How to reheat tamales

How to reheat tamales

The delicious tamale is the iconic food dish of Mexicans. Tamales are loaded with ingredients, so it’s not easy to prepare them. However, you can still learn to prepare and perfect the cooking technique. But since the preparation is cumbersome, follow what others do. Cook a whole bunch and store the excess for another day. When the craving returns, there is the best way to reheat tamales, so the taste will be like they’re newly cooked.

Best Way To Reheat Tamales

How to reheat tamales

Tamales are really meant for storing because you can have it practically for breakfast, lunch or dinner. For lovers of this Mexican dish made of corn-based dough, a reheated tamale straight out from the fridge can be just as good as the last one. But the secret to still good tasting tamales is where it’s reheated and the reheating method that applies.

The general texture of tamales is quite different such that it easily loses its taste when you reheat them the wrong way. You have 4 options to reheating your favorite tamales and in the right way.

1. Microwave

Reheating tamales in the microwave may be the quickest way to satisfy your craving but not necessarily the best option if you’re thinking the taste would be like newly-cooked tamales.

Thaw the tamales from the fridge or defrost if frozen and prepare a microwavable plate and a damp full-size paper towel for covering.

Line up your tamales on the microwavable plate and arrange them in a way each will not touch the other. Do not load up the plate and place just right number of pieces following the needed spacing. This is to ensure even reheating.

Cover the top of the tamales with the damp paper towel and place the plate at the center of the microwave. Set the temperature at full power and the timer at 15 seconds then push the start button.

Open the microwave and turn the tamales over and repeat Step 3. The water in the paper towel converts to steam and works to preserve the texture and taste.

Reheating tip: If you’re not satisfied with the uneven cooking, interchange the positions of the tamales then reheat for another round. Reheating in your microwave will not bring out evenly cooked tamales. You’ll burn them or distort the taste if reheating goes beyond the prescribed time.

If properly stored, tamales can last six months or more in the freezer.

Celeste Noche, Freelance / Special to The Chronicle Show More Show Less

With the magical aroma of masa and meat wafting through homes across the city, nothing says the holidays in Texas quite like tamales. Whether made at home during an annual tamalada, picked up at the store or slyly purchased from a cooler in a parking lot, countless thousands of tamales will be joyously consumed during the Christmas season here.

But unless you have the appetite of an army on the march, there’s a good chance you’ll have oodles of tamales left over once the festivities have ended. Fortunately, with a little know-how you can make those corn husk-swaddled delights last well into the new year.

Tamales have a relatively short shelf life in the refrigerator. They’ll only be at their best for about three days wrapped in their husks and placed in a plastic bag or other airtight container. After that, they run the risk of becoming overly dry and brittle, although they won’t start spoiling until the one-week mark.

A better option for long-term storage is the freezer. Tamales freeze, thaw and reheat quite well if handled properly.

The secret is to avoid letting the tamales come in contact with the frigid air of the freezer, which will cause them to dry out and form jagged ice crystals in the masa and fillings, damaging their texture.

If you bought tamales in foil-wrapped bundles, just wrap those, foil and all, in a layer of plastic wrap and place that inside a sealable plastic bag with as much air squeezed out as possible to stave off freezer burn. Handle unbundled tamales the same way, leaving the husks on and tightly wrapping them in plastic before bagging. For easy individual servings, wrap the tamales one by one or in pairs in plastic before bagging and freezing.

Tamales can be safely stored in the freezer indefinitely, but the quality will begin to suffer after roughly six months.

A slow thaw in the refrigerator will best preserve the texture of tamales. Place the bag of tamales in the fridge the night before you intend to reheat them so they have enough time to thaw completely. If you’re in a hurry, you can use the defrost setting on your microwave, although the results won’t be as good.

A steamer is the best method for reheating thawed tamales. Place the tamales, still wrapped in their husks, in a steamer basket or a rack over about an inch of water in a large pot. Bring that water to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and cover the pot. The hard part here is patience. Depending on how crowded the steamer basket is, it’ll take 10 minutes or more to heat the tamales all the way through.

A microwave can also be used to reheat tamales if you re-create the environment of a steamer. To do that, place the tamales, still in their husks, inside a loosely closed plastic bag along with a tablespoon or so of water. Microwave that bag of goodness on high two to five minutes, depending on the quantity. Check them every minute or so, jostling the tamales around a bit, to ensure they heat evenly.

