How to protect yourself from coronavirus covid-19 (2020)

Lisa Bricknell, Dale Trott, Conversation

One of the most profound ways the COVID-19 pandemic has affected our lives has been the way we work. For people who are lucky enough to keep their jobs, and even those of us who have jobs where possible, working from home has become the new norm.

Australia’s success in “flattening the curve” means that the restrictions are now lifted. With this, many employers bring their employees back to the office, or at least take it into consideration.

But as the current outbreaks in Victoria show, it is dangerous to think that we are now safe from the threat of COVID-19.

So what should we consider when taking the first timid steps back to the office?

First, how does the virus spread?

While we still don’t know much about SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, we do know that it spreads most effectively from person to person in the form of droplets. Infected people emit these droplets when they sneeze, cough, or even talk.

These droplets can be carried directly into the air – when an infected person, for example, coughs at someone nearby – or they can settle on surfaces where they can remain viable for hours.

The virus enters the body of an uninfected person through contact with mucous membranes in the nose, mouth, or eyes and attaches itself to cells in the upper respiratory tract to cause infection.

What does this mean for employees?

In many workplaces, employees share a small office, work in an open-plan office, or use hot desks shared between different employees in different shifts.

Workers in these situations often have to work for long periods in environments that make it difficult to comply with the recommended distance rule of 4 m².

This combination – several hours spent in close contact – increases the risk of transmitting COVID-19. This is illustrated by the outbreak at an open call center in Seoul, where over 43% of employees contracted COVID-19 in February and March.

Notes for employers

First of all, every employee in a shared office should have at least 4 m² for themselves. If this isn’t possible, it would be a good idea to irritate employees or allow them to continue working from home.

Second, think about the airflow. Small offices often have insufficient airflow to dilute the virus, and if an infected person is present, high concentrations of virus particles can occur within an hour or so.

Conversely, higher airflow combined with poor ventilation can also lead to infections as droplets can be carried further.

Therefore, wherever possible, increase ventilation and air exchange in open work spaces. Increasing the ratio of fresh air inlet to recirculated air can reduce the concentration of viral particles in air-conditioned environments. Even simply opening windows can limit the spread of the virus.

Third, the cleaning protocols need to be increased. Where a weekly visit by a contracted cleaner is sufficient to vacuum floors, empty containers and quickly clean surfaces, all surfaces should be thoroughly cleaned every day during COVID-19.

Pay particular attention to frequently touched surfaces such as desks, light switches, doorknobs, telephones, stair railings, touch screens, keypads, faucets, and toilets, which may require more frequent cleaning.

Fourth, if an employee develops respiratory symptoms, isolate them from other employees and arrange to return home. Advise them to get tested for COVID-19 and not to return to work until they test negative.

Likewise, it reinforces the message: “If you’re sick, take the test and don’t come to work.” Now more than ever, an ill-health “soldier” culture puts others at risk.

Finally, you can also ask employees to wear masks to work. Face masks are unlikely to protect the person wearing them, but they can reduce the spread of the disease by coughing and sneezing.

Considerations for employees

First, equipment such as keyboards, phones, and mice should be regularly and permanently cleaned between each user if desks are shared. Just clean your desk and equipment with a household spray cleaner.

Secondly, the best protection against the virus is personal hygiene. Washing your hands with soap and water provides excellent protection against SARS-CoV-2. When you are unable to wash your hands, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer instead.

You should wash or disinfect your hands regularly throughout the day, especially whenever you touch something that you suspect someone else has recently come into contact with.

Third, keep a distance of 1.5m from other people to protect yourself from droplets in the air.

Fourth, practice good airway hygiene by coughing and sneezing into a tissue or by bending your elbow. Zapobiega to rozprzestrzenianiu się cząsteczek wirusa po powierzchniach i w kierunku osób wokół ciebie.

Finally, if you have symptoms, don’t go to work. Take the test as soon as possible and stay home until you get the results.

This article was republished by The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Lisa Bricknell, Dale Trott, Conversation

One of the most profound ways the COVID-19 pandemic has affected our lives has been the way we work. For people who are lucky enough to keep their jobs, and even those of us who have jobs where possible, working from home has become the new norm.

Australia’s success in “flattening the curve” means that the restrictions are now lifted. With this, many employers bring their employees back to the office, or at least take it into consideration.

