How to print transparencies

How to load paper into the Bypass Tray

When selecting a paper size other than for paper trays or printing on envelopes or transparencies, use the Bypass Tray.

To use the Bypass Tray, load paper and specify the paper type.

Open the Bypass Tray. How to print transparencies

  • To load large-sized paper, pull out the Tray Extension.
NOTICE
  • Be careful not to touch the surface of the Paper Feed Rollers with your hand.
  • When printing on letterhead (paper where company names, preset text, and other text or images are already printed), load it with the print side facing up.
NOTICE
  • Do not load an excessive number of sheets such that the top of the stack is higher than the mark.
  • If paper is curled, flatten it before loading it.

Slide the Lateral Guide to fit the size of the loaded paper.

  • For details, refer to Here.

Loading postcards

Up to 20 postcards can be loaded into the tray. The following example explains how to load a postcard of 4 6 (A6 Card).

With the print side facing down, load a postcard in the direction as shown in the figure.

  • Select [Paper] – [ ] – [Change Tray Settings] – [Paper Size] – [Standard Size] – [4 6] ([A6 Card]). Selecting [4 6] ([A6 Card]) sets [Paper Type] to [Thick3].
  • When using a postcard other than 4 6 (A6 Card), confirm its size, and select [Paper Size] – [Custom Size] to specify the size.
Reference
  • When printing data stored in a computer onto a postcard, use the [Basic] tab of the printer driver to configure settings. For details, refer to Here.

Loading transparencies

Transparency is a transparent film to project an enlarged image on the screen.

Up to 20 transparencies can be loaded into the tray.

With the print side facing down, load a transparency in the direction as shown in the figure.

  • Select [Paper] – [ ] – [Change Tray Settings] – [Paper Type] – [Transparency].
  • Transparencies can only be printed in black. When the color function is other than black and [Transparency] is selected, check the displayed message, and tap [Yes].

Loading envelopes

Up to 10 envelopes can be loaded into the tray.

NOTICE
  • Before loading, remove air from the envelope(s), and securely press along the flap fold line. Otherwise, it will result in an envelope wrinkle or paper jam.

Face up the flap part, and load an envelope as shown in the figure.

  • The flap side of envelopes cannot be printed on.
  • Select [Paper] – [ ] – [Change Tray Settings] – [Paper Type] – [Envelope].

Loading label sheets

A label sheet consists of the printing surface, sticking layer, and pasteboard. Peel off the pasteboard, then you can stick the label to other objects.

Up to 20 label sheets can be loaded into the tray.

With the print side facing down, load a label sheet in the direction as shown in the figure.

  • Select [Paper] – [ ] – [Change Tray Settings] – [Paper Type] – [Thick 1+].

Loading index papers

Up to 20 index papers can be loaded into the tray.

With the print side facing down, align the tab side to the opposite side of this machine.

  • Select [Paper] – [ ] – [Change Tray Settings] – [Paper Type] – [Index Paper].

Loading banner papers

This machine prints data stored in a computer on banner paper that is up to 47-1/4 inches (1200 mm) in length. Up to 10 banner sheets can be loaded into the Bypass Tray.

Install the Mount Kit MK-730 into the Bypass Tray.
Set the Guidance of the Mount Kit MK-730.
With the print side facing down, load paper into the tray.

I just finished setting up my 4-color setup and am now challenged with where to print transparencies to use for exposing the screens. I heard that you have to be careful and make sure the black ink is thick enough to fully block the light. Suggestions? Advice?

If you’ll send your file to me, I can print it on transparency and send it to you for a few bucks plus postage. Dense, beautiful black on clear 13X18 film.

OP, you should do this if you have time. Then start saving up money for your own printer. Congrats on getting your press set up!

If I can’t get something printed on transparency I usually just print it on thin paper and use baby oil to make the paper transparent. It’s as if you’re using frosted mylar. Totally works and is super convenient.

The local library. Buy copy transparencies, and print them with toner. The toner is thick and excellent for blocking light. Warning though make sure the copier doesn’t have any lines running through it when printing, older damaged copiers often get these lines on them.

Good tip, you can find “print your own” lasers around in UPS stores, copy shops, etc.

This is what I did: Purchased hp inkjet printer 7000 ($199) Purchased 13×19 Transparencies from e-bay $60 for 100 sheets

Not sure what your budget is, but this will save you money in the long run.

That’s actually right within my budget. How long have you been using that printer? Any issues?

What is your budget? And which emulsion?

