How to salute like a soldier

EVA TALENT

OCTOBER 4, 2017

DEGREE

A deceased soldier or veteran has the right to say hello at his funeral or ceremony on the ramp after the deployment. The ramp ceremony is held when a soldier is killed in combat and his coffin is loaded onto a military plane. Generally, only soldiers are present at the ramp ceremony. Solo i membri del servizio e i veterani dovrebbero rendere omaggio a un soldato caduto; civilians should never say hello. However, civilians should greet the fallen soldier by taking off their hat and placing their right hand over their heart, as they would during the national anthem.

Please see this article

  • Greetings at the military funeral
  • Pass
  • Stop three steps
  • Raise your right hand in greeting
  • Make a forward motion
  • You made your move in the face
  • Salute to the ramp ceremony
  • Get Info
  • Edition
  • It is placed in a military departure plane inside a military departure plane

1 Greetings at the military funeral

2 Pass

After the first row of funeral guests has passed, approach the coffin in an orderly fashion. The first row of funeral guests is usually made up of close relatives and other family members and friends. Wait for all civilians to go through the coffin before taking your place in the ledger. Usa le tecniche di marcia dell’esercito e i movimenti del viso per avvicinarti alla bara. If you are marching with another soldier at the same time, walk step by step; the highest ranking soldier must whisper a shot as you approach the coffin.

3 Stop three steps

Stop three steps in front of the casket and stand at the position of attention. If you are with another soldier, the highest ranking soldier among you must whisper the command “Present a weapon”.

4 Raise your right hand in greeting

Slowly raise your right hand in greeting. Unlike normal greetings, the funeral greeting must be done slowly and respectfully. Hold the salute for about three seconds or until a taller soldier orders “Order a weapon”. This command must also be issued in a low voice. Slowly lower your hand and restore the attention position.

5 Make a forward motion

Make a forward motion toward the exit door. Don’t go back if the only way out is behind you; instead, turn left or right and go around the seat to reach the exit. If you are with another soldier, the taller one among you gives the opposite order.

6 You made your move in the face

Go ahead after making a forward facing motion. If you are with another soldier, an elderly soldier whispers the command, “Forward, march.” He keeps walking until you leave the room.

7 Salute to the ramp ceremony

8 Get Info

Get Info while you await the arrival of the fallen soldier’s casket. If you are in formation, grab the attention of your soldiers when the coffin is in sight. If you are a member of a lineup, you will be directed to a comment post in due course.

9 Edition

Edition the command “Present arms” when the casket is five paces away from the end of your formation if you are leading the formation. If you are part of a formation, raise your right arm in a normal salute after giving the command “Present your arms”.

10 It is placed in a military departure plane inside a military departure plane

Edition the command “Order arms” when the casket is placed inside the military aircraft for departure. If you are a member of a formation, hold the greeting until you are instructed to drop it.

Health is not just a converted honor. This is a privileged gesture of respect and trust among the soldiers. Remember the salute is not only prescribed by regulation but is also recognition of each other’s commitment, abilities, and professionalism.

Some historians believe that the hand greeting began in the late Roman period, when killings were the order of the day. A citizen who wanted to see a public official had to step forward with his right hand raised to prove that he is not holding a gun. The armored knights raised their visors with their right hand as they met their mate. This practice gradually became a way of showing respect and in early American history it sometimes involved taking off your hat. In 1820, this movement was modified to touch a hat and has since become the hand salute used today. Greetings to show respect to the officer, flag or our country.

Health is commonly misunderstood outside the military. Some consider it a gesture of servility, as the young man greets the older one, but we know that it is quite the opposite. A salute is an expression that is considered to be members of the arms profession; who have made a personal commitment to sacrifice themselves to preserve our lifestyle. The fact that the youngest is the first to deliver the greeting is just a matter of etiquette – the folded or returned greeting is the same statement.

The way you greet says a lot about you as a soldier. A proud and wise greeting shows pride in yourself and in your unity and confidence in your skills as a soldier. A sloppy salute might mean that you’re ashamed of your unit, lack confidence, or at the very least, that you haven’t learned how to salute correctly.