But as the current outbreaks in Victoria show, it is dangerous to think that we are now safe from the threat of COVID-19.

So what should we consider when taking the first timid steps back to the office?

First, how does the virus spread?

While we still don’t know much about SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, we do know that it spreads most effectively from person to person in the form of droplets. Infected people emit these droplets when they sneeze, cough, or even talk.

These droplets can be carried directly into the air – when an infected person, for example, coughs at someone nearby – or they can settle on surfaces where they can remain viable for hours.

The virus enters the body of an uninfected person through contact with mucous membranes in the nose, mouth, or eyes and attaches itself to cells in the upper respiratory tract to cause infection.

What does this mean for employees?

In many workplaces, employees share a small office, work in an open-plan office, or use hot desks shared between different employees in different shifts.

Workers in these situations often have to work for long periods in environments that make it difficult to comply with the recommended distance rule of 4 m².

This combination – several hours spent in close contact – increases the risk of transmitting COVID-19. This is illustrated by the outbreak at an open call center in Seoul, where over 43% of employees contracted COVID-19 in February and March.

Notes for employers

First of all, every employee in a shared office should have at least 4 m² for themselves. If this isn’t possible, it would be a good idea to irritate employees or allow them to continue working from home.

Second, think about the airflow. Small offices often have insufficient airflow to dilute the virus, and if an infected person is present, high concentrations of virus particles can occur within an hour or so.

Conversely, higher airflow combined with poor ventilation can also lead to infections as droplets can be carried further.

Therefore, wherever possible, increase ventilation and air exchange in open work spaces. Increasing the ratio of fresh air inlet to recirculated air can reduce the concentration of viral particles in air-conditioned environments. Even simply opening windows can limit the spread of the virus.

Third, the cleaning protocols need to be increased. Where a weekly visit by a contracted cleaner is sufficient to vacuum floors, empty containers and quickly clean surfaces, all surfaces should be thoroughly cleaned every day during COVID-19.

Pay particular attention to frequently touched surfaces such as desks, light switches, doorknobs, telephones, stair railings, touch screens, keypads, faucets, and toilets, which may require more frequent cleaning.

Fourth, if an employee develops respiratory symptoms, isolate them from other employees and arrange to return home. Advise them to get tested for COVID-19 and not to return to work until they test negative.

Likewise, it reinforces the message: “If you’re sick, take the test and don’t come to work.” Now more than ever, an ill-health “soldier” culture puts others at risk.

Finally, you can also ask employees to wear masks to work. Face masks are unlikely to protect the person wearing them, but they can reduce the spread of the disease by coughing and sneezing.

Considerations for employees

First, equipment such as keyboards, phones, and mice should be regularly and permanently cleaned between each user if desks are shared. Just clean your desk and equipment with a household spray cleaner.

Secondly, the best protection against the virus is personal hygiene. Washing your hands with soap and water provides excellent protection against SARS-CoV-2. When you are unable to wash your hands, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer instead.

You should wash or disinfect your hands regularly throughout the day, especially whenever you touch something that you suspect someone else has recently come into contact with.

Third, keep a distance of 1.5m from other people to protect yourself from droplets in the air.

Fourth, practice good airway hygiene by coughing and sneezing into a tissue or by bending your elbow. Zapobiega to rozprzestrzenianiu się cząsteczek wirusa po powierzchniach i w kierunku osób wokół ciebie.

Finally, if you have symptoms, don’t go to work. Take the test as soon as possible and stay home until you get the results.

This article was republished by The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Updated on April 27, 2020

How to protect yourself from coronavirus covid-19 (2020)

This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government License v3.0 unless otherwise stated. To view this license, visit the National Archives. government. uk / doc / open-government-license / version / 3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi @ nationalarchives. government. Great Britain.

This publication is available at https: // www. government. united kingdom / government / publications / coronavirus-covid-19-fraud-and-cyber-crime / coronavirus-covid-19-advice-how-to-protect-yourself-and-companies-against-fraud-and – cybercrime

Coronavirus (COVID-19) measures announced in recent weeks have drastically changed our daily lives – we spend more time at home and on the internet.

Unfortunately, criminals will take advantage of every opportunity they have to deceive innocent people and their businesses. They are experts in impersonating people, organizations and the police. They spend hours researching you for their scams, hoping you’ll let your guard down for just a moment.

They can contact you by phone, email, text message, social media, or in person. They will try to trick you into parting with your money, personal information, or buying goods or services that don’t exist.

