How to raise down syndrome awareness

Each year, about 6,000 babies in the U. S. are born with Down syndrome, a genetic disorder in which a person is born with one extra chromosome. Down syndrome also causes physical and mental differences, ranging from mild to severe. Every October, during Down Syndrome Awareness Month, many Down Syndrome organizations raise awareness and support families.

With the right support and early intervention services, babies born with Down syndrome can lead incredibly fulfilling and successful lives. That’s why these organizations exist: to give hope, support, and information to parents and families of those living with Down syndrome.

During Down Syndrome Awareness Month in October, or any time of the year, consider making a donation to these world-class Down syndrome organizations.

How to raise down syndrome awarenessPhoto source: Reece’s Rainbow Facebook

Reece’s rainbow

Combination locks, WI
Around the world, babies born with Down syndrome are being abandoned more often. Reece’s rainbow works to give these children a loving home, caring services, and inclusive advocacy. This Down syndrome organization is not an adoption agency. Instead, it advocates for international children with Down syndrome and other developmental disabilities, helping them find loving and caring families in the U. S.

Reece’s rainbow has helped more than 2,100 children over 14 years of service. By offering adoption grants for those willing to give a developmentally disabled child a loving home, Reece’s rainbow is changing the lives of children all over the world.

We found three of our children on Reece’s rainbow! All three of our children have special needs and all three were supposed to spend the rest of their lives in institutions in their country. We are grateful for an organization that strives to find and be their voice for children with special needs!– Very satisfied

How to raise down syndrome awareness

A cruise with a friend

Lithuania, Florida
A cruise with a friend is dedicated to supporting families of children with special needs by promoting awareness, providing advocacy, and allowing families to connect with one another. The A cruise with a friend is an annual cruise for children and adults with Down syndrome and their families. On this journey, families can connect with the resources they need, gain valuable information, and receive support from peers and professionals. Meanwhile, their children have fun, build self-confidence, and learn important life skills.

But the organization is more than an annual cruise. On the ground, they work closely with children, families, educators and other community members to raise awareness of children with special needs. Through their efforts, A cruise with a friend hopes to create a more understanding and kind world for all children and a more supportive environment for families.

We are very grateful for this organization. A cruise with a friend enables us to relax and vacation with others with disabilities and their families, while also attending seminars and getting much needed support and information. They do so much for people with disabilities!– ConnieStives

The LAMB Foundation in North Carolina

Charlotte, North Carolina
The LAMB Foundation is dedicated to supporting people with intellectual disabilities in North Carolina. The organization is entirely run by volunteers, and over 93% of all funding goes directly to programs that impact people in the community.

Since its founding in 1999, the LAMB Foundation has raised over $ 21 million to support institutions, educational programs and other services for people with intellectual disabilities and their families. The organization recently won a “Gold Status” for the North Carolina Special Olympics, one of the largest recipients of funding.

The LAMB Foundation has supported my special needs class in recent years by funding community engagement opportunities and purchasing the items for the class I need. We truly appreciate everything they do to help people with disabilities in our community. – Wagons

How to raise down syndrome awareness

The field of Adam

Centenary, CO
The field of Adam began in 1986 with just a few families. Currently, the organization serves over 1,000 people with special needs and their families each year.

At The field of Adam, participants have incredible experiences, partnering with volunteers and professionals to learn how to better care for their special needs loved ones. Meanwhile, children, adolescents and young adults with intellectual disabilities can live a wonderful life outdoors, building self-confidence, making new friends and participating in specialized therapy programs.

Our 35-year-old son has Down syndrome and has been going to Adams Camp every year for 22 years. It’s been instrumental to his social growth and his independence. He can’t wait to do it all year round and he loves every minute of it in the beautiful mountain scenery. Debber

Resistant since 1978

How to raise down syndrome awareness

Let’s help celebrate and raise awareness on World Down Syndrome Day, which is Sunday March 21st. It’s an important day to help educate the public and support people with Down Syndrome. So, let’s start with some education. Do you know why the Consciousness date is 3-21? It’s because it represents Trisomy 21. That is medical term for Down syndrome, which is the third replication of the 21st chromosome.

What is Down’s Syndrome?

Down syndrome is a genetic disorder that occurs when abnormal cell division results in an additional complete or partial copy of chromosome 21. It is the most common chromosomal condition and varies in severity in humans. Down syndrome causes lifelong intellectual disability, developmental delays, and other medical abnormalities.

This is the information you get when you Google what Down syndrome is. And although It’s important to understand the facts that are published. I believe it’s even more important to understand a parents point of view. What would a parent say if I asked what do you think people really need to know about Down syndrome?

