How to ride a bicycle

Regular short runs are the fastest way to get in shape and improve your cycling performance

"How

Virtually everyone who rides a horse wants to improve. Whether you are a beginner or a pro, regardless of experience, most of the same rules apply.

Training is a controlled way to challenge our body, and regular training allows the body to adapt and become fitter. To develop, we must constantly increase the difficulty of these challenges. This can mean driving farther or harder. However, without burdening the body with new physical challenges, fitness will stop improving or even regress.

To get back into shape you need an adequate dose of training. It needs to be frequent enough for some stress to apply, but it needs to be balanced and restorative enough to allow for the adaptation process.

Frequent short training sessions are more effective than infrequent long training sessions. In equivalent times, interval sessions improve performance better than sustained and sustained effort.

>>> How to do a fat burning HIIT session

If you only have three hours a week, you will be able to improve your condition more with three-hour sessions and even a few 30-minute runs compared to just one long run.

If you only ride once a week, you may be wondering why, despite your regular rides, you aren’t improving. This is because after just seven days without pedaling, your body will begin to lose some of the benefits you have gained. To make progress and stay fit, it’s best to ride every two to three days, even if it’s just a matter of training with a turbo trainer. The least you can get away with and still see significant gains in physical fitness is three runs a week.

Watch: Five Ways To Eat To Lose Weight

Cycling for fitness: essential cycling training sessions

Cover at least one of these runs a week and you’ll be on the fastest path to fitness possible.

A long trip
60 minutes +

Long, discreet runs are the key to improving your endurance. A questo ritmo, la respirazione è profonda, ritmica e regolare e non dovrebbe mai essere tesa o a scatti. Stick to flat or rolling terrain, not hills, for these rides. Focus on maintaining a steady, high cadence and use your long run to get used to eating and drinking on the go.

This run will teach your body to get used to burning fuel efficiently. It will also help you improve your riding posture and get used to sitting in the saddle for long periods.

Hill driving
30-60 minutes

Long, gradual climbs are perfect for this session and can also be done on flat ground in high gear or with a lot of resistance on the turbo trainer. After a good 10-minute warm-up, pedal for five minutes at a pace that feels difficult but you can control. You should breathe deeply and only be able to say a word or two at a time. Rest for a minute and then repeat.

Exercise for at least 20 minutes at a brisk pace per session. If you have more time, aim for 10 minutes at an intense pace before recovering for one minute.

These sessions help improve muscle performance and make climbing easier.

Rough driving
30-60 minutes

High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) has been shown to increase endurance, increase calorie consumption and improve cardiovascular fitness. You have to work very hard during the intervals – it takes 100 percent effort – but the intervals are very short. After a good 10-minute warm-up, spend five minutes alternating between 30 seconds of hard work and 30 seconds of recovery. Pedal easily for five minutes and then repeat.

If your time is very limited, just three HIIT sessions per week is the best way to improve your overall fitness.

Don’t believe the pessimists: it’s never too late to learn to drive.

"How

There’s a common misconception that if you didn’t learn to ride a bike as a kid, you’ve missed your chance. But Marilyn Northcotte has been teaching adults to ride a bike for decades through a program called Pedal Ready in Wellington, New Zealand. The vast majority of her students (some 69 years old!) Learned the art of horse riding.

"How

"How

Dopotutto, imparare ad andare in bicicletta da adulto non è più difficile che imparare da bambino, purché si segua lo stesso approccio passo dopo passo al processo e respingi la paura e i nervi degli adulti. All you need is a bicycle and a large, safe fitness area, such as an empty parking lot or park. And if you have a bike available and want to take a long-distance ride in the area, now is a good time to go back for an easy ride.

Follow the steps below and you will be able to go cycling in no time:

Configure your bike

First, make sure you can stand on top of the bike without the top tube pressing against you. (If you can’t, you’ll need to pick a smAller size. Remember, proper bike fit is important when possible.) Then lower the seat so you can sit on the saddle with your feet just resting on the ground. Dovresti essere in grado di raggiungere comodamente il volante e i freni.

Practice getting in and out

To mount the bike, lean it toward you while applying the brakes so it doesn’t roll or wobble. Apply the brakes again after getting off the bike.

Get used to braking

Braking is a key skill that Northcotte says will give you a lot of confidence in the beginning. Walk along your bike and push it along the road as you practice applying the brakes to stop. Make sure you apply pressure to both brakes evenly.

The best beginner bikes for adults

"How

A fast women’s road bike that’s comfortable enough to ride for hours.