Law enforcement, government and industry are working together to protect you and your business from these criminals by identifying fraudulent websites, preventing phishing emails, blocking phone numbers, and ultimately securing those responsible. to justice.

There are simple steps you can take to protect yourself and your business.

How to protect yourself

  • taking a moment to stop and think before parting with money or information can keep you safe

Challenge

  • consider if it might be fake – you can refuse, deny or ignore any request – only criminals will try to rush or panic you
  • the police or your bank will never ask you to withdraw money or transfer it to another account and will never ask you to reveal your full password or your bank PIN
  • do not click on links or attachments in unexpected or suspicious texts or emails
  • Confirm requests are genuine by using a known number or email address to contact organizations directly

To protect

  • Contact your bank immediately if you believe you have fallen into a scam and report it to Action Fraud
  • to stay safe online, make sure you are using the latest software, applications and operating systems on your phones, tablets and laptops – update them regularly or set automatic updates so you don’t have to worry

Visit Take Five for more tips on how to protect yourself from fraud and Cyber ​​Aware for tips on staying safe online.

How to protect your business

  • if you receive a request to make an urgent payment, change the supplier’s bank details, or provide financial information, take a moment to stop and think

Challenge

  • could be a counterfeit – verify all payments and supplier details directly with the company on a known phone number or first in person

To protect

  • Contact your company’s bank immediately if you believe you have been scammed and report it to Action Fraud

National Center for Cyber ​​Security

The National Center for Cyber ​​Security also has advice on how to keep your business secure online:

  • Self-employed and self-employed: Tips on how to protect the business and technology you rely on
  • small and medium-sized organizations: advice for businesses, charities, clubs and schools with up to 250 employees – you probably fall into this category if you don’t have a dedicated in-house cybersecurity management team
  • Large Organizations: Security Consulting for Businesses, Charities, and Critical National Infrastructures with 250+ Employees – Chances are you have a dedicated cybersecurity management team

Where to get help

If you are concerned that you have fallen victim to a scam or would like more information on what you can do to protect yourself, these services can help you.

Report fraud and cybercrime to Action Fraud

If you believe you have been scammed, scammed or experienced cybercrime, Action Fraud is the UK’s national cybercrime and fraud reporting center.

You can call Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or via Action Fraud. You can follow Action Fraud on Twitter for the latest information on the coronavirus scam.

Council to citizens

Not sure where to start? Council to citizens offers confidential advice online, over the phone, and in person, for free. You can contact them for support on issues you might be facing, if you’ve been a victim of fraud or a scam.

How to stay safe on the Internet?

The National Center for Cyber ​​Security (NCSC) is the UK’s national technical authority on cyber security. Provides advice to help people and businesses stay safe online, including advice to the public on the safety of video conferencing, online shopping, and online gaming. For organizations, it provides advice on how to work from home and reduce the risk of ransomware.

The NCSC has launched a cross-governmental ‘Cyber Aware’campaign, which offers actionable advice for people to protect passwords, accounts and devices. It encourages people to ‘Stay home. Stay in touch. Stay Cyber Aware’. You can learn more about the Cyber ​​Aware campaign.

Suspicious emails

The NCSC has launched the pioneering ‘Suspicious Email Reporting Service’, which will make it easier for people to forward suspicious emails to the NCSC – including those claiming to offer services related to coronavirus. You can forward any suspicious emails to report @phishing. government. Great Britain. The NCSC’s automated programme will immediately test the validity of the site and if found to be a phishing scam, it will be removed immediately.

Investment or retirement fraud

ScamSmart is a Financial Conduct Authority campaign designed to help consumers avoid investment or retirement fraud. They recently published specific advice on coronavirus scams.

Countering fraud

The National Trading Standards anti-fraud team hosts Friends Against Scams, an online training session designed to allow people to take a stand against fraud. Aiuta a costruire la resilienza della comunità e a prevenire le vittime di truffe insegnando loro a riconoscere i segnali e a condividere i messaggi. It was recently updated to include the coronavirus scam

Share it:

How to protect yourself from coronavirus covid-19 (2020)

Are people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) more at risk of COVID-19?

Not exactly, says pulmonologist and critical medicine doctor Russell G. Buhr, MD, PhD.

“One of the misconceptions is that people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are more susceptible to COVID-19,” he says. “A better way to think about it is that a severe respiratory virus like COVID-19 is much more dangerous for people with COPD.”

