How to prevent and treat popeye in betta fish

If you’ve ever woken up to your Siamese fighting fish staring at you with bulging eyes, you’re not alone. Congratulations. Your Betta fish has what is known as Exopia or Popeye. And the new bug eyes your betta sports are a symptom of two potential problems:

  • mycobacterial infection (which is easy to treat)
  • tuberculosis (not so treatable)
  • parasitic infection
  • Ichthyophonus or Ick (another bacterial and highly treatable infection)
  • Glance
  • internal metabolic disorders

Either way, the reason your betta’s eyes bulge is likely because of an abscess behind the eye.

How to treat Popeye in Betta Fish?

If the cause of Popeye is a mycobacterium infection, you should first treat the bacterial root itself first. This can be done easily by cleaning the water in the tank and making sure the pH balance of the water is only slightly acidic. As a side note, nearly all bacterial infections found in bettas and other pet fish can be prevented or at least reduced by keeping the water clean and monitoring the pH balance.

Additionally, you can treat your water with tetracycline or terramycin, two very popular antibacterial drugs that you can buy at your local pet store. The standard is to add this to the water … 100 mg of antibiotic every 4 ounces. from food.

If that doesn’t work, you can try other methods to get a quick fix that also works as a preventative measure for your betta …

  • Heat the water to 86 degrees. We recommend that you do this gradually at a rate of 1 degree per hour. The water temperature should already be in the high 70 degree range.
  • Add some salt to the water – The key is “small”. Don’t give your betta fish a salt bath. The percentage of salt added to the water must not exceed 0.6%

Both of these quick fixes will help keep bacterial infections at bay. It is important to note that if the fix shows signs of Popeye, you should avoid contact. While your betta is unlikely to have tuberculosis, it spreads to humans through open wounds.

Overall, Popeye is treatable, and like most bacterial infections, it’s usually caused by dirty water or a low pH. The best way to prevent Popeye is to make sure your betta fish is in a stress-free environment. This means clean water, good food, and nice warm water.

How to prevent and treat popeye in betta fish

Betta fish Popeye is a sign of infection around a betta fish’s eye. It could be an infection of the eye itself or a sign of a more serious internal disease.

As with other fish diseases and diseases, early detection can increase the survival rate of the betta fish. Knowing how to recognize the signs early can make a huge difference. Let’s discuss this condition so you can provide better care for your betta fish.

Keep in mind that veterinarians who specialize in fish care will always be your best source for diagnosing and treating betta fish health problems.

Here are the things you need to know about the Betta Fish Popeye treatment. Let’s begin!

Summary

What is Popeye in Betta Fish?

How to prevent and treat popeye in betta fish

The infection of a betta fish’s eye is called Popeye. This is usually caused by dirty water in a Betta aquarium. Poor water conditions in a small tank less than a gallon in volume will have more harmful substances for your betta.

What are the signs and symptoms of Popeye betta fish?

You will notice that your betta fish’s eye will be bulging and swollen. This condition is called exophthalmia. There is a buildup of pressure fluid behind the betta fish’s eye which causes it to bulge out. This is the hallmark of an infection. Arm wrestling can affect only one eye (unilateral) or both eyes (bilateral) of your betta.

The white ring is also one of the first signs of Popeye, even before the bulge occurs. Other symptoms include lethargy and a lack of appetite.

What causes the popeye of betta fish?

In fact, it is easier to prevent it than to cure it. Maintaining good and suitable water parameters for betta fish through regular water changes and a cleaning program will prevent susceptibility to betta disease. Poor water conditions will stress your betta and make it vulnerable to disease and disease.

Treating Betta Popeye fish requires knowing the causes and addressing them. A one-sided Popeye most likely results from an injury, such as being injured by hitting a decoration in your aquarium. It is important to choose plants and decorations without sharp edges that can damage your betta. Remove any decorations with sharp edges.