Mom’s point of view

I’m lucky enough to know some amazing moms of kids that have down syndrome. So I asked them to share what they really want people to know about Down syndrome. A mom told me: “I suppose there may be a delay in planning the talk with Down syndrome, but if we are patient and take advantage of the doubt, we will be amazed by the abilities of people with Down syndrome.” She also said that “people with Down syndrome crave friendships and human connection, so don’t be afraid to include friends with DS in birthday parties, play dates etc. weekends are very lonely “

Another mom shared, “that’s it’s not sad or bad, it’s different”. She said: “My best advice for those people who want to meet someone with Down syndrome is patience. When you slow down and have patience, you’ll realize how alike you really are.”

Both of these statements are strong and I hope everyone takes the time to think about them. I know several families with children that have Down Syndrome and what I’ve learned from them is that people with down syndrome are kind, funny, caring, and capable just like you and me. Pomyśl o tych rzeczach i o tym, jak możesz pomóc ludziom z zespołem Downa. Maybe it’s to invite a child to a birthday party or help an adult get a job. Or take a moment to get to know them.

Now that you understand Down syndrome, what happens next?

Make sure you educate your children at an early age to see how different we are all. I recently read a book inspired by a young woman with Down syndrome. It was called “Basta” and you can find it on Amazon. It was a great book to help kids understand that we are all different and special in our own way and that’s it’s important that we include each other so that we can learn more about each other. I encourage you to tell your children what my friend said which was that people with Down Syndrome crave friendships and you shouldn’t be afraid of them. Get to know someone with Down syndrome and make sure they go to school, play, activities, job opportunities, etc.

Celebrate and raise awareness of Down’s Day

What can you do to celebrate people with Down syndrome on March 21st? You could do a casual act of kindness to honor a local friend named Gus with Down syndrome. His family started a movement years ago that our entire community engages in and it’s so uplifting and fun. Every March Gus’s family starts a campaign to do random acts of kindness in honor of there son to raise awareness for World Down Syndrome Day. Può essere qualsiasi cosa, dall’aiutare qualcuno a mettere la spesa nel bagagliaio al pagare un caffè per la persona dietro di te in coda. The possibilities are endless. So please choose your random act of kindness in honor of our friend Gus. Check out the Facebook page Random acts of kindness to Gus and World Down Syndrome Dayand post your act of kindness!

You can also take part in “Rock your Socks” on March 21st. It is a tradition where people wear brightly colored socks or socks that are not suitable for World Down Syndrome Day. Socks are symbolic because they look like the shape of a chromosome. Join this year and share on social media!

Defending the rights of people with Down syndrome

World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD), March 21, is a World Awareness Day officially celebrated by the United Nations since 2012.

How to raise down syndrome awareness

What is Down’s Syndrome?

Down syndrome (or trisomy 21) is a natural chromosomal system that has always been part of the human state.

The best people to answer many questions about Down syndrome are people with Down syndrome, so let’s pass them on …

How to raise down syndrome awareness

Storiess

The best way to promote awareness of Down syndrome is for people with and their loved ones to share their stories in their own words.

How to raise down syndrome awareness How to raise down syndrome awarenessHow to raise down syndrome awareness

switch on

Monuments around the world are illuminated on World Down Syndrome Day, such as the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa in Dabaj.

How to raise down syndrome awareness

CONNECT for WDSD 2021

WDSD is a unique annual opportunity for the global Down syndrome community to connect.

We want you to CONNECT for WDSD 2021.

Get involved

Every year we encourage people with Down syndrome, families, lawyers, professionals and organizations to observe the WDSD in their own activities. Here are some ideas to get you started.

How to raise down syndrome awareness How to raise down syndrome awarenessHow to raise down syndrome awareness

#LotsOfSocks campaign

#LotsOfSocks campaign exists to raise awareness of Down syndrome.

Just choose the socks that will stand out. Invite friends, classmates and classmates to join you.

Start a conversation. We take care of the rest!

How to raise down syndrome awareness

Year after year, the voice of people with Down syndrome and those who live and work with them grows louder and louder.

Join us on March 21 to create a global voice for the rights, integration and well-being of people with Down syndrome.

It is estimated that around 50,000 people in Germany live with Down syndrome and many of them feel marginalized in daily life. Now the famous German TV presenter is working to raise their awareness.

How to raise down syndrome awareness

Brandenburg Bildungsministerin besucht Schule

German TV host Kai Pflaume has a mission: to raise awareness of people with trisomy 21 or Down’s syndrome. In a new four-episode TV series, which aired in June on the leading German network ARD, he visits people with Down syndrome and provides insight into their daily lives. The “Show Me Your World” project aims to show how people with Down syndrome can live a normal life.

