How to prevent obesity

Prevention facts

Obesity is a chronic disease that affects an increasing number of children, adolescents and adults. Obesity rates among children in the U. S. have doubled since 1980 and have tripled for teens. About 17% of children between the ages of 2 and 19 are considered obese, compared with more than 35% of adults who are considered obese.

Healthcare professionals most frequently observe early onset type 2 diabetes, heart and blood vessel disease, obesity-related depression, and social isolation in children and adolescents. The longer a person is obese, the more important the risk factors for obesity become. Given the chronic diseases and conditions associated with obesity and the fact that obesity is difficult to treat, prevention is extremely important.

The main reason why preventing obesity in children is so important is that the likelihood of persistent obesity in adult children increases with the age of the child. This puts the person at high risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease.

Children

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC, breastfed babies are less likely to be overweight. The CDC also reports that the longer babies are breastfed, the less likely they are to become overweight over time. However, many bottle-fed babies grow up to be healthy adults. If your baby hasn’t been breastfed, it doesn’t mean he can’t reach the correct weight.

Children e giovani

Young people are generally overweight or obese due to poor eating habits and lack of exercise. Genetics and lifestyle also affect the baby’s weight.

Recommendations for the prevention of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents include:

Work gradually to change the family’s eating habits and activity levels rather than focusing on the child’s weight.

Be a role model. Parents who eat healthy foods and participate in physical activity lead by example so that their child is more likely to do the same.

Encourage physical activity. Children should get 60 minutes of moderate exercise most days of the week. More than 60 minutes of activity can promote weight loss and maintain weight.

Riduci il "tempo di visualizzazione" davanti alla TV e al computer a meno di 1 o 2 ore al giorno.

Encourage children to eat only when they are hungry and to eat slowly.

Don’t use food as a reward or refuse to eat as a punishment.

Instead of sodas and snacks that are high in sugar and fat, refrigerate skim or skim milk, fresh fruits and vegetables.

Provide at least 5 servings of fruit and vegetables per day.

Encourage children to drink water instead of sugar-based drinks. These include soft drinks, sports drinks, and fruit juices.

Adults

Many strategies for effective weight loss and weight maintenance help prevent obesity. Improving eating habits and increasing physical activity play a key role in preventing obesity. Recommendations for adults include:

Keep a food diary containing information on what you ate, where you ate, and how you felt before and after you ate.

Eat 5 to 9 servings of fruit and vegetables a day. A serving of vegetables is 1 cup of raw vegetables or 1/2 cup of cooked vegetables or vegetable juice. A serving of fruit is 1 piece of small to medium-sized fresh fruit, 1/2 cup of canned or fresh fruit or juice, or 1/4 cup of dried fruit.

Choose whole grains like brown rice and brown bread. Do not eat highly processed foods made from refined white sugar, flour, high fructose corn syrup and saturated fat.

Weigh and measure food to learn the correct portions. For example, a 3-ounce serving of meat is the size of a deck of cards. Do not order enlarged menu items.

Learn to read and use food nutrition labels, remember the number of servings you actually eat.

Balance your food with a “checkbook”. If you eat more calories than you burn, you will gain weight. Weigh yourself every week.

Do not eat high “energy density” or high calorie foods in a small amount of food. For example, an average cheeseburger with fries and one order can go up to 1,000 calories and 30 grams or more of fat. By ordering a grilled chicken sandwich or a simple burger and a small salad with low-fat dressing, you can avoid hundreds of calories and shed a lot of fat. For dessert, eat a serving of fruit, yogurt, a piece of angel cake, or a piece of dark chocolate instead of iced cake, ice cream, or cake.

Simply reducing portions and using a smaller plate can help you lose weight.

Aim to engage in an average of 60-90 minutes or more of moderate to vigorous physical activity 3-4 days a week. Examples of moderate-intensity exercise are the 15-minute walk or weeding and weeding the garden. Running or playing tennis for singles are examples of more strenuous activities.

Look for ways to get up to 10-15 minutes of some type of activity throughout the day. Walking the block or walking up and down a few flights of stairs is a good start.

More and more Americans are overweight, which can lead to a number of serious health problems and even premature death. Here’s how to escape an epidemic.

How to prevent obesity

As we continue to modernize our way of life – driving instead of walking, working in the pits instead of the field, playing with iPods instead of playing sports – more and more people are overweight and, worse, obese. In fact, there are so many overweight and obese people that some public health officials are calling it an epidemic, mostly due to the many health problems it creates.