When you say hello, turn your head and eyes towards the person or flag you are waving. He raises his hand to the correct position with a smart move without any preparation. When you lower the salute, lower your arm directly into its natural lateral position without hitting the leg or moving the arm to the side. Any adornment in the greeting is inappropriate.

The correct way to greet with or without a cap is to raise the right hand until the tip of the index finger touches the outer edge of the right eyebrow (just above and to the right side of the right eye). While wearing the headdress, the index finger touches the headgear slightly above and to the right of the right eye. The fingers are together, straight and the thumb is in line with the fingers. The hand, wrist and forearm are straight, forming a straight line from the elbow to the fingertips. Your arm (from elbow to shoulder) is level with the ground.

All uniformed soldiers are required to say hello when encountered and recognized by persons qualified (by rank) to say hello, except when it is inappropriate or impractical (on public transport such as airplanes and buses, in public places such as theaters or while driving a vehicle ). A greeting is also given:

  • Quando si suona l’inno nazionale degli Stati Uniti, "Color", "Hil to the Chief" o inni nazionali stranieri.
  • For the unprotected National Color outdoors.
  • On solemn occasions, such as change of command or funerals.
  • During wake-up calls and retreats, while the flag is raised or lowered.
  • While the honors ring out.
  • When you swear to be true to the US flag on the outside.
  • When the control of the formations is reversed.
  • When rendering reports.
  • To the officers of friendly countries.

Greetings are not required when:

  • Indoors, unless you report to an officer or on duty as a guard.
  • Prisoner.
  • The greeting is obviously inappropriate. In any case not covered by detailed instructions, greetings.
  • Either the elder or the subordinate is dressed in plain clothes.

In general, you don’t salute when you are working (for example, under your vehicle doing maintenance), indoors (except when reporting), or when saluting is not practical (carrying articles with both hands, for example). A good rule of thumb is: if you are outside and the greeting is practical, do it. Outside there are theater tents, shelters above gas pumps, covered walkways, and other similar sheds open on the sides.

Health is not just a converted honor. This is a privileged gesture of respect and trust among the soldiers. Remember the salute is not only prescribed by regulation but is also recognition of each other’s commitment, abilities, and professionalism.

Some historians believe that the hand greeting began in the late Roman period, when killings were the order of the day. A citizen who wanted to see a public official had to step forward with his right hand raised to prove that he is not holding a gun. The armored knights raised their visors with their right hand as they met their mate. This practice gradually became a way of showing respect and in early American history it sometimes involved taking off your hat. In 1820, this movement was modified to touch a hat and has since become the hand salute used today. Greetings to show respect to the officer, flag or our country.

Health is commonly misunderstood outside the military. Some consider it a gesture of servility, as the young man greets the older one, but we know that it is quite the opposite. A salute is an expression that is considered to be members of the arms profession; who have made a personal commitment to sacrifice themselves to preserve our lifestyle. The fact that the youngest is the first to deliver the greeting is just a matter of etiquette – the folded or returned greeting is the same statement.

The way you greet says a lot about you as a soldier. A proud and wise greeting shows pride in yourself and in your unity and confidence in your skills as a soldier. A sloppy salute might mean that you’re ashamed of your unit, lack confidence, or at the very least, that you haven’t learned how to salute correctly.

When you say hello, turn your head and eyes towards the person or flag you are waving. He raises his hand to the correct position with a smart move without any preparation. When you lower the salute, lower your arm directly into its natural lateral position without hitting the leg or moving the arm to the side. Any adornment in the greeting is inappropriate.

The correct way to greet with or without a cap is to raise the right hand until the tip of the index finger touches the outer edge of the right eyebrow (just above and to the right side of the right eye). While wearing the headdress, the index finger touches the headgear slightly above and to the right of the right eye. The fingers are together, straight and the thumb is in line with the fingers. The hand, wrist and forearm are straight, forming a straight line from the elbow to the fingertips. Your arm (from elbow to shoulder) is level with the ground.