Learn how to reheat tamales the easy way, by steaming them in your Instant Pot!

How to reheat tamales

Did you know you can reheat tamales in the Instant Pot? It’s a cinch to do it, and the result is tender and moist tamales! Keep reading to get the tips and tricks for using this method.

Note: This post may contain affiliate links for your convenience. If you make a purchase, this site may receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. You can read my full disclosure policy here.

It doesn’t take long to realize just how versatile the Instant Pot is. It is one of the most useful appliances in my kitchen, for sure!

One of the most little-known uses for the Instant Pot is the fact that you can reheat leftovers in the Instant Pot!

Today, I’m sharing how to reheat tamales in the Instant Pot, whether they’re frozen or thawed, and you’ll be amazed at just how simple it is.

Warming Tamales without an Oven or Microwave

Warming food in the Instant Pot is particularly useful if you don’t have a microwave, or for those foods that can sometimes have a tendency to dry out in the microwave, such as tamales.

Not only that, but you can also keep food warm in the Instant Pot, which is great if you’re cooking now but won’t be eating it until a little later.

Related Articles:

The Best Way to Reheat Tamales

I don’t actually make homemade tamales myself, but every Christmas season, I order a dozen homemade tamales from a woman in my church who makes them, and they are amazing!

So when it’s time for us to eat them, I want to reheat them the best possible way, which is steaming!

Because let’s be honest–if you or someone else took the time to make delicious homemade tamales, you certainly want to reheat them the best way.

When you reheat tamales in the Instant Pot, the moist steaming environment helps to keep the tamales nice and tender, exactly as they should be!

I admit, I used to just reheat them in the microwave, and the fact is–that’s the fastest way to do it if you’re in a hurry.

But, I think using the Instant Pot is the best way to reheat tamales, because steaming them preserves their texture so well.

How to reheat tamales

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How to Steam Tamales in the Instant Pot

These are the tips and tricks I find useful when reheating tamales.

(Printable instructions are available below)

Add Water to the Instant Pot

First up, you’ll add some water to the insert pot of the Instant Pot. This is necessary to create the steamy environment.

How to reheat tamales

Use a Steamer Basket

To steam tamales in your Instant Pot, I recommend using a steamer basket.

Since we added water to the Instant Pot, we need a way to keep the tamales out of the water, and a steamer basket works perfectly for that.

I have this steamer basket and it works great for this purpose.

How to reheat tamales

  • ⭐️ Instant Pot Compatible – The 717 Steamer Basket is compatible with 6 and 8 quart Instant Pots, as well as many other Pots and Pressure Cookers. The 717 Steamer Basket is perfect for Eggs, Meats, and Veggies

Stand the Tamales Upright if Possible

While you can stack the tamales on top of each other, I find they reheat more evenly if you stand them upright on their ends.

This positioning exposes more surface area, which allows the steam to circulate more around each tamale.

How to reheat tamales

Use the Steam Function

If your tamales are cold (but not frozen), start with a 5 minute steam time. I’ve found this is the perfect amount of time for reheating tamales, but this is just a starting point.

If your Instant Pot is crammed full of tamales, you may need to increase the steam time by a minute or two. Likewise, if your tamales are large and have a lot of filling, they may need additional steam time.

How to Reheat Frozen Tamales in the Instant Pot

Heating frozen tamales is a cinch with your Instant Pot! If you’re wanting to warm up some frozen tamales, whether they are homemade or store-bought, this is the best way to reheat them!

Keep in mind, these tamales were already cooked before being frozen, so we’re basically just heating the tamales using the steam function of the Instant Pot.

How to reheat tamales

How Long to Steam Frozen Tamales

If your tamales are frozen, all you have to do is increase the steam time to 15 minutes. This worked great for my fairly large tamales.

If your tamales are smaller, you will likely be able to get by with less time–you could try a steam time of 10 minutes.

After the steam time is complete, do a quick release and carefully open the lid to lift out the basket.

How to reheat tamales

What if I Don’t Have a Steamer Basket?

If you need to reheat tamales but don’t have a steamer basket, you can try standing the tamales up on the trivet that came with your Instant Pot. It can be a little tricky to balance them this way, but it can still be done!

