How to rock your media job interview

When it comes to the job search, the informational interview can be a great tool. It can give you a glimpse into a company’s culture, let you receive career advice from a professional and, in some cases, act as an informal job interview.

These meetings “can provide invaluable insights into an industry and the field of accounting in general, from someone with decades of experience,” said Joni Holderman, a career coach and résumé writer in Myrtle Beach, S.C. They can even build connections that can lead to a job offer down the road.

However, even though informational interviews are less formal than official job interviews, you still need to prepare for them if you want to get the most out of them. Here’s how to make them work for you:

Do your homework. You can find the right person on a company’s website or via LinkedIn. If that doesn’t work, call the company and ask a receptionist who might be the right contact, said Janis Orel, CPA and president of Orel & Associates CPAs Inc., based in Hopkinton, Mass. Given professionals are busy, email is the easiest way to ask for a meeting.

Once you’ve set something up, “learn as much about the person you’re interviewing as possible by reading any blog posts, articles, or books they’ve published, plus check them out on social media,” Holderman said. “Research their company and industry, but be prepared to be surprised [by what you hear]. Often the insider’s view is very different.”

Dress your part. Look professional during the interview: You don’t have to wear a suit, but don’t show up in tattered jeans. Orel suggested business casual without a tie. For men, a collared shirt and khaki slacks always work, she said. Women should avoid anything that would better be suited for a night out. Avoid sneakers or sandals.

Know what to say about yourself. Be prepared to discuss why you contacted this particular individual and how you envision your career turning out, Orel said. She suggested that, during the interview, you describe your practical skills and let your personality show. “I want to know who that person is, rather than how book-smart they are,” she said.

Know what not to say. Feel free to start the meeting with small talk, but avoid politics and other hot-button issues. This isn’t the time for debate. If you don’t like something the person you’re interviewing says, don’t argue because it can make you look unprofessional, Holderman said. Also, don’t ask the person to be your mentor. “It comes off as socially awkward,” she said, as mentors typically prefer to choose the people they coach.

Even if the organization is hiring, don’t ask for a job. “It comes across as needy and desperate,” Holderman explained. “Instead, get their buy-in by asking ‘If you hear of any openings for someone with my skills, will you keep me in mind?’ near the end of the interview.”

Get connected on social media. Connect with the person on LinkedIn and follow his or her organization. Send connection requests to anyone else at the organization who is in your extended network, Holderman advised, as this can help you rank higher in searches by the company’s talent acquisition specialists or third-party recruiters.

Follow up. Be sure to send an appreciative thank you message to the person you interviewed within a day or two, Orel said.

“This calls for an over-the-top thank-you because they have shared that most precious of all commodities with you — their time, in the middle of the workday,” Holderman said. “Send a nice card with a handwritten note or a letter to their business address if you are comfortable doing so. If not, send a nice email. In either case, if you were especially struck by something they said, mention it just so they’ll know you were really listening.”

By Dawn Wotapka

Dawn Wotapka is a Georgia-based freelance writer. To comment on this article or to suggest an idea for another article, contact Courtney Vien, senior editor of newsletters at the Association of International Certified Professional Accountants.

How to rock your media job interview

Interviewing can be a hard thing to master, but it doesn’t mean you can’t get better at it over time.

Check out my top 10 interview tips based on my own experiences interviewing others for research and career/educational opportunities, being interviewed for jobs and internships, interning with CBS Human Resources recruiters, interviewing individuals with CBS Newspath, and working at Princeton Office of Career Services.

You can trust this advice because as the title says I’ve been around a whole lotta darn interviewing.

Note: These tips are in no particular order.

Further Note: These are not the only interviewing tips you might need. Just 10 that I’d like to highlight.

1. Be early, but never too early. You want to make sure you are on time for an interview but when you arrive too much before your scheduled time, you become an inconvenience. People have to tend to you (get you water, show you where to sit, worry about you being there) during a time they hadn’t planned to. Never arrive more than 15-20 minutes before an interview if you can help it. You might be labeled as inconsiderate if you do.

2. Send a thank-you note. Thank you notes go a long way. They show the interviewer that you have an interest in the position. They also are just a nice gesture. People like feeling appreciated. When I started interviewing others, I was surprised when I received no thank-you emails. It made me wonder if the individual really cared about the opportunity. Don’t ever let the interviewer think you aren’t interested (unless you really aren’t.) Make sure to get a business card after your interview is over.

The thank-you note will be the last impression you can probably make on the interviewer. It also may be your only chance to do so. Once when interviewing at MTV, I lost my interviewer’s business card and wasn’t able to get it from her secretary due to confidentiality terms. I had to do some major scouring later on because I failed to be organized.

