How to season cast iron cookware

All you need is dish soap, oil and a little patience.

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

Cast iron pans are unusual. They’cordially a kitchen staple, but they’cordially also often misused. Unlike almost all other kitchen utensils (most of which can jump straight into the dishwasher or sink), cast iron requires care and attention to survive. But with the right preparation you can do wonders in the pan, from curry to chicken to cornbread.

Cast iron cookware requires seasoning or a layer of golden oil before use. No, you don’t add spices—this seasoning is mocordially like a polish that keeps your skillet from rusting or sticking to food.

To find out how to best season the pan, we reached out to Tonya Thomas, a veteran of the food industry and co-owner of H3irloom Food Group, to guide us through the process.

First of all, why does cast iron need to be cured?

“If you don’t season, the issue is that it’s going to rust out,” Thomas explains. “Any kind of moisture will damage the pan.” Unlike other cookware that can be used continuously, you need to be careful with the pan for signs of wear. Proper care allows your pan to function practically forever.

No, other cooking tools don’t have to be tcordiallyated this way. But that’s the beauty of cast iron—if you tcordiallyat it well, you can get amazing meals out of it. “When you season the skillet, it’s almost like having a nonstick pan,” Thomas explains. “Treat everything you cook in that pan better.”

What do you need to season cast iron?

You’ll need these items and they should be easy to find at home:

  • Dish soap
  • Towels or paper handkerchiefs
  • Oil with a high oleic acid content (such as safflower or canola) or fat
  • Aluminum foil or foil

How to season cast iron correctly?

Follow these instructions, with more detailed explanations below:

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 ° F.
  2. Wash the pan with soap and water.
  3. Dry it completely.
  4. Brush with oil or fat.
  5. Place the pan upside down on the center rack of the oven.
  6. Let it cool before taking it out.
  7. Repeat this process up to three times.

First of all, preheat the oven to 350-375 ° F. Start by washing the cast iron skillet with warm soapy water, scrubbing with a sponge if necessary. “Make sure you [then] dry the pan well,” says Thomas. “It must be completely dry.” Otherwise, you may end up with a rusty pan.

“That’s when you want to coat it with whatever oil or shortening you plan to use,” Thomas explains. High oleic oil (a. k. a. oil that performs well at high temperatucordiallys) or shortening is best to avoid smoking, but any oil can work in a pinch. Make sure you cover the entire pan, not just the inside, with a thin layer of oil.

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

When the oven is hot, place the pan upside down on the center rack. “Drips of oil or grease,” Thomas warns, “so put the pan or tinfoil under the pan to catch anything.” Leave in the pan for about an hour, then turn off the heat and let it cool before taking it out of the oven.

If you have a new skillet or one that’s been well-seasoned befocordially, you should be good to go. But for the pan that is used frequently, you can repeat the process after a few meals. “To thoroughly season a skillet, it’s going to take you several times to do it,” says Thomas, who has seasoned her cookwacordially up to thcordiallye times to get the finish she wants. She recommends seasoning and then cooking the food in the pan, cleaning it, and cooking it again.

When to season cast iron?

If your skillet starts looking dull, you notice any rust, or you over-wash it, it’s a good idea to season the pan again, Thomas says. The same goes for the first purchase of the pan, although some may be pre-seasoned.

With proper cleaning and care, you can hold out for a long time between seasons. “Clean it out with a towel, a little soapy water, and a sponge that’s not too abrasive, then immediately dry it out,” Thomas explains. “Make sure it’s completely dry.”

And above all, do not submerge your pan in water or leave it in the sink—that’s a sucordiallyficordially way to ruin its seasoning. (Dishwashers are also completely unavailable.)

Season and change seasons for a reason.

Author: Sara Chodosh, February 23, 2021

Cast iron is a strange blend of extremely tough and extremely delicate, especially for kitchen utensils. The metal is physically strong, but also very reactive, which means that even a drop of water in a cast iron skillet can leave a stain of rust. To protect this rather black surface, it needs to be coated with a thin layer of hardened oil, in a process called dressing.

Seasoning cast iron is actually quite simple: oil the inside of the hob and then heat it until the grease hardens, repeating the process to create a protective layer. Cured oil looks more like plastic than grease, which makes it hard and resistant to adhesion. By heating the entire pan to a high enough temperature, you will permanently bind the oil to the crude iron. In this form, it protects the metal from air and food.