Alternatively, you can lay the tamales flat on the trivet and steam them that way.

If you’re stacking several tamales, I’d increase the steam time by a couple of minutes. But if you’re just laying a few on the trivet, the 5 minute recommendation should work just fine.

Either way, enjoy your perfectly reheated tamales! I love serving mine with some Instant Pot Spanish rice or Instant Pot yellow rice as a quick and easy side item.

With their magical aroma of masa and meat wafting through homes across the city, nothing says the holidays in San Antonio quite like tamales. Whether they’re made at home during an annual tamalada, picked up at the store or slyly purchased from a cooler in a Walmart parking lot, countless thousands of tamales will be joyously consumed during the Christmas season here.

But unless you have the appetite of an army on the march, there’s a good chance you’ll have oodles of tamales left over once the festivities have ended. Fortunately, with a little know-how you can make those corn husk-swaddled delights last well into the new year.

Tamales have a relatively short shelf life in the refrigerator. They’ll really only be at their best for about three days if stored wrapped in their husks and placed in a plastic bag or other airtight container. After that, you run the risk of them becoming overly dry and brittle, although they won’t start spoiling until you hit the one-week mark.

For the best texture, reheat tamales in a steamer.

A better option for long-term storage is the freezer. Tamales freeze, thaw out and reheat quite well if handled properly.

The secret is to avoid letting the tamales come in contact with the frigid air of the freezer, which will cause them to dry out and form jagged ice crystals in the masa and fillings, damaging their texture.

If you bought your tamales in foil-wrapped bundles, just wrap those, foil and all, in a layer of plastic wrap and place that inside a sealable plastic bag with as much air squeezed out as possible to stave off freezer burn. Handle unbundled tamales the same way, leaving the husks on and tightly wrapped in plastic before bagging. For easy individual servings, wrap the tamales one-by-one or in pairs in plastic before bagging and freezing.

Tamales can be safely stored in the freezer indefinitely, but the quality will begin to suffer after roughly six months.

A slow thaw in the refrigerator will best preserve the texture of your tamales. Place the bag of tamales in the fridge the night before you intend to reheat them so they have enough time to thaw completely. If you’re in a hurry, you can use the defrost setting on your microwave, although the results won’t be as good.

If properly stored, tamales can last six months or more in the freezer.

San Francisco Chronicle file photo

A steamer is the best method for reheating those thawed-out tamales. Place the tamales, still wrapped in their husks, in a steamer basket or a rack over about an inch of water in a large pot. Bring that water to a boil, reduce the heat to low and cover the pot. The hard part here is patience. Depending on how crowded the steamer basket is, it’ll take 10 minutes or more to heat the tamales all the way through.

A microwave can also be used to reheat tamales if you re-create the environment of a steamer. To do that, place the tamales, still in their husks, inside a loosely closed plastic bag along with a tablespoon or so of water. Microwave that bag of goodness on high heat for two to five minutes, depending on the quantity. Check them every minute or so, jostling the tamales around a bit, to ensure they heat evenly.

[email protected] | Twitter: @pjbites | Instagram: @pjstephen

Paul Stephen moved to San Antonio from North Carolina in 2017 to join the Express-News Taste team. In that time, he’s cooked through about 1,000 recipes, noshed at more than 200 restaurants and seriously considered getting a map of the city’s grocery stores tattooed on his arm for easy reference. He cannot be trusted around your cookbook collection.

Tamales are probably not as difficult to make as you might think. I know when I first tried them, I was surprised how easy they were to make, and of course I was so glad to have made them myself because they are so delicious.

If you’ve never made tamales before, you may find them intimidating, but they are not difficult to make at home on your own. It is so good when they come out freshly steamed when you make them at home. It will take some time to prepare and to steam- around 2 hours altogether- but the process for making them is fairly simple.

There are some shortcuts you can take, and you can buy some of the components for tamales at the grocery, or you can make everything completely on your own. It’s up to you, but just be aware that there are some shortcuts you can use to speed things up a bit, if you like.

Tamales can be made a few different ways, like in an instant pot or on the stovetop. You can steam them either of these ways, and it is important that you steam them to get that authentic taste and texture.

