How to replace a garbage disposal

If you’ve just purchased a new InSinkErator garbage disposal, you’ll be glad to know our garbage disposals are the easiest to install, remove, and replace.

IMPORTANT

  • There is a correction to Installation, Care and Use Manuals included with products manufactured November 2019 to January 2020. There is an important update to step six of the manual. Please review the update by clicking here.

Watch & Learn

InSinkErator shows you how to install a garbage disposal by following the steps outlined in the instructions manual and as shown in this 4-minute video.

Written Directions

Before attempting to install your garbage disposal, read and understand the entire InSinkErator safety and installation instructions included with your garbage disposal model.

Materials Needed

Plumber’s Putty (.1 kg)
Wire Nuts (2-size 54)
Worm Gear Clamp
Dishwasher Drain Connector Kit (optional)
Hammer
Channel-Lock Pliers
Flathead Screwdriver
Phillips Screwdriver
Pipe Wrench

1. Turn off power to the garbage disposal and disconnect the down trap.

Turn off the electrical power at the fuse box or circuit breaker. Then, using adjustable pliers, disconnect the drain top from the garbage disposal waste discharge tube. (See Fig 1a)

How to replace a garbage disposal

2. Free the garbage disposal from the mounting assembly.

Support the garbage disposal with one hand and insert the end of the wrenchette or screwdriver into the right side of one mounting lug on the lower mounting ring. Lift the garbage disposal slightly and loosen the lower mounting ring by pushing or pulling the wrenchette or screwdriver to the left until the garbage disposal is free from the mounting assembly. (See Fig 1b)

How to replace a garbage disposal

3. Disconnect the electrical.

Lay the garbage disposal on its side and remove the electrical cover plate from the bottom. Loosen the green ground screw and remove wire connectors. Disconnect garbage disposal wires from electrical supply wires. Loosen screws on the electrical clamp connector and remove wires from the garbage disposal.

4. Remove existing mounting hardware if hardware replacement needed. Otherwise skip to step 12.

To remove the existing mounting hardware, loosen the three mounting screws, pry the snap ring off with a screwdriver and remove the old mounting assembly. (See Fig 2)

How to replace a garbage disposal

5. Remove the old sink flange and putty.

Push the old sink flange up through the sink hole. Use a screwdriver or putty knife to carefully scrape all old putty from the edge of the sink hole.

6. Install the new sink flange, gasket and rings.

Place a 1/2 inch rope of plumber’s putty around the drain opening in the sink. Drop the new sink flange into the drain opening and press it into place. Placing a weight, such as the garbage disposal, on top of the sink flange will help hold the sink flange in place while mounting the sink flange to the sink. To avoid scratching your sink or the flange, place a towel between the sink surface and the weight. (See Fig 4) From under the sink, slide the fiber gasket, backup flange and mounting flange over the sink flange. Hold these pieces in place.

How to replace a garbage disposal

7. Remove the dishwasher knockout plug.

If using a dishwasher, you will need to tap out the dishwasher knockout plug. Lay the garbage disposal on its side and use a screwdriver and hammer to tap it out. Next, remove the loose knockout plug from inside the garbage disposal.

8. Connect the electrical.

Turn the garbage disposal over and remove electrical cover plate. Pull out wires. Insert cable connector (not included) and run electrical cable through access hole on bottom of garbage disposal. Tighten cable connector. Push wires into garbage disposal (do not displace cardboard shield) and replace electrical cover plate.

If you have a hardwired unit and you’re looking to attach a cord, you will need a power cord kit. For power cord kit installation instructions, click here.

For a garbage disposal with a factory-installed cord, simply plug in to the outlet under your sink after completing the rest of the steps.

9. Hang the garbage disposal.

Hang the garbage disposal by aligning the three mounting tabs with the slide-up ramps on the mounting ring. Holding the garbage disposal in place, turn the lower mounting ring until all three tabs are locked into the mounting assembly. The garbage disposal will now hang by itself.

10. Insert the discharge tube.

Insert the discharge tube into the discharge coupler, then slide the clamp over the discharge tube and position it in the groove on the rubber tailpipe coupler. (See Fig 7b)

How to replace a garbage disposal

11. Align the discharge tube with the drain trap.

Rotate the garbage disposal so that the discharge tube is aligned with the drain trap. If the discharge tube is too long, cut off as much as necessary. If it is too short, you can purchase an extension.