Another reason your betta lives with your aquarium mates is because of aggression and struggles with other fish. You can prevent this from happening by selecting compatible tank mates. Betta fish, especially males, will fight for their territory. In the wild, a losing betta can float away, but restrictions in aquariums will prevent this from happening. Their constant presence with each other will cause a fight.

Avoid using fishnet stockings with a rough texture. Choose smoother textures. Catching a betta with a rough net with too much force can injure the fish. Be gentle when handling your betta. They have delicate fins and tails, and the membranes that protect the eyes can also be damaged.

Double-sided arm wrestling is a sign of an infection. This can be caused by bacteria, fungi, or parasites. If your betta has another disease, Popeye could be a sign of a secondary infection. You need to approach it in such a way that you focus not only on Popeye, but also on the root cause of the disease.

Do I need a separate tank to treat Popeye?

Having a 5 gallon aquarium as a backup tank is always a good idea. This small tank will act as a hospital tank or quarantine tank where you will place your betta during treatment.

This allows for easier tracking as you will immediately see your betta without having to find her in a larger tank. This will avoid the hassle of finding your betta in a well-decorated tank with lots of hiding places. Closely observing your betta is essential on the days she is being treated.

It is large enough to hold an aquarium heater and an air stone. It is best to use a small amount of smooth gravel as a substrate for the glass tank to avoid reflecting your betta to the bottom. A plastic food container can also be an ideal solution as there is no need to put gravel on the bottom.

A heater is indispensable, because when dealing with domestic fish, it is necessary to ensure the optimum temperature. Betta is a tropical fish that will benefit primarily in the temperature range of 78 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit or 25 to 27 degrees Celsius. Prepare an aquarium thermometer to make sure the temperature is constant. Fluctuations in temperature will cause thermal shocks and aggravate betta stress.

The air stone is essential as it will allow the water to circulate in the quarantine tank. This can be beneficial if your betta doesn’t have too much energy to always swim up to the surface. It can partially take oxygen from the water through the gills. This tank with a lot of water will also be low enough so that the betta doesn’t use too much energy while swimming on the surface. Remember that your fish isn’t in top shape.

Another benefit of using this tank capacity is the economic considerations. In a smaller tank, you will spend less medication than in a larger tank.

If your betta is part of a community tank, the practice of placing her in a separate quarantine tank will reduce the stress she receives when regenerating on her own in peace.

How to start treating one-sided betta popeye?

Unilateral arm wrestling from injury can be treated by supporting the natural healing abilities of the betta fish by providing a clean environment through clean water and frequent water changes.

1. Prepare the hospital’s 5 gallon reservoir by filling it properly with treated water. This will remove all harmful substances such as chlorine, chloramine and heavy metals.

2. Insert the pneumatic stone and turn on the heater. Let it reach the optimal temperature range. Check with an aquarium thermometer.

3. Add aquarium salt by following the manufacturer’s recommended dose. Typically 1/2 round teaspoon for each gallon. One popular brand is API Aquarium Salt.

How to prevent and treat popeye in betta fish

Betta fish Popeye is a sign of infection around a betta fish’s eye. It could be an infection of the eye itself or a sign of a more serious internal disease.

As with other fish diseases and diseases, early detection can increase the survival rate of the betta fish. Knowing how to recognize the signs early can make a huge difference. Let’s discuss this condition so you can provide better care for your betta fish.

Keep in mind that veterinarians who specialize in fish care will always be your best source for diagnosing and treating betta fish health problems.

Here are the things you need to know about the Betta Fish Popeye treatment. Let’s begin!

Summary

What is Popeye in Betta Fish?

How to prevent and treat popeye in betta fish

The infection of a betta fish’s eye is called Popeye. This is usually caused by dirty water in a Betta aquarium. Poor water conditions in a small tank less than a gallon in volume will have more harmful substances for your betta.

What are the signs and symptoms of Popeye betta fish?