Obesity: a global problem

Worldwide, over one billion adults are overweight and around 300 million of them are obese. In the United States, 66% of all adults are overweight and 32% are obese.

Obesity levels in Japan and some African nations are below 5 percent, but they’re rising. Obesity rates in China overall are not high, but in some of that country’s larger cities, rates are up 20 percent.

Childhood obesity has also reached epidemic proportions. The number of overweight children in the United States has doubled since 1980 and has tripled among teenagers. And the problem with children is now also a global problem.

Obesity: why it happens

While your genes play a role in your body weight, there are other factors. In many places around the world, especially the United States, we have plenty of nutrient-rich foods and easy access to fast food and fattening sweets. Also, due to our modern lifestyle, we are not as active as we used to be. The end result: We eat more calories than we can burn.

Being overweight or obese can cause a cascade of health problems, from heart disease and diabetes to strokes and even some cancers. These diseases can seriously affect a person’s quality of life and lead to premature death.

Obesity: how it differs from being overweight

Obesity and overweight are terms used to describe the level of overweight that is considered unhealthy for your body size. One way to determine if you are overweight or obese is to calculate your body mass index (BMI), which is a calculation you make by dividing your weight in kilograms by the square of your height in meters (kg / m2). Don’t worry — you don’t have to do the math; You will find BMI calculators online.

Remember that for adults:

  • A BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight
  • A BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese

When evaluating adolescents and children, BMIs that are above normal weight ranges have other signs such as “risk of being overweight” and “overweight”. In addition, health professionals take into account the differences in body fat between boys and girls, as well as changes in body fat at different ages.

Obesity: finding a solution

Controlling our obesity and overweight epidemic will require more than just telling everyone to go on a diet. The World Health Organization says it requires an integrated approach that includes:

  • Promote healthy eating habits and encourage exercise
  • Develop public policies that promote access to healthy, low-fat and high-fiber foods
  • Train health professionals so they can effectively support people who need to lose weight and help others avoid gaining weight

Here is what you can do to lose weight or avoid being overweight or obese:

  • Eat more fruits, vegetables, nuts, and whole grains.
  • Exercise, even moderately, for at least 30 minutes a day.
  • Limit your consumption of fatty and sweet foods.
  • Use vegetable oils instead of animal fats.

So walk a little more, eat a little less, and do what you need to do to maintain a healthy BMI.

Find out more at the Healthy Daily Life Center.

Interview between Dr. Richard Besser, President and CEO of RWJF, and Jamie Bussel, Senior Program Officer

On October 14, 2020, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation was releasedChildhood Obesity Status: Prioritizing children’s health during a pandemic. In this video, Dr Besser and Jamie Bussel talk about childhood obesity, COVID-19, income inequality, and what the country needs to do to address these intertwined challenges. Watch the video and read the slightly edited transcript below.

Jamie Bussel:Today we are very excited to publish our second annual report,Childhood Obesity Status: Prioritizing children’s health during a pandemic. And I’m thrilled to have our President and CEO, Dr. Rich Besser, qui con me per discutere il rapporto. Hi rich.

Rich Besser: Hey, Jamie, it’s great to see you remotely and to have a chance to talk about the report. What is the data for us?

Jamie Bussel: The latest data comes from a survey of children between the ages of 10 and 17 and shows that 15% of children in this age group are obese. That’s a number that’s remained pretty consistent over the last couple of years. Furthermore, we still observe clear and profound inequalities of race and income. And interestingly, and not surprisingly, a lot of the disparities that we’re seeing are also being mimicked by the kinds of disparities that we’re seeing with the COVID epidemic. So, I’d love Rich to sort of hear from your perspective, how you’re thinking about that. A sort of intersection or almost the enhancement of one issue, of one crisis with another.

Rich Besser: What you’re saying in terms of the obesity data in America and the disparities and what we’ve been seeing over time really resonates with what’s taking place around COVID. Because while obesity hits every racial and ethnic group and every income group, it doesn’t hit each group equally. And that’s what we’re seeing with COVID. And when you think about why this is the case, there are many different factors. Some have to do with exposure, but a lot has to do with the ability to make healthy choices. If you live in communities where the jobs that are available to you require face-to-face interaction and are lower paying jobs then the likelihood is that you’re going to have to go to work if you want to put food on the table and want to pay the rent.