"How

Bicycle with accelerator and electric pedal assistance.

"How

Affordable chassis and component package that exceeds its price range.

"How

A sturdy commuter to take you wherever you go.

Learn to glide

Now you’re ready to start moving. Northcotte teaches both adults and children the basic "balance method" which involves moving the feet on a bicycle.

"How

"How

"Riding together helps them learn to balance on two wheels," he says. “The goal is to push yourself and get both feet off the ground for as long as possible. If they have to lower one foot to improve their balance, they lower both feet and start over. Once they can glide without touching their feet to improve, they are ready to pedal. ”Practice gliding until you can keep your feet up for three seconds.

Perfect your balance and your vision

"Everything about balance is useful and can act as a benchmark," says Northcotte. “For example, if you’ve ridden a scooter before with both feet on the platform, you should be able to balance on two wheels." Guarda nella direzione in cui vuoi andare invece di concentrarti sugli ostacoli da evitare. Tieni gli occhi alti e guarda sempre dritto davanti a te invece che in basso. Ti aiuterà a mantenere l’equilibrio e a seguire la tua linea di vista.

Get ready to ride

"How

"How

"How

Once you can maintain balance while gliding and have mastered braking and keeping your vision steady, you’re ready to pedal. Start with one foot on the ground and the other foot on the pedal in the 2 o’clock position to give yourself some momentum as you push away.

Then press the pedal and add the other foot as you walk forward. You’ll notice the faster you pedal, the easier it is to maintain your balance. Practice cycling in circles in the park or parking lot. Once you feel confident, get off the bike and move the saddle up until your feet reach the pedals with a very slight flex. Practice navigating cones or obstacles until you get it right. You’re riding a bike!

Vincent Iannelli, MD, is a certified pediatrician and a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Dr. Iannelli has been taking care of children for over 20 years.

Cara Lustik is a fact-checking expert and copywriter.

"How

Cycling is great fun and great exercise for children. An important milestone is also learning to ride a two-wheeled bicycle without wheels. Children usually learn to ride a bike between the ages of 3 and 8, on average a little over 5 years old. ..

Go cycling

While developmental skills are one factor when your child starts pedaling alone, accessibility is another. Your child won’t learn until he or she removes his training wheels and rides a two-wheeled bike.

Other things that affect when children learn to ride a bike include:

  • Siblings, friends or neighbors who ride two-wheeled bicycles as it is often a big push for a child to learn to ride a bicycle
  • Availability of a safe place to drive
  • Interest in learning to ride which is not that great in some children who prefer the skateboard or the scooter

You may be wondering if the age your child learns to ride a bike makes a difference. La maggior parte dei bambini imparerà a guidare quando è pronta, ma una revisione della ricerca ha rilevato che gli infortuni erano maggiori nei bambini che hanno iniziato a guidare tra i 3 e i 5 anni, rispetto a quelli che hanno imparato un po’ più tardi, quando avevano 6 o 7 years. years. . ..

Bicycles for children

Bicycles have many functions in childhood, from a development tool to a toy, to the way children can move. And they often perform all their functions at the same time, even as your kids get older. Choosing a bike has more to do with personal preference than with strict rules on learning to ride a bike.

Types of bicycles can include:

  • Big wheel
  • Tricycle
  • Balance bike – a bicycle without pedals and usually without brakes, so that children can focus on learning balance and control (counter steering) while pedaling. They are also called racing or racing bikes.
  • Bike with training wheels
  • A bicycle without wheels

Tricycles vs. Training wheels

Some children between the ages of 1 and 3 may start riding a children’s tricycle as a child. Most can ride a tricycle well by about age 3. ..

Once you reach the first cycling milestone – pedaling – it may take a few years or more to reach the next one – balancing well enough that you can only pedal with two wheels.

Some parents prefer one to the other when deciding whether their child should ride a tricycle or a bike with wheels. But many people use both because their kids switch from a tricycle to a wheeled bicycle during the preschool period.

One method is probably no better than the other, and whether you’re using a tricycle, training wheels, or both, usually depends on personal preference or what you had as a child. However, you need to be careful, otherwise your home or garage can get very cluttered with old bikes.

Learn to ride a bike

While everyone has heard the stories of kids getting on their bikes for the first time and just riding, most remember how they learned to ride a bike the old way – with a parent running beside him, holding the back of the bike. and finally let go.