You will notice that your betta fish’s eye will be bulging and swollen. This condition is called exophthalmia. There is a buildup of pressure fluid behind the betta fish’s eye which causes it to bulge out. This is the hallmark of an infection. Arm wrestling can affect only one eye (unilateral) or both eyes (bilateral) of your betta.

The white ring is also one of the first signs of Popeye, even before the bulge occurs. Other symptoms include lethargy and a lack of appetite.

What causes the popeye of betta fish?

In fact, it is easier to prevent it than to cure it. Maintaining good and suitable water parameters for betta fish through regular water changes and a cleaning program will prevent susceptibility to betta disease. Poor water conditions will stress your betta and make it vulnerable to disease and disease.

Treating Betta Popeye fish requires knowing the causes and addressing them. A one-sided Popeye most likely results from an injury, such as being injured by hitting a decoration in your aquarium. It is important to choose plants and decorations without sharp edges that can damage your betta. Remove any decorations with sharp edges.

Another reason your betta lives with your aquarium mates is because of aggression and struggles with other fish. You can prevent this from happening by selecting compatible tank mates. Betta fish, especially males, will fight for their territory. In the wild, a losing betta can float away, but restrictions in aquariums will prevent this from happening. Their constant presence with each other will cause a fight.

Avoid using fishnet stockings with a rough texture. Choose smoother textures. Catching a betta with a rough net with too much force can injure the fish. Be gentle when handling your betta. They have delicate fins and tails, and the membranes that protect the eyes can also be damaged.

Double-sided arm wrestling is a sign of an infection. This can be caused by bacteria, fungi, or parasites. If your betta has another disease, Popeye could be a sign of a secondary infection. You need to approach it in such a way that you focus not only on Popeye, but also on the root cause of the disease.

Do I need a separate tank to treat Popeye?

Having a 5 gallon aquarium as a backup tank is always a good idea. This small tank will act as a hospital tank or quarantine tank where you will place your betta during treatment.

This allows for easier tracking as you will immediately see your betta without having to find her in a larger tank. This will avoid the hassle of finding your betta in a well-decorated tank with lots of hiding places. Closely observing your betta is essential on the days she is being treated.

It is large enough to hold an aquarium heater and an air stone. It is best to use a small amount of smooth gravel as a substrate for the glass tank to avoid reflecting your betta to the bottom. A plastic food container can also be an ideal solution as there is no need to put gravel on the bottom.

A heater is indispensable, because when dealing with domestic fish, it is necessary to ensure the optimum temperature. Betta is a tropical fish that will benefit primarily in the temperature range of 78 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit or 25 to 27 degrees Celsius. Prepare an aquarium thermometer to make sure the temperature is constant. Fluctuations in temperature will cause thermal shocks and aggravate betta stress.

The air stone is essential as it will allow the water to circulate in the quarantine tank. This can be beneficial if your betta doesn’t have too much energy to always swim up to the surface. It can partially take oxygen from the water through the gills. This tank with a lot of water will also be low enough so that the betta doesn’t use too much energy while swimming on the surface. Remember that your fish isn’t in top shape.

Another benefit of using this tank capacity is the economic considerations. In a smaller tank, you will spend less medication than in a larger tank.

If your betta is part of a community tank, the practice of placing her in a separate quarantine tank will reduce the stress she receives when regenerating on her own in peace.

How to start treating one-sided betta popeye?

Unilateral arm wrestling from injury can be treated by supporting the natural healing abilities of the betta fish by providing a clean environment through clean water and frequent water changes.

1. Prepare the hospital’s 5 gallon reservoir by filling it properly with treated water. This will remove all harmful substances such as chlorine, chloramine and heavy metals.

2. Insert the pneumatic stone and turn on the heater. Let it reach the optimal temperature range. Check with an aquarium thermometer.

3. Add aquarium salt by following the manufacturer’s recommended dose. Typically 1/2 round teaspoon for each gallon. One popular brand is API Aquarium Salt.