I’m using ryonet rxp emulsion. Right now I’m on a lower budget because I’m financially recovering from buying all the other equipment >_<. So something cheap and temporary until I can afford a large format printer.

I was reading that print centers like Office Depot etc are good for quick transparencies. Any thoughts on that? I too am struggling to find a working transparency setup

I had never though of this, but I wonder if they can output accurate halftones? I did go to FedEx office once when I was first getting started, and they used a laser printer for their transparencies – the heat caused some dimensional stability issues for registration, but otherwise it was alright.

My buddy prints these and does great work. He is really more useful if you need larger format films, but you can gang the images onto a single pdf and it costs less. I use him all the time.

The cheapo option which will work fine for less detailed work with most setups is a laserjet copy on film at a kinkos.

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I want to print an image on transparent sheets.

So some of the pixels are supposed to be “transparent” as opposed to a particular color.

How do I tell my HP printer that those pixels are not supposed to be printed?

Currently, the transparent pixels are pure white, so I don’t want white pixels on the transparency,

just omitted. Is there a way to designate a certain color as “transparent?”

Does this require a special file format, i.e.. as opposed to BIT MAP?

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Bob_Headrick

‎06-05-2010 08:54 PM – edited ‎06-05-2010 08:56 PM

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“White” areas on the image will be left transparent. No special software will be required.

Edit – BTW, make sure you use the proper media for your printer type. Laser media is designed to handle the high temperatures, while inkjet media has a special coating to properly accept the ink. Using the wrong media can cause damage to the printer and/or poor results.

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‎06-06-2010 09:27 AM

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Thanks for your reponse.

So, if this is an inkjet (a 6500 all-in-one), acetate sheets would be OK?

I don’t want to damage the print head, of course.

Bob_Headrick

‎06-06-2010 10:40 AM

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The Officejet 6500 would not be harmed by trying the acetate sheets, but unless they have a coating to accept ink the ink will bead up and may never dry properly. They also may not feed properly. I would suggest using sheets designed for inkjet printers.

If the sheet does not have a removable paper strip on the leading edge the printer’s media sensor may not recognize the media has fed and may signal a paper jam. This may be corrected by putting a thin strip of post-it note on the upper right leading edge of the transparency.

I am not an employee of HP, I am a volunteer posting here on my own time.

If your problem is solved please click the “Accept as Solution” button

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I’ve been having trouble trying to figure out how to print transparency film on my epson printer. It’s been a few hours and i noticed i just been wasting a lot of ink. The transparency paper are coming out either streaky, bleeding thru the paper, and just messy. I’ve gone thru 20 paper so far and been messing around with the settings. Not seem to work. I changed the settings to glossy paper and it’s bleeding thru the transparency film and just very wet. It doesn’t have the paper option to change it to transparency. Much advice or guidance needed. Thank you.

Much advice or guidance needed.

Check out the User Guide for your printer model. There should be instructions on how to print on transparencies if any pre-defined options are available. I checked out the guide for myself and didn’t find anything that seems specific to transparencies.

Epson 3640 User Guide (Page 74 on paper type settings):

Its possible your printer is not compatible with or designed for transparencies. This means you would have to either keep trying the various options until you find one that works or setup a custom paper type setting on your own.

Another option would be to check the specs on the media you have selected to print on. Often times there will be details and instructions on what kind of printer settings are necessary for the best results. I’d suggest starting here to know what the parameters are on the media before attempting any more test prints.

Match up the printer settings with the recommendations from the media manufacturer and you should get a good result.

There’s also generic googling to see what others have tried when attempting to print on Epsons in this way.

How to print transparencies

Getting tired of transparencies that are not black and are less dense? Ever dealt with the frustration of the inability to rinse out the stencil because the film was subpar? It might be time for a new film output printer.

Golden Press Studio used to have a CMYK printer, which used four different colors to make black ink. If one of the colors ran out, the printer wouldn’t print. The printer also required lots of maintenance.

The Indiana shop decided it was time for a new printer, so they got the Canon Pro 100 Printer with the AccuRIP Ruby software. Why the Canon Pro? The all-black ink cartridges drew them in. No more needing several colors to make one color. Plus, the cartridges are refillable, so they don’t have to continuously purchase cartridges and throwing the old ones. Better on the wallet, better on the environment.

To see if there were any differences between the printers, the shop printed off the same design on the same film on both printers. The differences between the printed films were night and day. First, you can see how much darker and blacker the Canon Pro printed compared to the CMYK printer.