All uniformed soldiers are required to say hello when encountered and recognized by persons qualified (by rank) to say hello, except when it is inappropriate or impractical (on public transport such as airplanes and buses, in public places such as theaters or while driving a vehicle ). A greeting is also given:

  • Quando si suona l’inno nazionale degli Stati Uniti, "Color", "Hil to the Chief" o inni nazionali stranieri.
  • For the unprotected National Color outdoors.
  • On solemn occasions, such as change of command or funerals.
  • During wake-up calls and retreats, while the flag is raised or lowered.
  • While the honors ring out.
  • When you swear to be true to the US flag on the outside.
  • When the control of the formations is reversed.
  • When rendering reports.
  • To the officers of friendly countries.

Greetings are not required when:

  • Indoors, unless you report to an officer or on duty as a guard.
  • Prisoner.
  • The greeting is obviously inappropriate. In any case not covered by detailed instructions, greetings.
  • Either the elder or the subordinate is dressed in plain clothes.

In general, you don’t salute when you are working (for example, under your vehicle doing maintenance), indoors (except when reporting), or when saluting is not practical (carrying articles with both hands, for example). A good rule of thumb is: if you are outside and the greeting is practical, do it. Outside there are theater tents, shelters above gas pumps, covered walkways, and other similar sheds open on the sides.

There is no definitive beginning in the history of the military salute. Most sources speculate that the roots of this revered tradition go back to Roman times, when killers were the order of the day. It is believed that the raising of the right hand was a gesture that showed that they were not shielding any type of weapon. Apparently, the knights raised their helmets with their right hand to greet their mate or superior.

How to salute like a soldierThis gesture eventually evolved as an expression of respect and sometimes involved taking off the hat. In 1820, the gesture was officially changed to the current version that is still used in the military today: touching a hat. The palm-down salute is believed to be an influence of the British Navy, as the hands on the deck were often dirty and exposing a dirty hand was considered disrespectful.

Health Protocol

Health is a privileged gesture that shows trust and respect among soldiers. In the army, the subordinate always greets first. A soldier’s salute reflects his pride in himself, his unit and shows confidence in his ability as a soldier. When he greets, his eyes and head should be turned towards the person (or flag) he is saluting. Military greetings are not required if conditions are inadequate or impractical, such as at an airport, in a public place (theater, restaurant, etc.) or while driving.

Persons entitled to the greeting

The protocol requires a nod to:

How to salute like a soldier

  • President of the United States
  • Officers and ensign
  • All winners of the Medal of Honor
  • Officers of allied foreign countries

Always greet:

  • USA Anthem, "To the Colour", "Hail to the Chief" o suonare qualsiasi inno nazionale straniero
  • When the national colors are not covered on the outside
  • festive occasions,
  • Wake up and solemn retreat
  • Raise and lower the flag
  • When honors sound
  • Pledge of fidelity – on the outside
  • When rendering reports
  • When the control of the formations is reversed

Gone are the days of Roman soldiers and medieval knights, but the mark they left in history with the military salute continues.

How to salute like a soldier

7 September Final greetings with military funeral honors

The Department of Defense (DOD) is responsible for military funeral honors. However, military downsizing during the late 80’s and 90’s resulted in difficulty in providing funeral honors. As a result, Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) and the American Legion were called upon to assist the DOD in their duties by volunteering for funeral home operations for fallen veterans when the DOD couldn’t.

Il Congresso ha ritenuto questo insoddisfacente nel 1999 e ha approvato una legge che richiede ai servizi militari di fornire onorificenze funebri ai veterani idonei ("Qualificazione per la sepoltura militare").

Upon request, the DOD is required to provide an honor guard of at least two military members to conduct funeral honors for eligible veterans. The honorary company is obliged to at least hold a ceremony involving the laying down and presentation of the American flag to the closest relatives and the playing of tapas.