Even in the safest aquarium, fish can get injured or sick. Popeye is one of those ailments.

Betta fish Popeye può essere uno spettacolo allarmante e i proprietari si chiedono immediatamente se il pesce Betta potrebbe morire per Popeye? Figuring out what’s causing the betta popeye can help aquarists find the best cure, ensuring the fish’s lasting health.

What is Popeye?

Popeye is a catch-all term for any condition that causes a fish’s eye or eyes to bulge or appear swollen. Occasionally the eye may also appear surrounded by a ring or white spots. Symptoms of Betta Popeye can also include clouding or redness and irritation of the eyes. It can occur in any species of fish, but many people notice it in their betta.

What causes popeye isn’t always the same, so if you see that your betta fish has popeye, it’s best to observe the fish and look for other stress or illness symptoms. Figuring out what’s causing the popeye can help you quickly find a cure and solve the problem.

Left untreated, Popeye can lead to other health problems, including eye cracks and blindness, and can eventually kill fish.

Popeye caused by injuries

If your betta fish has a protruding eye, check first if only one eye is affected or if both eyes are swollen. If only one is swollen, popes can be injured.

Sometimes it can be difficult to pin down what caused the injury that led to Popeye in the betta. Watch your fish swim around the tank. Pay attention to any sharp or rough surfaces it rubs on or otherwise comes into contact with.

How to prevent and treat popeye in betta fish

Hard stones or sharp plastic plants can often cause injury. Replace anything that might be responsible for your betta fish popeye with something smoother or softer, like live plants.

If your betta is housed with tank mates, you will also want to make sure that the betta isn’t being bullied. Other fish often injure each other, and bettas are solitary fish that can become territorial, so you shouldn’t rule out a fight being the cause of popeye. Separating fish that aren’t getting along is often the best cure for injury-related popeye.

Popeye infections

Infections can also cause popeye in bettas. In fact, a bacterial or fungal infection is the most common cause of Popeye. Infection can occur in one or both eyes. If your betta is in an aquarium and other fish also have Popeye symptoms, the condition is almost certainly caused by an infection. You should seek a cure and cure the infection as soon as possible (see below).

If you suspect Betta Popeye is the result of an infection, check for other signs of illness. If the betta seems lethargic or isn’t interested in eating, chances are the fish is sick and the popeye is indeed an infection and not something caused by an injury.

How to cure Popeye

Once your fish has been diagnosed, the next logical step is to figure out how to cure Popeye in a betta.

Treatment for betta fish popeye depends on the underlying cause. If it’s an injury, the best cure is generally to move the betta to a calm, solitary aquarium and let the eye heal independently.

If an infection is causing Popeye, Popeye may need to be used. Antibiotic or antifungal medications can help treat Popeye. The exception is when the fish also appears to be bloated. In this case, although some medications may help to treat the popeye, the fish may have an internal illness that can’t be cured

Will Melafix cure Popeye?

Melafix is ​​an antibacterial drug, so it can often help treat betta popeye.

Can Epsom Salt Cure Popeye in Betta Fish?

Epsom or aquarium salt can often be helpful when it comes to reducing inflammation, swelling, and infection.

To cure Popeye with salt, move the fish to a separate aquarium, away from other fish or plants that might be bothered by the salt. If you’re using Epsom salt, use one tablespoon for each gallon of water. Leave the fish in salted water for 10-15 minutes, but no more.

For aquarium salt treatment, use the same amount of one tablespoon of salt per liter of water. Aquarium salt, however, is a bit harder for fish than Epsom salt, so leave the fish in this solution for only five to eight minutes.

Popeye Prevention

Although it is common to treat Popeye, it is best to avoid Popeye to begin with.

Infections that lead to betta popeye are mainly caused by dirty aquarium water, so do frequent partial water changes, avoid overfeeding, and install a filter system to keep your aquarium as clean as possible.