How long do you steam tamales for? I will answer this and all your other questions about preparing tamales so that they come out perfectly every time.

Preparing the Tamales

I am focusing more here on how long do you steam tamales rather than the whole process of making them, but I want to share a brief little overview about preparing left tamales. It is important to understand those basics before I get into how long it takes to steam them.

Making the Tamale shells from scratch takes time, and you’ll need to soak corn husks for about 30 minutes until they soften. You also need to mix up the masa dough, which you can do in a hand mixer or in a stand mixer .

If you have lots of time, you can make them by hand. You also need your fillings, like your meat and veggies that go in the tamales. Once you have made up the shells and put all your fillings in to make what is basically a small burrito, you can fold the ends down and tie everything together.

Then, closing everything in the corn husks. From there, you just have to steam the tamales until they are done.

How Long Do You Steam Tamales?

This steaming process is key to making sure these come out perfect. You want to make sure you don’t steam them for too long and that you don’t undercook them. Over-steaming your tamales can resolved in tamales that are too soggy and too soft, and they can fall apart as soon as you try to cut into them.

Of course, if you don’t steam them long enough, they may not be cooked all the way through and may be too tough.

How long do you steam tamales to cook? You have to strike that balance between too much and too little steaming. You’re looking at about 30 to 40 minutes for steaming them on the stovetop. Keep in mind, however, that the length of time it takes to steam them will depend on how many you’re trying to steam at once.

You can look for signs that they are fully cooked and that they have been steamed enough before taking them off the stove top. What you’re looking for is separation from the masa and the husks. In other words, the dough should have separated from the corn husk, and that tells you that they have been steamed enough.

You can also see tamales in the instant pot or some other kind of pressure cooker. If you’re following a recipe for steaming tamales on the stovetop and want to steam in the instant pot instead, simply halve the amount of water you would be using. So, if you use 2 cups of water to steam on the stove top, you would just use 1 cup of water for steaming in the instant pot.

How long do you steam tamales in the instant pot? You should steam them for about 20 minutes while cooking on high pressure. This is the fastest way to steam your tamales, and once again you’re looking for the masa and corn husks to separate.

How Long Do You Steam Frozen Tamales?

If you are using frozen tamales, that can affect the amount of time you need to steam them. How long to steam tamales that have been frozen? If you’re steaming about four tamales or less, you can steam them for 25 to 30 minutes. If you’re steaming more than that, steam for about 35 to 40 minutes. It does take longer to steam them if they are frozen than if you are making them fresh.

How Long Do You Steam Tamales to Reheat?

You could also use the steaming process to reheat your tamales. How long should that take? If the tamales are thawed in the fridge, it should only take about 15 to 20 minutes to steam them this way. However, if you stored them frozen and they are already cooked, you’ll need to add another 10 minutes onto that.

You want your tamales to be warmed all the way through and to not still be cold in the centre. So, you have to steam them thoroughly and not take any shortcuts with this process. When reheating tamales, just turn the heat to medium make sure your steamer is filled completely with water.

There are a few different ways you can reheat tamales, if you don’t want to go through the process of using a steamer. You can reheat them in the oven for 20 minutes at 425 degrees Fahrenheit. If you are reheating in the oven , be sure to flip the tamales over halfway through the cooking.

For best results, wrap the tamales in a couple layers of aluminium foil. You can also reheat them in the microwave, but the texture probably won’t be quite right. They will likely be somewhat dried out, and you can help prevent them from drying out a little bit by wrapping them each in damp paper towels.

Tamales always taste best when they come fresh from the steamer and are made fresh rather than reheated, but you have some options if you made too many and need to reheat them. Whenever heating tamales, whether cooking them initially or reheating them, be sure you leave some space between each one. This will ensure that they cook all the way through and that they get an even heating.

Written by Pauline

I’m Pauline, a mother of four grown children, my passion for cooking stemmed from the joy i get cooking for my family. I love to try new dishes, especially when dining out but creating and sharing my own recipes is my favourite thing to do!

How to reheat tamales

Sweet tamales can end the perfect meal or get your day off to a lovely start. Regardless of the course, tamales dulces, as they are called in Spanish, are often served around celebrations with atole, a little cup of coffee, or hot punch.