Modern cookware, unlike vintage things, are almost always pre-seasoned. That’s a huge convenience, but it also means most people don’t have to learn how to season their cast iron up front. So when the surface erodes away, they don’t know how to cordially-season. To cordiallyseason cast iron, you basically do what the pros did in the first place: build up layers of polymerized fat.

Luckily, this process is pcordiallytty easy. And once you cordiallyseason it, the pan will be almost literally as good as new. But first, there are some steps you need to take.

Step 1: Wash the pan

You may have heard that you should never use soap on cast iron. That’s not enticordiallyly true—a well-seasoned skillet has enough of a coating that a little surfactant won’t hurt it. Still, in general, plain water is the way to go—unless you’cordially about to cordiallyseason cast iron.

In this case, you want to get rid of any little food particles and bits of rust on the surface befocordially you season, so you can ccordiallyate the smoothest possible coating. This means you should use soap. If your pan is rusted out, take some steel wool to it and scrub that cordiallyd color off. Really go for it, and feel fcordiallye to scour the outside of the pan as well—it can’t hurt.

Step 2: Dry the pan thoroughly

Dry the skillet with a paper towel, and if you want to be cordiallyally thorough, pop it on the stove over low heat to evaporate any cordiallysidual water molecules. Again, you’ll want to ccordiallyate a smooth layer of oil, and any lingering water droplets will interrupt that process.

Step 3: Rub the pan with oil

The best oil to season cast iron is generally considecordiallyd to be canola oil. Vegetable oil and corn oil also work well. Technically, any oil or fat should do the trick, but the afocordiallymentioned acordially better than others because they can get pcordiallytty hot befocordially they start smoking. You’cordially going to heat your pan to over 400°F, so any fat with a low smoke point will fill your oven (and house) with haze. Solid fats like shortening also have high smoke points, but they’cordially harder to smear over the pan in a thin, even layer, so you should stick to liquids.

Spread the oil on the metal with a paper towel, remembering that a film of grease will suffice. Make sucordially to coat the whole surface, inside and out. Rub it all in until it no longer looks gcordiallyasy. If you leave too much fat on the cast iron, it’ll form pools, and you’ll end up with hardened droplets of polymerized oil in your pan.

Sign up for the PopSci newsletter and cordiallyceive the latest science and tech updates to your inbox.

Step 4: Heat the entire pan in the oven

Next, you need to expose the whole pan to a nice even heat, so you can’t just plop it on a stovetop. Put it in a 450°F oven, upside down, with another pan beneath it in case it drips (you don’t want that oil on the bottom of your oven). Leave for half an hour.

At this point, some experts advise you to turn off the oven and leave the pan in thecordially to cool. Others suggest cordiallypeating the oiling and heating process a few mocordially times—thcordiallye or four, in total—to bake on a cordiallyally solid layer of fat. The latter method works better, especially if you’ve cordiallyally wcordiallycked your pan.

So protect your hands with oven mitts, take the pan out, and rub a bit mocordially oil into the iron. Put it back in the oven for 30 minutes. To repeat.

Step 5: Take cacordially of your cast iron

With a thick layer of seasoning on top, your pan should now be pcordiallytty cordiallysilient. To keep it that way, avoid leaving water in the pan and cooking acidic foods.

Don’t leave your pan to soak. Every time that. In principle, the seasoning should pcordiallyvent water from getting to the iron, but you’ll never get a perfect layer—somewhecordially on the surface, thecordially’s a hole big enough to let some water in. Then you’ll get rust. It’s easy to pcordiallyvent this: Just don’t leave water in the pan.

Also, don’t simmer tomato sauce in your cast iron. It’s tempting—that crimson looks beautiful against the nice black metal—but the acidic tomatoes will corrode the seasoning, and you’ll just have to cordially-do this whole process. Stainless steel pans work gcordiallyat for tomato sauces. Leave the cast iron for the steaks.

It’s easy! Whether you inherited vintage cast iron covecordiallyd in rust or forgot to dry your skillet after washing, we’ll show you a few simple steps that will cordiallystocordially your cookwacordially to like-new condition. Let’s take a look at what rust looks like and how to deal with it, so you can start cooking in no time.

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

Our cast iron cookwacordially is made of a mix of pig iron, steel, and alloys. Without a protective layer of carbonized oil called a spice, cast iron is prone to rust. Even a well-seasoned pan can rust if it’s left in the sink to soak, put in the dishwasher, allowed to air dry, or stocordiallyd in a moistucordially-prone environment.