You may also want to isolate any new fish in the quarantine tank before introducing them to the community tank to keep them healthy. It’s also best to avoid overcrowding, so only place as many fish in a tank as acceptable for the aquarium’s size.

Bettys are mostly solitary fish, so it’s best to keep them alone to prevent fighting. You can also use smoother natural objects and real plants to avoid injury.

If you notice a swelling of the fisheye betta, it could be a sign of an injury or infection. Treat these issues as soon as possible so that they don’t become worse and threaten the betta’s life.

How to prevent and treat popeye in betta fish

Steps to heal the Pope:

  • Determine if the Pope is due to an injury or an infection
  • Remove any rough or sharp objects from the aquarium
  • Keep your betta away from intimidating fish
  • Treat infections or injuries with aquarium salt or Epsom
  • Treat infections with antifungal or antibacterial drugs

Comment below to ask us questions about Betta Popeye!

How to prevent and treat popeye in betta fish

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Popeye, or exophthalmos, is a serious disease that often negatively affects the betta and other fish in the aquarium. It is a bacterial infection that causes the fish’s eyes to bulge out. A swollen eye can also develop a white ring around it, which is another significant Popeye symptom. Additionally, the infected eyes may look cloudy, and if the cornea is damaged, the fish’s eyes have a milky color. Additionally, popeye fish often appear lethargic and lose their appetite. If this condition is not a treatment for betta fish popeye at an early stage, it could cause the betta to die.

Effective treatment of Popeye in Betta fish

If you suspect your betta has Popeye, there are a few things you can do to help. These are:

  • Isolate from other fish. Since the double-sided stern arm is highly contagious, the affected betta should be removed from the other fish in the aquarium immediately. It should be stored separately in a glass container and quarantined until fully recovered. Additionally, if you have more than one betta, do not use the same net or holding tanks when you clean your betta’s water to avoid cross-contamination.
  • Change the water in the tank. Cleaning is the best way to slow the spread of popeye. Therefore, it is highly recommended to replenish 100% of the aquarium water every 2-3 days if the fish are in these conditions.
  • Addition of an antibiotic – Ampicillin is an antibiotic that comes in capsule form. It is recommended to add a tablet to 10 liters of water in the tank to cure arm wrestling. If your betta is kept in a smaller container with much less water, it is best to divide this capsule into two half doses. You can then give another dose at the end of the complete water change. The powder in the capsule must be mixed until completely dissolved in water. You can also add Indian almond leaves to the water to aid in the healing process. Some also add aquarium salt. However, adding aquarium salt shouldn’t take more than 10 days as it can be harmful to fish. Epsom salt is known to be effective because it can kill parasites, reduce nitrates, encourage the production of your betta’s slime coat, improve your betta’s gill function, and more.
  • Bath with Epsom salt – In the case of a one-sided pope, the cause could be physical trauma, not a bacterial infection. In this case, the treatment would be slightly different from the previous method. For an injury-type condition, you must change a portion of your betta’s water and place your fish in a separate container with a bit of Epsom salt solution added to it. Typically, a tablespoon of Epsom salt is recommended for every quart of water. Then the infested betta fish should be added to this Epsom salt water and kept there for at least 10 minutes. However, you must make sure that your fish doesn’t lose consciousness while in the water or have issues breathing. If so, you need to immediately transfer them to fresh water. After this time, your fish can be re-acclimatized in its main tank.

Betta’s usually bulging eyes with Popeye can heal in a few weeks or months if you get them early. However, it is difficult to treat, so it is best to take preventative measures to prevent Betta from taking it. Always clean your fish’s water regularly and do not keep too many fish in your tank. Also, avoid plastic artificial plants and dangerous decorations. Make sure you are using live or silk plants and that none of the decorations have sharp edges to prevent the fish from getting hurt.