These steamy, sweetened dumplings of love are a bright and comforting ride of flavor. Recipes vary, depending on what ingredients are available in a given region. They can include raisins and cinnamon, pineapple and coconut, sweet corn and cajeta, chocolate, and so forth.

The sweet tamales in this recipe were inspired by a hibiscus roselle (also known as flor de jamaíca). Additional ingredients include masa harina, rice milk and oil, and a few spices you probably already have in your pantry.

As it goes with making tamales, they are a labor of love because they take multiple steps. If you have a spare set of hands to help out, recruit your friends, neighbors, and family members. Once you get going, making tamales can become a fairly easy and meditative process.

This recipe uses a sweetened masa dough. It's best made the same day you assemble and steam the tamales. You can make the hibiscus jam filling up to three days in advance, and in fact, its flavors will enhance with time. Or, skip the hibiscus jam and use dulce de leche, cajeta, stone fruit preserves, or pineapple preserves. See the recipe variations below for more substitutions.

These are just like the tamales my Abuelita used to make for special occasions. This recipe makes a lot, but if you’re going to go to all the trouble of making tamales from scratch, you might as well have a party! You will need butchers’ twine and a large pot with a steamer basket to make these. May be frozen up to 6 months in heavy-duty resealable plastic bags. To reheat, thaw in refrigerator and then steam or microwave until heated through.

Gallery

Recipe Summary test

Ingredients

  • 4 pounds boneless chuck roast
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 3 (8 ounce) packages dried corn husks
  • 4 dried ancho chiles
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh oregano
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar
  • salt to taste
  • 3 cups lard
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 9 cups masa harina
  • Step 1

Place beef and garlic in a large pot. Cover with cold water and bring to a boil over high heat. As soon as water boils, reduce heat to a simmer and cover pot. Let simmer for 3 1/2 hours, until beef is tender and shreds easily. When beef is done, remove from pot, reserving 5 cups cooking liquid and discarding garlic. Allow meat to cool slightly, and shred finely with forks.

Meanwhile, place corn husks in a large container and cover with warm water. Allow to soak for 3 hours, until soft and pliable. May need to weight down with an inverted plate and a heavy can.

Toast ancho chiles in a cast iron skillet, making sure not to burn them. Allow to cool and then remove stems and seeds. Crumble and grind in a clean coffee grinder or with a mortar and pestle.

Heat oil in a large skillet. Mix in flour and allow to brown slightly. Pour in 1 cup beef broth and stir until smooth. Mix in ground chiles, cumin seeds, ground cumin, minced garlic, oregano, red pepper flakes, vinegar and salt. Stir shredded beef into skillet and cover. Let simmer 45 minutes.

Place lard and salt in a large mixing bowl. Whip with an electric mixer on high speed until fluffy. Add masa harina and beat at low speed until well mixed. Pour in reserved cooking liquid a little at a time until mixture is the consistency of soft cookie dough.

Drain water from corn husks. One at a time, flatten out each husk, with the narrow end facing you, and spread approximately 2 tablespoons masa mixture onto the top 2/3 of the husk. Spread about 1 tablespoon of meat mixture down the middle of the masa. Roll up the corn husk starting at one of the long sides. Fold the narrow end of the husk onto the rolled tamale and tie with a piece of butchers’ twine.

Place tamales in a steamer basket. Steam over boiling water for approximately one hour, until masa is firm and holds its shape. Make sure steamer does not run out of water. Serve immediately, allowing each person to unwrap their own tamales. Allow any leftovers (still in husks) to cool, uncovered, in the refrigerator.

How to reheat tamales

This delectable red salsa pork tamale recipe is a collaboration that spans generations. The pork filling is by contributor Ubish Yaren. And, the masa dough originates with senior editor Adriana Velez's paternal grandmother, Maria Estevez Velez, as transcribed by her mother, Norma Mendez Velez.

Ubish’s family makes their pork tamales for celebrations, like Mexican Independence Day, when all the family gathers to eat and drink. It is simple, yet delicious. Much of the flavor comes from guajillo chiles mixed with cumin seeds, which is a typical mix of spices used a lot in central and northern Mexico.