Next was a light test. The team put the films on their exposure unit to see how much light came through the film. Again, the Canon Pro exhibited that it produces darker, denser prints compared to the other printer.

How to print transparencies

The last test was burning a screen. On the film printed by the old printer, they drew a sad face with a sharpie. After exposing the screen, they washed out the images and the sad face was the first to emerge.

If transparencies are not completely black, light will shine through the image, which will harden the emulsion behind it. That emulsion is hardening behind the image, meaning it’ll be incredibly difficult to wash out and later on, put ink through the screen.

The Canon Pro produces crisp, rich, black transparencies that make clean edges on the stencil. The opaque transparencies will ensure that the stencil washes out completely so you don’t have to worry about ink buildup when it’s on the press. Overall, printers will save a ton of time and money by speeding up the process with a solid printer like the Canon Pro.

How to print transparencies

Getting tired of transparencies that are not black and are less dense? Ever dealt with the frustration of the inability to rinse out the stencil because the film was subpar? It might be time for a new film output printer.

Golden Press Studio used to have a CMYK printer, which used four different colors to make black ink. If one of the colors ran out, the printer wouldn’t print. The printer also required lots of maintenance.

The Indiana shop decided it was time for a new printer, so they got the Canon Pro 100 Printer with the AccuRIP Ruby software. Why the Canon Pro? The all-black ink cartridges drew them in. No more needing several colors to make one color. Plus, the cartridges are refillable, so they don’t have to continuously purchase cartridges and throwing the old ones. Better on the wallet, better on the environment.

How to print transparencies

To see if there were any differences between the printers, the shop printed off the same design on the same film on both printers. The differences between the printed films were night and day. First, you can see how much darker and blacker the Canon Pro printed compared to the CMYK printer.

Next was a light test. The team put the films on their exposure unit to see how much light came through the film. Again, the Canon Pro exhibited that it produces darker, denser prints compared to the other printer.

The last test was burning a screen. On the film printed by the old printer, they drew a sad face with a sharpie. After exposing the screen, they washed out the images and the sad face was the first to emerge.

If transparencies are not completely black, light will shine through the image, which will harden the emulsion behind it. That emulsion is hardening behind the image, meaning it’ll be incredibly difficult to wash out and later on, put ink through the screen.

The Canon Pro produces crisp, rich, black transparencies that make clean edges on the stencil. The opaque transparencies will ensure that the stencil washes out completely so you don’t have to worry about ink buildup when it’s on the press. Overall, printers will save a ton of time and money by speeding up the process with a solid printer like the Canon Pro.

How to print transparencies

Printing on vellum or transparencies can be tricky and frustrating. Below are some tips and pointers that will help you out. These are based on a tip submitted by Scrapbook.com user Scraperfect.

TIP 1: Try printing on transparency setting as this puts out a lot less ink.

DRAWBACK: The printing will not be perfect, bold or crisp, and the ink may still dry slowly.

TIP 2: Use vellum made specifically for inkjet printers or office supply vellum which often prints fairly well.

DRAWBACK: Inkjet vellum can only be made in plain pastels. no pearl, embossed, or metallic coating. No sparkle! Also, inkjet vellum tends to be more expensive and still takes a long time to dry.

TIP 3: Use the “right side” of the vellum. If you can find a less shiny side, use it.

DRAWBACK: You will probably be frustrated trying to find that side and waste a good deal of vellum in the process.

TIP 4: Don’t use big, wide fonts as thinner lines won’t show the resisting as much.

DRAWBACK: If you want big, bold fonts for your title, who wants to compromise?

TIP 5: Since the ink will smear when it’s wet, don’t touch it until it is totally dry or use embossing powder and a heat gun.

DRAWBACK: Waiting to use your vellum–sometimes for hours or days–can be a drag. And while embossing can be attractive, who wants to have to do this every time you print on vellum?

TIP 6: Buy markers specifically made for vellum and stamp ink specifically designed to stick to more difficult surfaces

DRAWBACK: Buying additional special inks and markers can be costly, and your storage space may be limited.

TIP 7: Buy pre-printed vellum, transparency film, ribbon and twill tape.

DRAWBACK: Pre-printed supplies are expensive, aren’t personalized, and when you buy packs of quotes, you may find some you love and throw away the rest (or forever store them).

TIP 8: Buy inkjet transparency film for printing on.