Meeting of the Military Honorary Guards

Members of the Guard of Honor are trained in military exercises and ceremonies. Upon request, they can honor the memory at the funeral of eligible veterans. Most military installations have a team of honor guards. In most cases, military funeral decorations are performed by squads of honor guards stationed at multiple military bases.

Although the military pays for the honor guard’s uniforms, equipment, and transportation costs, the military honor guard is generally a volunteer who practices, practices, and performs at funerals while doing other full-time military jobs.

A minimum of two honor guards to perform at a veteran’s funeral is mandatory by law, but in most cases, the funeral company is comprised of four to seven members, contingent on the abilities of the local honor guard unit, accessible resources, and manpower. Other veterans’ services taking place in the same vicinity on the same day can also affect the honor guard availability.

Know what prizes are awarded

The DOD is obligated by law to play taps, fold the U. S. flag, and present the flag to the next of kin. Additional decorations, including Caravan of the Honor Guard and Save for Rifles, may be available depending on the resources available to the Honor Guard Company and the wishes of the family. Additional highlights may include:

  • Auscultation: Taps is the traditional trumpet call sounded at military funerals by the official trumpet player, if available, or by electronic means. The guard of honor greets the deceased veteran during the tapa game.
  • Fold the flag: The U. S. flag is carefully taken from the casket and silently folded by the honor guard company. When folded, the flag resembles a triangle, representing the triangular hats worn by colonial soldiers during the Revolutionary War. The method used to fold the flag requires 13 folds representing the original colonies, and when the flag is fully folded, no stripes are visible, leaving only the blue and the stars.
  • Flag presentation: After the flag is folded, it is presented to a member of the honor guard in the same military branch as the deceased veteran, who then marches the flag to the closest relatives and hands them the flag. During the member’s presentation to the next of kin, they say, “As a representative of the United States Army (Air Force/Navy/Marine Corps/Coast Guard), it is my high privilege to present you this flag. May it be a symbol of the gratitude that this nation feels for the exceptional service rendered to our country and our flag by a loved one ”.

Provided there are no close relatives, the flag is handed over to the friend of the deceased.

  • gravediggers:If possible, family members can request members of the Honor Guard to serve as a trailer and provide other funeral honors.
  • Blank Rifle: Rifle salvo is a customary tradition in which members of the Honor Guard Company fire three rounds in honor of the deceased veteran. Rifle bursts are carried out only when the family decides.

Rifle bursts are fired from rifles, not firearms, so they are not greetings with firearms. A shooting team consists of seven or eight members, with each member firing three times.

The three volleys stem from the custom that the battle is temporarily interrupted for service members to remove their dead from the battlefield. When one side successfully removed their dead, they fired three bursts of rifles to signal the continuation of the battle.

When the honor guard completes a volley, he usually deposits three scales in the flag before presenting it to the family.

Salutes by Individuals & Units in Formation;
Obligation to say hello
WITHThe recruit

Below you will find an excerpt fromRegulation of the supervision service corresponding to men of rank. This was taken from an English translation of a 1935 German Army manual. Many thanks to Michael Bollow for giving us permission to use the excerpts. The recruit here on this page. If you would like to purchase this manual, please visit their website at: http: // members. aol. com / soldaten / recruit. htm

The image example of a German Military salute was added for this site & was taken from the book: The cards please!by Ray & Josephine Cowdery. This book is an excellent resource for those who want to learn more about German WWII documents.

How to salute like a soldier

If the soldier is prevented from saluting because he is carrying or holding objects, etc., the salute is indicated by walking past at attention & standing or sitting at attention. Saluting while seated is allowed only if circumstances require it or if the salute cannot be given while standing, e. g., in an enclosed vehicle, in open moving vehicles, etc. In all other cases, subordinates are required to stand while greeting.

Enlisted men must also salute uniformed civilian Wehrmacht officials, as well as military chaplains in vestments, including former officials of the Wehrmacht, the old army & the old navy who are in uniform.

All salutes should be quickly & crispy executed. They begin five steps in front of the superior & end two steps past, or are given upon entering & leaving a room.

