How to preserve lemons

The curing process

"How

Preserved lemons are an essential ingredient in Moroccan cuisine where they are used to enrich many traditional dishes, from tagines to salads, both as a side dish and as a key ingredient. Traditionally, they are made with two simple ingredients – lemon and coarse kosher salt – with the salt serving as a preservative and preservative.

For those who do not live in Morocco, you can definitely buy preserved lemons online. But they are so easy and inexpensive to make yourself, why not try it? Canned Moroccan lemons have a unique marinated flavor that cannot be recreated by adding freshly squeezed lemon juice.

What you need

To preserve five lemons, you’ll need 1/4 to a 1/2 cup of the salt and the juice of two lemons. You’ll also need a sterile glass jar that is just large enough to accommodate the lemons as well as a sharp knife. You can make lemons in 10 minutes or less, but the longer the lemons ripen, the more intense the flavor will be.

If you are in Morocco, try picking doqq or boussera lemons sold ascedar beldi. Outside of Morocco, Eureka or Meyer lemons are preferred for canning, but in reality any variety will do.

Prepare the lemons

The method of preparation varies slightly depending on the variety of lemon. If you are using small Moroccan doqq or bousser lemons, remove the stems, make an incision or two in the top of the lemon, but otherwise leave the lemons whole.

If you are using a different lemon variety, remove the stems and cut off the ends. Cut each lemon lengthwise into quarters, but be careful not to cut it all: about three-quarters of the length is enough. That way, the quarters should still be attached to the base.

Pack in a jar

The next step is to wrap the lemons with salt and put them in a jar. Again, the method varies depending on the lemon variety. Intact Moroccan doqq and boussera lemons are simply placed in the jar with plenty of salt between each lemon. If the lemons have been partially quartered, fill the slots with plenty of kosher salt, close the lemons and place them in a jar.

Make sure the lemons are well packaged so they don’t move freely. Compress the lemons by adding them to the jar to squeeze them and release the juices. Add enough fresh lemon juice to cover the lemons and sprinkle generously with salt. Cover the lemons tightly and set them aside in a cool, dark place. A cupboard or pantry is fine.

The maintenance process

Every two or three days, open the jar and squeeze the lemons to release more juice. If you have room to add another lemon, do so. The idea is that well-packaged lemons will not be able to rise to the surface. Continua a farlo per la prima settimana o fino a quando il barattolo non si sarà riempito il più possibile e i limoni rimangono immersi nel succo.

At this point, you want to leave the lemons alone now. The lemons will be stored and ready to use in about four to five weeks when the skins are very soft. You can keep them longer if you wish, up to a year or more.

The use of lemons

After opening, put the jar in the refrigerator, where the preserved lemons must be stored well for several months. Rinse the lemons before use to remove excess salt and any film that has formed in the liquid.

Use the peel, finely chopped, for salads. In tagines, stews and sauces, remove the seeds and use the quarters, with or without pulp. Leaving the pulp on will give a stronger lemon flavor. Remember to be careful with salt in recipes that call for preserved lemons, as lemons will add a unique salinity to the dish.

So I made the preserved lemons. And now?

"How

Preserved lemon: it’s not exactly a love/hate relationship with cooks in America as much as love/bewilderment. Everyone loves idea of lemon preserves: that spicy, salty, unique taste so essential in Moroccan and Middle Eastern cuisine. Conservatives love the super simple recipe: lemons, salt and time. Yet every time I publish a recipe with preserved lemon, at least a dozen people say: "I want to love preserved lemons, but what am I doing with it?" Lub, "Years ago I made a large jar – most of it is still in my fridge, taking up space. Help!"

Zawsze jest jeden lub dwóch kucharzy, mocno osadzonych w obozie „miłości", którzy odpowiedzą: „Oh my god, I put canned lemon in iteverything!" And really, preserved lemon does work almost anywhere lemon or salt will work: it’s amazingly versatile. But telling home cooks to toss it into “everything" isn’t all that helpful, and even the classic suggestions of “tagine" and “grain salad" can only take you so far in getting through last year’s jar.

