decent amount of income for you, if you know how to sell them. There are different outlets available for selling an individual baseball card or card collection. Know how to sell the fruits of your hobby and avoid getting ripped off.

Step 1: Learn collector jargon
Learn baseball card collector jargon. A “set” is a consecutively numbered series of cards. A “jersey card” includes a swatch from a players uniform.

While an “insert” is part of a card set, its appearance is different from the rest of the set.

Step 2: Learn card values jargon
Learn terms used for card values. “Book values” are set on baseball card price guide values. “Sell value” is the most recent sale price paid for a card or collection.

Step 3: Learn card condition terms
Learn the descriptors used in grading card conditions. Terms include “mint,” “near-mint,” “excellent,” “very good,” “fair,” and “poor.”

Step 4: Get your collection graded
Get your collection professionally graded. You can find grading services through sports card collector publications and online groups.

Step 5: Visit sports memorabilia shows
Go to card collector shows to get an overview of current baseball card prices. You can find information about schedules for shows in your area by searching online.

Step 6: Visit a major card company website
Visit a major card company website for a list of authorized baseball card dealers. Get a price quote at a dealer’s shop.

Step 7: Sell your collection at an online auction
Sell through an online auction like eBay, especially if you feel that you know your collection’s value. The internet can help you reach collectibles buyers from around the world. With some effort, your collection is sure to find a good home and bring you some cash.

As controversial Detroit Tigers manager Billy Martin posed for a 1972 baseball card, he discreetly “flipped the bird.”

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When I got back into the hobby, I couldn’t believe all of the changes that were made. I knew Ebay had really changed the game and enabled collectors to buy cards that previously were hard to get. But were there other places that I didn’t know about? Well there was!

When I started searching I could’t believe all the different places I could go to buy, sell, and trade cards. Now if you have been following me and my podcast I have shared this information with you before. But if you are just starting out this will be a great starting point

  1. Ebay – This is still the go to place to buy and sell sports cards. Ebay changed the game when they started back in the day. The ability to buy cards that people couldn’t get at their local card shops really was a huge draw. Also, the amount of cards that were available drove prices down which made cards more affordable. People complain about their fees, but I feel it’s a small price to pay for the amount of buyers they can attract.

Check out this video I did about selling on ebay. If you need a place to start out here is the place.

2. Facebook Groups – Outside of Ebay, facebook groups are the biggest buyers and sellers of sports cards. Engage with the community and you will be buying and selling in no time. Please be warned there are scammers on there. Luckily there is a website for that – Click Here. Also make sure you pay Paypal Goods and Services to protect yourself if they don’t ship the card.

If you want to learn how to buy cards to flip on Facebook check out this interview below!

3. Instagram – A great place to post pictures of your cards to buy, sell, trade, or just show off. Instagram trends towards a younger crowd with newer cards being more popular on the platform. You can save on fees if you put the work into your account. Here is an article that I wrote to help you build your following and make some bank bro.

4. COMC – This marketplace is only for buying and selling sports cards. You send in your cards and COMC will scan and list your cards for you. If someone buys you cards they ship it for you! The best part of Comc is that you can buy from multiple buyers and pay one shipping cost. They also have a feature that you can buy and then list the card without touching the card.

5. Blowout Forums – They have different sections for each sport, there they talk about each release of cards. Also, they buy, sell, and trade cards on these forums. It’s a great place to learn as well as buy/sell cards.

6. PSA Card Forums – Similiar to Blowout forums. But they also have set registries where you can see collector’s PSA sets. Take a look at what they are missing from the set and shoot them an email if you have the card for a sale. No guessing what they are looking for, you already know it!

Did I miss any? Please let me know in the comments below and if you found this informative please share!

Wait! Wait! I have to add 1 more!

Next Door App – I found this app awhile back but never used it to buy sports cards. Well that changed last month. I posted that I was looking to buy sports cards and I received a ton of messages. I eventually bought 13 sets from an older women who was just looking to get them out of her house. I bought them really cheap too. Don’t miss out on this app which can be downloaded on ios and android.

Baseball Card Values – Free Price Guide

I’ll show you how to look up your baseball card values using Mavin. Get real market prices… see what your cards ACTUALLY sell for.

We’re going to be using Mavin.io to look up baseball card values. It shows you what the card sold for. It can also show you what it’s currently selling for… but the true value is what someone paid for it. Grab your card and enter these details:

  1. Enter the year. Look at the back for the copyright date, or the last year of stats.
  2. Enter the brand. For example: Topps, Upper Deck, Bowman, etc.
  3. Enter the player’s name.
  4. Enter the card number. Found on the back of the card.

Looking up a Baseball Card’s Value

The search results will show cards that have recently sold (hopefully just like yours). The “worth” is the average of the results on the page, including shipping. I like using the “sold” results to get a true estimate of the baseball card’s value… but you can also check out the “selling” link to see what people are listing the card for.