12. Lock the garbage disposal in place.

If you are connecting the garbage disposal to a dishwasher, it may be connected through an air gap. Use a hose clamp to attach the drain hose to the dishwasher inlet. Now that everything is installed and in position, lock the garbage disposal to the sink mounting assembly using the wrenchette that came with the unit. For Evolution models, insert the Quiet Collar® Sink Baffle into the sink opening by pressing it into the sink until it snaps into place. (See Fig 7c)

How to replace a garbage disposal

13. Test the garbage disposal.

For all models, you should test for leaks at the sink flange, dishwasher, tail-pipe and mounting assembly connections. Finally, turn on the electrical breaker to test its operation.

Looking for more?

Text us at 262-233-2231 for personalized help with installing your new InSinkErator garbage disposal!

If you must remove a garbage disposal and return to the original sink drain, take heart. The job is moderately easy. However, preparation and organization are keys to making the work go quickly, safely and efficiently. You can finish in two to three hours. The most important thing is to gain a thorough understanding of what’s involved. Review the materials needed list, and inspect the garbage disposal, drain plumbing and all connections before starting.

Remove the Garbage Disposal and Sink Drain

Unplug the garbage disposal from the wall socket. If your unit is hardwired to your house, you’ll need the additional instructions in Step 2. If not, skip to Step 3. Do not begin working with the disposal until you are certain there is no power reaching the unit.

If your unit is hard wired into your home, turn off the circuit breaker to the garbage disposal. Use a Phillips-head screwdriver to remove the plate covering the wire connections on the disposal, and disconnect the exposed wires. Remove the plate covering the junction box, untwist the wire caps securing the disposal wires to your home and set the disposal’s wires aside. Twist the wire caps over the exposed wires in the junction box, push the wires back inside the box and reattach the junction box plate. Use a noncontact voltage tester to ensure no electricity is leaking from the wires inside the box. Adjust the sensitivity of the voltage tester to respond only when it touches or nearly touches the junction box. Hold the tip of the pen against the junction box. A beep or LED light indicates there’s voltage. No beep or no light means there’s no voltage coming from the box.

There will be a drain pipe extending from the side of the garbage disposal to the drain on the adjacent sink. It will be secured with slotted screws. Use a flat-head screwdriver to remove it from the disposal. If you have a dishwasher, you will need to detach a dishwasher hose from the disposal.

A snap ring secures the garbage disposal to the mounting bracket. Slide a flat-head screwdriver under the snap ring to pry it open and off the flange. Since there is a chance the screwdriver will slip as you’re working, you may want to wear work gloves for this step.

Use caution as the garbage disposal comes loose. It will be heavy. You might want to place clean rags or towels below the dishwasher to protect the floor.

Once the disposal is out of the way, remove the mounting bracket. It will be attached by three Phillips-head screws. Unscrew it from the bottom of the sink.

Replacing Sink Drain

Use a pipe wrench to carefully loosen then remove the nut securing the drain flange. You will then be able to push the sink drain portion up through the sink for removal.

Use a putty knife to clean up the plumbers putty from around the drain hole. You may need to use a razor blade for stubborn bits. Then rub down the area with a scrubbing pad and water. If any putty remains, you may need to scrub the area with rubbing alcohol or mineral spirits.

Roll out a 1/8-inch rope of plumber’s putty, long enough to go around the circumference of the new drain. Place the rope around the underside lip of the drain. Set the drain into the sink opening, and press down firmly. Wipe away any excess plumber’s putty.

Your new sink drain will come with a flat washer. From underneath the sink, place the washer over the drain’s threads, and press it up against the bottom of the sink. Use the large retaining nut that came with your new sink drain to secure the drain. You’ll be able to hand-tighten it to a point, but you must secure it firmly with channel-lock pliers. At this point you may want to ask a helper to hold the sink drain down tightly against the sink. Or you can place enough weight (bags of sand, flour, sugar, anything heavy) on top of the drain. Wipe away any excess plumber’s putty.

Install New Drain Pipes

Locate the PVC drain tail piece. Measure it to ensure that it drops the correct height for installing the elbow and connector pipe to the T-fitting under the adjacent sink. If necessary, trim with a fine-tooth hacksaw. Once you’ve achieved a good fit, hand-tighten the tail piece to the sink drain. You can use plumber’s tape to ensure a watertight seal, but it’s not a requirement.

