How to play flag football

Flag football is a non-physical approach to the game of football. Instead of tackling an opponent, you pull the flag attached to the person with the ball’s belt to cause a stoppage in play. This was designed so that people can enjoy football without worrying about injuring themselves due to contact.

Flag Football – Basic Rules

Although rules for flag football may vary, here is an example of a typical league’s rules.

  • A flag football field is usually around 60-80 yards long and 20-30 yards wide. The end zones are 10 yards long.
  • In flag football there are no kickoffs. Whoever wins the coin toss will start with the ball from their own five yard line and will have three plays to cross midfield. Once a team crosses midfield it has another three plays to score a touchdown or else the other team takes over possession from its own five yard line.
  • A flag football team consists of six players. Five of those players are allowed on the field at a time.
  • When a team is within five yards of a touchdown, they are not allowed to run the ball. They must use a passing play.
  • The flag football game consists of two halves that are 10-25 minutes in length.

How to play flag football

Flag Football – Equipment

Unlike normal football, a lot less equipment is necessary to play flag football. Most participants wear non-metal cleats. The only other required piece of equipment is a special flag football belt where you place the flag. It’s also a good idea to have good hands and fast feet!

Flag Football – Getting Involved

There are many different leagues for those interested in playing flag football. Youth leagues are open to kids five to 17 years old.

How to play flag football

Try to not get your flag pulled!

Whether you’re new to the game or looking to brush up on flag football rules, this guide will teach you the ins and outs of how to play flag football.

More kids are playing flag football than ever before. And we can see why—it’s engaging, inclusive, and ridiculously fun.

The best part is: anyone can learn how to play flag football. You don’t need a certain build, skill set or prior experience. Both girls and boys from 5 to 17 years old can sign up for NFL FLAG.

FLAG FOOTBALL FIELD

A flag football field is shorter than a standard tackle field at 30 yards wide and 70 yards long, with two 10-yard end zones and a midfield line-to-gain. To prevent power football in tight spaces, no run zones are located 5 yards before the end zone and on each side of the midfield line-to-gain. If the ball is spotted on or inside the no run zone, the offense must use a pass play to get a first down or touchdown.

How to play flag football

BASIC FLAG FOOTBALL RULES

When learning how to play flag football, it’s best to start with the basics. In NFL FLAG football leagues, teams play 5 on 5 and each game consists of two halves, usually 15 to 25 minutes long. Tournament games are typically shorter with two, 10 to 12 minute halves. The clock only stops for halftime, timeouts (each team has 3), or injury, making games quick and competitive. Each player has a specific role on the field and every play counts.

The most important rule in flag football is that there’s no contact allowed, including tackling, diving, blocking, screening or fumbles. Instead of physically tackling an opponent to the ground, players wear flags that hang along their sides by a belt. Defenders “tackle” the ball-carrier by removing one or both of their flags.

While this rule is designed to keep players safe, there are several other rules that limit contact among players, including:

The quarterback isn’t allowed to run with the ball, unless it was handed off first. They can run behind the line of scrimmage, but they can’t gain yardage.

All passes must go forward and be received beyond the line of scrimmage.

Laterals and pitches aren’t allowed—only direct handoffs are permitted.

Center sneak plays aren’t allowed.

There are no fumbles. Instead, the ball stays in possession of the offense and is spotted where the ball-carrier’s feet were when the fumble occurred.

The ball is dead when: the ball-carrier’s flag is pulled, the ball-carrier steps out of bound, a touchdown or safety is scored, the ball-carrier’s knee hits the ground, or the ball-carrier’s flag falls off.

Players can’t obstruct or guard their flags.

SCORING

Every game starts with a coin toss (there are no kickoffs). The starting team begins on its own 5-yard line and has four downs—essentially four plays—to cross midfield for a first down.

If the offense fails to advance after three attempts, they can “punt,” meaning they turn over the ball to the opposing team, which then starts from its own 5-yard line. Or they can go for a first down, but if they fail, the opposing team takes over possession from the spot of the ball.