The basic structure of this ancient dish (which originated in Mesoamerica around 8000-5000 BC) starts with a starch-based dough. To this, a meat, fruit, or vegetable filling is added, and everything is wrapped in plant leaves, then steamed. In Mexico, the most typical tamales are made with corn masa, and they are wrapped in dried corn husks. Countless varieties of tamales abound, but the pork tamale with a red chile sauce is perhaps the most popular.

While freshly-ground masa makes a superior tamale, it's difficult to source. So we've created a recipe for any brand of masa harina you might find in the Latin American section of your grocery store. Please note that you cannot substitute with masarepa (a cooked corn flour such as PAN masarepa). Corn husks and dried chiles will most likely be found in the same section of your grocery, or at a Latin American food market.

You will need a large stockpot with a strainer or steamer basket deep enough to hold the tamales vertically. You can find steamer baskets at kitchen supply, home goods, and grocery stores.

Tamales take time. You can make the filling up to three days in advance. Assembling tamales is considered a group activity, especially popular around Christmas. Family and friends gather to share the labor of preparing copious numbers of tamales, and everyone brings home at least a dozen to enjoy through the holiday season.

To eat, you open the corn husk envelope, discard, and eat the tamale inside with salsas and other condiments, like escabeche. Once cooked, the tamales will last around one week in the fridge. They also freeze very well.

Since the holidays are our busiest time of the year, Delia’s invites our customers to indulge in our delicious tamales. We have an extensive menu of tamales to choose from, including chicken, pork, bean, and sweet cream tamales. Be sure to pre-order your tamales online as soon as possible to beat the holiday rush!

Best Texas Tamales Holiday Staple

We want to share a few reasons tamales are a preferred food for the holidays:

  • Previous cultures made tamales for community and spiritual celebrations.
  • Making tamales together is a familial tradition passed down from generation to generation.
  • Tamales are a great way to share our cultural foods with strangers, close friends, and family.
  • Maize, the core ingredient of tamales, was considered sacred to several civilizations in Mexico and Central America, as they believed it to be a gift from their gods.

Where Can I Buy Tamales?

Don’t worry if you can’t visit or live near our seven locations! We ship nationwide to whoever craves our savory tamales. All of our orders arrive frozen and ready to make! Once you receive your order, warm up your tamales to enjoy with your friends and family.

Follow Us Online!

Reach out to us online if you have any questions about holiday orders or shipping! Be sure to follow our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Snap a picture when you receive your orders enjoying Delia’s and use #DeliasTamales to tag us!

This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclaimer.

How to reheat tamales

Sweet Tamales made with raisins and sweetened with cinnamon and sugar. Easy to make and perfect for holidays and celebrations with family and friends.

How to reheat tamales

What are sweet tamales?

Sweet tamales are a Mexican dessert made from a sweet masa corn dough and filled with a variety of fruit, nut and sugary fillings. Common fillings include raisins, pineapples, fruit preserves, cajeta and dulce de leche.

To give the tamales a festive touch, the masa is sometimes mixed with food coloring to give the dough a bright pink or yellow color.

How to reheat tamales

Ingredients in Sweet Tamales

These sweet raisin tamales are one of my favorite kinds to make because they’re so easy! Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Raisins – I used a combination of regular black raisins and golden raisins for a bit of variety.
  • Sweet Masa Tamale Dough – You’ll need some masa harina (I used Maseca), canola oil (or other vegetable oil with a neutral flavor), salt, baking powder, ground cinnamon and granulated sugar. This dough is very similar to regular masa for tamales, but includes the sugar and cinnamon for that sweet flavor.
  • Corn Husks – You’ll need about 25-35 corn husks (about 1/4-1/3 pound). Dried corn husks can be easily found in most hispanic grocery stores or online.

How to make Sweet Tamales

  1. To get the raisins plump and juicy, you need to rehydrate them in some hot water.
    Simply place the raisins in medium microwave-safe bowl, cover them with water and microwave them on high for 3-4 minutes until the water is very hot. Cover them with aluminum foil and let them sit in the hot water for about 10-15 minutes. Drain the water and set aside.
    When you uncover the bowl, the raisins will be larger because they’ve absorbed some of the water. Rehydrating them makes sure that each bite of the sweet tamales includes a nice juicy pop from the raisins that is so satisfying!
  2. Mix together masa ingredients to make the dough.
    First, mix together the dry ingredients (masa harina, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon and salt) followed by the oil. Then mix in the rehydrated raisins and water. The dough will be very wet like a thick hummus and look like the photo above.
  3. Assemble the sweet tamales.
    This is the easiest type of tamale to make because it doesn’t require spreading the masa! Simply scoop a big spoonful of masa into the middle of the softened corn husks and close. Since the raisins are already mixed into the dough, you don’t have to “fill it” like savory tamales.
  4. Steam and eat!
    Cook the tamales open side facing up in a steamer pot like this one. A batch of 25-35 sweet tamales like in this recipe will take about 2 or so hours to steam. To check and see if they’re cooked through, carefully remove a tamale and open it up. The masa should easily separate from the corn husks and it should be fairly firm.