So the risk increases. The overlap between groups that are being hit hardest for COVID and the disparities that you’re laying out for obesity show there are real parallels there. It also shows how important it is not only to bridge these gaps, but also to focus them on opportunities. Who is able to eat healthy and be active and behave in a healthy way that reduces the risk of obesity?

Jamie Bussel: So Rich, on that, because I think this conversation could be a bit gloomy, but I’m definitely a person that sees the glass half-full and so I’d love to chat a little bit about what gives you hope and optimism. Wiem o sobie, a w nowym raporcie zawarte są niesamowite historie, które naprawdę podnoszą na duchu niezwykłych ludzi, niezwykłych liderów na pierwszej linii frontu, którzy robią rzeczy, które zmieniają ludzi, dzieci, rodziny, bez wsparcia polityki lub zasoby i inwestycje. So I think these are amazing signs of hope for me.

Rich Besser: There are many things that give me hope. I get hope from the humanitarian outpouring that we’ve seen during COVID. You know, in response to hunger, people are stepping up and giving more support to food banks and other ways to provide people with food. And that’s terrific. What I want to see though, longer term, is the support for the policies that, if put in place, will mean that in the next crisis, or everyday for so many Americans, we won’t need so many food banks because we will have jobs that pay a living wage so people can buy healthy food. We will break down the barriers that separate our communities so that they prevent people from accessing them. And I think we are at a point in our history where due to this crisis, the coronavirus pandemic, and the devastation caused by the economic slowdown, spread and growth and the inspiring movement for racial justice, we can see political changes taking place. truly changing the nature of our communities. . We can make our communities really communities of opportunity and not communities that lead to the health consequences that we’re talking about today.

Jamie Bussel: Rich, I love this idea, the community of opportunity concept. Maybe I’ll just close by saying that I think our Foundation’s commitment to preventing childhood obesity is really a commitment to ensuring that every child in this country, every family, has a fair and just opportunity to live the best, healthiest life possible.

I really hope and am thrilled that you have taken the time today to talk to me about the upcoming relationship.

Rich Besser: Well said Jamie. Thanks for sharing all that you’re doing around childhood obesity and around this report. I hope you are well and that you are well. I have a nice conversation with you.

Jamie Bussel: Thank you. You too. Thanks, Rich.

To reverse the obesity epidemic, places and practices must support healthy eating and an active life in many places. The following are the recommended obesity prevention strategies.

Nutrition, exercise and obesity prevention strategies

The CDC Guide to Strategies for Increasing Physical Activity in the Community Cdc-pdf [PDF-1.2 MB] provides guidance for program managers, policy makers and others on choosing a strategy for increasing physical activity.

Physical activity: approaches to the built environment Combine the intervention of the transport system with land use and external environmental design
The Social Task Force on Preventive Services recommends environmental strategies that combine one or more interventions to improve pedestrian or cycling systems with one or more land use interventions and environmental design interventions to increase physical activity.

The CDC Guide to Strategies for Increasing Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Cdc-pdf [PDF-2.1 MB] provides guidance for program managers, policy makers and others on choosing strategies for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption.

The CDC Breastfeeding Intervention Guide provides information for members of the state and local community to choose a breastfeeding intervention strategy that best fits their needs.

Recommended community-based strategies and measures for obesity prevention in the United States Cdc-pdf [PDF-376KB] contains 24 recommended strategies for obesity prevention, focusing on policy and environmental change initiatives that can be implemented by local governments and school districts to promote healthy eating and active living.

  • Implementation and Measurement Guide Cdc-pdf [PDF-2.6 MB] can help communities implement and report on recommended obesity prevention strategies.
  • Healthy Communities: What Local Governments Can Do to Reduce and Prevent Obesity Cdc-ppt [PPT-8.5MB] is a presentation developed for use by local government staff that makes the case for investing in CDC’s Recommended Community Strategies and Measurements to Prevent Obesity in the United States Cdc-pdf [PDF – 375KB] . Also available in PDF Cdc-pdf [PDF-3.8 MB].

Early Care and Education Strategies

CDC’s framework for obesity prevention, in the ECE setting is known as the Spectrum of Opportunities Cdc-pdf [PDF-666KB] . The spectrum identifies ways in which states and to some extent communities can support childcare and early childhood education facilities to achieve recommended standards and best practices for obesity prevention. Spectrum complies with ECE’s comprehensive national obesity prevention standards for nutrition, infant feeding, physical activity and screen time, Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards (CFOC), 2nd ed. Cdc-pdf [PDF-4.71 MB] External

Guidelines for health in schools

Guidelines for health in schools to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity provides nine guidelines that serve as the foundation for developing, implementing, and evaluating school-based healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices for students in grades K-12.