Once midfield is crossed, the offense has three downs to score a touchdown. A touchdown is 6 points and a safety is 2 points (1-point conversion from the 5-yard line; 2-point conversion from the 10-yard line).

A touchdown is 6 points and a safety is 2 points (1-point conversion from the 5-yard line; 2-point conversion from the 10-yard line). A safety occurs when the ball-carrier is declared down in their own end zone. This happens when their flag is pulled by a defensive player, their flag falls out, their knee or arm touches the ground, or if a snapped ball lands in the end zone.

As a general rule of thumb, if a team is winning by a 28 or greater point margin, the game is over and the team doesn’t attempt an extra point.

RUNNING

When players run with the ball, their feet can’t leave the ground to avoid a defensive player. In other words, players can spin to avoid their opponent, but they can’t leap or dive.

Only direct handoffs are permitted—there are no laterals or pitches. Once the ball has been handed off, all defensive players are eligible to rush. And the person who takes the handoff is allowed to throw the ball from behind the line of scrimmage. So while you’ll see a designated quarterback on the field, several plays actually rely on other teammates to pass the ball. This changes up plays, keeps the defense on their toes, and makes the game even more exciting.

Also, under flag football rules, the quarterback can’t run with the ball unless it has been handed to him/her in the backfield. And all players who rush the passer must be a minimum of seven yards from the line of scrimmage when the ball is snapped.

Flag football rules aim to prevent power plays and avoid short-yardage situations, so you’ll find no run zones located 5 yards from each end zone and on either side of the midfield. In this designated area, the offensive team must complete a pass play.

Lastly, if an offensive player’s flag is pulled when they’re running with the ball, their feet determine where the ball is spotted, not the flag.

RECEIVING

One rule that makes flag football unique (and that much more competitive) is that everyone can receive a pass, including the quarterback, after the ball has been handed off behind the line of scrimmage. This allows coaches to include a variety of flag football plays into their playbooks and helps players develop fundamental offense skills. Plus, it makes the game more engaging. Keep in mind that when making a catch, players must have one foot in bounds, just like tackle.

PASSING

Flag football rules state that all passes must go forward and be received beyond the line of scrimmage. Shovel passes, which are short passes to forward receivers, are allowed, but also must be received beyond the line of scrimmage. Quarterbacks have a seven-second pass clock to get rid of the ball. And if they don’t, the play is dead.

Additionally, center sneak play—where the quarterback hands off to the center as the first handoff of the play—is no longer allowed.

Interceptions are allowed, but look a little different in flag football. They change the possession of the ball at the point of the interception. So if an interception occurs, the referee blows the whistle and the play is dead. Interceptions are the only change of possession that don’t start on the team’s 5-yard line.

How to play flag football

A flag football field is 30 yards wide and 70 yards long, with two 10-yard end zones and a midfield line-to-gain, making it shorter than a conventional tackle field. Restricted run zones are positioned 5 yards before the end zone and on each side of the middle line to stop power football in tight areas. If the ball is sighted on or within the no-run zone, the offense must go for a first down or score with a throwing play.

BASIC FLAG FOOTBALL RULES

It’s recommended to start with the fundamentals while attempting to play flag football. Teams play 5 on 5 in NFL FLAG football leagues, and each game is split into two halves, each lasting 15 to 25 minutes. With two 10 to 12 minute halves, tournament games are usually shorter. Games are swift and competitive since the clock only stops for halftime, timeouts, or injuries. On the pitch, each player has a certain job to play, and every play matters.

In flag football, the essential regulation is that no contact is permitted, particularly tackling, diving, blocking, screening, or fumbles. Players wear flags that are attached to their sides by a strap instead of actually tackling an enemy down by withdrawing one or both of their flags, the defenders “tackle” the ball-carrier.

While this regulation is intended to keep players safe, there are a number of additional rules that restrict player interaction.