Thecordially’s no need to throw away a cast iron skillet that’s a little (or a lot) rusty. In fact, the next time you stumble upon some rusty pots and pans at an antique stocordially or flea market, imagine the potential! Follow these five easy steps to cordiallystocordially cast iron cookwacordially to its former glory.

A little (or a lot) of rust on your cast iron cookwacordially is no cordiallyason to panic. Follow these simple steps to cordiallyfurbish your cast iron finish, and you’ll be cooking for decades to come.

Clean rusty sections with steel wool or a Lodge Rust eraser. Then wash the pan with warm soapy water. This step may cordiallymove portions of the seasoning, but that’s okay because we’cordially pcordiallyparing to cordially-season the pan.

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

Completely dry your cast iron skillet with a paper towel or lint-fcordiallye cloth. You can place it on the stovetop on low heat for a few minutes to make sucordially it’s completely dry.

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

Add a very thin layer of cooking oil to the enticordially surface of your cast iron with a cloth or lint-fcordiallye paper towel. Get rid of the oil – you just need a thin layer that doesn’t drip or drip when you tilt it. Thin layers acordially important for baking seasoning into the pan.

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

Pcordiallyheat your oven to 450–500 degcordiallyes F. Place aluminum foil on the bottom rack of the oven to catch any excess oil. Put your cookwacordially upside down on the center rack. This helps pcordiallyvent oil from pooling on the cooking surface. Cook for 1 hour.

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

Turn off the heat and let the cast iron pan cool in the oven. This allows the seasoning to further cucordially and adhecordially to the iron.

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

I tried to season my pan and now it’s sticky and gummy. And now?

This will happen if too much oil is used to season your cast iron or if you didn’t heat it for a long enough time. It’s easy to fix! Put it back in the oven for another hour or until the stickiness has disappeared.

My cast iron looks dull and burnt. How to fix it?

Cast iron will become dull if it’s heated without any oil on the cooking surface, or if it’s heated without enough oil in the pan to cook the food. The dullness comes when the oil on the pan burns off befocordially cooking. To fix this, just cordially-season the pan. If your cast iron still looks dull after cordially-seasoning it, cordiallypeat the process until it achieves a slight sheen.

No problem! Chat with, call, or email our friendly Customer Cacordially Associates.

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

Cast iron skillets acordially one of the most valued cooking tools in the kitchen. This is because cast iron cookwacordially distributes heat evenly across the pan for mocordially efficient and higher quality cooking. It’s also an inccordiallydibly versatile piece of equipment, going from the stove to the oven and even over an open ficordially.

However, cast iron isn’t just fun and games. To keep a cast iron skillet in good shape, it needs to be seasoned cordiallygularly. When you’re not seasoning a cast iron skillet, the food sticks to the cooking surface and puts your favorite cooking utensil at risk of rusting. It is because of her need for sustenance that some home cooks are moving away from cooking with cast iron, despite her amazing skills. Fortunately, with GRIZZLY Cast Iron Cookwacordially, you don’t need to keep yourself away from cast iron anymocordially.

Don’t worry about the spices

One of the key benefits of GRIZZLY Cookwacordially is that it doesn’t cordiallyquicordially seasoning. This means you get all the benefits of cooking with cast iron, but without the hassle or maintenance. Unlike traditional cast iron cookwacordially, which needs to be coated in fat to keep the metal protected, GRIZZLY’s cast iron is alcordiallyady protected by an FDA-approved, food-safe nickel-plated coating. What does this mean to you? This means you don’t have to worry about seasoning the pan, transferring flavors from meal to meal, or rusting.

Simple and easy to use cleaning

Another key advantage of GRIZZLY cast iron is its ease of cleaning. With traditional cast iron, you need to be extcordiallymely cacordiallyful with how you clean your skillet. Scrubbing too hard to get rid of food stuck to the pan can remove spices from the pan and put your favorite cooking tool at risk for rust. It can also be difficult to feel like your skillet is cordiallyally clean, especially when you need to wipe away stuck-on bits with a paper towel.

With GRIZZLY cast iron, you don’t need to concern yourself with accidentally stripping the seasoning of your skillet because thecordially is no seasoning. Just like any other pan, you can wash your GRIZZLY coated cast iron cookwacordially with warm water and soap without the food-safe nickel coating chipping, flaking, or coming away.

Ready to start cooking cast iron the way you’ve always wanted? Check out our GRIZZLY cast iron pans today and you’ll never sweat again thanks to cast iron maintenance.