The following resources are intended to help schools and program coordinators inform school stakeholders and health professionals about the facts of obesity, engage students, and manage chronic conditions.

Community guide

The Community guide – Obesity Prevention and Control External is a free resource to help you choose programs and policies to prevent and control obesity in your community.

Clinical guidelines

Expert Group on Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents Cdc-pdf [PDF-3.26MB] External This resource summarizes the integrated guidelines developed by the federal government to address cardiovascular disease in children and in adolescents.

Screening for Obesity in Pediatric Primary Care: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations External Guide for Primary Care Providers to Screen Obesity and Offer or Refer to Comprehensive Behavioral Mass Control Interventions.

Expert Committee Recommendations External The American Academy of Pediatrics released the Expert Committee Recommendations that suggest screening all children for obesity (>=2 years) and providing tiers of care regarding the treatment and prevention of obesity.

2013 External Cardiovascular Risk Assessment Guidelines This is a report from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association Task Force on Practical Guidelines on Reducing the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease.

In the United States, the number of obese children has steadily increased over the past two decades. Childhood obesity poses an immediate and future health risk.

Parents, guardians, and teachers can help children maintain a healthy weight by helping them develop healthy eating habits and reducing caloric temptation. You also want to help your kids stay physically active, reduce screen time, and get enough sleep.

The goal for overweight children is to reduce the rate of weight gain by allowing for normal growth and development. Children should NOT be introduced to a reduction diet without consulting a doctor.

Develop healthy eating habits

How to prevent obesity

To help children develop healthy eating habits:

  • Provide plenty of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains.
  • Include low-fat or non-fat milk or dairy products, including cheese and yogurt.
  • Choose lean meats, poultry, fish, lentils, and beans for protein.
  • Encourage your family to drink plenty of water.
  • Limit sugary drinks.
  • Limit your intake of sugars and saturated fats.

Remember that small changes every day can lead to success!

Limit calorie temptations

How to prevent obesity

Limiting the availability of high-fat, high-sugar, or salty snacks can help children develop healthy eating habits. Let your kids only rarely eat these foods so that they are truly delicacies! Ecco alcuni esempi di snack facili da preparare, a basso contenuto di grassi e a basso contenuto di zuccheri che contengono 100 calorie o meno:

  • 1 cup carrots, broccoli or paprika with 2 tablespoons of hummus.
  • Medium apple or banana.
  • 1 cup of berries or grapes.
  • A quarter cup of tuna wrapped in a lettuce leaf.
  • Some homemade kale chips.

Help children stay active

How to prevent obesity

In addition to entertaining your children, regular physical activity has many health benefits, including:

  • Strengthen the bones.
  • Lowering of blood pressure.
  • Reduce stress and anxiety.
  • Increased self-esteem.
  • Helps to control weight.

Children ages 3 to 5 should be active all day. Children e giovani w wieku od 6 do 17 lat powinny być aktywne fizycznie przez co najmniej 60 minut każdego dnia. Include aerobic activity, which is all that makes their heart beat faster. Also include bone-strengthening activities such as running or jumping and muscle-strengthening activities such as climbing or push-ups. See the details.

Remember that children imitate adults. Start adding physical activity to your routine and encourage your child to join you.

Reduce your sedentary time

While quiet times for reading and homework are fine, limit your time watching TV, playing video games, or surfing the Internet to no more than 2 hours per day. In addition, the American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend watching TV for children 2 years of age and younger. Instead, encourage your kids to find fun activities with family members or alone that just require more activities. See wearing time and lean time.

Provide adequate sleep

Too little sleep, the external icon is associated with obesity, in part because insufficient sleep causes us to eat more and be less physically active. Children need more sleep than adults, and the amount depends on their age. Check out the recommended amount of sleep and suggested sleep habits.

BAM! Body and mind
Classroom resources for teachers from grades 4 to 8 to help students make healthier life choices.
The best nuts forever!outdoor icon
Children learn why calcium, vitamin D and bone strengthening are essential.
Explosive gameoutdoor icon
Kids learn to take off with the food pyramid space shuttle!
BMI (body mass index) calculator for children and adolescents
For children, the BMI controls obesity but is not a diagnostic tool. Find out more about BMI for children and adolescents.
Overweight and obesity in childhood
How childhood obesity is defined, its prevalence, related factors and related health consequences.
How to avoid the pitfalls of portions
Don’t understand the portion size? Play the CDC’s portion control game!
My baby dishoutdoor icon
Includes games, worksheets, videos and songs.
Physical activity for everyone
Physical activity recommendations by age.
Conchiglia us!outdoor icon
A national adult education program to help children ages 8 to 13 maintain a healthy weight.