When players run with the ball, they are unable to lift their feet off the ground in order to evade a defensive player. To put it another way, players can spin to dodge their opponent but not jump or dive.

There are no laterals or pitches allowed; only direct handoffs are allowed. All defensive players are eligible to rush after the ball is passed off. The receiver of the handoff is also permitted to toss the ball from behind the line of scrimmage. While there is a designated quarterback on the field, some plays rely on the passing of the ball to other players. This mixes up the plays, keeps the defense guessing, and adds to the excitement of the game.

One regulation that distinguishes flag football (and makes it more competitive) is that when the ball is passed off behind the line of scrimmage, anybody, including the quarterback, can catch a pass. This allows coaches to incorporate a wide range of flag football plays into their playbooks while also assisting players in developing core offense skills. It also makes the game more interesting. Keep in mind that, much like tackle, athletes must have one foot in boundaries when catching the ball.

All passes in flag football must move forward and be caught beyond the line of scrimmage, according to the regulations. Short passes to forward receivers, known as shovel passes, are permitted, but must be caught beyond the line of scrimmage. To get dispose of the ball, quarterbacks have a seven-second throw clock. If they don’t, the game is over.

A center sneak play, in which the quarterback hands off to the center as the first handoff of the play, is also no longer permitted.

If we are talking about the numbers we can say that only in the USA flag football is played by more than 1 million kids! And solely in Europe, we have around 600 clubs, in Slovenia alone, we have 8 flag football teams. And we hope the number will rise in the next few years.

The best part is: anyone can learn how to play flag football. You don’t need a certain build, skill set or prior experience. It’s the most equal sport where boys and girls, men and women can play together on the same field at the same time! The first biggest tournament will be the World cup in Israel, December 2021. 22 teams will be focused on winning the biggest World cup yet! Did we forget to mention that the sport will be at the World Games 2022 in Birmingham, Alabama, in the USA? And it’s rapidly coming toward the Olympic games which will be held in 2028 in Los Angeles, the USA!

FLAG FOOTBALL FIELD

Field of play: length 50 yd (45,75 m), additional end zones 10 yd (9,15 m), width 25 yd (22,90 m). Total required space for one field including safety area: 76 yd (69,55 m) x 31 yd (28,40 m). Width of lines: 4 inches (10 cm).

BASIC RULES OF FLAG FOOTBALL:

The quarterback isn’t allowed to run with the ball unless it was handed off first. They can run behind the line of scrimmage, but they can’t gain yardage.

All passes must go forward and be received beyond the line of scrimmage.

Laterals and pitches aren’t allowed—only direct handoffs are permitted.

Centre sneak plays aren’t allowed.

There are no fumbles. Instead, the ball stays in possession of the offence and is spotted where the ball carrier’s feet were when the fumble occurred.

The ball is dead when: the ball carrier’s flag is pulled, the ball carrier steps out of bounds, a touchdown or safety is scored, the ball carrier’s knee hits the ground, or the ball carrier’s flag falls off.

Players can’t obstruct or guard their flags.

For the details flag football rules click here .

Every game starts with a coin toss (there are no kickoffs). The starting team begins on its own 5-yard line and has four downs—essentially four plays—to cross midfield for a first down. If the offence fails to advance after four attempts, to get to the middle or to the endzone that means they turn over the ball to the opposing team, which then starts from its own 5-yard line. Or they can go for a first down, but if they fail, the opposing team takes over possession from the spot of the ball.

Once midfield is crossed, the offence has four downs to score a touchdown. A touchdown is 6 points and safety is 2 points (1-point conversion from the 5-yard line; 2-point conversion from the 10-yard line). Safety occurs when the ball carrier is declared down in their own end zone. This happens when their flag is pulled by a defensive player, their flag falls out, their knee or arm touches the ground, or if a snapped ball lands in the end zone.

When players run with the ball, their feet can’t leave the ground to avoid a defensive player. In other words, players can spin to avoid their opponent, but they can’t leap, jump or dive.