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author: Erika doma | 03 November 2020 |

How to prevent and treat popeye in betta fish

Have you noticed that there is something wrong with your betta fish? If you think your Betta has Popeye, you’ve come to the right place. Fortunately, there is a small chance that you are misdiagnosing your betta, even if they have all the symptoms of Popeye. If you’re looking for some Popeye Disease treatment tips, read on to help your fish feel better than ever.

What is Popeye?

Popeye isn’t just a disease that affects betta fish. Unfortunately, any fish can suffer from this disease. Popeye occurs when the extra pressure behind the eyes causes them to bulge. If you leave this disease untreated, it can kill the fish.

The causes of unilateral and bilateral Popeye

There are a number of reasons that are directly related to the swelling of the fish eyeball. Unilateral arm wrestling occurs when only one eye has swelling. Hitting your head on a hard surface or arguing with another fish are most likely the causes of a one-sided Popeye. Double-sided arm wrestling occurs when both eyes suffer from swelling. Parasites, fungi or bacteria are the most common causes of this form of Popeye.

Symptoms and symptoms

If your fish shows signs that one or both eyes are sticking out, your betta fish is likely suffering from Popeye. The eyes also often change color and may appear cloudy, milky, and even bloody. If your betta has a white ring around her eye, it could be another warning sign that she is suffering from Popeye. Also, Popeye can be caused by another infection or disease. If you experience a lack of appetite or energy, check for other signs and symptoms of this disease.

Treatment and prevention

If you notice your fish suffering from Popeye, the first thing you should do is remove the fish from the aquarium and quarantine it. Once this is done, you need to clean the tank. If you’ve identified other issues with your tank after this step, be sure to fix them. If this doesn’t help your fish, the next step is to provide them with antibiotics, such as sulfamethoxazole for fish.

Hopefully, the above instructions for treating Popeye betta fish can help you not only identify that your fish is really suffering from Popeye Betta, but also learn how to treat it. And if you are looking for antibiotics to treat this disease, visit our website for prices and details on different drugs that can help your fish. Help your fish feel better!

At first it was just a small white ring around the eye. But eventually her eye began to swell. At that moment I realized that my beautiful Betta has Popeye!

This prompted me to investigate what it actually is, what causes it, and most importantly, how to cure Betta Popeye!

What is Popeye in Betta Fish?

Popeye is scientifically known as exophthalmia and is a disease that causes a fish’s eye to swell and appear cloudy or white. This can happen in one eye or both (unilaterally or bilaterally) at the same time.

This bulging is the result of the swelling that occurs when fluid builds up in the space behind the eye. As the amount of liquid increases, the pressure increases and this forces the eye to swell, giving it a “papal” appearance.

How to prevent and treat popeye in betta fish

What Causes Popeye?

What causes a buildup of fluid? There are several potential causes. Most often, a simple bacterial infection causes popeye in the betta. These bacterial infections are often the result of dirty aquarium water.

While the less common popeye can be caused by physical damage to the eye. Injuries can result from fighting with other fish, colliding with objects in the aquarium, or rough handling of the fish.

In rare cases, Papeye can be caused by fish tuberculosis, scientifically known as mycobacteriosis. While this isn’t the same tuberculosis that humans get it is fatal and most likely incurable.

Popeye Symptoms in Betta Fish

How can you tell if your Betta fish has Popeye? As discussed above, one or both eyes will clearly protrude from the socket.

A one-sided arm wrestling with one eye sticking out is more likely the result of some sort of injury. On the other hand, double face is a symptom of a more serious problem, such as a bacterial infection.

In addition to the “popeye” symptom, your betta’s behavior will also likely change. Bulging of the eye is painful and causes vision problems and even blindness. Because of this, Betta may have difficulty locating food.

Other behavioral symptoms include lethargy and loss of appetite. You’ll notice this if you see it in your favorite hiding place, which doesn’t move much for most of the day.

Betta Fish Popeye Treatment

What can you do if your Betta becomes Popeye?