Dr. Buhr offers advice to help people with COPD avoid the serious consequences of the coronavirus and other respiratory viruses. The key is to follow public health guidelines to reduce the risk of contamination.

How COVID-19 affects the lungs

The coronavirus attacks the cells that line the airways. Known as skin cells, they filter viruses and pollutants that can cause disease. COVID-19 damages these cells and causes them to thicken, preventing oxygen from entering the bloodstream from the lungs. Without oxygen, people begin to choke and require respiratory assistance such as a respirator.

People with COPD or other lung conditions, especially those with more advanced disease, have less lung function. “Their supply is much smaller, so they start backwards,” says Dr. Buhr. “The body can’t fight off infection as well — that’s the reason they have poorer outcomes when they develop COVID-19.”

Mitigation strategies are key to keeping COVID-19 under control

The advantage is that the mitigation strategies that prevent coming into contact with the coronavirus are very effective. These are strategies that we already know well, but which we sometimes choose not to use:

  • Wash your hands:Use soap and water for 20 seconds or a dose of hand sanitizer with a minimum alcohol content of 60%.
  • Create physical distance: Avoid contact with sick people in your home. Outside the home, keep 6 feet of space between you and others.
  • Cover your face: Because people who aren’t yet symptomatic can spread the virus, people over age 2 need to wear face masks. The masks also protect against inhalation and exhalation of respiratory droplets containing the coronavirus.
  • Vaccinate: Get a flu shot to protect yourself from the flu virus. it can also protect you from developing severe COVID-19 symptoms.

Common myths about COPD and COVID-19

Dr. Buhr often has to dispel myths about his COPD patients, including:

It is safe to see your family on vacation

“I’ll have patients tell me that their kids will be in from out of town and want to get together for small holiday gatherings,” says Dott. Buhr. “I hate to tell people to skip gatherings with family members, but it’s vital this year.”

I don’t need to wear a mask because I have COPD

“There are no medical exceptions for the mask,” he says. “If you can’t breathe with your mask on, please don’t go out in public; it means your health is really at risk. “

I can’t go out and exercise right now

“Many of my patients experience a worse quality of life because they find it easier to get out of breath,” says Dr. Buhr. “When people aren’t keeping up their baseline activity, they get out of shape easier. It’s not that the lung function has changed; they’ve just become deconditioned.”

Dr Buhr says walking the block in a mask is a very small risk. If you can’t tolerate a masked outdoor walk, try doing home exercises such as Pilates, yoga, squats or lunges.

Vitamin D and a heartburn medication can help prevent COVID-19

“There are many reports of potential immune system enhancers such as vitamin D and famotidine (a heartburn medicine),” says Dr. Buhr. “Vitamin D is harmless enough when used as directed, but science shows that people deficient in vitamin D get sick more often than supplements prevent disease.”

It warns you not to get into any anti-coronavirus fad without consulting the provider first. “All drugs have side effects. Some are serious and some are not, ”she says. “So it’s important to clear it with your doctor before taking over-the-counter medicines.”

If you have COPD, continue your efforts to avoid getting infected

“People are really scared and tired of living in a pandemic,” says Dr Buhr. “But it’s important to remember that public health guidance is there for a reason. The recommendations come from scientists whose job is to make recommendations based on the best available data. The more we follow the guidelines, the sooner we’ll get through this.”

As for the news of the breakthrough in coronavirus vaccines, Dr Buhr says the top distribution priorities will be residential areas (nursing homes) and healthcare workers. Then as doses become available it’s likely the higher-risk people, including those with COPD, will get priority.

“When you feel that a vaccine is approved and available, call your doctor,” says Dr. Buhr. “There will likely be more than one vaccine available, so your doctor can determine which vaccine is best for you.”

For more information on how to protect yourself from coronavirus, if you have COPD contact your doctor or treating physician basic health care Doctor.

Stay up to date with the latest information on the Covid-19 pandemic, available on the WHO website and through national and local public health authorities

Most people infected with Covid-19, caused by a new strain of coronavirus, experience mild illness and recover, but others may be more severe. Take care of your health and protect others by doing the following:

Wash your hands often

Wash your hands regularly and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after being in a public place or after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

How come:Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand sanitizers will kill any viruses that may be on your hands.