The quarterback can run only if there is a double handoff, which means if the centre is snapping the ball to the receiver who gives the ball to the QB. Only direct handoffs are permitted—there are no laterals or pitches.

Once the ball has been handed off, all defensive players are eligible to rush. And the person who takes the handoff is allowed to throw the ball from behind the line of scrimmage.

So while you’ll see a designated quarterback on the field, several plays actually rely on other teammates to pass the ball. This changes up plays, keeps the defense on their toes, and makes the game even more exciting. And all players who rush the passer must be a minimum of seven yards from the line of scrimmage when the ball is snapped.

Flag football rules aim to prevent power plays and avoid short-yardage situations, so you’ll find no run zones located 5 yards from each end zone. In this designated area, the offensive team must complete a pass play. Lastly, if an offensive player’s flag is pulled when they’re running with the ball, their feet determine where the ball is spotted, not the flag.

RECEIVING

One rule that makes flag football unique (and that much more competitive) is that everyone can receive a pass, including the quarterback, after the ball has been handed off behind the line of scrimmage. This allows coaches to include a variety of flag football plays into their playbooks and helps players develop fundamental offense skills. Plus, it makes the game more engaging. Keep in mind that when making a catch, players must have one foot in bounds, just like tackle.

PASSING

Flag football rules state that all passes must go forward and be received beyond the line of scrimmage. Shovel passes, which are short passes to forward receivers, are allowed, but also must be received beyond the line of scrimmage. Quarterbacks have a seven-second pass clock to get rid of the ball. And if they don’t, the play is dead and they lose a down.

Additionally, centre sneak play—where the quarterback hands off to the centre as the first handoff of the play—is no longer allowed.

Interceptions are allowed, but look a little different in flag football. They change the possession of the ball at the point of the interception. So if an interception occurs, the play is dead when the offence player pulls the flag on the defender who intercepted the ball. If the defender carries the ball to the end zone of the opponents the result is 6 points. Interceptions are the only change of possession that don’t start on the team’s 5-yards.

RUSHING THE PASSER (or blitzing)

Players who rush the passer must stand at least seven yards off the line of scrimmage when the ball is snapped, while players who aren’t rushing the passer may start on the line of scrimmage. The seven-yard rule no longer applies once the ball is handed off—all defenders are allowed to go behind the line of scrimmage at that point. A sack occurs when a defensive player pulls off the quarterback’s flag(s) behind the line of scrimmage. The quarterback, or anyone in possession of the ball, is down when their flag(s) are removed.

FLAG FOOTBALL PLAYS

To set up teams for success, coaches teach a variety of formations, routes and 5 on 5 flag football plays throughout the season. And with every player being eligible to receive a pass, including the quarterback, coaches can get creative and tailor their plays to their team’s strengths—or their opponent’s weaknesses.

Some plays are complex, while others are more basic. Some go for long yardage, while others aim for short gains. In every scenario, these plays determine the flow of the game and teach players the basic fundamentals needed to succeed. In other words, it teaches them how to play flag football.

The object of the game of flag football is to move the ball over the opponent’s goal line without being “tackled”. Points are awarded for a touchdown (6 points).

Do flag football players get paid?

While ZipRecruiter is seeing annual salaries as high as $71,000 and as low as $16,000, the majority of Professional Flag Football salaries currently range between $26,000 (25th percentile) to $41,000 (75th percentile) with top earners (90th percentile) making $53,500 annually across the United States.

How is flag football different than football?

The main difference between these two types of football is that flag football does not involve tackling the opposing player who has the ball. In flag football, each player wears two flags that hang down at their sides from their waist (these flags are often attached to a belt).

Is Flag Football easy?

With a few simple rules, you can learn how to play flag football in no time. This popular sport requires little equipment and can be easily adapted for a few players and any size and type of playing area you have available.

What are the 7 positions in flag football?

In flag football rules the center is then eligible to act as a wide receiver and go out for a pass.