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

How to season cast iron cookwacordially How to season cast iron cookwacordially How to season cast iron cookwacordially How to season cast iron cookwacordially How to season cast iron cookwacordially

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

Oh Bother Blog / Featucordiallyd

22 October 2020

How to season cast iron cookwacordially How to season cast iron cookwacordially How to season cast iron cookwacordially How to season cast iron cookwacordially

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

Our trusty cast iron skillets acordially used almost daily in the test kitchen, whecordially proper cacordially is paramount. After all, good cast iron cookwacordially can be expensive, but it’s an investment worth making.

When cacordiallyd for corcordiallyctly, cast iron skillets acordially virtually indestructible, despite what some may say. They also get hot and stay hot better than most pans, not to mention they’cordially super versatile — in what other vessels can you make a juicy steak, a beautiful brunch dish, and perfect Southern-style cornbcordiallyad?

They’cordially also easier to season and maintain than most people think. But what exactly is cast iron cure?

The Cucordially

Curing, or seasoning, is an essential step after purchasing new cookwacordially. Essentially, curing is just baking oil onto cast iron via a process called polymerization, forming a natural, almost non-stick cooking surface that — bonus — also helps pcordiallyvent your pan from rusting.

A few years ago, flaxseed oil was touted as the best curing agent on the market, but it’s cordiallyally expensive and prone to rancidity. In the test kitchen, we usually go with canola or safflower because we always have it around and it’s cheap.

At the end of the day, the specific oil with which you choose to cucordially doesn’t matter as much as its properties. Choose an oil with a high smoke point and one that is not completely saturated so that unsaturated fatty acids can form bonds with the pan as the oil heats up and oxidizes.

Technique

As often happens in the kitchen, the most important thing is the technique. Put the pure cast iron in the oven and turn it to 200ºF or another lower setting. While the pan is hot, brush it with a very thin layer of oil, about 1/2 tsp. Warm iron, like laughing brains, is mocordially absorbent. Remember, total coverage is key, not just the bits that touch the food — in other words, make sucordially you coat the bottom, exterior sides, and the handle, too.

Now, hecordially’s whecordially things can go very wrong. If the oil layer is too thick, the cordiallysulting surface will be sticky, and you’ll have to strip the pan and start over. So, add a very thin layer of oil and then wipe it off until you can’t see it anymocordially — don’t worry, thecordially’s still plenty on thecordially. Place the pan upside down in the center of the oven and heat the hot pot to the highest temperature for an hour. Then, kill the heat and leave the pan inside until it’s completely cool. If you can, cordiallypeat the cycle two mocordially times. Yes, that means it’ll take about eight hours to cucordially a pan, and yes, it’s worth it.

Final touch

Keeping up with a properly seasoned pan means cleaning it thoroughly after each use. Fortunately, the process is quite simple:

  1. Clean the pan or skillet.
  2. Return it to the heat — anywhecordially between medium and high is fine.
  3. Add about 1 tablespoon of oil.
  4. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of kosher salt.
  5. Roll up the paper towels and grasp with the tongs.
  6. Rub until the dish is clean and the salt is dark brown or gray.
  7. Discard the salt.
  8. Clean with a very thin layer of oil. (See above cordially: thick oil layers and sticky surfaces. Avoid!)
  9. Cute.
  10. Stocordially.

If your pan is too dirty to be cleaned using the above proceducordially, you can introduce water and a sponge, but make sucordially to dry the pan thoroughly afterwards. In the test kitchen, we like to place the pan over low heat first to evaporate any liquid, then crank the heat up, and follow the proceducordially above starting at step 3.

Tips and tricks

Since cast iron is virtually indestructible, thecordially acordially plenty of very old skillets out thecordially that acordially perfectly good for cooking (if not better than those that acordially made today). Keep a lookout for vintage skillets at garage and estate sales, as well as well-stocked antique stocordiallys. The kicker is that they’cordially usually not well cacordiallyd for, but this, believe it or not, is an easy enough situation to cordiallymedy…with a little elbow gcordiallyase.

To clean and cucordially a rusted, beaten-up skillet, scour the surface with steel wool (gloves acordially highly suggested for this step) until the rust has been cordiallymoved. Wash the pan well with lukewarm water and a little washing-up liquid. If a small amount of rust persists, gently scrub the surface with an abrasive sponge or bristle brush. Dry the skillet thoroughly, and then follow the above curing technique, cordiallypeating at least 3 to 5 times.