Maintain social distance

Practice social distance by keeping a distance of about six feet from others if you need to go out in public.

How come: When someone coughs or sneezes, they spray small droplets of fluid from their nose or mouth, which can contain the virus. If you are too close you may be inhaling droplets, including the Covid-19 virus if the coughing person has the disease.

Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth

Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Infected hands can spread the virus to the eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and make you sick.

If you can, stay home and avoid meeting more than 10 people.

Practice airway hygiene

Make sure you and the people around you are following proper respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with a bent elbow or handkerchief when coughing or sneezing. Then immediately discard the used handkerchief. Wear a mask if you are sick. You should wear a mask when you are around other people – e. g. sharing a room or a vehicle – and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.

How come: The droplets spread the virus. By following proper respiratory hygiene, you protect the people around you from viruses such as the common cold, the flu and Covid-19.

Keep your surfaces clean

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, doorknobs, desks, computers, telephones, cell phones, keyboards, sinks, toilets, faucets, and countertops.

If you have a fever, cough, and difficulty breathing, see a doctor early

Stay home if you feel unwell. In case of fever, cough and breathing difficulties, consult a doctor and call ahead. Follow the directions of your local health authority.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in the United States, symptoms of Covid-19 include fever, shortness of breath and cough. Symptoms can appear 2-14 days after exposure. Call your doctor for medical advice if you think you have been exposed to Covid-19 and develop symptoms.

How come: National and local authorities will have the most up-to-date information on the situation in your area. Call ahead and your doctor will quickly direct you to the right medical facility. It will also provide protection and help prevent the spread of viruses and other infections.

Stay informed, follow the advice of your doctor

Stay up to date with the latest Covid-19 news. Follow the advice of your doctor, national and local public health authorities or your employer to protect yourself and others from Covid-19.

How come: National and local authorities will have the latest information on the spread of Covid-19 in your area. They are able to best advise what people in your area should do to protect themselves.

Sources: World Health Organization (WHO), International Red Cross

How to protect yourself from coronavirus covid-19 (2020)

I hear a lot about the coronavirus spread through aerosols: is wearing a mask at the supermarket sufficient protection? What else should I do to stay safe?

First, the quick answer: going to the grocery store where you and everyone wear a mask and keeping your distance is still considered a low-risk activity. Go get the summer strawberries!

In the background, aerosols are tiny micro-drops containing the virus that can be expelled when we speak or breathe and that can float and travel with air currents. It is not yet clear how important their role is in the spread of the virus, but recently more than 200 scientists wrote an open letter asking the World Health Organization to pay more attention to them.

The agency continues to argue that the greatest risk of spread appears to be caused by droplets – larger particles, even excreted during conversation or breathing, which settle more quickly and are less likely to accumulate in the air. However, WHO released a new scientific report on July 9 stating that airborne transmission could contribute to spread in crowded and poorly ventilated areas such as gyms, choir rehearsal rooms and nightclubs. However, they cannot say for sure how many transmitting aerosol particles are responsible with respect to the droplets and contaminated surfaces.

Goats and soda

WHO: Airborne transmission plays a limited role in the spread of the coronavirus

“We are calling for more systematic research in this kind of context,” said Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO technical director for the health crisis program, at a press conference on Friday. In other words, stay informed.

Conclusion: It cannot be excluded that part of the transmission may be caused by aerosols. If you want to be careful, here’s what some infectious disease researchers say that can help minimize the risk:

Get away from people when you say: When you talk to someone face to face, you are in the direct line of the plumes of breath that come out of their mouths as they speak. “If there is a scenario where I am facing someone, I tilt my head out of the center so that I no longer inhale that direct plume,” says Seema Lakdawala, a researcher on influenza transmission at the University of Pittsburgh. One piece of advice that helps is not to make direct eye contact with people. She admits it might be embarrassing, but “it’s not just about protecting yourself, it’s also about protecting other people” because you can get rid of the virus without knowing you are infected.

Wear the mask correctly: Wear a layered cloth mask in public places, especially if you are indoors or in a place where you cannot maintain social distance. Make sure it covers your nose and mouth. This allows you to catch a lot of droplets that come out when you breathe or speak and prevents them from escaping into the air. Ideally, to take precautions against the tiny aerosolized micro-droplets, “we should mask everyone with better masks,” says Harvard Medical School physician Abraar Karan. But the N95 masks, which effectively filter out most aerosol particles, are missing and uncomfortable to wear. Karan suggests some suitable KN95 masks that have similar protection (but make sure your mask is not fake).