3. Let your personality shine. I know this may be a hard thing to do, but don’t go into an interviewing with getting the job being the only thing on your mind. I’d suggest having the mindset of making yourself likeable. At the end of the day recruiters are looking for the best fit. If they called you into an interview, you’ve probably already been screened and they see you as atleast potentially capable. Interviewers take notice of your personality and who you are as a person. Be yourself.

4. Dress and groom appropriately. People will talk about you if you walk into an interview for a corporate job in a mini-skirt. Know the culture of the place that you are interviewing for and try to dress appropriately. Men, don’t engulf yourself in cologne. Not everyone’s noses can take strong smells. Bad breath is a no-no. Chipped nails could become a point of conversation. Just saying. I’ve heard and seen the conversations that can ensue when people come into an interview looking cray-cray.

5. Do your research. Imagine you’re on a second date and your date forgets your name. How would you feel? Confused? Angry? Upset? Think of an interview as a second date ( the first one being the organization reading your application). Know some things about the company. You don’t want to go into a interview for tech consulting and talk about non-profit granting. You’ll look really unprepared in the interviewer’s eyes and potentially be labeled as a joke. Don’t be a joke. Be a winner. Know some facts and current news about the industry/position you’re applying for. Impress the interviewer. It won’t hurt ya.

6. Ask the right questions. It’s an interviewer’s job to answer specific questions about the company or position, not give you an overview of the company. Make your questions worthwhile. And please, I repeat, please ask questions. It’s a personal pet peeve of mine when I ask “So do you have any questions?” and the person replies “No.” If you did your research (as outlined in step #5), you’ll probably have some type of question. Good questions are:

1. How would the employees describe the culture of the organization?

2. What would be the ideal candidate for this position?

You can even be a bit forward and ask:

3. What are some of your concerns about whether I would be a good fit for this position?

Though that question seems pretty odd to ask, it’s actually a good tactic for identifying what might make you not get the opportunity and then making your case for why you should. It might also make you aware of something about the organization that you don’t like such as “everyone here works by themselves.” Maybe you like working at organizations that value teamwork, so this place might not actually be a fit for you.

7. Don’t lie. If a interviewer asks you a question that you don’t know the answer to, don’t lie. This is especially important if it involves fact-based things or specific skills set. If you don’t know how to code, don’t tell an interviewer you do. It could come back to bite you in the ass.

8. Don’t Lie, but you can be IMAGINATIVE. We all freeze up sometimes. I once asked a prospective student I was interviewing for an admissions interview the question:

If you could go back in time and ask anyone anything, who would you pick and what would you ask them?

I must have scared the life out of this girl because she looked terrified. I wasn’t expecting for her to take the question too seriously. I basically wanted to get a better sense for her imagination and thought-process. She eventually answered that she’d want to ask Velma from Scooby Doo about her mystery solving skills. To me, GREAT ANSWER! However, she probably thought it was a weird question.

Sometimes interviewers will ask you things to throw you off. They are probably testing your problem solving abilities, response to pressure, and communication skills.

Instead of thinking about being right, think about being creative and coming up with an answer!

9. Don’t Talk Too Much. Just like you, interviewers get bored. Just like you interviewers, zone out. The person you’re interviewing is probably not your friend and doesn’t care about the intimate details of the questions you asked. Keep answers to the point. Provide substance when needed. You want interviewers to remember what you said and not have to sort through their memory’s clutter to remember the sound bites that might make or break their decision to hire you or bring you back for a second interview.

10. READ ABOUT INTERVIEWING. I DON’T KNOW EVERYTHING. I’m an avid reader and think everyone can always benefit from reading more. There are plenty of other articles out there that have great advice. Some good ones I recently found were Huff Post’s The Top 10 Interview Tips for College Graduates and ABC News’s The Top 5 Interview Tips No One Mentions.

I used to give Princeton Students career advice. Read some of it here.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE GO-TO INTERVIEW TIP? COMMENT BELOW.

To get more of my articles and advice delivered straight to your inbox, click here.

How to rock your media job interview

Prepare, prepare, prepare. Seems obvi, but think of it this way: Preparation is the only thing you have total, 100% control over, says HR expert and consultant Lucy Cherkasets of Clarity Media Group (she's interviewed more than a thousand people, so she would know!) Don't just assume you can wing it. Research the company and the person interviewing you and practice your answers.