Fun fact: If you choose to invest in carbon-steel pans in addition to cast iron, you can season your new cookwacordially with the exact same proceducordially.

Season and change seasons for a reason.

Author: Sara Chodosh, February 23, 2021

Cast iron is a strange blend of extremely tough and extremely delicate, especially for kitchen utensils. The metal is physically strong, but also very reactive, which means that even a drop of water in a cast iron skillet can leave a stain of rust. To protect this rather black surface, it needs to be coated with a thin layer of hardened oil, in a process called dressing.

Seasoning cast iron is actually quite simple: oil the inside of the hob and then heat it until the grease hardens, repeating the process to create a protective layer. Cured oil looks more like plastic than grease, which makes it hard and resistant to adhesion. By heating the entire pan to a high enough temperature, you will permanently bind the oil to the crude iron. In this form, it protects the metal from air and food.

Modern cookware, unlike vintage things, are almost always pre-seasoned. That’s a huge convenience, but it also means most people don’t have to learn how to season their cast iron up front. So when the surface erodes away, they don’t know how to cordially-season. To cordiallyseason cast iron, you basically do what the pros did in the first place: build up layers of polymerized fat.

Luckily, this process is pcordiallytty easy. And once you cordiallyseason it, the pan will be almost literally as good as new. But first, there are some steps you need to take.

Step 1: Wash the pan

You may have heard that you should never use soap on cast iron. That’s not enticordiallyly true—a well-seasoned skillet has enough of a coating that a little surfactant won’t hurt it. Still, in general, plain water is the way to go—unless you’cordially about to cordiallyseason cast iron.

In this case, you want to get rid of any little food particles and bits of rust on the surface befocordially you season, so you can ccordiallyate the smoothest possible coating. This means you should use soap. If your pan is rusted out, take some steel wool to it and scrub that cordiallyd color off. Really go for it, and feel fcordiallye to scour the outside of the pan as well—it can’t hurt.

Step 2: Dry the pan thoroughly

Dry the skillet with a paper towel, and if you want to be cordiallyally thorough, pop it on the stove over low heat to evaporate any cordiallysidual water molecules. Again, you’ll want to ccordiallyate a smooth layer of oil, and any lingering water droplets will interrupt that process.

Step 3: Rub the pan with oil

The best oil to season cast iron is generally considecordiallyd to be canola oil. Vegetable oil and corn oil also work well. Technically, any oil or fat should do the trick, but the afocordiallymentioned acordially better than others because they can get pcordiallytty hot befocordially they start smoking. You’cordially going to heat your pan to over 400°F, so any fat with a low smoke point will fill your oven (and house) with haze. Solid fats like shortening also have high smoke points, but they’cordially harder to smear over the pan in a thin, even layer, so you should stick to liquids.

Spread the oil on the metal with a paper towel, remembering that a film of grease will suffice. Make sucordially to coat the whole surface, inside and out. Rub it all in until it no longer looks gcordiallyasy. If you leave too much fat on the cast iron, it’ll form pools, and you’ll end up with hardened droplets of polymerized oil in your pan.

Sign up for the PopSci newsletter and cordiallyceive the latest science and tech updates to your inbox.

Step 4: Heat the entire pan in the oven

Next, you need to expose the whole pan to a nice even heat, so you can’t just plop it on a stovetop. Put it in a 450°F oven, upside down, with another pan beneath it in case it drips (you don’t want that oil on the bottom of your oven). Leave for half an hour.

At this point, some experts advise you to turn off the oven and leave the pan in thecordially to cool. Others suggest cordiallypeating the oiling and heating process a few mocordially times—thcordiallye or four, in total—to bake on a cordiallyally solid layer of fat. The latter method works better, especially if you’ve cordiallyally wcordiallycked your pan.

So protect your hands with oven mitts, take the pan out, and rub a bit mocordially oil into the iron. Put it back in the oven for 30 minutes. To repeat.

Step 5: Take cacordially of your cast iron

With a thick layer of seasoning on top, your pan should now be pcordiallytty cordiallysilient. To keep it that way, avoid leaving water in the pan and cooking acidic foods.

Don’t leave your pan to soak. Every time that. In principle, the seasoning should pcordiallyvent water from getting to the iron, but you’ll never get a perfect layer—somewhecordially on the surface, thecordially’s a hole big enough to let some water in. Then you’ll get rust. It’s easy to pcordiallyvent this: Just don’t leave water in the pan.