Make the inside look more like the outside: “You limit aerosol transmission by increasing ventilation and increasing air circulation, opening a window, putting on a fan and simply moving the air,” says Lakdawala, who works continuously with several fans in his laboratory and office. The moving air disperses the particles into the air and reduces the likelihood of inhaling a concentrated cloud of infectious virus. Donald Milton, an infectious disease aerobiologist at the University of Maryland and lead author of an open letter on aerosols, also recommends indoor air purification using air filtration and ultraviolet light decontamination. “You don’t drink the water of another city without treating it. But we breathe other people’s air without treating it, “he says.

Limit the time you are in close contact with people: A basic public health rule that counts as exposure is close contact with an infected person for 15 minutes or more, so uncrowded grocery stores where everyone is masked and walking around present a relatively low risk situation, both Lakdawala and Milton I agree. Hopefully you won’t stay too long in an aisle, but you will shop efficiently, says Lakdawala, “So even though there are good aerosols that are released by someone who is infected, they dwindle as these people move in the currents of the day. ‘air .”. Indoor bars, restaurants, and other situations where people stay in one place for a while and talk or sing loudly make Milton more attentive. “I don’t know how to drink beer with a surgical mask,” he says. “And I wouldn’t go to choir rehearsal, okay?”

Keep the personal space buffer: Not only is this important for droplet spraying, it can also help with fine particles in the air. If you plan to sit and talk to a friend, keeping a distance of at least 6 feet creates more opportunities for airflow between you and others. “We have a happy hour in our neighborhood when everyone brings our chairs and we sit on someone else’s lawn,” says Lakdawala. “Everyone is spatially distant and we bring our drinks and chat.” Keeping your distance from others means more ventilation and more room for airflow between you, Lakdawala says.

Each precautionary measure adds another layer of safety against aerosolized particles, says Milton. “Wearing a mask means putting fewer virus droplets in the air and sucking in less [air]. Keeping the right distance means there’s less nearby. And good ventilation or hygiene means what’s in the air. is removed. All of these things contribute to good protection. “

By Zdrowie First // 4th October 2020

Your health is Health First’s top priority

ABOVE THE VIDEO: Health First adheres to comprehensive safety measures in all facilities. Your health is Health First’s top priority.

COUNTRY BREVARD, FLORIDA – Abbiamo sentito le stesse domande e preoccupazioni per settimane – "Come farò a stare al sicuro durante la stagione influenzale in una pandemia globale?"

Right now, we’re having to deal with COVID-19 and the impact it has on the flu season, and vice versa. We know that COVID-19 is a deadly disease that continues to affect every neighborhood and hospital in our country.

As for seasonal flu, raise your concerns.

"Tra 30.000 e 80.000 persone muoiono di influenza in America ogni anno", ha affermato il dottor Timothy Laird, direttore medico ad interim dell’Health First Medical Group.

Click here to watch the entire Health First Webex event.

The current overlap of both diseases is causing some people to wonder if they should still get the flu shot, when is the best time to get it, and if it’s possible to have the flu and COVID-19 at the same time.

Dott. Laird and Dott. Jayde George, Health First’s Virtual Care Medical Director, recently discussed these important topics during a Health First Webex event. They also discussed the benefits of virtual visits during the current public health crisis.

Let’s start with what’s on everyone’s radar: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it’s possible to get the flu as well as other respiratory diseases and COVID-19 at the same time, further worsening the health impact.

How to protect yourself from coronavirus covid-19 (2020)

When it comes to getting flu shots, it’s highly recommended. The CDC encourages everyone aged six months and over to get flu shots.

“It’s absolutely safe and one of the most important years to get a flu vaccine,” Dott. disse Giorgio. “Both diseases are terrible, so being able to protect yourself from one aspect is hugely important this year. Now is the best time to get the flu shot. The sooner the better. “

However, keep in mind that the flu and COVID-19 are caused by different viruses, and the flu vaccine is only meant to prevent the flu, not COVID-19.

Don’t fall victim to the myths – one being the flu vaccine will actually make you sick. That’s not true. While the flu shot can cause mild side effects like pain and fatigue for a day, it’s certainly not the flu, which would be much more severe and long-lasting.