"Tell me about yourself." Don't answer this by trying to cram your entire life story into a two-minute spiel. "This should be your cue to tell me why you're at this table," Cherkasets says. Be friendly but focused, narrowing in on the aspects of your personality that make you perfect for this job.

Think stories, not answers. Come up with five skills you've picked up from different jobs and craft stories about how you acquired them. There should be a clear beginning, middle, and end, so your interviewer isn't tempted to zone out. This will prepare you for those general questions like "Are you good at working with a team?" Instead of a flat "yes, of course!," tell a story about a team project you worked on that boosted your company's numbers like crazy.

Know what you want to get out of this. Well, a job! But go deeper than that, says Cherkasets. "If you have a goal, you can guide the interviewer through the experience as opposed to them being in control." Think of key things you want get across (your time studying abroad, your love of the finer points of data collection), plus questions you want answered and how you want to leave the conversation.

Put that webcam to good use. Record yourself practicing your answers so you can get rid of the hair twirls and "ummms" peppering your otherwise awesome interview. You might cringe (everyone sounds so different on recordings, right?!), but you'll be thankful for it when you're in the room.

Being a perfectionist is not a "weakness." When you get the dreaded "what's your weakness?" question, resist temptation to turn it positive. Your future employer is going to see your weaknesses, anyway! "We want to know what area you have to continue developing and see that you're working on that," Cherkasets says. "I'm not judging you based on what your answer is, I'm judging you based on what you're doing about it."

Think of yourself as a consultant. It'll give you the headspace you need to stay calm. You are the expert, and you're offering something to the company. Instead of a desperate "I need this job!" attitude, you'll give off a "Here's how I'm going to help you" vibe. Much better.

Allow a do-over. This is the job interview, so it's normal to be nervous. If you stumble over words or ramble, take a breath and say, "I'm so excited to be here that I got a little ahead of myself! Let me reiterate what I wanted to say." Cherkasets is all about taking control of the interview, and this action shows you know how to do that.

Pause. Once you've mastered Start Over, move on to Pause, a Jedi-level move. "Taking a pause doesn't mean you don't know the answer," Cherkasets says. Instead, you've bought yourself a few seconds to organize your answer and then begin speaking. Don't feel awkward—as long as a strong answer follows the pause, you're golden.

Follow up. Cherkasets is on team Email and Thank You Card. Why? Multiple platforms mean you've covered all your bases. "Email is the way to get an actual response," she says, "so it can be more detailed. See the email as another argument for why you should be hired." Keep the card short and sweet—and then pat yourself on the back for nailing the interview.

How to rock your media job interview

You’re ready to jump into the technical job market. Maybe you’re a network engineer, maybe you’re a brand-new coder, or perhaps you work in server support. Whatever your specialization, all technical interviews share some common aspects. Our guide shows you how to prepare ahead of time so you can rock your technical interview. A little advance work can make all of the difference and land you that job you want.

  • Career Karma matches you with top tech bootcamps
  • Get exclusive scholarships and prep courses
  • Career Karma matches you with top tech bootcamps
  • Get exclusive scholarships and prep courses

In this article, we walk you through the technical interview process from start to finish. You’ll learn about the different interview stages you can expect to go through, and we also give you advice on what to wear and how to present yourself. Job interviews can be fraught experiences, but planning ahead will give you the confidence you need to knock your interviews out of the park. Is everyone ready? Then let’s get crackin’!

You’ll Actually Go Through Multiple Interviews

It’s a bit inaccurate to describe your experience at a hiring company as one big interview. In fact, you’ll probably have several different interviews as you move through the hiring process. Think of the multiple interviews as hurdles you have to clear or as qualifying heats. At each interview stage, some people will fail to advance. By the time you sit for a final onsite interview, you’ll have cleared a number of bars and established yourself as a promising candidate.

You’ll likely have an initial phone interview to get the hiring process underway. This will be a technical interview for the most part and will gauge your qualifications and enthusiasm for the work. You might also get a second remote interview to test your skills ahead of an in-person visit. Then, you’ll have a final interview with the hiring manager and any other folks who have to sign off on you. Plan on answering technical questions at all stages, and project an enthusiastic and cooperative attitude, and you’ll be set.

  • Career Karma matches you with top tech bootcamps
  • Get exclusive scholarships and prep courses

How to rock your media job interview

You might feel exhausted by all the interviews, but it’ll be worth it in the end.

Dress to Impress, and Bring Your Tools

You made it to the final interview, huh? Congratulations! Just getting to this point is a huge accomplishment, one that many of your peer couldn’t achieve. Now, all you have to do is make a positive impression on your interviewers. To do so, you’ll need to answer the technical questions to their satisfaction, but you’ll need a little extra to put you ahead of the other candidates. Fortunately, you can get a head start on impressing your future employers with a few simple steps.