My favorite way to enjoy sweet tamales is in the mornings with a cup of coffee or as an after dinner dessert with a cup of Mexican Atole or Mexican hot chocolate.

They’re so warm and filling, they’re truly a Mexican comfort food that makes me so so happy.

How to reheat tamales

This post is sponsored by our friends over at Bob’s Red Mill.

Today we are sharing with you a step-by-step guide on how to make vegan tamales this holiday season.

Not only are these fairly easy to make, but they are also packed with flavor and will definitely impress your friends and family! Growing up, one of my favorite parts of the holiday season was tamales. We never made them ourselves, but our generous neighbors and friends at church always shared them with us.

How to reheat tamales

Since going vegan, I have not been able to partake in the tradition and honestly have missed tamales, so I decided this year that I would change that and make some of my own. We partnered up with our friend’s over at Bob’s Red Mill to bring you this recipe and we couldn’t be happier with the outcome!

How to reheat tamales

The key to good vegan tamales, in my opinion, is the quality and flavor of the dough — and we couldn’t have achieved that without the Masa Harina we used!

In our home, we say that the key to our hearts is through food and we always make it a point to share our creations with our friends and family. We hope you love these vegan tamales as much as we do and do the same!

How to reheat tamales How to reheat tamales

How to reheat tamales

Make sure you tag us on Instagram @sweetsimplevegan and @consciouschris and hashtag #sweetsimplevegan if you recreate any of our recipes, we love to see your photos!

This post may include affiliate links. As an Amazon associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

How to reheat tamales

How to reheat tamales

How to reheat tamales

This Costa Rican Tamale recipe (perfect tamales ticos) includes easy step-by-step instructions to make tamales de puerco de Costa Rica in the United States.

How to reheat tamales

Just imagine a bustling hot open-air kitchen- preferably in the cloud forest- full of people talking and laughing. There definitely has to be some Latin music, and a band of kids running in circles and yelling.

As each person arrives, they place on the table their offering- might be Maseca, might be vegetables, freshly cooked rice or braised pork, maybe even coffee, homemade juice and empanadas for the long wait.

Everyone puts on their aprons, washes their hands, and starts to give their opinion on how to proceed. There is tons of noise, laughing, and banter as the tamalada begins…

In this post I’ll tell you exactly how to make traditional Costa Rican tamales- step by step! I’ve even got an easy video for you to follow– even if you are making them for the first time, in cold weather, and all by yourself (like I usually do!)

We spent a day making Costa Rican tamales with our uncle William in Costa Rica. The girls learned a timeless food tradition, and we made delicious food to sell.

William sells tamales year-round to small business employees in San Ramon, Costa Rica. He’s an expert cook, and he does everything in a traditional way. Check out our day learning to make tamales, and the step-by-step Costa Rican tamale recipe- modified to make in the United States.

You managed to cook your steak to the perfect temperature and get that beautiful sear on the outside. Now you have leftovers, but you know deep down after being reheated, the steak will never be the same, and could result in a tough, tasteless piece of rubber. Properly reheating a steak takes a little bit of patience and some faith, but with the proper technique your steak can be every bit as juicy and delicious as it was fresh out of the skillet.

How to reheat in the oven

A great way to maintain a juicy steak is reheat it slowly in the oven first and then finish on the stovetop. Preheat your oven to 275° and place a wire cooling rack over a large baking sheet. Cooking your steak on a cooling rack allows the hot air to circulate around the steak, giving you more evenly heated meat.

Place your steak on top of the cooling rack and warm in the oven until the internal temperature reaches 110°. This will take about 20 to 30 minutes, depending on the thickness of your steak.