As with most things, there are many new techniques, such as:

  • Using a balance bike instead of a wheeled bike.
  • Remove the pedals from the bike and lower the saddle so that it functions like a bike without pedals.
  • Instead of yelling at your baby for balance, tell him to face the direction he is falling (contrasting) that should straighten him.
  • Raising the wheels a little.

Since all of these methods work and work fairly quickly, it’s hard to think that you should put too much effort into choosing a method. Instead, take your time to learn how to ride a bike.

Above all, make it fun. If this becomes too frustrating for one of you, try a different method or let someone else try teaching your child.

Safety teaching

Safety is the biggest concern when your child rides a bicycle. Teach your child to wear a helmet correctly and put it on to lead by example. Find the best bike paths and routes that separate your child from traffic and teach traffic awareness. Make sure your child wears bright colors and reflective clothing while cycling.

report, eseuri, material, proiecte

How did I learn to ride a bicycle?

I still remember it like it happened yesterday. I must have been seven or eight when I rode my first bike and the day I learned to ride is a truly memorable day for me. Learn to ride a bike może być zarówno ekscytująca, jak i bolesna. But I found it really exciting. I started to realize that all the other kids are riding two wheels, and I was the only one who was still riding these fun training wheels. I felt it was time to move from training wheels to the "big baby" bike.

It was my sister who taught me to ride a bike "The training wheels go down today" was the first thing she said at breakfast. Mom just finished a batch of her secret blueberry pancake ingredient with butter on top of her. Walking outside that morning I can remember how sunny it was and how there wasn’t a cloud in the sky. It was a warm, bright day and a perfect summer day. Everyone seemed to be enjoying the afternoon.

She and I went to the park to see what we could do there. There was no one in the park when we arrived. My sister brought her bicycle and told me to sit on it and put my feet on the pedals. It was a blue and white two-wheeler with a basket in front. The event stayed in my memory because it was the first thing I remember with my sister that we did together.

“Pedala piano!" Mi ha consigliato, tenendo la bici e correndo lentamente.

The way I studied was fluid. My sister was holding the rear of the seat to make sure I wouldn’t fAll. She assured me that I would not fall as she would run in the back holding the bike. She reassured me that it was her sister’s word and I could trust him.

"Farai benissimo!" He said she.

My sister was nice. She spent several hours trying to teach me to ride. She never gave up the bike. In fact, I was very excited about the opportunity to learn to ride a bike. I thanked my sister for her kindness and patience. Before I knew it, the sun was already setting, so she said we could continue at the pit stop tomorrow. During dinner my mom cooked my favorite dishes because of the hard work I put into it.

The next day my sister took me on a trip again. I started pedaling and the bike moved. When she started moving, I found pedaling a lot easier than I remembered.

"Sarebbe così facile andare in bicicletta senza tenerla su?" I asked.

She did not answer me because she couldn’t run, hold the bycicle, and talk at the same time. Or so I thought. I’ll know the reason for her silence from her in a few seconds, but for now I told her we could stop if she was tired. She once again she didn’t answer. I turned to see if she was feeling O. K. I saw her, except she wasn’t where I expected her to be. She was about fifty meters from where I was. I suddenly got dizzy. I was scared to death that I would fall and get hurt. When I was scared, my mind was blank from trading and I just wanted to quit. I forgot how to use the brakes, lost control and fell off the bike. I was crying, but no one was looking at me because … well … there was no one.

She ran up and said she let me go because she couldn’t keep up anymore. When I finished crying, she told me there was nothing else she could teach me, that I had learned enough. I just needed some practice. I was very happy to hear that. She said if I can drive like I did for those fifty meters, then I have no problem.

I practiced for a few more hours and was doing pretty well. But it was painful because I fell several times and injured my arms and legs. But my sister told me not to lose heart. I soon found that I could pedal a bit without falling. My sister told me I was the fastest student she had ever seen. I told her that she was the best teacher that I’d ever met. We came home side by side as if we were best friends.

Soon after, my father bought me a brand new bike. It was neon red! As soon as I looked at my bike, I fell in love with it. I looked after the bike like a kid, replacing all worn lines, thoroughly lubricating all necessary parts, aligning the brakes.

A few days ago I went for a ride with my sister and I recovered all my memories. When I think of those days, one of my most memorable childhood experiences would surely have been learning to ride a bicycle. Almost all children will encounter this event at some point in their life and will actually learn a lot from it.