  • Running Back ( RB ) – The running back is the primary ball carrier for running plays.
  • Nose Guard (NG)
  • Defensive Tackles(DT)
  • Defensive Ends(DE)
  • Linebackers (LB)
  • Cornerbacks(CB)

What is the most called penalty in flag football?

The two most popular penalties are tripping (11,722, 13.8%) and hooking (11,585, 13.6%).

How many players do you need for flag football?

Team: A team consists of 7 players. A team must have 5 players to start the game. If a team does not have 5 players by 5 minutes after the scheduled starting time, that team will forfeit the contest.

What is a dead ball in flag football?

Flag football Times when it can be a dead ball: anytime the ball hits the ground (also called a fumble) the ball carrier falls to the ground. If any other part of the body of the ball carrier, other than the hands and feet, touch the ground, it is a dead ball.

Are there fumbles in flag football?

All offensive players must be momentarily within 15 yards of the ball. It must be clear who the seven offensive players are on each play. Fumbles are dead when the ball touches the ground. The ball is put into play at the point where the ball first touched the ground.

Who invented football?

The man most responsible for the transition from this rugby-like game to the sport of football we know today was Walter Camp, known as the “Father of American Football.” As a Yale undergraduate and medical student from 1876 to 1881, he played halfback and served as team captain, equivalent to head coach at the time.

Is flag football safer than tackle?

Study Details on flag football and tackle football His focus of interest is sports injuries in youth football leagues, and he has received a 2016 pilot grant from UI IPRC for studies in that domain. According to the information he provides, flag players have the highest rates of injuries (more so than tackle players).

One of the largest sports in American history has to be American Football. It’s known for its exciting gameplay, but also rough characteristics. Luckily, for us an easier version called Flag Football has been created that makes for a great playground game.

According to Sportsvite.com, the Football game had already become popular during the 1800s, and was played in colleges especially. There are several national and international tournaments held but also many local football clubs, where it is played to a lesser extent.

If you have played football before, then learning how to play Flag Football should be easy for you! If you haven’t played football before, don’t worry; we’ve got you covered. By following these simple Flag Football rules you’ll turn into a champion before the day is over.

Flag Football Requirements

You will need a large field so that there is enough space for everyone to play. You must mark off end zones on each side of the field. You will also have to gather round some friends to play with you. Divide them up into teams of 4 – 9 players per side. Also be sure to attached different coloured flags to each member of a team. You will also need a timer as most games are 40 minutes long, stopping the clock only for timeouts or half-time (1 minute).

How to Play Flag Football

  1. Flip a coin to decide which team should go first. The team that goes first will place the ball on the opponent’s 5-yard line.
  2. From there each team will have 3 tries to get the ball to the midfield. If the team gets that right, they will have 3 more tries to score a touchdown. A touchdown is scored when the player places the ball in the other team’s end zone.
  3. If the team cannot cross to the midfield in 3 tries, the other team will have possession and try to do the same thing as mentioned above.
  4. Instead of tackling a player, you have pull the receiver’s flag. The receiver may not attempt to dodge a flag pull. Once the flag has been pulled, the play ends.
  5. The scoring of flag football is similar to the scoring in normal football. Each touchdown counts as 6 points. Points can also be accumulated after touchdowns, where the ball is placed at the opponents’ 5-yard line. This counts for 1 point. Similarly if the ball is placed on the opponents’ 12-yard line your team will receive 2 points.
  6. Usually in flag football there is no kicking as this is a non-contact sport, but if you want to spice things up a bit a add kicking as an option, you may do so. If you choose to do this, you have to score points according to regular football rules.

Flag Football Game Variations

It would be a great idea for you to involve all your friends and their families to create your own Flag Football Superbowl. Make it an outdoor activity by providing snacks, drinks, and letting teams compete against each other until you reach the ‘final’.

Get a rundown of the basics of NFL FLAG Football, from the rules, equipment and positions on the field.

Player Positions

Offense

The center snaps the ball to the quarterback and then can run for a pass as a receiver.