Let’s start with your clothes. Naturally, you don’t want to dress too casually to your interview—leave your shorts and halter tops at home—but you can dress too formally, too. A good approach is to wear outfits that are one level higher than the company’s dress code. For example, if the company allows employees to wear jeans or shorts, come to the interview in business casual dress.

You should also bring some basic tools, including a pen, a notepad, and your resumé. You might not need any of them, but having them on hand will impress your interviewer.

So that’s how the story goes, folks. When you set out to land a technical job, the interview process can be overwhelming. We’re here to help, though. Our guide shows you how to rock your technical interview. We give you some dynamite tips and advice to help ensure that your next technical interview ends with a job offer and handshake.

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About us: Career Karma is a platform designed to help job seekers find, research, and connect with job training programs to advance their careers. Learn about the CK publication.

Hi Everyone, this week’s show topic on my BlogTalkRadio Show, Career Talk with Holly Bunn, included how to rock your phone interview. Below are a few bullets and golden nuggets from Saturday’s online radio show.

Prepare for Your Phone Interview:

How to rock your media job interview

  • Research the company – go beyond the company website and set up a Google alert to email news, sign up for newsletters and follow their blogs; look for current events that could affect your potential job.
  • Like/Follow the company’s social media pages (LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and Instgram, Blogs, etc.) to get updates.
  • Calculate your asking salary (refer to Episode 9) because you will get asked the salary question during the first interview and preparation is key to landing your optimal salary.
  • Prepare CAR stories that create value – at least three. Challenge, Action, Result stories. Create stories that demonstrate your ability to do the job you are applying for…..
  • Have pen and paper handy to take notes during the phone interview.

. How to Get to the Second Interview

  • Ask thoughtful questions that only a hiring manager can answer. Stay away from questions that can be answered within the job posting.
    • What is expected of the successful candidate within the first 90 days of the job?
    • Tell me about the team I’d be working on/with.
    • Send a thank you note within 24 hours of the interview. Include 2-3 bullet points on why you are a good fit for the position. Be genuine and purposeful in your note. No empty or cliché thank you notes.
    • Find and connect with the recruiter/interviewer on LinkedIn with a tailored connection request message.

    10 Phone Interview Rules to Follow

    How to rock your media job interview

    1. Smile – People can hear you smiling and feel the positive energy.
    2. Sit up straight or stand during the interview. Sitting up also creates positive energy. Do not lie down or slouch on the couch for the call.
    3. Tell the truth – no lies, they will eventually catch up to you.
    4. Dress the part – Yes, get fully dressed as if it’s an in person interview. It plays a role in your attitude.
    5. No background noise –Find a quiet place without distractions.
    6. No dropped calls Use a landline, if possible, to reduce the chances of a dropped call. Have a fully charged phone if cordless or mobile.

    7. No eating, drinking, or smoking while on the call. Do not chew gum or eat candy. Remember, you can’t undo burping.
    8. Do not use the bathroom while on the phone – this seems obvious, but people have done it. Please use the bathroom before the call.
    9. Do not bad mouth your former/current employer or manager.

    How to rock your media job interview

    Ending thought: The key to acing the phone interview is attitude and preparation. Present your best self during the interview and be optimistic. Optimism (or the lack thereof) comes out in your voice tone and word choice.

    In case you missed the show, click here now to listen to the entire episode: How to Rock Your Phone Interview.

    Hi Everyone, this week’s show topic on my BlogTalkRadio Show, Career Talk with Holly Bunn, included how to rock your phone interview. Below are a few bullets and golden nuggets from Saturday’s online radio show.

    Prepare for Your Phone Interview:

    How to rock your media job interview

    • Research the company – go beyond the company website and set up a Google alert to email news, sign up for newsletters and follow their blogs; look for current events that could affect your potential job.
    • Like/Follow the company’s social media pages (LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and Instgram, Blogs, etc.) to get updates.
    • Calculate your asking salary (refer to Episode 9) because you will get asked the salary question during the first interview and preparation is key to landing your optimal salary.
    • Prepare CAR stories that create value – at least three. Challenge, Action, Result stories. Create stories that demonstrate your ability to do the job you are applying for…..
    • Have pen and paper handy to take notes during the phone interview.