If you didn’t get an accurate price estimate, try refining your search by entering more card details, or pick a few comparable items by using the checkboxes to pick your “comps”. This gives you a much more accurate estimate of what your baseball card’s value.
How to sell baseball cards

What to do Next

Once you’ve gone through and searched for the value of your baseball cards using our price guide, you have several different options:

If they’re valuable: You can either hold onto the cards, perhaps get them graded if not already, and see if they appreciate in value over time. Alternatively, you sell it to a local card shop without getting ripped off since you know it’s worth. Lastly, you can sell it yourself on eBay to get a competitive price. Read our guide to selling on eBay.

If not: A card doesn’t have to be worth money to be considered valuable. Card collecting has been a beloved hobby that has been passed through generations. Each card has sentimental value to someone: where they found it, how they traded for it, who gave it to them. If your cards aren’t worth money, they could be worth some memories to a relative or a stranger. Put them on Craigslist, take them to a card shop, donate them, or hold onto them to give to the next generation.

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How to Sell Your Baseball Cards

First, if you’re trying to find out the value of your cards, you may want to visit your local sports card shop to buy a price guide. Look in your yellow pages under “Sports Cards”, or “Sports Memorabilia”, or “Collectibles”, then visit the dealer in person. I recommend not asking them over the phone how much your cards are worth. Dealers receive tons of these calls already. If you show the dealer your collection in person they can give you an idea on the value of your cards and may even be willing to make an offer.

Second, once you have an idea of what your cards are worth, you may want to consider breaking your collection down. Selling the valuable cards individually will likely get you more money than selling your collection as a whole. Selling them individually takes more work, but usually means more money. It’s up to you to decide what’s more important, time or money.

Okay, you want to sell them. Two common options are:

1) Taking them to a local sports card dealer and see what the dealer is willing pay for them. If you get 50% of book value for your cards, consider yourself extremely lucky. Getting 5% to 25% of book value is more realistic. If your cards are old, and by old I mean from 1900 to 1960, you have a better chance of getting close to book value. Most cards from the late 1980’s and early 1990’s are extremely plentiful, and hardly any dealers need cards from that era. If they’re actually interested in buying cards from that era, expect to get anywhere from 5% to 25% book value for them.

2) Sell your cards on eBay. Again, if you sell the valuable cards individually, you’ll likely make more money than if you just sell your whole collection. Be sure to show photos of the cards, and describe the condition of the card(s) as best as you can. If you have a high feedback rating on eBay, that will help. If you don’t have a high feedback rating, or you’re not familiar with eBay, consider asking a friend who is familiar with selling on eBay to help you.

If you decide to sell your collection as a whole on eBay, give a good description of your collection, such as the year and brand of your cards, and the condition the cards are in. The more pictures, the better.

If you’d like to sell your cards on ebay but don’t know how or don’t want to do the work I may be willing to sell them for you. I typically split the final selling price. For example, if your cards sell for $500, you get $250 and I get $250. I am a very reputable seller on ebay with outstanding feedback, with 10+ years of experience having completed over 25,000 transactions. You can view my ebay feedback rating here. If you’re interested or have questions call me (Chuck) at 423-531-8909 or email me at [email protected] .

*** Please note, I’m currently not buying cards from the 80’s or 90’s. I can only help you sell cards that are worth $50 or more ***

If you’re trying to figure out the value of your baseball cards, visit this page:

So maybe you’ve inherited Uncle Jimmy’s collection of baseball cards from back in the day.

If you have a card collection you would like to sell or pawn, I’d recommend trying PawnGuru first. We’ll show you multiple offers from pawn shops near you. But before submitting your baseball cards, keep in mind a few tips to get top dollar for your card collection.

Looking to sell or pawn an item now?

Get local cash offers – free, fast & easy.

Pawn or Sell an Item

Be Honest

When it comes to sports cards, this is even more important since the card’s condition directly impacts its value. If the card you are selling has any major flaws, say so in your description and provide a picture. While this might mean it sells for less money, this is much better than having the pawn shop say no deal, making your trip to the pawn shop a waste.

Research

Make sure you do your research to figure out how much your collection may be worth. It’s always a great idea to walk into a pawn shop knowing how much your cards are worth in a direct sale, and how much you’re willing to settle if the pawnbroker decides to knock the offer down a bit.

Cleaning or other maintenance

Don’t do either of these things. If the cards are a little dirty or dusty, just dust it away. If the card is bent a little or ripped, don’t try ironing it out or taping it. Any chemicals, water, or heat added to a collection of cards can damage them, rendering them worthless.

Paperwork and Validation

Make sure to have the paperwork or certificate that can prove that your collectable cards are legit. Not many pawn shops will have an expert on baseball or basketball cards on staff that can tell if your cards are worth something. The more confident the shop is that your cards are authentic, the bigger the offers you can expect to receive.

If you have any questions, please send us an email at [email protected] . We’re eager to help!

Looking to sell or pawn an item now?

Get local cash offers – free, fast & easy.