In the premises inside the barracks (including canteens), office buildings or other residential premises, the command “Attention!” shall be given by the duty officer, etc., when officers & platoon sergeants (company sergeants) enter their own company’s space, etc. Everyone stands at attention in front of the superior until the superior says “Easy!” or he leaves the room. The superior is announced by the person of the highest rank. In the offices of “Attention!” is not commanded & the superior is not announced. Greetings are performed from a seated position, as long as the superior does not speak to the subordinate.

In enclosed spaces other than barracks, such as public transportation, waiting rooms, boarding houses, garden cafйs, theaters, concert halls, & lecture rooms, a salute is to be given if a superior & a subordinate approach within greeting distance of each other. The salute should be performed according to the circumstances.

Whoever first notices the superior warns his companions of the need to say goodbye in time.

Before saying goodbye, take the cigars out of your mouth, your hands out of your pockets, etc. It is not allowed to greet with a whip or similar object in the saluting hand.

When on horseback, say hi on a walk, if he doesn’t mind the business task. Subordinates wishing to overtake a superior on horseback must ask permission to do so (except during field exercises, maneuvers, etc.) Cyclists, drivers, & riders salute by sitting at attention.

Unit in formation with headgear

For units riding horses or vehicles, the greeting command is “Attention! Eyes to the right (left)!” When “Warning!” you hear, sit at attention as indicated. Gdy polecenie „Occhi a destra (a sinistra)!” is given, personnel in the back seat of a vehicle turn their heads & look to the opposite 4 side. Il saluto termina quando il comando “Pronto, vai avanti!” it served.

Troops marching with vehicles salute at the commander’s signal, which must be repeated by all accompanying personnel except the vehicle driver.

For stationary pedestrian units, the commander says “Watch out! Eyes to the right (left)!” For units on horseback or in vehicles that have stopped, the command is [also] “Warning! Eyes to the right (left)!” Watch the supervisor. If he is walking or riding along the unit, every head should be turned toward him & every gaze should rest on him until he is two steps past, then the head & eyes should automatically face forward. If units are dismounted, they step to their horses or vehicles when the command “Attention” is served. Leaders go to designated positions. The greeting ends when the command “Take it easy!” it served.

Unit in formation without headgear

Units formed without headgear greet with the same greeting as those with headgear. However, in this case, the unit commander offers the German salute if he is also without a hat (for example in a sports uniform).

The personnel of the Wehrmacht, to whom the unit in formation does not owe a greeting, are only greeted or greeted by the commander. While marching at a broken pace (or when comfortable), any soldier can salute civilians.

For soldiers in uniform & wearing headgear, the type of salute to use is summarized in the regulations on saluting.

Uniformed soldiers who are not wearing headgear or are dressed in civilian clothes use the German salute.

A soldier with a lower rank or seniority should say goodbye first. It is a matter of honor among soldiers – even if the person who is being saluted is not part of the Wehrmacht – to execute each salute in a crisp & soldierly manner.

Under the same conditions discussed above, the obligation to say hello does not apply to certain people (e. g. drivers of motor vehicles, horse messengers, etc.)

Voluntary greeting

A voluntary greeting is expected when members of the foreign military are the first to greet. Units in formation do not salute. If a salute is to be given, it will be ordered by the chief post officer or navy commander.

The return of Health

If the supervisor returns the soldier’s greeting by replying “Heil!” or “Good morning,” etc., the greeting is answered using the same wording & adding “(superior’s rank), Sir!”

The superiors greet the units in formation by saying “Heil!” & adding the branch of service or force. The unit responds to “Heil!” & adds “(superior’s rank), Sir!” The Minister of War replies: “Hello, general, sir!” The Fuehrer & Chancellor of the Reich is answered with “Heil to the Feuhrer!”

I am often asked the reason for the military salute. Sometimes it’s for a job, sometimes it’s for respect, sometimes it’s for death.

Kelly Thompson updated February 3, 2011.

How to salute like a soldier

I am often asked why the military greet each other. They know that it’s a sign of respect but who are we saluting? When do we say goodbye? As? One of the most important things that people should know is that in reality, when someone salutes me, they aren’t really paying respect to me as a person. They’re saluting my commission.