But it can get a little confusing if you fall ill in the next few months. COVID-19 and the flu are respiratory diseases that share similar symptoms that can be difficult to understand.

The CDC outlines the key symptoms of any respiratory disease:

Influence (flu)
▪ Fever or a feeling of fever / chills
▪ Cough
▪ Pain in the muscles or body
▪ Fatigue
▪ Runny or stuffy nose
▪ Headache
▪ Sore throat

COVID-19
▪ Fever or chills
▪ Cough
▪ Pain in the muscles or body
▪ Fatigue
▪ Headache
▪ Sore throat
▪ Shortness of breath or difficulty in breathing
▪ Loss of taste and / or smell

"L’unico sintomo principale che differisce tra COVID-19 e l’influenza è la perdita del gusto e dell’olfatto, che è comune tra i nostri pazienti COVID-19", ha affermato il dottor George.

Some protection is better than no protection. This year’s flu season could be lighter than usual because of the ongoing physical distancing, hand-washing and wearing face masks, but there’s no guarantee.

And it’s a bigger picture, for those who don’t know how to get vaccinated against the flu.

“Get it for your kids, parents, and other community members,” said Dr. Laird. “Un vaccino antinfluenzale è il modo migliore per evitare l’influenza. While it isn’t 100% protective, it’s better to have some protection than no protection at all when it comes to being prepared and safe.”

If you’re still unsure how to tell the difference between the flu and COVID-19 symptoms, help is available in the comfort of your own home with our Virtual Visit services. This smartphone or computer screen option has changed the way we meet our health needs.

At its peak, patients took full control of our virtual visit options.

"A marzo abbiamo iniziato a fare dalle 20 alle 30 visite settimanali ea metà aprile effettuavamo dalle 1.000 alle 1.500 visite virtuali alla settimana", ha affermato il dottor George.

Three hundred Health First Medical Group providers and specialists were able to connect with patients during the pandemic. Some services included chronic and preventive care, patient evaluations, prescription refills, review of lab results, mental health assessment, and more. Our patients’needs come first, which is why we’ve offered Virtual Visits seven days a week with extended hours in the mornings and evenings.

As we enter flu season, virtual visits are considered “win-win”. Consentono di identificare e trattare la maggior parte dei sintomi del raffreddore e dell’influenza comodamente da casa, ma proteggono anche i pazienti che devono recarsi in ufficio e i colleghi che si trovano lì.

It’s crucial that you don’t put off your next flu shot or other healthcare needs during the pandemic and the upcoming flu season. We fully understand how important our virtual tour services are to our Brevard neighbors and friends, and will continue to bring this valuable and affordable technology to those who need it most. Call 321.434.3131 to make a virtual appointment with one of our specialized suppliers or to arrange the next available date for the flu shot.

Click here to watch the entire Health First Webex event.

How to protect yourself

Avoid touching your face
The virus can enter the body through the eyes, nose and / or mouth, so it’s important to avoid touching your face with unwashed hands.

Wash your hands
In all situations, it is recommended that you wash your hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or wash your hands thoroughly with alcohol-based solutions, gels or wipes.

Stay away from infected people
Avoid close contact with COVID-19 infected people.

Avoid socializing
Avoid physical gatherings, parties, and other social gatherings in community broadcast areas and follow local recommendations for mass gatherings.

Use a face mask
Wear a face mask indoors and outdoors when physical distance to other people cannot be guaranteed.

How to protect others?

How to protect yourself from coronavirus covid-19 (2020)

Use a face mask
If you are infected, using a medical mask reduces the risk of infecting other people.

If you are in good health, the use of a medical mask when visiting crowded and confined spaces reduces the spread of the infection in the community. Always follow local recommendations for wearing masks in public places.

Cough and sneeze label
Cough or sneeze on your elbow or use a disposable tissue. If you are using a handkerchief, throw it away carefully after a single use, then wash your hands.

Stay home if you are sick
If you don’t feel well, stay home. If you are experiencing symptoms suggesting COVID-19, see your doctor right away for advice.

Maintain physical distance
Physical distancing’means physically staying apart from other people. Instead, socialize with friends, family and colleagues from a distance.

Self-isolation
Isolati se sai di essere infetto da COVID-19 o se hai sintomi di un’infezione respiratoria acuta come tosse, febbre, mal di gola o naso che cola.

Travelers

If you are planning a trip, follow local recommendations and:

Published
Categorized as IT