In an effort to showcase the versatility of preserved lemons, and to spark some ideas for your own neglected jar, the following slides include links to a variety of preserved lemon recipes: starters & sides, main dishes, condiments & dressings, even cocktails & desserts. So this year, put back a simple jar of canned lemons. You may just find that you are wearing them everything.

The use of lemons conservati nei cereali e nelle verdure

"How

SEEDS

VEGETABLES

  • Tagine with artichokes and beans by Closet Cooking
  • Baby Collard Salad With Preserved Lemon from Autumn Makes & Does
  • Okra with tomato, lemon and coriander by Yotam Ottolenghi et alGuardian
  • Potato Salad With Lemon Canned Stone Soup
  • Roasted Beet Salad With Feta & Mint from Healthy Green Kitchen
  • Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Preserved Lemon & Aleppo Pepper from Local Kitchen
  • Fried Green Beans with Garlic and Preserved Lemon by David Scribner forWashington Post
  • Spicy Cabbage and Jicama Salad with lemons preserved in jars and bowls

So I made the preserved lemons. And now?

"How

Preserved lemon: it’s not exactly a love/hate relationship with cooks in America as much as love/bewilderment. Everyone loves idea of lemon preserves: that spicy, salty, unique taste so essential in Moroccan and Middle Eastern cuisine. Conservatives love the super simple recipe: lemons, salt and time. Yet every time I publish a recipe with preserved lemon, at least a dozen people say: "I want to love preserved lemons, but what am I doing with it?" Lub, "Years ago I made a large jar – most of it is still in my fridge, taking up space. Help!"

Zawsze jest jeden lub dwóch kucharzy, mocno osadzonych w obozie „miłości", którzy odpowiedzą: „Oh my god, I put canned lemon in iteverything!" And really, preserved lemon does work almost anywhere lemon or salt will work: it’s amazingly versatile. But telling home cooks to toss it into “everything" isn’t all that helpful, and even the classic suggestions of “tagine" and “grain salad" can only take you so far in getting through last year’s jar.

In an effort to showcase the versatility of preserved lemons, and to spark some ideas for your own neglected jar, the following slides include links to a variety of preserved lemon recipes: starters & sides, main dishes, condiments & dressings, even cocktails & desserts. So this year, put back a simple jar of canned lemons. You may just find that you are wearing them everything.

The use of lemons conservati nei cereali e nelle verdure

"How

SEEDS

VEGETABLES

  • Tagine with artichokes and beans by Closet Cooking
  • Baby Collard Salad With Preserved Lemon from Autumn Makes & Does
  • Okra with tomato, lemon and coriander by Yotam Ottolenghi et alGuardian
  • Potato Salad With Lemon Canned Stone Soup
  • Roasted Beet Salad With Feta & Mint from Healthy Green Kitchen
  • Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Preserved Lemon & Aleppo Pepper from Local Kitchen
  • Fried Green Beans with Garlic and Preserved Lemon by David Scribner forWashington Post
  • Spicy Cabbage and Jicama Salad with lemons preserved in jars and bowls

2 – I didn’t like it

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  • 2 Reviews

The curing of lemons usually takes 4 to 6 weeks to get the right texture and flavor. However, this quick method avoids lengthy maintenance and is a great substitute for the real thing. Use the peel to accent a variety of dishes, from seafood to pan-fried vegetables.

gallery

Recipe summary

ingrediants

Combine the water and salt in a small saucepan; bring to the boil. Add the lemons; cook for 30 minutes or until the liquid has reduced to 1/2 cup and the lemon zest is soft. Remove from the heat; cool to room temperature.

Chef’s notes

Mash the meat into a sauce or stew or use it to coat chicken or lamb. They can be prepared several days in advance and stored in the refrigerator for up to a week. To spread the flavor, chop it up before adding it to the dish.

Reviews (2)

This is probably the biggest addition to my culinary repertoire in a decade! What a delightful surprise to discover how versatile these lemons are! A pinch of chopped preserved lemon zest as a substitute for lemon juice in each recipe takes it to a whole new level. Try it in the tuna salad. Add to hummus. Also good in couscous, rice… your favorite fish recipe… the possibilities are endless. Make sure you rinse the lemons before use as they are very salty. You’ve got to try this to really “get it”.