Attach the elbow fitting to the tail pipe. Measure the distance between the end of the elbow and the T-fitting under the adjacent sink. Cut the connector pipe, if necessary, to the proper length. Connect the pipe to the elbow and T-fitting using the nuts and washers provided with your PVC pipe kit and the existing nut and washer on the T-fitting. The plastic nuts should be hand-tightened. Using channel-lock pliers or a pipe wrench is not recommended.

For a dishwasher drain, you must replace the drain pipe that runs from the P-trap to the wall with a pipe made for dishwasher drains. Disconnect the old pipe, and measure it to get the length for the new pipe that has a connector for the dishwasher drain.

Several problems requiring repair commonly crop up with garbage disposers or disposals. They can jam up when objects bind the impeller blades inside the appliance. The drain fittings can loosen and cause leaking beneath the sink. Or, the drain connecting the garbage disposal to the rest of the sink’s drain trap assembly can become clogged and cause water to back up into the sink basin where the disposer is installed.

In a double-basin sink, when it's only the disposer basin that backs up with water, the likelihood is that the drain fitting on the disposer is clogged.

Causes of a Garbage Disposal Clog

A disposal generally has no problem grinding most food waste, but it's what happens after the grinding that can cause a clog. Often this has to do with how ground food waste reacts to water (or lack of water) after the disposal unit grinds it up and sends it on its way toward the drain line. When a garbage disposer clogs, you will often find the problem in the drain trap assembly located on the waste discharge side of the disposal.

Disposals also can back up over time because the waste line or trap gets coated and eventually obstructed with food waste. If your garbage disposal is draining very slowly or not at all, the problem is most likely in the drain trap—the U-shaped plumbing fitting that is located downstream of the disposal discharge pipe.

Here are some of the most common ways that users create garbage disposer clogs:

  • Lack of flushing water: Not putting enough water down the disposal when it’s grinding is a sure way to get a clog. Without sufficient water, the waste can’t be flushed through the pipes and will quickly build up. Once a full blockage occurs, water can’t flow at all.
  • Grinding up eggshells or coffee grounds: Food items like eggshells or coffee grounds are a bigger problem than you might imagine. When ground up by a disposal, eggshells and coffee grounds create very tiny granular waste that will stick to any sludge found in the pipes, quickly becoming a clog.
  • Grinding potato peels: Potato peels are notorious clog makers and should not be put in a garbage disposal. Once ground up, they form a starchy paste similar to mashed potatoes that will quickly clog the drain.
  • Grinding banana peels: These are a similar problem to potato peels, except they also add stringy fibers to the mix.

The simplest way to prevent a clog is to make a habit of flushing the disposal with plenty of water when it is running and for several seconds after you turn it off.

After scraping the dinner plates into the sink, flipping a switch and watching the food particles disappear, many of us don’t think twice about our garbage disposals (also known as garbage disposers). We especially don’t think about installing a new one. However, even the best disposals will eventually need to be replaced. When that time comes, be prepared with these tips on what to consider when buying a garbage disposal.

How to replace a garbage disposal

Signs it’s Time to Think About Buying a New Garbage Disposal

First, determine if a replacement is necessary. Sure, it may not be your top priority, but if you find yourself experiencing the following, it may be time to replace your garbage disposal:

  • It frequently gets clogged.
  • You reset it regularly.
  • The odors aren’t alleviated.
  • The blades aren’t chopping efficiently.
  • You have an unfixable leak.

What Garbage Disposal is Best for Me?

There are two types of garbage disposalsto choose from: the continuous feed and the batch feed. Both get the job done; however, the continuous feed disposals are the easiest to use. Also the most commonly used disposal, the continuous feed version has an open mouth and is operated by a switch. The batch feed disposal, on the other hand, requires that you place your food waste into the chamber and close the stopper lid to activate the food grinder inside.

If you find that you’re constantly dropping silverware and other non-food items in your disposal, you may want to consider the batch feed version. If, on the other hand, you don’t have that issue and prefer the added convenience of an on/off switch, the continuous feed version is right for you.