Happy in their world

Down syndrome is a genetic disorder caused in whole or in part by the third copy of chromosome 21, hence the name trisomy 21. Because the severity of this disability can vary, many people with Down syndrome lead perfectly normal lives with their families, while others need more help.

How to raise down syndrome awareness

The new television program Kai Pflaume aims to raise awareness among people living with Down syndrome

Support for them and their relatives is provided by the German Down Syndrome Network, chaired by Heinz Joachim Schmitz. He często zauważa, jak ludzie bez niepełnosprawności reagują, gdy spotykają kogoś z trisomią 21. „Na początku trochę się boją” – powiedział him. „Robią dwa kroki do tyłu, potem trzy do przodu – kiedy już nawiążą z nimi kontakt”.

This is because people with Down syndrome are often remarkably cheerful and have fewer suspensions than others. „Mają swój własny świat, są w nim osiedleni i szczęśliwi” – powiedział Schmitz, który uważa, że ​​to wstyd, że tak wielu początkowo reaguje tak obojętnie. “People with Down syndrome belong to our society and shouldn’t be marginalized.”

Narrower scope of attention

André Zimpel is an educator and neuropsychologist who currently conducts research on the lives of 1,000 people with Down syndrome. He is particularly interested in how they learn and what they learn best. It is already clear that people with trisomy 21 have a narrower attention span than others. „Ta zmieniona zdolność uwagi to nie tylko słabość, ale także mocna strona” – powiedział Zimpel. “But special schools often can’t support it because people with trisomy 21 are more dependent on abstraction. That’s why many of them can already learn to read and write by the age of two or three. “

Chciałby również, aby zespół Downa cieszył się większą uwagą w społeczeństwie – podobnie jak autyzm w tej chwili. But sadly, says Zimpel, we live in a society with a “cult of intelligence” in which there is hardly anything worse than being considered “stupid”. “In such an environment there is a lot of contempt for people with Trisomy 21 because they are assumed to have no intelligence, which is not true.”

How to raise down syndrome awareness

Schmitz is shocked that prenatal testing for Down’s syndrome has been legalized

So-called “integration schools” have existed for a long time in Germany, where non-disabled and non-disabled children learn together. Not only is this beneficial for children with disabilities, it also works in reverse. „Jest to szczególnie dobre dla dzieci bez trisomii 21, ponieważ daje im możliwość pomocy innym” – mówi Zimpel. “And in neuropsychology, we’ve shown that helping people makes you happy like chocolate and winning money.”

Controversial blood tests

Yet fewer children with trisomy 21 are being born in Germany. This is mainly due to prenatal diagnosis, a medical examination of the unborn children. Doctors are learning more and more about embryos and they do so in early pregnancy. Blood tests can now diagnose Down syndrome very early on. And when it’s found, it’s estimated that around 90 percent of prospective parents decide to terminate the pregnancy.

This so-called Prenatest has been legal in Germany since 2012, but remains ethically controversial. Krytycy twierdzą, że test nie służy żadnemu celowi medycznemu ani therapeutycznemu – ponieważ zespół Downa jest nieuleczalny – ale jest po prostu selekcją genetyczną. Schmitz is shocked that the test has been legalized: “I think this test is completely wrong because I fear that people with Down syndrome will die.”

Schmitz welcomes the fact that a famous face like Kai Pflaume draws attention to Down syndrome as much of his work is about educating the public and encouraging greater acceptance of people with Down syndrome. Mówi, że tylko ludzie, którzy zdają sobie sprawę, że zespół Downa nie jest chorobą – i że ludzie z tą niepełnosprawnością nie są głupsi od innych, tylko inni – są wanie zespółs sprout womans wilz podejs .

DW recommends

The Down syndrome test poses an ethical dilemma

In the past it was called mongolism, today it’s referred to as Down’s syndrome. A new blood test can help detect a genetic defect in unborn babies, causing an ethical dilemma. (2012-07-06)

Call more centers to improve the work

Antenatal and perinatal care experts are calling for more specialized clinics for high-risk pregnancies and newborns. DW’s Nicole Goebel went to a specialist conference to review the latest trends and treatments. (17/05/2012)

Disabled artists celebrate the 15th anniversary of the Circus Sonnenstich

On stilts, on the trapeze and with hula-hoops: young people with Down syndrome can be great artists. The Circus Sonnenstich in Berlin has been proving this for 15 years. (2012-05-14)

Defending the rights of people with Down syndrome

World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD), March 21, is a World Awareness Day officially celebrated by the United Nations since 2012.

How to raise down syndrome awareness

What is Down’s Syndrome?