2 – I didn’t like it

2
4 star values:

0
3 star values:

0
2 star values:

0
1 star values:

  • Read the reviews
  • Add reviews
  • 2 votes
  • 2 Reviews

The curing of lemons usually takes 4 to 6 weeks to get the right texture and flavor. However, this quick method avoids lengthy maintenance and is a great substitute for the real thing. Use the peel to accent a variety of dishes, from seafood to pan-fried vegetables.

gallery

Recipe summary

ingrediants

Combine the water and salt in a small saucepan; bring to the boil. Add the lemons; cook for 30 minutes or until the liquid has reduced to 1/2 cup and the lemon zest is soft. Remove from the heat; cool to room temperature.

Chef’s notes

Mash the meat into a sauce or stew or use it to coat chicken or lamb. They can be prepared several days in advance and stored in the refrigerator for up to a week. To spread the flavor, chop it up before adding it to the dish.

Reviews (2)

This is probably the biggest addition to my culinary repertoire in a decade! What a delightful surprise to discover how versatile these lemons are! A pinch of chopped preserved lemon zest as a substitute for lemon juice in each recipe takes it to a whole new level. Try it in the tuna salad. Add to hummus. Also good in couscous, rice… your favorite fish recipe… the possibilities are endless. Make sure you rinse the lemons before use as they are very salty. You’ve got to try this to really “get it”.

Preserved lemons will give your kitchen a new, strong dimension. Food writer Malou Herkes shows you how to make it.

"How

Photo: Natalé Towell.

Preserved lemons, bright, fragrant and delicious, are the staple of Moroccan and Middle Eastern cuisine. They add depth to tagines and stews, lighten salads, and enhance the sides of bulgur or couscous. Try them chopped up with fresh herbs, garlic and olive oil and drizzled over grilled fish, packed into a sandwich or stirred through last night’s stew to liven it up. Pound in the butter, then combine the butter with the regular rice, melt it into a steak or place it under the skin of the whole chicken before cooking.

I limoni conservati aggiungono un sapore intenso e una dimensione completamente nuova alla tua cucina e possono diventare uno di quegli ingrediants su cui fai affidamento. Preserved lemons are relatively easy to buy nowadays, but they can be stored quite simply.

Why untreated lemons?

You’ll need about eight unwaxed lemons per 1-litre jar (although this depends on the size of your lemons) and a generous amount of salt. Buying lemons that are unwaxed is important because it’s the rind that you’ll end up eating. If you can’t get hold of them, scrub your lemons thoroughly with hot soapy water to get rid of the wax.

And the salt?

Salt will save your lemons. Many recipes call for coarse salt, and since you use so much salt, it makes sense to get quality products. However, in practice, any salt will work. Just make sure you use slightly less if preserving with table salt as it’s so finely ground. If you want to add spices or aromatic herbs, put them in a jar, arranging the lemons in layers; chillies, cinnamon sticks, bay leaves, peppercorns, crushed coriander seeds and cloves are a few ideas to get you started.

How to store lemons

Step 1

"How

Photo: Natalé Towell.

Clean the lemons, remove the stems and remove the woody stumps.

Step 2

"How

Photo: Natalé Towell.

Quarter each lemon lengthwise, being careful not to cut the whole lemon so that they stick to the base.

Step 3

"How

Photo: Natalé Towell.

Put a tablespoon of salt in each lemon, placing it in a sterilized 1-liter jar along the way. It’s best to work over a bowl as you do this to collect any juices.

Step 4

"How

Photo: Natalé Towell.

Along the way, squeeze the lemons firmly into the jar so that their juices are released and packed as tightly as possible.

Step 5

"How

Photo: Natalé Towell.

When you get to the top, push the lemons down again and make sure there are no air bubbles. Pour the juices that have collected into the bowl. If the lemons are not already soaked in their own juices, add more lemon juice and a generous spoonful of salt.

Step 6

"How

Photo: Natalé Towell.

Close the jar and leave it in a cool, dark place for two to three months before use, turning it over when you think about it. For the first week, put the lemons in the jar every few days. Add another lemon if there’s room so that they’re as compressed as possible.

After opening, keep the lemons in the refrigerator. They’ll keep for at least several months and up to a year.

How to eat canned lemons?