Interview between Dr. Richard Besser, President and CEO of RWJF, and Jamie Bussel, Senior Program Officer

On October 14, 2020, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation was releasedChildhood Obesity Status: Prioritizing children’s health during a pandemic. In this video, Dr Besser and Jamie Bussel talk about childhood obesity, COVID-19, income inequality, and what the country needs to do to address these intertwined challenges. Watch the video and read the slightly edited transcript below.

Jamie Bussel:Today we are very excited to publish our second annual report,Childhood Obesity Status: Prioritizing children’s health during a pandemic. And I’m thrilled to have our President and CEO, Dr. Rich Besser, qui con me per discutere il rapporto. Hi rich.

Rich Besser: Hey, Jamie, it’s great to see you remotely and to have a chance to talk about the report. What is the data for us?

Jamie Bussel: The latest data comes from a survey of children between the ages of 10 and 17 and shows that 15% of children in this age group are obese. That’s a number that’s remained pretty consistent over the last couple of years. Furthermore, we still observe clear and profound inequalities of race and income. And interestingly, and not surprisingly, a lot of the disparities that we’re seeing are also being mimicked by the kinds of disparities that we’re seeing with the COVID epidemic. So, I’d love Rich to sort of hear from your perspective, how you’re thinking about that. A sort of intersection or almost the enhancement of one issue, of one crisis with another.

Rich Besser: What you’re saying in terms of the obesity data in America and the disparities and what we’ve been seeing over time really resonates with what’s taking place around COVID. Because while obesity hits every racial and ethnic group and every income group, it doesn’t hit each group equally. And that’s what we’re seeing with COVID. And when you think about why this is the case, there are many different factors. Some have to do with exposure, but a lot has to do with the ability to make healthy choices. If you live in communities where the jobs that are available to you require face-to-face interaction and are lower paying jobs then the likelihood is that you’re going to have to go to work if you want to put food on the table and want to pay the rent.

So the risk increases. The overlap between groups that are being hit hardest for COVID and the disparities that you’re laying out for obesity show there are real parallels there. It also shows how important it is not only to bridge these gaps, but also to focus them on opportunities. Who is able to eat healthy and be active and behave in a healthy way that reduces the risk of obesity?

Jamie Bussel: So Rich, on that, because I think this conversation could be a bit gloomy, but I’m definitely a person that sees the glass half-full and so I’d love to chat a little bit about what gives you hope and optimism. Wiem o sobie, a w nowym raporcie zawarte są niesamowite historie, które naprawdę podnoszą na duchu niezwykłych ludzi, niezwykłych liderów na pierwszej linii frontu, którzy robią rzeczy, które zmieniają ludzi, dzieci, rodziny, bez wsparcia polityki lub zasoby i inwestycje. So I think these are amazing signs of hope for me.

Rich Besser: There are many things that give me hope. I get hope from the humanitarian outpouring that we’ve seen during COVID. You know, in response to hunger, people are stepping up and giving more support to food banks and other ways to provide people with food. And that’s terrific. What I want to see though, longer term, is the support for the policies that, if put in place, will mean that in the next crisis, or everyday for so many Americans, we won’t need so many food banks because we will have jobs that pay a living wage so people can buy healthy food. We will break down the barriers that separate our communities so that they prevent people from accessing them. And I think we are at a point in our history where due to this crisis, the coronavirus pandemic, and the devastation caused by the economic slowdown, spread and growth and the inspiring movement for racial justice, we can see political changes taking place. truly changing the nature of our communities. . We can make our communities really communities of opportunity and not communities that lead to the health consequences that we’re talking about today.

Jamie Bussel: Rich, I love this idea, the community of opportunity concept. Maybe I’ll just close by saying that I think our Foundation’s commitment to preventing childhood obesity is really a commitment to ensuring that every child in this country, every family, has a fair and just opportunity to live the best, healthiest life possible.

I really hope and am thrilled that you have taken the time today to talk to me about the upcoming relationship.

Rich Besser: Well said Jamie. Thanks for sharing all that you’re doing around childhood obesity and around this report. I hope you are well and that you are well. I have a nice conversation with you.