Down syndrome (or trisomy 21) is a natural chromosomal system that has always been part of the human state.

The best people to answer many questions about Down syndrome are people with Down syndrome, so let’s pass them on …

How to raise down syndrome awareness

Storiess

The best way to promote awareness of Down syndrome is for people with and their loved ones to share their stories in their own words.

How to raise down syndrome awareness How to raise down syndrome awarenessHow to raise down syndrome awareness

switch on

Monuments around the world are illuminated on World Down Syndrome Day, such as the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa in Dabaj.

How to raise down syndrome awareness

CONNECT for WDSD 2021

WDSD is a unique annual opportunity for the global Down syndrome community to connect.

We want you to CONNECT for WDSD 2021.

Get involved

Every year we encourage people with Down syndrome, families, lawyers, professionals and organizations to observe the WDSD in their own activities. Here are some ideas to get you started.

How to raise down syndrome awareness How to raise down syndrome awarenessHow to raise down syndrome awareness

#LotsOfSocks campaign

#LotsOfSocks campaign exists to raise awareness of Down syndrome.

Just choose the socks that will stand out. Invite friends, classmates and classmates to join you.

Start a conversation. We take care of the rest!

How to raise down syndrome awareness

Year after year, the voice of people with Down syndrome and those who live and work with them grows louder and louder.

Join us on March 21 to create a global voice for the rights, integration and well-being of people with Down syndrome.

Dear DSAW family,

Happy March !! March has been one of my favorite months of the year ever since March 21 is World Down Syndrome Day. Chociaż codziennie świętujemy piękny dar zespołu Downa, 21 brand każdego roku jest obchodzony jako święto międzynarodowe – dzień, który świętuje z nami reszta świata. This year we are having BIG party and celebrating it all month.

W tym miesiącu chodzi or świadomość – podnoszenie świadomości i akceptację naszych niesamowitych przyjaciół z zespołem Downa. We know how incredible they are, now let’s shout it to the world!

This month we have some interesting ideas and simple ways to raise awareness:

How to raise down syndrome awareness

  1. Raise awareness everywhere, every day!
    1. Zmień swoje zdjęcie na okładkę, aby poinformować znajomych i rodzinę o Światowym Dniu Zespołu Downa i o tym, jak jesteśmy #bardziejalikethandifferent. Click here to download the photo!
    2. Print these Down syndrome cards and hand them out at school, work or your local business. It’s an easy way to spread awareness wherever you are! Click here to download the printable cards.
    3. Share our special World Down Syndrome Day photo that we’ll post on 3-21. Be careful!
  2. Join us and show off your crazy socks on March 21st! Szalone skarpetki stały się symbolem Światowego Dnia Zespołu Downa – każdy jest wyjątkowy i piękny. Use the #DSAWCrazySocks hashtag in your posts for a chance to stand out on our site!
  3. Raise funds for the First Call for DSAW nationwide with the Dimes for Down Syndrome campaign! Click here to download our printable label and stick it on a coffee can / other container. Place the containers at local businesses, your child’s classroom, or your office. The group with the most money will receive a pizza or donut organized by our Down Syndrome Self Defenders. Send the rest or start an online fundraiser(click here to visit the Dimes for Down Syndrome website).
  4. Find a DSAW World Down Syndrome event near you!

In addition to celebrating World Down Syndrome Day this month, we are also launching the DSAW Statewide Parental First Call Program by sending materials to over 400 doctors in Wisconsin, launching advertising campaigns and showcasing our new magazine. first call from DSAW parents.

When you raise awareness of Down syndrome in your local community, you are not only raising awareness of your child, neighbor or sibling… but you are raising awareness of people with Down syndrome who are not yet born.

The dropout rate for Down syndrome fetuses is still well over 80%. Through DSAW’s awareness campaigns and the Parent’s First Call program, YOU can be an integral part of reaching expectant parents who may one day face a terrible decision. future parents who can look back on your work, your joy, your hope … and decide that this life is indeed very beautiful. You can change it for families and people with Down syndrome in Wisconsin.

Join us. Raise your voice for Down syndrome! Turn your photo into a cover, shake your crazy socks and participate in Dimes for Down Syndrome. Because in the end we are # more similar than the others.

How to raise down syndrome awareness

If you have a baby or know someone with Down syndrome, you know their unique characteristics. Although they develop slower than neurotypical children, they are usually able to achieve developmental milestones.

It’s fascinating to know that researchers are beginning to understand that the abilities of kids with Down Syndrome are far greater than previously believed. When they receive the right interventions and treatments, their potential can be unlocked and developed further.