This event is not only free for me, but it also helped me lay the foundation on which to base my existence. Learning to ride has shown a new way to have fun and illustrates how willpower and tenacity help you overcome the challenges of your life: “Life is like riding a bicycle. You have to move to maintain balance ". (Alberto Einstein)

Five clever field repairs that can save you the day on the trails

"How

1. Repair damaged frame

A crack in the metal pipe is usually easy to see. Carbon fiber is stronger, says Brady Kappius, owner of a Broken Carbon frame repair shop in Boulder, Colorado. Press on the suspicious area, feeling the weak spots. You can also touch the pipe – healthy charcoal sounds boring, not boring.

Correction: Kappius recommends J-B Weld’s FiberWeld repair cast ($10), which is smAll enough to keep in your repair kit. Moisten the fiberglass tape to activate the resin, then wrap the frame and let it harden for 15 minutes. The weld should hold up even on bumpy terrain, but as with All of these fixes, it’s a temporary solution to get you back to the car or trailhead.

2. Patch the torn flank

Side tears are often too large for tubeless or sealing plugs. Tire protectors – thick rubber patches – retain most cuts, but if the tear is large and frayed, the inner tube may warp.

Correction:Steve Fassbinder, co-founder of Four Corners Guides, Mancos, CO, an equipment supplier who organizes bike tours, carries a sewing needle and sturdy thread to sew a tear (as is the case with clothes) for a pass at home.

3. Avoid the exploded rear derailleur

First, check which part has failed. Modern derailleur dropouts are designed to break first, saving expensive parts. (Consider having a spare in the box.)

Correction: If the derailleur itself is damaged, temporarily set your bike to single speed. First, remove the damaged derailleur. Run the chain over the cassette cog that’s directly in line with the chainring. Cut the chain with the chain tool to match this gear and use the quick link to connect the ends. Then lock the rear suspension or the disconnected sections. (The rear suspension stretches the chain as you tighten it; without a derailleur, the force could break the chain.)

4. Lift up the burnt dropper

A dropper post is great for technical terrain, but hydraulic systems can be fragile and complicated, leaving the seat cushioned.

Correction: If your dropper won’t stay in the extended position, try disconnecting the remote lever to let the cable move freely. Then, raise the entire riser to bring the saddle to or near its normal height. (This will probably work only with a long-travel dropper, 150 millimeters and up—don’t exceed the minimum insert line.) Alternatively, lift the dropper to the full extension and tighten a rubberized hose clamp—three-quarter-inch covers most diameters—on the slider just above the base section.

5. Driving with a broken steering wheel

When a carbon rod breaks, it is usually the fault of twisted bolts (e. g. brake levers). Avoid this by investing in a torque wrench. However, if this happens, you can usually drive with a few simple adjustments.

Correction: Remove the handle on the damaged side of the handlebar and reposition the shift lever and brake lever within a few inches of the brake. Slide the handle back to cover any sharp edges. Go easy: you’ll have to walk technical sections.

When you purchase something using the retail links in our stories, we may earn a small commission.The third party does not accept money for editorial hardware reviews. Read more about our policy.

Posted on 7 September 2015 by Amy Kapp in Trail Use

I am 30 years old and recently I started pedaling again after …long.

The last and only bike I ever owned was a blue three speed straight bike I bought when I was 15 and although I loved it, I rode it to all the typical teen destinations, I have never been a professional. It was just fun. A driver’s license at 17—and my life in general—turned that bike into a distant memory. And after two unpleasant experiences getting back on one, I told myself, “I’m not a cyclist."

Cut to present day: I work in a place where 95 percent of my colleagues use bikes regularly for commuting and recreation, and it’s an envy builder—hearing their stories and watching them bike around Washington, D. C., and hit trails together. Yes, I want a piece of the action. So with a new blue (10-speed) bike to boot, I’m sorting things out as I go. Here are a few things I’ve learned so far.

"HowPhoto courtesy of SPOKES

Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

There are many great bike sharing programs out there, but I have decided to buy / acquire my bike so I can grow with it and use it every day. I had no idea where to start.

Talking to other cyclists, especially friends and colleagues, put me in the right direction. They offered me to try their bikes and put me in contact with people who repair used bikes. My friend Elissa went with me to a bike shop and explained to me how specific models (with different frames, gears, wheels, handlebars, etc.) handle different types of riding, such as endurance road bike or commuting. She was opening her eyes – and empowering.

It’s okay to have a little anxiety. It will pass.

As a runner and dancer, I’ve stayed active. But for years, when people offered to ride bikes with me, I refused. Secretly, I was afraid I’d embarrass myself because it had been a while, and the two times I’d tried to ride again didn’t end well. In those cases, one bike was in bad condition, and the other wasn’t a good fit for my short legs. But every time I thought it was me.