Jamie Bussel: Thank you. You too. Thanks, Rich.

The best way to prevent obesity and overweight is to understand the factors responsible for weight gain. This will help you avoid conditions that can contribute to obesity. For most people, obesity and overweight are caused by a lack of energy balance.

Get energy or calories from food and drink. This energy is called IN energy. Your body needs a certain amount of energy for activities such as breathing, digesting, and being active. This energy is called OUT energy. When the IN energy is greater than the OUT energy, you gain weight. Similarly, when the OUT energy is greater than the IN energy, weight is lost. If you want to keep the same weight, your IN and OUT energy should be the same.
Obesity is certainly familiar. Additionally, identical twins typically maintain a weight within two pounds of each other throughout their lives if they live in similar conditions, or within five pounds of each other if their living conditions vary widely.
This may be partly due to eating habits developed in childhood, but this closeness, as with twins, is generally believed to be genetically controlled.

I geni possono indirizzare il grado di nutrizione in diversi modi, inclusa un’anomalia genetica del centro di alimentazione per impostare un livello alto o basso di accumulo di nutrienti, fattori psicologici ereditari anormali che esacerbano l’appetito o inducono una persona a "rilasciarli" come un meccanismo.

Overeating in childhood is also a major factor in obesity. The rate of formation of new fat cells is particularly rapid in the first years of life and the higher the rate of fat accumulation, the greater the number of fat cells. In obese children, the number of fat cells is often up to three times higher than in healthy children. However, after puberty, the number of fat cells remains nearly the same for the rest of your life. Therefore, it has been suggested that overfeeding children, especially in infancy and to a lesser extent in the older years of childhood, can lead to lifelong obesity. A person with excess fat cells has a higher fat storage setting due to the self-regulating mechanism of fat tissue with feedback from the hypothalamus. In less obese people, particularly those who become obese in middle age or old age, most obesity is due to hyperbiophy (enlargement) of existing fat cells. This type of obesity is much more treatable than the permanent type. An interesting peculiarity of this type of obesity is the excessive secretion of insulin, as in animals with alterations of the ventromedial nuclei of the hypothalamus.

How to prevent obesity

Obesity is becoming a common problem in India. Over 5% of India’s population is now morbidly obese. On the other hand, the government promotes fitness initiatives such as Hum Fit Toh India Fit. The average citizen is increasingly eating a healthier diet and exercising regularly. If you are concerned about your health and want to avoid excess calories, here are 6 tips you can use to prevent obesity.

Burn the calories you eat

The secret to not gaining weight is to burn as many calories as you eat. Maintain a healthy balance between regular exercise and a healthy diet. Put simply, your body should have a calorie deficit to burn fat and lose excess weight. If you eat 2,000 calories a day, you need to burn over 2,000 calories to lose weight. You can track your calorie intake and intake using the HealthifyMe app. Maintaining your calorie intake and production will help keep your body healthy and prevent obesity.

Is your diet correct?

Diet is an essential part of your fight against obesity. It is recommended to consume vegetable oils such as soybean or canola oil instead of animal fats such as lard as they are rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Vegetable oils contain less saturated fatty acids and do not contain cholesterol. Also, choose high-fiber foods like dry beans and raw vegetables. They also help maintain a healthy intestinal system which in turn improves nutrient absorption slowly throughout the day after meals.

Keep a food diary

A food diary is a useful way to keep track of food intake and the number of calories consumed. Consult your dietician to determine which diet is best for you. Use the food diary to follow this plan religiously.

How to prevent obesity

Keep track of your BMI

For Indians, a body mass index of 18-22.9 is ideal; 23-24.9 is overweight and anyone over the age of 25 is obese. Monitor your weight and keep it in line with your height to keep your BMI within the perfect limit. This would go a long way in stopping obesity.

Pay attention to food labels

According to the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), a food product containing less than 40 calories per 100g of food is defined as a low calorie food. Make sure you read the labels on your foods and choose low-fat, high-fiber, and low-calorie foods.

How to prevent obesity

Say no to refined foods

Refined products such as refined white sugar and refined white salt should be avoided. They are rich in simple carbohydrates which are easily absorbed by the body and stored as fat. Limiting the consumption of refined foods will help with long-term weight control.

In summary, to ward off obesity, it is necessary to maintain a calorie deficit, monitor the diet and maintain a healthy diet of vegetables, fiber and saturated fats. You should also exercise regularly and stay away from refined foods. With these 6 tips at your fingertips, fighting obesity should be a lot easier.

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