The quarterback receives the snap and passes the ball or hands it off. A quarterback is not allowed to run with the ball after the snap.

The running back takes a handoff and runs with the ball or throws it. A running back is also eligible to receive a pass.

Depending on the play, some five-on-five teams field three receivers, or two receivers and a running back. The receiver runs designated routes to catch a pass (usually right and left receivers).

Defense

The defensive back covers wide receivers, either man-to-man or zone.

The rusher attempts to prevent the quarterback from passing the ball (must be at least seven feet off the line of scrimmage at the snap to rush the passer).

The safety stands farther back from the line of scrimmage and is responsible for stopping opponents who get loose.

The Field

To accommodate a smaller team size, a flag football field is shorter than a typical football field at 30 yards wide and 70 yards long, with two 10-yard end zones and a midfield line-to-gain.

The part of the field directly behind the line of scrimmage.

The outer perimeter lines around the field, including the sidelines and back of the end zone lines.

The two end zones, located on opposite sides of the field, are the scoring areas. The goal line, which a player must cross to score a touchdown, is the start of the end zone.

The line the offense must cross to get a first down or score.

Line of scrimmage

This is an imaginary line that expands the width of the field and runs through the point of the football. It indicates where teams can’t cross until the play has begun.

The rules for flag football include no run zones that are located five yards before each goal line and the midfield. If the ball is spotted within a no run zone, the offensive team must use a pass play to earn a first down or touchdown. The objective is to prevent power football in tight spaces, limiting contact.

The Game

The team who has possession of the ball and is trying to advance to the opponent’s end zone for a touchdown.

The team who doesn’t have possession of the ball and is trying to prevent the other team from scoring by pulling the ball-carrier’s flags down.

This refers to the period of time directly before or after a play, when the ball isn’t in motion. Flag football rules are more strict about deadlines: they commonly happen when the ball touches the ground, the ball-carrier’s flag is pulled from their belt, the ball-carrier steps out of bounds, the ball-carrier’s body — outside of their hands or feet — touches the ground, the pass is incomplete, the ball-carrier’s flag falls out or the receiver has one or no flags when catching the ball.

A down is the period after the ball is snapped and the team is attempting to advance down the field. In flag football rules, teams have four downs to cross midfield. If they successfully cross midfield within four downs, then they have three downs to score a touchdown.

This flag football term happens when the ball-carrier prevents a defender from pulling down their flags. For example, they might stiff arm, cover their flag with their open hand, or lower their elbow. It is illegal and results in a penalty.

A backward or sideway toss of the ball by the ball-carrier. Laterals are not permitted according to youth flag football rules.

From only 5.5 million participants in 2014 to over 6.5 million in 2018, flag football programs have been on a steady rise in recent years according to Statista. Along with this increased participation comes an increase in friendly competition.

As a coach or administrator of a flag football program, you may be wondering how you can dominate your competition at any age level while also teaching your young athletes the proper way to play and enjoy the game of football.

Regardless of your goals on the field, learning how to call youth flag football plays successfully is a great place to gain traction as a fun and competitive program.

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Understanding Your Leagues Rules

When it comes to play calling and teaching kids how to play flag football, the first thing you need to teach is the rules of the league your program is registered with. Typically, the flag football rules look a lot like they do in regular youth football with the main exception being rules focused around running plays.

A few important rules to note are:

A quarterback is not allowed to run beyond the line of scrimmage with the ball

Only direct handoffs behind the line of scrimmage are allowed

The ball is spotted where the flag is pulled, not where the ball is located

Center sneak plays are not allowed

All players are eligible to receive a pass

A player must have at least one foot inbounds when making a reception

Once the ball has passed the line of scrimmage, the remaining offensive players cannot impede the defense from attempting to pull the ball-carriers flag

The “No Run Zone’ is located 5 yards before midfield and 5 yards before the goal line. You must call a pass play in these situations

You can learn more about the typical rulebook at NFL Flag Football or on our blog.