I just had to give myself a chance. When I tried the bikes this time, I relaxed, sat comfortably (on a bike that suited me) and took some getting used to. And after a few minutes I did. And it was great.

"HowPhoto courtesy of Hakan Dahlstrom | DC of 2.0

Make sure you are comfortable.

Honestly, when you get a bike (used or new) you might be worried about a million things, but my colleague Ryan gave me great advice: how you feel on your bike (and how you feel on it) iskey.

Start small.

In the company of my husband, I returned to the streets of the neighborhood for the first time. I practiced turns and hand signals in a dead end. I feel comfortable with my new helmet. Chodziłem w górę i w dół po kilku wzgórzach. BasicAlly, it was a fun time in a familiar, low-key (non-scary) setting.

Practice the basics of safe and responsible driving.

In addition to having fun, my test drive told me I needed ita little more practice before hitting the busiest / city streets. Another thing I realized is that despite all the fact that I was riding a bike as a teenager, I need to be familiar with some things like (bitch) how to make the correct left turn. I’m going to grab some savvy friends and take some less busy streets for a tutorial.

"HowTrying on helmets, June 2015 | Photo: Elissa facing south

Ponadto, oprócz kasku, nabyłem blokadę rowerową, która była bardzo polecana, oraz mały (bardzo przystępny cenowo) zestaw keyy imbusowych. (I will also be raiding my wardrobe for visible clothes.)

Okay, the trails are great options for any level of cyclist – novice, returnee, or pro – as they provide a safe, flat, and visually stunning environment to get away from car traffic. And as TrailLink shows, there are plenty of them!

As such, the RTC Share the Trail campaign has some great tips for using the trails.

Know your local bike groups.

There are bicycle groups with programs specially designed for people who are absent for the first time or for a long time. Find out when local rides are taking place, so you don’t have to go it alone! They have wonderful support systems and can provide resources—like this Women & Bicycles Workbook from the Washington Area Bicyclist Association. The Bikers League of America also provides an extensive online resource and offers nationwide activities.

To havegame!

As a planner, I can get stuck in the weeds from time to time. Before buying my bike, I asked my colleague Katie, a passionate and maintenance-conscious cyclist (she also rode a cyclocross bike) if there was a tool I should never have taken a bike trip without. She looked at me and said, “Don’t wait to bike because you don’t have a specific tool! Go out and have game!"

Don’t get me wrong; Katie strongly believes in becoming independent on a bicycle. But her point of view was clear: have fun!

Tagged with tag:

"How

Amy Kapphe is the managing editorTrail tracks magazine. Kapp often writes about the impact and broad historical and cultural ties that connect American railways, parks, and public spaces.

From finding the right bike to converting, we’ve got you covered.

"How

"How

From the outside, looking inwards, cycling looks simple – all you have to do is pedal, right? But it can sometimes come off as intimidating if you’re brand new to getting back on the bike for the first time in a few years. You might think: "Wait, do I need more equipment?" lub po prostu, "Oh my. Spandex."

But once you take that first ride, we’re sure you’ll be hooked by the sense of freedom, adventure, and joy so commonly felt on the bike. Getting started is easier than it seems, and we’ll let you in on a little secret: You don’t even have to wear tight fitting clothes if you don’t want to. To help, we’ve gathered up six need-to-know tips on how to start cycling so you can hit the open road with confidence.

Enhance your cycling life and get exactly what you need with All-Access!

1. Select the correct bike

Of course, you can’t get started without a great set of wheels. While we’re big fans of All types of bikes, we’re specificAlly talking about bikes suitable for the road here. It is the most popular and affordable form of cycling for beginners, and the lightweight bikes, with thin tires and efficient ride geometry, are designed to help you navigate paved bike lanes and city streets.

Just like choosing the perfect pair of running shoes, you’ll first need to adjust the size of your bike. Stand on top of the top tube and shoot about an inch of space between your body and the frame. If this sounds like a stranger to you, your local bike shop can help you out. Find out more about how to find the right bike size here. Need some support as you move? You can check out the latest fleet of e-bikes.

"How

"How

So you have to choose a bike that fits your budget and your riding style. Will you earn miles on weekends? Would you like to use your exercise bike? Are you planning on eventuAlly doing long-distance rides like centuries or racing? Road bike frames have specific geometries and components to suit each of these purposes at every price range.