DRAWBACK: Inkjet transparencies may not be acid-free and the ones that are may be expensive and difficult to find. (While Polyester film, such as film negatives and ‘write-on’ transparencies are acid free and archivally safe, most ink jet transparencies are treated with acid to make the matte surface and are not acid free. If archival safety is important to you, make sure the inkjet film specifies archivally-safe.

TIP 9: Buy shrink plastic specifically made for inkjet printers or use sand paper to rough up the surface so the ink adheres better.

DRAWBACK: Inkjet shrink plastic may be less commonly available and more expensive. You may already have non-inkjet shrink plastic in your child’s supplies and while sanding helps, the surface may still resist the ink.

TIP 10: Avoid using mulberry paper, shiny holographic papers, cool acrylic-coated, flocked papers, other specialty papers, clay and wood for backgrounds. Don’t try to print on these materials.

DRAWBACK: Limiting your usage means you’ll have fewer opportunities to use these cool materials.

Inserting front and back covers ([Front Cover]/[Back Cover])

You can insert cover sheets, which may be different from those used for the body, before the first page and after the end page of the original.

The front and rear cover sheets can be a paper different from body pages (in paper color and thickness). You can print them at a time.

In [Paper Tray] in the [Basic] tab, select the paper tray for printing the body pages.

You cannot select [Auto].

In the [Cover Mode] tab, select the [Front Cover] or [Back Cover] check box.

If necessary, you can select whether to print the original on the inserted sheets or to leave them blank. When the inserted sheets are printed, the first page of the original is printed on the front cover and the last page of the original is printed on the back cover.

In [Front Cover Tray] or [Back Cover Tray], select the paper tray for the paper to be used as the front cover or the back cover.

Inserting front and back covers ([Front Cover from Post Inserter]/[Back Cover from Post Inserter])

In bizhub C554e, you can insert a sheet of the Post Inserter into the first page and the last page of the original as an outer front cover.

In [Paper Tray] in the [Basic] tab, select the paper tray for printing the body pages.

You cannot select [Auto].

In the [Cover Mode] tab, select the [Front Cover from Post Inserter] or [Back Cover from Post Inserter] check box.

Select the PI trays for paper to be inserted as the front and back covers.

How to print transparencies

To use [Front Cover from Post Inserter] or [Back Cover from Post Inserter]:
The Finisher FS-535 and Post Inserter are required (only for bizhub C554e).

Inserting paper between transparencies ([Transparency Interleave])

When printing on multiple OHP transparencies, you can insert the specified paper between the OHP transparencies. These sheets of paper prevent the OHP transparencies from sticking together due to heat generated during printing or static electricity.

In [Paper Type] in the [Basic] tab, select [Transparency].

If you select [Transparency], the [Print Type] is set to [1-Sided], and the [Select Color] is set to [Gray Scale].

In the [Cover Mode] tab, select the [Transparency Interleave] check box.

In [Interleave Tray], select the paper tray for the paper to be inserted between OHP transparencies.

OHP interleaves are inserted as blank sheets.

Inserting Paper into the Specified Pages ([Per Page Setting])

Paper different from other pages is inserted into the specified pages.

You can select color paper and thick paper as paper to be inserted. You can also select whether to print the original on the inserted paper.

Create in advance a list that specifies the paper and print settings for each page. When printing on inserted paper, select the list you want to apply to printing.

In the [Cover Mode] tab, select the [Per Page Setting] check box, then click [Edit List. ].

When you have already prepared a list, select the list you want to apply to printing.

Create a list by specifying the paper and print settings for each page.

The settings for each page are displayed in a list.

Select the list to be created.

If necessary, change the list name.

These buttons move the order of settings in the list. They do not change the settings.

This button adds the setting to the list.

This button deletes the setting selected in the list.

[Tab Paper Settings]

When using index paper, set the number and positions of index tabs.

You can add settings to the [Settings List] or edit settings.

Enter the page numbers you want to add.

To specify multiple page numbers, separate each number with a comma (for example, “2,4,6” ) or connect the numbers using a hyphen (for example, “6-10” ).

Change the setting for the item selected in the [Add/Edit] list.

[Print Type]: Select the print type applied when printing the specified pages.

[Tab Paper]: Select whether to use index paper.

[Paper Tray]: Select the paper tray for printing the specified pages.

[Staple]: Select the staple position applied when the specified pages are stapled.

Specify what number tab of index paper is to be used to print text.

Enter text to be printed as a tab of index paper using up to three lines.

[Tab Text Details]

Specify the details such as the direction, position, or size for text to be printed as a tab of index paper.