For the most part, we only salute officers and that’s because they have been granted a commission from the Queen, which allows each officer to carry out orders on the Queen’s behalf. To remind you of this call, you will be given a scroll. Many people have a scroll in a frame and then leave it somewhere in the basement to collect dust, forgetting that the words really mean something. But I appreciate mine. Whenever I have a professional moral dilemma or need guidance in my work, I read these words aloud. Below is a fragment of the parchment:

Showing particular confidence and trust in your loyalty, courage and integrity, use these gifts to establish and appoint you as an officer in our Canadian military.

These words always remind me of some of the reasons why I joined forces.

But in all this conversation about respect, I have to say that there are definitely times when you greet a person and not their rank. When a soldier dies, we greet his coffin with admiration for the sacrifice he paid for his homeland. And there are certainly soldiers you respect so much that it is a real pleasure to show them respect.

Saluting is one of those things that people either know how to do well, or they don’t know how to do at all, and there are many people who are sticklers for it being done properly. The right hand should be parallel to the floor with the forearm bent, forming a straight line at the corner of the right eye. It’s a rather precise thing, so we learn it over and over again in basic training, during drill practice.

When my car broke down, my dad came to visit me in basic training, laughing at my callused hands and messy hair (since he knows that’s usually not my style). When I went to leave the room he said, “Aren’t you forgetting something?” It was a bit of a joke, but my dad was an officer, so I knew I had to say hello. But suddenly, overwhelmed by traffic corruption and not showing my father the respect he deserved, I stabbed myself in the eye. Then I cried a little. Not my proudest moment.

But since then, I’ve had many opportunities to salute him and do it properly. And as I said, there are people you greet because you respect the person, his rank and his contribution, not just the commission.

Just for the record: Dad, when I salute you, I don’t just do it because of your rank. I salute you for being the officer that I’ve always strived to be—loyal, understanding, compassionate, and with the straightest saluting arm on the parade square.

Author: John Miller

About this quiz

The salute is an ancient rite of passage in armies around the world. It’s a way for soldiers to learn discipline and respect, and a means for those in uniform to show their appreciation for the other men and women who are offering their time and service to their nation. W Siłach WITHbrojnych Stanów WITHjednoczonych personel szybko uczy się opanować etykietę salutowania lub staje się wyrzutkiem, który wzbudza szydercze spojrzenie sierżantów musztry. Think you really know the American greeting protocol in this extremely formal quiz?

The salute has a long and somewhat obscure history. Some people believe it originated with the Roman Empire, but suffice it to say, the practice and execution of this simple act has evolved in countless ways over the centuries, even in the U. S. What started as a much more formal act is now a more efficient (yet still formal) courtesy. Do you remember any salvation stories?

Greetings have strict standards. If you drop your fingers or your arms at an improper angle, people will think you’re lacking in pride, disrespectful, or perhaps just daft. And God help you if you give a comic salute in the wrong situation. Answer this fascinating quiz with the greeting etiquette now!

Ten huts! Before you Semper Fi yourself into eternal glory on the battlefield, you’re going to have to learn the basics of soldiering . and this includes the greeting. In America, it’s a requirement.

Legend has it that the salute began with the Romans. They required citizens to salute public officials as a means of proving they weren’t hiding weapons that could be used for assassinations.

Younger soldiers and sailors are the first to greet the senior officers. It’s a sign of respect for the commanding officer’s power.

Don’t drop your eyes, soldier! Salute like you mean it, and keep your eyes on the person you’re saluting.

Sure, you can always salute the general later, but not if you’re all dead because you tried to salute while driving. Keep both hands on the wheel.

WITH pewnością piosenka przewodnia „Airwolf” sprawi, że poczujesz się jak salutowanie. but for soldiers, it’s not really appropriate. However, they should always say hello when “Top Gun” is played on TBS.

Greetings indoors are rare. But if you’re addressing a superior officer, better have that salute sharp and ready to go.