Zjedz całą cytrynę, skórkę i everything. Cut it into pieces and walk away. Mix salads and couscous, add to spicy stew, sprinkle with labneh or hummus, chop into chimichurri and serve over steak … chance!

"How

Lemon is the most common side dish in fish and other seafood dishes. It’s interchangeable with vinegar for many sauces and salad dressings.

Here’s a way to save lemons to use as a spice in pickles, salad dressings, and many fish and stew recipes. The taste is slightly salty, pleasantly fermented and only slightly bitter.

Use this method to preserve ‘Meyer’ lemons, limes, and oranges. High season for Meyers and oranges are the coldest months. Other lemons and limes harvest during the hottest months of the year.

(By the way, if you want to store lemon and lime juice for off-season use, squeeze the fruit and freeze the juice in ice cube trays, then store the cubes in plastic freezer bags.)

Also interesting:

preserved lemons

Author Steve Albert

ingrediants

  • 8 lemons (maybe more depending on the size of the fruit)
  • 1½ cup of kosher salt
  • a sprig of rosemary and olive oil (optional)

Instructions

  1. Thoroughly rinse the lemons. Quarter each lemon, cutting the peel lengthwise from top to bottom.
  2. Sprinkle salt on the bottom of the 1 to 1 1/2 liter wide-mouth jar. Take the lemon wedges one at a time and squeeze some juice into the jar. Sprinkle the inside of each lemon with extra salt, then wrap each squeezed quarter in a jar. After packing each in a jar, sprinkle the skin of each with more salt. You can fully pack a jar of lemons, so use as many lemons as you need, but 8 decent lemons should be enough.
  3. After packing, squeeze the fruit with a wooden spoon to get more juice; the goal is to dip the fruit into the juice. (Alternatively, pour enough olive oil into the jar to cover the lemons.) If desired, drizzle the jam with a sprig of rosemary.
  4. Close the jar tightly and store it in the refrigerator for at least 2 weeks before use. During the first week, use a wooden spoon to press down on the fruit every few days so that the lemons are immersed in the liquid. Your stored lemons will last up to 6 months in a cool place.

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"How

I first tried preserved lemons when I went to Ojai two years ago for a press tour of Sunkist lemon groves. (What a divine journey it has been. Three days in Southern California in the middle of a messy Philadelphia winter.) Before eating a canned lemon, it has little to do with the fruit we know of. Strategicznie pokrojone i solone, cytryny radykalnie zmieniają swój charakter, aż everything, co pozostaje, to pikantna, pikantna, wydajna przyprawa, która działa jak poważny gracz w smaku.

And, as preserving projects go, this one couldn’t be easier. It’s just a matter of scrubbing, trimming, slicing and packing with salt. There is no need for boiling water or sterilization.

Here’s how it works. Wash the lemons very well and then cut both ends to remove any debris from the stem and a cup. Then slice them as if you’re cutting them into quarters, but not all the way. The goal is to cut each lemon into four pieces but still attached to the whole lemon. They always look a bit like one of those fairy games we used to play in elementary school.

Once all your lemons are prepped, cover the bottom of the jar you’ll be using with salt (either kosher or sea salt is best). One by one, hold each lemon over the jar and add a tablespoon of salt to the pieces. Put them in a jar, filling them with salt, exerting a little force to store them when needed. I used a 1 1/2 liter jar of Le Parfait and found it contained nine lemons pretty well. Spread a little salt between each layer of lemons and be sure to pour well into the jar as well.

Keep it on the counter for the first three days, shaking the jar well once or twice a day to help distribute the salt and activate juice production. If they aren’t producing a whole lot of juice, feel free to open the lid and press down to help things along. On the fourth day, take a look at your lemons. At this point, they should be soaked in their own juice. If not, fill the jar with some extra juice. Store them in the back of the refrigerator for at least three weeks. After that, they should be ready for use. However, they’ll keep this way for at least six months (if not longer).

When you’re ready to use one, remove it from the jar and give it a rinse. Cut into small pieces and dress them in salads, stews or cereal dishes. I imagine it would be delicious in this salad, instead of the stewed lemon slices.

If you’ve already bought or made them, what’s your favorite way to use canned lemon?