Next, heat a tablespoon of olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add your steak and sear for about 1 minute on each side. This should heat your steak to about 130°, or medium-rare. Keep flipping your steak if you prefer steak that's a bit more "done."

How to reheat on the stovetop

If you'd rather skip the oven, you can go straight to the stovetop for reheating. This method is faster, but you'll need to baby-sit your steak more closely during the process.

Heat a tablespoon of olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add your steak, and flip every minute until your desired doneness is reached. This should only take 2 to 3 minutes for medium-rare status. Now, enjoy!

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How to reheat tamales

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There’s nothing wrong with savoring cold fried chicken (we love it in this brilliant Fried Chicken Salad), but sometimes you simply want your fried chicken to taste hot and crispy like it came out of the deep fryer five minutes ago. We get it. Whether you’re reheating homemade fried chicken or leftover takeout, you deserve that crisp-skinned fried favorite to taste its best. Luckily we’ve got a foolproof method that’ll make leftover fried chicken crisp without drying it out.

First things first: Resist the urge to microwave your fried chicken — all it’ll get you is a hot and soggy mess. You can do better.

Instead, we recommend turning to your oven (or your air fryer, but more on that later) for the best results. Reheating the chicken in a hot oven quickly crisps up the skin and heats through the meat without drying it out.

Our method: Preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Meanwhile, pull the leftover fried chicken from the fridge. Fit a wire rack inside of baking sheet and arrange the chicken on the rack in a single layer. While the oven preheats, the chicken will come to room temperature. Allowing the chicken to come to room temperature ensures that it cooks more evenly. Next, pop the chicken in the oven and bake until the skin feels hot and very crispy, about 15 minutes. We like using a rack instead of simply plopping the chicken on a foil-lined baking sheet because the rack allows the oven’s hot air to reach and crisp-up every single nook and cranny in the chicken skin.

A quick word on whether or not you should cover the chicken in foil. While you might think that covering it with foil will prevent the chicken from drying out, it ends up trapping steam as the chicken cooks and makes for sad, soggy skin. So whatever you do, make sure you skip the foil.

If you happen to own an air fryer, you can certainly reheat your fried chicken in its basket. Preheat the air fryer to 375 degrees Fahrenheit and let the fried chicken come to room temperature. Next, arrange the fried chicken in a single layer and cook it for about four minutes, flipping it once to ensure even cooking. Resist the urge to pile up fried chicken in the basket. To achieve crispy skin you have to cook it in a single layer. This may mean cooking one or two pieces at a time, but trust us, being the patience pays off.

Now, is anyone else in the mood to whip up a double batch of tasty fried chicken? We have a few suggestions.

Ina Garten has a secret. She marinates her chicken in a mixture of buttermilk, shallot, garlic and jalapeños overnight for extra crispiness and a gentle kick of flavor.

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As a Mexican immigrant, I wasn’t born into a family steeped in Thanksgiving traditions.

When I was in eighth grade, our priest brought leftovers from a Thanksgiving meal to our family; none of us liked it. I spit out my first bites. Dressing, potatoes and gravy: a mushy, gooey blob. Poultry — bland. Not one to waste food, Mami stripped meat from bones and sauteed it with onions, jalapeños and tomatoes sprinkled with cumin. We loved that first Thanksgiving dinner with homemade tortillas.

Decades later, I married Tom, a Wisconsinite weaned on mashed potatoes and gravy. One sunny November morning, he suggested “something Mexican for Thanksgiving dinner.” Not one to waste opportunity, I said, “I’ll make tamales” — a small batch; Tom would make the full turkey dinner.

Our college-age daughters (my one and his two) would be home for Thanksgiving. Tom’s mother, in her late 80s, would join us as well, along with his siblings and their spouses and children. My white in-laws deserved tamales.

I prepared beef tamales and some with black beans for a vegetarian friend.

As family and friends ambled toward the dining room, I stood near the stove. “Bring your plates here for tamales!” I said. I lifted lids off the dutch ovens and that earthy aroma rushed out in steamy clouds. Serving tamales at the stove was my idea to keep them hot. But after seeing Tom’s spread of golden turkey and traditional side dishes, I realized I had segregated my tamales. Now there was no space for another platter on the table.