How to Pick a New Garbage Disposal

It’s easy to know which garbage disposal to buy if you consider how important the following factors are to you:

1. Identify the Right Motor Size

– The smaller the motor size, the fewer and softer the foods need to be. For example, a one-third or one-half horsepower (HP) motor is perfect for a single homeowner occasionally grinding soft vegetables. A three-fourths or 1 HP motor, on the other hand, is much more suited to a large family that often eats at home and will provide smoother operation, finer pulverization and less jams — which equals less stress on your waste water system.

2. Identify the Best Grinding Chamber Size And Material

– Chambers in disposals with more HP will be larger, since their motors can handle more food. And chambers and blades made of stainless steel will last longer, be more efficient, are the easiest to clean and won’t rust.

3. Extra Features

– Of course, a garbage disposal is going to make noise. Better quality (and more expensive) units, however, tend to have better insulated grinding chambers, so there’s a marked difference in the noise level. Similarly, some models offer additional features, such as sound baffles (to lower the decibel level of the unit), anti-splash baffles (to keep your sink cleaner) and corrosion protection shields.

Bonus Tip: If your home has a septic system, consider buying a garbage disposal with an enzyme reservoir, to help break down the food scraps.

And since it’s on your mind, did you know most homeowners insurance doesn’t cover broken garbage disposals? Just another reason to help protect your budget with a home warranty from American Home Shield.

How to replace a garbage disposal

Did you know that your home’s garbage disposal needs to be cleaned regularly? During use, food particles and residue can be left behind and cause the unit to have an unpleasant odor. We all know that smell that tells us when the garbage disposal needs to be cleaned!

The good news is that you don’t have to buy special or expensive products to do the job. Your disposal can be effectively cleaned with common household items that you probably already have in your kitchen. Read on to learn some of the best and easiest ways to clean your garbage disposal .

Broken Garbage Disposal? Need a Pro Now? Book a qualified, local home repair Pro with American Home Shield ProConnect in just a few clicks. Click here to book now. *Available in most major markets. Services vary by market.

1. Ice cubes and cold water

How to replace a garbage disposal

One of the best garbage disposal cleaning methods is using plain ice cubes from your freezer. Simply put a few handfuls of ice into the unit, then turn it on and run some cold water while the cubes grind. The ice helps loosen debris and food trapped in the unit and the cold water helps flush it down the dra in.

2. Ice and rock salt

How to replace a garbage disposal

You can also add about a cup of r ock salt to some ice cubes for some extra scrubbing power. Remember to always run cold water when you turn the disposal on.

3. Baking soda and vinegar

How to replace a garbage disposal

A simple mixture of baking soda and vinegar is also a good garbage disposal cleaning method. Sprinkle about a half-cup of baking soda into the disposal, followed by a cup of white or apple cider vinegar. Let the mixture bubble up and sit for five to ten minutes, then turn on the disposal and run cold water to distribute the mixture and flush throug h the unit.

4. Citrus

How to replace a garbage disposal

Any type of citrus peel is a good natural disposal deodorizer. Lime, lemon, orange, tangerine, and grapefruit peels will all help refresh your sink , drains, and disposal system. Be sure to cut the peels into small enough pieces for the unit to handle, then turn on the unit and run cold water while the peels grind.

5. Borax

How to replace a garbage disposal

Borax is a natural laundry booster and is used in many household cleaning products. To use, simply sprinkle a few tablespoons of borax into the disposal, followed by cold running water for about 30 seconds .

6. Hot water and dish soap

How to replace a garbage disposal

Another method of disposal cleaning requires only hot water and dish soap. This method can be particularly helpful if you have noticed an unpleasant odor coming from your garbage disposal . Using the sink stopper, plug the disposal drain and add a generous squirt of dish detergent to the sink. Run hot water into the sink until it ’s at least halfway full. As you release the sink stopper, turn on the disposal and let the entire sink contents drain into the unit while it runs. This cleaning method helps fill the disposal with soapy water to reach the upper portions of the unit, which often don’t get cleaned by other methods. It also helps clean the disposal drain line, which can harbor food residue and odors.

7. Boiling water

How to replace a garbage disposal

Pouring boiling water into the disposal — by itself or following one of the other methods listed here — can help loosen stubborn food particles .

8. Dish soap and baking soda

How to replace a garbage disposal

It’s also important to clean the drain crevices around the disposal as well as the rubber splashguard around the drain. You don’t need anything fancy; y ou can use dish soap or baking soda with a small brush or toothbrush to scrub underneath the splashguard flaps. (Make sure the disposal is turned off when you do this!)