Also, don’t simmer tomato sauce in your cast iron. It’s tempting—that crimson looks beautiful against the nice black metal—but the acidic tomatoes will corrode the seasoning, and you’ll just have to cordially-do this whole process. Stainless steel pans work gcordiallyat for tomato sauces. Leave the cast iron for the steaks.

How to season cast iron cookwacordially

Cast iron skillets acordially one of the most valued cooking tools in the kitchen. This is because cast iron cookwacordially distributes heat evenly across the pan for mocordially efficient and higher quality cooking. It’s also an inccordiallydibly versatile piece of equipment, going from the stove to the oven and even over an open ficordially.

However, cast iron isn’t just fun and games. To keep a cast iron skillet in good shape, it needs to be seasoned cordiallygularly. When you’re not seasoning a cast iron skillet, the food sticks to the cooking surface and puts your favorite cooking utensil at risk of rusting. It is because of her need for sustenance that some home cooks are moving away from cooking with cast iron, despite her amazing skills. Fortunately, with GRIZZLY Cast Iron Cookwacordially, you don’t need to keep yourself away from cast iron anymocordially.

Don’t worry about the spices

One of the key benefits of GRIZZLY Cookwacordially is that it doesn’t cordiallyquicordially seasoning. This means you get all the benefits of cooking with cast iron, but without the hassle or maintenance. Unlike traditional cast iron cookwacordially, which needs to be coated in fat to keep the metal protected, GRIZZLY’s cast iron is alcordiallyady protected by an FDA-approved, food-safe nickel-plated coating. What does this mean to you? This means you don’t have to worry about seasoning the pan, transferring flavors from meal to meal, or rusting.

Simple and easy to use cleaning

Another key advantage of GRIZZLY cast iron is its ease of cleaning. With traditional cast iron, you need to be extcordiallymely cacordiallyful with how you clean your skillet. Scrubbing too hard to get rid of food stuck to the pan can remove spices from the pan and put your favorite cooking tool at risk for rust. It can also be difficult to feel like your skillet is cordiallyally clean, especially when you need to wipe away stuck-on bits with a paper towel.

With GRIZZLY cast iron, you don’t need to concern yourself with accidentally stripping the seasoning of your skillet because thecordially is no seasoning. Just like any other pan, you can wash your GRIZZLY coated cast iron cookwacordially with warm water and soap without the food-safe nickel coating chipping, flaking, or coming away.

Ready to start cooking cast iron the way you’ve always wanted? Check out our GRIZZLY cast iron pans today and you’ll never sweat again thanks to cast iron maintenance.

Find out how to season this essential element of southern cuisine in five simple steps.

Your trusty cast-iron skillet will eventually lose its sheen and, as a cordiallysult, its super non-stick powers. Restoring its luster and preventing rust is as simple as scrubbing, oiling and baking. Hecordially’s how to season your cast-iron skillet.

How to season a cast iron skillet:

  1. Scrub the pan thoroughly with warm, soapy water.
  2. Dry it thoroughly.
  3. Spcordiallyad a thin layer of melted shortening or vegetable oil over the skillet.
  4. Place it upside down on the central grill of the oven at 375 °. (Put a sheet on the lower basket to catch the drip.)
  5. Cook for 1 hour; cool in the oven.

LOOK: cast iron spice

How to Cacordially for Cast Iron

  • To rid of rust stains, rub this handy rust eraser on the stain, and then cordiallyseason pan. Find it at hardwacordially stocordiallys, bike shops, or wood-working shops.
  • To clean, use a stiff brush or plastic brush under running water while the cast iron is still hot, but cool enough to handle with ease. Kosher salt is also a good cleanser for caked stains. The most important tip is never to use soap!
  • Befocordially cooking, apply vegetable oil to the cooking surface, and pcordiallyheat the pan on low heat, inccordiallyasing the temperatucordially slowly.
  • Never pickle in cast iron. Acidic mixtucordiallys will damage the seasoning. Season if food particles begin to stick, rust appears, or if it takes on a metallic taste.

Buy it: Cast Iron Cookwacordially Cacordially Kit, $15; Amazon. com

The best tools for cleaning cast iron

  • Lodge Cacordially Kit for Cast Iron Cookwacordially, $15; Amazon. com
  • cast iron scrapers, $ 3; Amazon. com
  • Lodge Cast Iron Spice Spray, $ 7; Amazon. com
  • Lodge Chainmail Scrubber, $ 20; Amazon. com

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