    . How to Get to the Second Interview

    • Ask thoughtful questions that only a hiring manager can answer. Stay away from questions that can be answered within the job posting.
      • What is expected of the successful candidate within the first 90 days of the job?
      • Tell me about the team I’d be working on/with.
      • Send a thank you note within 24 hours of the interview. Include 2-3 bullet points on why you are a good fit for the position. Be genuine and purposeful in your note. No empty or cliché thank you notes.
      • Find and connect with the recruiter/interviewer on LinkedIn with a tailored connection request message.

      10 Phone Interview Rules to Follow

      How to rock your media job interview

      1. Smile – People can hear you smiling and feel the positive energy.
      2. Sit up straight or stand during the interview. Sitting up also creates positive energy. Do not lie down or slouch on the couch for the call.
      3. Tell the truth – no lies, they will eventually catch up to you.
      4. Dress the part – Yes, get fully dressed as if it’s an in person interview. It plays a role in your attitude.
      5. No background noise –Find a quiet place without distractions.
      6. No dropped calls Use a landline, if possible, to reduce the chances of a dropped call. Have a fully charged phone if cordless or mobile.

      7. No eating, drinking, or smoking while on the call. Do not chew gum or eat candy. Remember, you can’t undo burping.
      8. Do not use the bathroom while on the phone – this seems obvious, but people have done it. Please use the bathroom before the call.
      9. Do not bad mouth your former/current employer or manager.

      How to rock your media job interview

      Ending thought: The key to acing the phone interview is attitude and preparation. Present your best self during the interview and be optimistic. Optimism (or the lack thereof) comes out in your voice tone and word choice.

      In case you missed the show, click here now to listen to the entire episode: How to Rock Your Phone Interview.

      Tips for finding the right school for you and for nailing that job interview.

      We’re told there’s a teacher shortage, which means schools are actively looking for candidates. But remember, regardless of whether you’re a new teacher or a veteran, you aren’t just looking for the school that wants to interview you—you’re also looking to interview the school.

      Before you send an email or click submit on EdJoin, get to know the school, the area, and a little about the personnel. Predict what you’ll be asked in an interview. And put your best foot forward by sharing a digital résumé and portfolio that shows you’re an educator who knows how to prepare students in this digital world.

      Learn About the Schools Where You’re Applying

      Before you apply, it’s vital to consider what you are looking for in a school. Think about the following questions:

      1. What’s the turnover rate of staff? A high turnover rate may or may not dissuade you. Some teachers are looking for their forever school, while others are instead looking for a variety of experiences and might not anticipate staying longer than a handful of years at a site.
      2. What kind of professional development and support do they offer? You might find this out by following a school, district, or system on social media (Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook). Is their professional development focused on keeping faculty current with tools, curricula, and ideologies?
      3. What kind of philosophy does the school or organization embrace? Is it a site based in project-based learning, for example? Does the school follow a philosophy or a mission statement you can get behind? Is there a dedication to 21st-century learning strategies? What is the quality of the curriculum they have adopted?
      4. What is the personality of the school and its facilities? If you can tour the school ahead of time, what’s the staff lounge like? Are the office staff, the first people a visitor meets, indicative of a place that’s welcoming to all stakeholders?

      Predict What They’ll Ask You

      There tends to be repetition to the questions that all interviews ask, and the challenge can be in how to prepare a unique response that includes your expertise and personality. This takes preparation and thinking ahead.

      Some questions (or versions thereof) you’ll likely be asked:

      1. What are your strengths as an educator? Have concrete examples of how your strengths brought results.
      2. What are your weaknesses as an educator? This one’s tricky, but necessary. They want to know that you’re reflective and have a growth mindset. Find a way to spin a weakness into a goal for your own growth.
      3. How would you handle a student who. This question can take a couple of forms. Maybe they will ask about a classroom management scenario, like a defiant student or a kid overtaken by malaise.
      4. How would you respond to a parent who. A scenario question about how you communicate with parents and guardians. Be open to reaching out in a variety of ways to ensure that people have been contacted effectively.
      5. How do you accommodate your content to meet the needs of. This question is at the heart of education. What are your experiences or ideas in helping English language learners? What about students in the special education population? And more advanced or gifted students?

      Don’t forget to bring some questions of your own. Do some research about the school or district or organization and ask concrete, specific questions that show you’ve done your homework.

      Create a Digital Portfolio

      One of the best ways to help you pitch yourself as an educator and to leave an impression is to create an digital portfolio and résumé that goes beyond the basic business card.

      A digital portfolio can be a simple website used just for this purpose. I’m a Weebly fan, though the new Google Sites isn’t too bad either. Have it password locked so that it can’t be accessed by just anyone. Just give the password to potential employers.

      There are many different pages you can create that showcase the real you. A few key pages to include:

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