Remember to use caution when operating your disposal and when using any of these disposal cleaning methods. Never put your hand into the unit for any reason, even if the unit is off. Taking the time to clean your disposal will help keep your sink and kitchen smelling fresh and inviting for your family and guests.

Did you know an American Home Shield ® warranty can help cover your garbage disposal against bre akdowns , along with many other components of your home appliances and systems? Find out more and get a fast, free quote below .

Garbage Disposal Repair Near You

Get affordable, upfront pricing when you use ProConnect for your appliance repair needs. Book online now. *Available in most major markets. Services vary by market.

Did you know your trashed dinner scraps end up in a landfill, slowly decaying into greenhouse gas? Garbage disposals solve this concern.

They do double duty, meeting the often competing demands of convenience and conservation. Disposals grind spoiled meats, corn cobs, fish bones, ice, and all those veggies kids reject, discharging them down the drain to a wastewater plant (unless you have a septic system). When food waste is processed at a wastewater plant, it’s even more eco-friendly than composting. Plus, garbage disposals immediately rid your home of waste, odors, and any critters they might attract.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), solid waste landfills release harmful gases, composed of roughly 50 percent carbon dioxide and 50 percent methane, a potent greenhouse gas that traps heat in the atmosphere—a key contributor to climate change. In 2019, methane emissions from municipal solid waste were almost equivalent to greenhouse gas emissions from more than 21.6 million passenger vehicles driven for one year.

Garbage disposals efficiently eliminate waste and dispatch it for environmentally friendly processing. Many major U.S. wastewater plants use what’s called anaerobic digestion to turn the gas generated from food waste into biofuel. The remaining solids are turned into fertilizer for farms. So if you’re considering installing or replacing a disposal but are concerned about the environmental impact, find out how your local sewage treatment plant processes the town’s wastewater.

A February 2020 nationally representative CR survey of 1,000 U.S. adults shows that just over half of Americans live in homes with a garbage disposal, and of those who do have one, more than 60 percent said their disposal was already installed when they moved in. According to the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, these appliances last about 11 years, so if yours came with the place, depending on how long you’ve lived there, it could soon be time to look for a new one.

Your disposal might be kaput if you notice it leaking, taking longer to grind, making louder-than-usual noises, or requiring a reset often. (The reset button is like a circuit breaker that needs to be reset after the disposal shuts off, typically because of a strain on the motor.) In fact, before you call the plumber—or throw down hundreds of dollars on a new grinder—simply reset the disposal by pressing the small (usually red) button on the bottom or lower backside of the unit. If this doesn’t work, check the circuit breaker or fuse to make sure it is not tripped. If that doesn’t work? It may be time to go shopping.

Here, we’ll cover everything you need to know about buying a garbage disposal, whether you’re looking to replace the one you have or you’re starting from scratch. Our ratings of 30-plus lab-tested disposals will make the process even more seamless and help you make the best choice, depending on your situation and particular needs.

How We Test Garbage Disposals

Consumer Reports tests garbage disposals on a number of factors. For our speed test, we grind pieces of beef rib bones for 1 minute with cold running water, then measure how much food is left in the disposal. The more food that’s left, the longer it takes to grind and the lower the score.

To see how well the disposals grind food, we toss a mix of bones and raw vegetable scraps into each model and run the resulting fragments through four different-sized sieves to gauge fineness. A garbage disposal that garners an Excellent rating turns out food particles fine enough to slip through most of the sieves. If bigger bits are left over, there’s a greater chance the kitchen sink drain will clog—and that model will receive a lower score in this test.

For noise, we measure the decibels emitted while the disposals grind a mix of bones and vegetables. In general, we find that the quieter models are heavier because they have more insulation. For details on how each model we test performs, see our garbage disposal ratings.

Before You Buy a Garbage Disposal

Before choosing a model, answer these three questions.

Are my pipes up to the task? Food debris might not present a problem in a newer home with slippery plastic drainpipes, but clog risks go up substantially if you have rugged old cast-iron drainpipes. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) piping became more commonplace in homes built after the mid-1970s. One general rule of thumb: If your pipes already clog fairly often, a disposal might not be for you.