One of the interventions that has proven very useful in the lives of people with Down syndrome is the Tomatis listening program. This approach provides significant auditory and cognitive stimulation. And this, in turn, helps improve sensory processing skills.

Sensory processing and Down syndrome

Sensory processing skills are often, if not always, one of the biggest problems faced by people with Down syndrome. Sight, sound, touch and taste are important parts of sensory processing. It also includes sensorimotor control and awareness of proprioception.

Muscle control

Poor posture and poor muscle tone control are often a component of Down syndrome. It makes sense that these factors may hinder sensory processing and expression. It is important to emphasize that the Tomatis method also works by stimulating the correct physiology of the ear. Some researchers have found that this method helps control speech and jaw / mouth.

Amazingly, by exposing the inner ear to sound stimulation, the inner ear muscles actually become stronger and fitter. When implemented correctly, this shifts to the facial muscles used for speech and expression.

As people with Down syndrome learn to listen (not just hear), they are taking important steps to improve their language skills.

General sensory processing

How to raise down syndrome awareness

Another common feature of people with Down syndrome is slower information processing. As their brains take longer to connect pieces of sensory input, they may be missing out on key information. Likewise, the harder it is to fully respond to a stimulus after “losing a part”, so to speak, in a neural processing path.

Basically, these people have a hard time integrating the external stimuli they receive. They often do not respond or do not respond to external stimuli.

Because the auditory processing system is so closely intertwined with the other senses, hearing programs offer an extremely effective treatment option. The Tomatis method stimulates the auditory system while introducing slight vibrations into the skull. The body perceives these vibrations before hearing the sound. They help create a holistic improvement in sensory processing and easily fill gaps in cognitive development.

General advantages of the Tomatis Method

The Tomatis Method is a painless, non-invasive therapy that is proven to train and retrain the brain’s abilities. And it offers many benefits to all children in the cognitive range. Exposing children to music, rhythm, tone, and timbre at an early age can improve their sensory and language skills. Additionally, the Tomatis approach also helps people increase focus, focus and performance.

The same concepts apply to people with Down syndrome. (For more information on these processes, see other articles on my site.)

Work with me

One of my passions is using the Tomatis method to improve the skills of children with Down syndrome and other disabilities. Over the years, I have seen how powerful this approach is in helping children strengthen their cognitive skills. It also helps accelerate the progress of development. More information on sensory processing can be found at: https: // www. saccharin. com / treatment-sensory-disorders /

Accurate assessments are always part of a treatment plan. I also work closely with other community professionals as helping people with Down syndrome requires a multifaceted approach. The best part of my job is watching children grow and develop!

If you want to know more about how the Tomatis Method can help your child or family, please contact my office.

What is World Down Syndrome Day?

World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD), March 21, is a World Awareness Day officially celebrated by the United Nations since 2012.

The WDSD date, which is the 21st of month 3, was chosen to indicate the uniqueness of the triple (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome that causes Down syndrome.

History of the WDSD

WDSD was first observed in 2006

The Singapore Down Syndrome Association launched and operated the WDSD website from 2006 to 2010 on behalf of DSi to record global activities.

Campaign that generates international support

The Brazilian Federation of Down Syndrome Societies has partnered with International Down’s Syndrome and its members to launch a major campaign for international support.

Resolution adopted unanimously

After Brazil and Poland worked together, the resolution was adopted by consensus during the plenary session of the Third Committee of the United Nations General Assembly on Thursday 10 November 2011.

Co-sponsor campaign

Down syndrome groups and associations around the world have campaigned for their governments to co-sponsor the resolutions. The resolution was ultimately co-sponsored by 78 UN member states.

International petition

In addition, DSi has launched an international petition for the United Nations to adopt World Down Syndrome Day. In two weeks it received over 12,000 signatures and was presented to the President of the Third Committee.

United Nations resolution

On December 19, 2011, the United Nations General Assembly declared March 21 to be World Down Syndrome Day (A / RES / 66/149).

This is a date!

The General Assembly has decided to celebrate World Down Syndrome Day on 21 March every year since 2012 and invites all Member States, relevant organizations of the United Nations system and other international organizations, as well as civil society, including non-governmental organizations. organizations and the private sector to properly celebrate World Down Syndrome Day in order to raise awareness of Down Syndrome.

DSi would like to thank all those who have supported this campaign, in particular the government of Brazil, the Brazilian Federation of Down Syndrome Societies, all the member organizations that have asked their governments for support and all those who have signed our international petition. .

Year after year, the voice of people with Down syndrome and those who live and work with them grows louder and louder.

Join us on March 21 to create a global voice for the rights, integration and well-being of people with Down syndrome.