Creating Your Flag Football Playbook

The most important part about creating a flag football play calling system is knowing your team and keeping your play calling appropriate for your teams age level. On the middle school level, some of your players may understand simple flag football plays such as “Spread Right Fills Left” whereas at a younger level, you should likely be calling plays like “Bobby is the QB, you hand it off to Jordan and you run it to the right side”. Remember, it’s best run easy flag football plays so everybody on the field understands and can run the play effectively.

USA Football recommends that you pick a few good flag football plays that your team knows and can run very well rather than implementing an entire playbook. Knowing what your team can do best can be a major key to success in your league.

A good place to start digging into some offensive flag football plays is by starting with the passing game with spreads, trips and stacks. Along with using some of these formations, by changing your flag football passing routes you can help keep the opposing team constantly on their heels. Just be sure to keep in mind that while some regular youth football plays may work, you may need to change a few things first.

Spreads:

Spreads are a great play to call when you want to spread the defense out, hence the name. You can either call spread plays to the right or left and typically the formation has two receivers to the side you call and one to the opposite side. An example of a spread play would be “Spread Right, Slant Under Right. Drawn up the play looks something like this:

Trips:

Trip plays are when all three receivers line up on the same side of the field. These plays can be a great way to confuse defenses with the direction of the routes the receivers run. Like spreads, trip plays can be called to the left or right side. An example of a trips play is “Trips Right, Boise”. Drawn up, the play looks like:

Stacks:

Stack plays get their name from the idea that one receiver lines up behind another on the side called, and the third receiver lines up on the opposite side. An example of a stack play would be “Stack Left, 45 Degrees”. Drawn up, the play looks like:

Scheming Some Unstoppable Plays

When you call flag football plays, it all comes down to creativity and execution. Think about the different formations and how they spread the defense out. Then incorporate different route combinations to help scheme a receiver open. Have some fun as a coach!

Remember, it’s always a good idea for your quarterback to have multiple options in the passing game. If the first read isn’t there, teach them how go through their progressions to find the open man. You can also teach them to move around in and out of the pocket to help gain time to throw the ball to the open man.

An example of how you can manipulate a play to your advantage is by first recognizing the defense. If you think your opponent is in a man to man formation, you know you can find a weak spot by targeting a fast receiver on a slow cornerback. By running a slant route to the inside or by throwing a deep ball on a go route you can take advantage of that defensive weakness in speed and hit your speedy receiver for potentially a big play downfield.

If you want to learn more about play calling and scheming your own kids flag football plays, check out USA Footballs Flag Football Playbook for some great ideas! But all in all, while running unstoppable plays for flag football can be a blast for you as a coach, you need to make sure your kids are still having fun!

Calling Flag Football Defenses

A good flag football team is one that can score points. A great flag football team is one that can score points and stop the opposing team from scoring. This is where your defensive scheme and play calling can help take your team to the next level.

Key Flag Football Defensive Factors

Switch your play calling up – by routinely changing your defensive formation from zone to man to a little bit of both, you can be sure to keep your opponent’s offense on their heels. Remember, while passing plays may work great at first, the defense may catch on, so be sure to mix in a few football running plays too

Match your defensive scheme to your team’s skill set – for example by matching your fastest defender with your opponent’s fastest receiver, you can decrease the probability that the offense will find a weakness in your defensive scheme

Disguise play calling to confuse the offense – by disguising your play calling, what looks like man to man defense could actually be a zone play with your safety reading the eyes of your opponent’s quarterback, ready to run over to the targeted receiver to try and force an interception

All in all, by teaching your team a few defensive plays that they know and understand well, you can ensure you won’t be giving up any easy points to your opponents.The

Benefits of Coaching Youth Flag Football

There are a lot of benefits to coaching kids in flag football. From teaching young athletes the proper way to play the game, to having a ton of fun playing against the competition, youth flag football is a great way to get your feet wet in the coaching football.

By using our top tips on how to call the best youth flag football plays, you should be well on your way to a successful season as a program.