Is my septic tank big enough? Disposal manufacturers insist their products are safe to use with septic systems, but some plumbers are equally adamant that they are not. The truth probably lies somewhere between and may depend on the age, type, and size of your system. You may need to size up your tank to accommodate food waste and pump it more often (once a year instead of the recommended three- to five-year intervals) or limit your garbage disposal use. If you have a septic system and want to install a disposal, check first with your local septic system inspector.

Is there room under the sink? Once you’re sure your plumbing can handle it, measure under the sink to make sure you have room for a disposal. The appliance attaches directly to the underside of your sink’s drain opening. There is no standard size for garbage disposals—the models we tested were 10 to 15 inches high, 5 to 9 inches wide, and 6 to 13 inches deep. Generally, the more sound insulation a unit has, the bigger it is.

If you’ve just purchased a new InSinkErator garbage disposal, you’ll be glad to know our garbage disposals are the easiest to install.

Watch & Learn

InSinkErator shows you how to install a new garbage disposal by following the steps outlined in the instructions manual and as shown in this 4-minute video.

Written Directions

Before attempting to install your garbage disposal, read and understand the entire InSinkErator safety and installation instructions included with your garbage disposal model.

Materials Needed

Plumber’s Putty (.1 kg)
Wire Nuts (2-size 54)
Worm Gear Clamp
Dishwasher Drain Connector Kit (optional)
Hammer
Channel-Lock Pliers
Flathead Screwdriver
Phillips Screwdriver
Pipe Wrench

IMPORTANT

  • The following instructions are for a first-time garbage disposal installation. If replacing a garbage disposal, click here for instructions.

1. Disconnect the p-trap and the horizontal extension pipe.

Large channel-lock pliers or a pipe wrench work well to loosen the nuts holding the pipes together. When both connections are free, remove the parts. You may want to clean the horizontal drain pipe to eliminate any possible blockage. (This is not necessary in new construction.)

2. Disconnect the down drainpipe.

Using large channel-lock pliers, disconnect the down drainpipe coming from the sink and the connection that attaches it to the p-trap. When both connections are free, remove the parts. (See Fig 1)

How to replace a garbage disposal

3. Unscrew the large nut.

Unscrew the large nut that holds the strainer in place underneath the sink. Remove the strainer body.

4. Pry off snap ring and clean off the old plumber’s putty.

Using a flathead screwdriver, loosen the 3 screws on the mounting assembly and pry off the snap ring. Clean off the old plumber’s putty that surrounds the edge of the drain opening.

5. Install the new sink flange.

Place a 1/2″ rope of plumber’s putty around the drain opening in the sink. Drop the new sink flange into the drain opening and press it into place. Placing a weight, such as your garbage disposal, on top of the sink flange will help hold the sink flange in place while mounting it to the sink. To avoid scratching your sink or the flange, place a towel between the sink surface and the weight. (See Fig 2)

How to replace a garbage disposal

6. Install gasket and flanges.

From under the sink, slide the fiber gasket, backup flange and mounting flange over the sink flange. Hold these pieces in place.

7. Slip on the mounting and snap rings.

Next, slip on the mounting ring and snap ring. Tighten the three mounting screws, alternately tightening each screw a few turns at a time until the mounting assembly is evenly and tightly seated against the bottom of the sink.

8. Remove the dishwasher knockout plug.

If using a dishwasher, you will need to tap out the dishwasher knockout plug. Lay the garbage disposal on its side and use a screwdriver and hammer to tap it out. Next, remove the loose knockout plug from inside the garbage disposal. (See Fig 3)

How to replace a garbage disposal

9. Connect the electrical.

Turn the garbage disposal over and remove electrical cover plate. Pull out wires. Insert cable connector (not included) and run electrical cable through access hole on bottom of garbage disposal. Tighten cable connector. Push wires into garbage disposal (do not displace cardboard shield) and replace electrical cover plate.

If you have a hardwired unit and you’re looking to attach a cord, you will need a power cord kit. For power cord kit installation instructions, click here.

For a garbage disposal with a factory-installed cord, simply plug in to the outlet under your sink after completing the rest of the steps.