Think about how you will use your bike and how you may want to grow with your bike. (For example: Maybe now you can only run 20 miles, but you have a 75 mile charity run ahead of you.) So contact your local bike shop to find the right choice.

Posted on 7 September 2015 by Amy Kapp in Trail Use

I am 30 years old and recently I started pedaling again after …long.

The last and only bike I ever owned was a blue three speed straight bike I bought when I was 15 and although I loved it, I rode it to all the typical teen destinations, I have never been a professional. It was just fun. A driver’s license at 17—and my life in general—turned that bike into a distant memory. And after two unpleasant experiences getting back on one, I told myself, “I’m not a cyclist."

Cut to present day: I work in a place where 95 percent of my colleagues use bikes regularly for commuting and recreation, and it’s an envy builder—hearing their stories and watching them bike around Washington, D. C., and hit trails together. Yes, I want a piece of the action. So with a new blue (10-speed) bike to boot, I’m sorting things out as I go. Here are a few things I’ve learned so far.

"HowPhoto courtesy of SPOKES

Don’t be afraid to ask for help.

There are many great bike sharing programs out there, but I have decided to buy / acquire my bike so I can grow with it and use it every day. I had no idea where to start.

Talking to other cyclists, especially friends and colleagues, put me in the right direction. They offered me to try their bikes and put me in contact with people who repair used bikes. My friend Elissa went with me to a bike shop and explained to me how specific models (with different frames, gears, wheels, handlebars, etc.) handle different types of riding, such as endurance road bike or commuting. She was opening her eyes – and empowering.

It’s okay to have a little anxiety. It will pass.

As a runner and dancer, I’ve stayed active. But for years, when people offered to ride bikes with me, I refused. Secretly, I was afraid I’d embarrass myself because it had been a while, and the two times I’d tried to ride again didn’t end well. In those cases, one bike was in bad condition, and the other wasn’t a good fit for my short legs. But every time I thought it was me.

I just had to give myself a chance. When I tried the bikes this time, I relaxed, sat comfortably (on a bike that suited me) and took some getting used to. And after a few minutes I did. And it was great.

"HowPhoto courtesy of Hakan Dahlstrom | DC of 2.0

Make sure you are comfortable.

Honestly, when you get a bike (used or new) you might be worried about a million things, but my colleague Ryan gave me great advice: how you feel on your bike (and how you feel on it) iskey.

Start small.

In the company of my husband, I returned to the streets of the neighborhood for the first time. I practiced turns and hand signals in a dead end. I feel comfortable with my new helmet. Chodziłem w górę i w dół po kilku wzgórzach. BasicAlly, it was a fun time in a familiar, low-key (non-scary) setting.

Practice the basics of safe and responsible driving.

In addition to having fun, my test drive told me I needed ita little more practice before hitting the busiest / city streets. Another thing I realized is that despite all the fact that I was riding a bike as a teenager, I need to be familiar with some things like (bitch) how to make the correct left turn. I’m going to grab some savvy friends and take some less busy streets for a tutorial.

"HowTrying on helmets, June 2015 | Photo: Elissa facing south

Ponadto, oprócz kasku, nabyłem blokadę rowerową, która była bardzo polecana, oraz mały (bardzo przystępny cenowo) zestaw keyy imbusowych. (I will also be raiding my wardrobe for visible clothes.)

Okay, the trails are great options for any level of cyclist – novice, returnee, or pro – as they provide a safe, flat, and visually stunning environment to get away from car traffic. And as TrailLink shows, there are plenty of them!

As such, the RTC Share the Trail campaign has some great tips for using the trails.

Know your local bike groups.

There are bicycle groups with programs specially designed for people who are absent for the first time or for a long time. Find out when local rides are taking place, so you don’t have to go it alone! They have wonderful support systems and can provide resources—like this Women & Bicycles Workbook from the Washington Area Bicyclist Association. The Bikers League of America also provides an extensive online resource and offers nationwide activities.

To havegame!

As a planner, I can get stuck in the weeds from time to time. Before buying my bike, I asked my colleague Katie, a passionate and maintenance-conscious cyclist (she also rode a cyclocross bike) if there was a tool I should never have taken a bike trip without. She looked at me and said, “Don’t wait to bike because you don’t have a specific tool! Go out and have game!"

Don’t get me wrong; Katie strongly believes in becoming independent on a bicycle. But her point of view was clear: have fun!

Tagged with tag:

"How

Amy Kapphe is the managing editorTrail tracks magazine. Kapp often writes about the impact and broad historical and cultural ties that connect American railways, parks, and public spaces.

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