Treatment options are available depending on the cause and severity of Popeye. If it’s small and caught early, a few basic treatments are enough. More severe cases are known to cause blindness and even tooth decay and eye fall

Treatment of a bacterial infection

Step 1. Quarantine

The first thing you should do is move Betta to the quarantine tank. If your betta does not have any tank mates and you don’t have a proper quarantine tank it is fine to leave the betta in the tank.

This not only gives you a place to care for your betta, but also gives you the ability to thoroughly clean your main tank.

Medicare

Once your betta has been isolated in a quarantine tank, you need to treat its water.

In mild cases, only Epsom salt can do the trick. Salt helps reduce swelling and prevent further infections. The recommended dose is 1-3 teaspoons in 5 liters of water. Salt is a good idea, even if you decide to go for something stronger, like an antibiotic.

More severe cases of Popeye will likely require antibiotic treatment. Depending on who you ask, you will listen to a lot of different advice. As long as it is a broad spectrum antibiotic for aquarium fish, it should be sufficient. Two of the most effective are ampicillin and erythromycin.

Make sure you follow directions carefully when taking these powerful antibiotics.

Water changes

During this time, it is necessary to make a 100% water change in the main tank. Thoroughly clean the tank, furniture, and equipment.

Also, perform a 100% water change every 3 days in the quarantine tank.

Return Betta to view the tank

Once you follow the protocol of your chosen treatment regimen and your betta is under repair, you can return it to the show tank. Continue to monitor your betta and water quality with frequent water changes.

Depending on the severity, it could take weeks or even months for a pope to resign completely.

Treatment of injuries

Treating popeye caused by an injury is a simpler process than treating an infection.

Epsom salt baths

Il sale di Epsom aiuterà a ridurre il gonfiore e a prevenire le infezioni. To find out how to treat your betta with a salt bath, check out this great video below!

In addition to the Epsom salt baths, all you need to do is follow the preventative measures outlined below. This will help prevent Betta’s damaged eye infection.

How to prevent Betta Popeye?

The best way to deal with Betta Popeye is to make sure she doesn’t happen!

There are several things you can do to reduce the chances of Betta facing this painful situation.

  • First of all, make sure the water stays clean. Perform partial water changes one to two weeks. Monitor the level of ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. This will prevent bacteria and maintain your betta’s health.
  • Don’t overstock your betta tank. The more animals you have, the more waste will be produced. This means your water will get dirty faster.
  • Avoid injuries. Make sure nothing in your Betta tank has sharp edges. Don’t use cheap plastic plants but instead opt for silk or live plants. If you manage your betta, do it with extreme caution. If you have pet fish, watch them carefully for aggressive behavior towards your betta.

Final thoughts

If you came here because your Betta fish has Popeye, I wish you all the best. Hopefully, the info you find here has helped you identify and successfully treat your betta’s condition!

Six days ago my Betta started showing bilateral Popeye symptoms. It started with white rings, but turned into a full-sized popeye in just a few hours. I did a 50% water change and went to get the medicine the next day (see attached photo). I have been treated for five days without a carbon filter. Betta’s eyes neither improved nor worsened. One of my other fish (little panda cory) died today. I checked the water parameters and the nitrite was a bit high so I did a 20% water change. I’m not sure I need to change the water because she says I should do 25% after seven days of treatment. The other fish, Julia’s cory, peppery cory and wiry back, are somewhat lethargic. They also show no signs of disease. I treat the entire tank in case it’s bacterial. Betta continues to eat (although she does not see very well and it is difficult to find food). She is good at swimming and quite active. I also added the aquarium salt (2 round tablespoons according to the instructions).

The tank is 10 gallons, 80 degrees (normally 78, but since I’m recovering from an illness, I jumped). I kept the filter on to aerate the water as well as the bubbler.

I don’t know what else to do. I am shocked that my little fish is dead and I think it is from the nitrites. I intend to complete the treatment (another 2 days) and then install a carbon filter cartridge. Let me know if there is anything else I can do or if I am doing something wrong.