10. Hang the garbage disposal.

Hang the garbage disposal by aligning the three mounting tabs with the slide-up ramps on the mounting ring. Holding the garbage disposal in place, turn the lower mounting ring until all three tabs are locked into the mounting assembly. (See Fig 5a)

How to replace a garbage disposal

11. Insert the discharge tube.

Insert the discharge tube into the discharge coupler, then slide the clamp over the discharge tube and position it in the groove on the rubber tailpipe coupler. (See Fig 5b)

How to replace a garbage disposal

12. Align the discharge tube with drain pipe.

Rotate the garbage disposal so that the discharge tube is aligned with the drain trap. If the discharge tube is too long, cut off as much of the tube as necessary. If it is too short, you can purchase an extension. If you are connecting the garbage disposal to a dishwasher, it may be connected through an air gap. Use a hose clamp to attach the drain hose to the dishwasher inlet.

13. Lock the garbage disposal in place.

Now that everything is installed and in position, lock the garbage disposal to the sink mounting assembly using the wrench that came with the unit. Insert the Quiet Collar® Sink Baffle into the sink opening by pressing it into the sink until it snaps into place. (See Fig 5d)

How to replace a garbage disposal

14. Test the garbage disposal.

Test for leaks at the sink flange, dishwasher, tail-pipe and mounting assembly connections. Finally, turn on the electrical breaker to test its operation. Enjoy your new garbage disposal!

Looking for more?

Text us at 262-233-2231 for personalized help with installing your new InSinkErator garbage disposal!

How to replace a garbage disposal

We have come to depend on the garbage disposal as the workhorse of the kitchen. Invented in 1927 by John Hammes, the garbage disposal has remained fairly consistent in its design but has increased in use to the point of becoming a required appliance in just about every kitchen. The following guides will give you all the information you need to select and install new a disposal, use your disposal properly, and even troubleshoot problems and make common repairs to your unit.

How a Garbage Disposal Works

The garbage disposal is mounted to the underside of a sink and is designed to collect solid food waste in a grinding chamber. When you turn on the disposal, a spinning disc, or impeller plate, turns rapidly, forcing the food waste against the outer wall of the grinding chamber. This pulverizes the food into tiny bits, which then get washed by water through holes in the chamber wall. While disposals do have two blunt metal "teeth," called impellers, on the impeller plate, they do not have sharp blades, as is commonly believed.

Things You Should Never Put in a Garbage Disposal

How to replace a garbage disposal

Your garbage disposal is different from your actual garbage can. Not all food scraps and liquids are meant to be poured into your disposal. To prevent clogs and disposal jams, it's important to learn what foods are best left for the trash and what the garbage disposal is meant to be used for. In general, you should not put in tough or fibrous food scraps, potato peels, grease and oil, and pits and other hard objects.

Garbage Disposal Troubleshooting

How to replace a garbage disposal

A little troubleshooting of common garbage disposal problems can save you hundreds of dollars in service calls or an unnecessary purchase of a new unit. Most disposal problems are related to jams. A jammed disposal is easy to fix, but ignoring a jam and repeatedly restarting the unit can burn out the motor.

Repair a Clogged Garbage Disposal

How to replace a garbage disposal

Clogs are most often caused by improper foods, such as grease, potato peels, or hard-to-grind foods going down the disposal. Clogs can occur in the disposal itself, but usually, they appear in the drainpipe downstream of the disposal. The best way to prevent clogs is to keep problem scraps out of the disposal and put them in the trash instead. Also, remember to keep it clean.

Selecting a Garbage Disposal

How to replace a garbage disposal

Choosing a new garbage disposal can be as simple or as detailed as you'd like to make it. You can head out to your local home center or appliance store and pick up a standard model that will most likely serve your needs just fine. On the other hand, you can research the latest additional features offered on some disposals, such as fancy stainless steel grinding chambers or extra insulation for sound reduction, and narrow it down to a model with just the right bells and whistles.

Garbage Disposal Installation

How to replace a garbage disposal

Installing a garbage disposal is fairly straightforward but does require some very basic plumbing and electrical wiring skills. Most handy-ish homeowners can install a new disposal in a few hours.

Garbage Disposal Removal

How to replace a garbage disposal

Removing a garbage disposal is necessary if you are going to replace a sink or a failed garbage disposal. With many disposal models, you can quickly release the motor unit (the heavy part) from the sink assembly and set it aside to simplify the rest of the disassembly and removal.

The city contracts with ACE Disposal to provide garbage and recycling services.

Containers are collected on all holidays except:

  • Independence Day
  • Christmas Day
  • Thanksgiving Day
  • New Year’s Day

Should a holiday fall on a scheduled collection day, all collections will be delayed one day for the remainder of the week, to include a Saturday collection. The normal collection will resume the following week.

If you would like to replace, repair, or add an additional garbage can, please complete this form.

For collection issues contact:

The West Jordan Public Works Department
801-569-5700
[email protected]

For services offered at the landfill contact:

Trans-Jordan Landfill
10473 Bacchus Hwy
South Jordan, UT 84009
801-569-8994
www.transjordan.org

How to replace a garbage disposal

Recycling

ACE Disposal provides weekly curbside recycling service for city residents. Place recyclables in the blue recycling can and place it curbside on your collection day. The recycling market continues to change.

Need to replace, repair, or add an additional recycling can? Fill out this form.

  • Paper (not contaminated by liquid)
  • Brochures/Magazines
  • Mixed Office Paper
  • Telephone Books
  • Catalogs
  • Newspaper
  • Cardboard (not contaminated by liquid)
  • Shipping boxes
  • Cereal and food boxes
  • Gift, shoe, and tissue boxes
  • Plastics
  • Juice & sports drinks
  • Laundry Jugs
  • Milk & soda pop jugs
  • Water jugs and bottles
  • Metals
  • Aluminum cans
  • Steel cans
  • Tin cans
  • Clean aluminum foil

Glass Recycling

West Jordan residents can drop off glass for recycling at two drop-off recycling bins located:

  • Parking lot of the Gene Fullmer Recreation Center, 8125 South 2200 West
  • Ron Wood Park, 5900 West New Bingham Highway

The glass recycling program is for residents only. No businesses. All colors, no separation required. But please use the bins ONLY for glass. No garbage, porcelain, ceramic, plate glass windows, light bulbs, or cardboard. If the program is abused, it will be discontinued. For additional locations or information: www.company.momentumrecycling.com or call 801-355-0334.

How to replace a garbage disposal How to replace a garbage disposal

Green Waste

The city’s green waste program runs the FIRST full week in April through the LAST full week in November.

Request an additional green waste can by completing this form.

Green waste containers are collected once a week on a seasonal basis on your normal collection day. Please only place loose yard clippings in the container.

  • Do not bag any items
  • Do not put dirt, sod, cardboard, garbage, debris, concrete, rocks, or plastic bags in the container.
  • Do not overload – the lid of the container must close completely.

How to replace a garbage disposal

City E-Waste & Shredding Events

Every year, the city holds four FREE E-waste and shredding events. In 2021, the remaining dates are:

  • November 6, 2021 10am – 12pm
  • February 5, 2022 10am – 12pm
  • May 7, 2022 10am – 12pm
  • August 6, 2022 10am – 12pm
  • November 5, 2022 10am – 12 pm

Residents can bring up to two ‘Bankers Boxes’ of paper for shredding and residential electronic waste. Documents will be shredded on site in the parking lot of West Jordan City Hall. (8000 S Redwood Rd)

Items need to be drop-off ready. Paper needs to be loose, remove large binder clips, rubber bands, and binders. Bring proof of resident or city employment to participate. (driver’s license, utility bill, or city ID badge)

Some acceptable items include:

  • Cell phones
  • Computers and keyboards
  • Hard drives (these can be shredded if they have been removed from the computer)
  • Stereos
  • Fax machines
  • iPods
  • MP3 players
  • DVD payers
  • Laptops

Televisions, CRT monitors, cracked LCDs, batteries, lightbulbs, and printers are not accepted. Contact The Transjordan or Salt Lake Valley Landfill for information on disposing of these items. 801-569-8994.

Neighborhood Clean Up

The City of West Jordan offers three free dumpster drop-off programs throughout the year. Green waste and general waste dumpsters will be available in the Public Works Maintenance yard (7960 South 4000 West) between 7 AM and 3 PM.

  • October 9, 2021 7am – 3pm, Public Works
  • March 12, 2022 7am – 3pm, Public Works
  • June 11, 2022 7am – 3pm, Public Works
  • October 8, 2022 7am – 3pm, Public Works

Staff will be onsite to assist with traffic direction and dumping instructions. Participants must bring proof of residency or city employment. (driver’s license, utility bill, or city ID badge)

Most non-hazardous waste, June, or debris is permitted. Acceptable items include:

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