How to paint gladioli in watercolor

You may already know how to make gladioli last a long time, but this week I learned something new. This is information directly from the market vendor who sells these flowers, and nothing else: if you want gladioli to last a long time, the trick is to use ice cubes. Change the water twice a day and add ice cubes each time. Cut the base of the sprouts once a day. Stay out of full sun. The flowers will open slowly and last for a full week. I bought them on Saturday and they were completely closed, but this method seems to work as expected.

How to paint gladioli in watercolor

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32 commenti su "Gladioli"

Oh! Super cute! Well done! Clothes! Beaucoup d’émotion en couleurs!

Oh, c’est gentil!! The beauty of Merci!

Shari, you have captured the spirit of these flowers beautifully, they are so vivid and expressive! The gladiolus was my dear relative’s favorite flower, so this post touches my heart a little deeper. PS Is this trader at Jean Talon’s market?

Hi Minerva,
Yes, I bought them at the Jean Talon Market from the woman who is in the first row on the right as you exit the parking lot. You very kind lady. And beautiful joys.

she is beautiful!

Oh! A great sketch. And the tips of the cut flowers. I have to admit, when I saw the title “gladioli” I thought “hmmm, that’s a tough flower to paint”. Once again, you have truly grasped the essence of this special bloom.

Thanks Alison. I thought these too would be difficult to paint because they are so tall that they can be difficult from composition. I wasn’t aiming for anything specific, just trying to keep it wet and loose, and happy to be enjoying the painting process, which I did!

Now I have also learned something new. Oh. They are fantastic.

the color is amazing. she is beautiful

Very beautifull. You need another blueprint lesson on flower painting. Purple flowers and background color with a low view out the window – a wonderful touch.

Thanks Judas. I have no plans for another project lesson yet. I am still working and unfortunately there is still no time for a large project of this magnitude.

It’s like I said on IG..wonderful 🙂 Thanks for the tips too ..

Thanks Monique. You grow a lot of flowers. I am surprised you didn’t already know this.

Hello Shari, Magnifiques glaieuls! Peux-tu donner un peu d’info sur la façon de faire que tu as suivie? J’imagine que tu as commencé sur papier humide et que tu as ajouté les détails après le séchage. Latrudne est toujours de calculer le bon moment pour continueer sans tout gâcher…

Bongior Carlo. I hope you don’t mind if I describe the process in English. I did it on dry paper, believe it or not. Here are the steps.
1. Pencil drawing
2. Wash everything lightly using a combination of cobalt purple and cobalt blue, everywhere except a few small areas that I wanted to leave white.
3. When the laundry is dry, paint the flowers with a very damp brush, allowing them to blend a little. At this stage, I keep the color deep enough so that I can get some strength on the first pass.
4. Back with more pigment in some moist areas of pink and purple.
5. Let it dry, then go back to the frosting in some shaded areas, again using a fairly clear varnish.
The last thing you want is dry, overworked flowers, so always try to start loosening, wetting and tightening as you progress. Treat the flowers as one shape, especially when they are the same color.
Hope it will help.
Shari

Have you ever wanted to learn how to paint in a botanical style? Well, here you can!

Learn to paint and improve your watercolor skills with Billy Showell– Co-president of the Society of Botanical Artists.

Sign up online and get access to a wide variety of botanical and watercolor painting techniques. It’s a treasure trove of step-by-step tutorials that you can access 24/7.

From beginner to advanced, Billy shows each stage of the painting. Join her in her home studio as he explains her techniques in an informal and friendly way.

Dear perfect painters, this week we paint with a silver spoon and take a different approach, starting with graphite and building all the deeper tones and ending with a light watercolor bronzer glaze. It’s a nice take on similar items, but also something new to add to your sketchbooks. After we painted the spoon, we continued to add a beautiful flower and a Clematis leaf. In this project, I start the flower and leaf show with a short tutorial on how to draw them from life. Individually, these are beautiful short projects that can be done at all levels and will fit perfectly into your busy schedule. Everything can be done as an individual study or as a whole, why not play around and see what kind of composition you can come up with.

How to paint gladioli in watercolor

What do you think about when you imagine?abundance? If you’re anything like me, the first image is food-related. I start with “abundance” which leads to “plenty,” which leads to “horn of plenty” or “cornucopia” and next thing you know I’m counting the days until Thanksgiving, or at the very least, digging into a pumpkin pie! (Charlie O’Shields, I know you’re agreeing with me; I’ve seen your paintings!)

Ma se aggiungiamo "acquerello" alla nostra associazione di parole, cosa viene in mente?

What is your rich artistic dream?

Maybe it’s having that coveted Kolinsky sable brush and the shelves full of luxurious paper and all the colors from the paint swatch table.

Perhaps you imagine a shimmering gallery of the colors of your art and your exclusive show.

Maybe you just want to have enough time to paint.

How to paint gladioli in watercolor

Z widokiem na abundance

L’abundance nel mio percorso artistico ha significato per me tutte queste cose in tempi diversi e anche di più. But I got it yearning for abundance is not the same as having it,and I have often found myself neglecting the wealth I had when I longed for what was out of reach.

When I valued my expensive sheets of cotton paper, “saving” them while I was a better painter, I underestimated the stage of development I was in and didn’t see that my “damaged” paintings taught me more. I have refrained from pouring all my curiosity and intention into my paintings and I have lost the discovery.

When, in the hectic days of parenting, I dreamed of a long afternoon of painting and reflection, I didn’t notice that in the fifteen minutes I was able to walk away here and there, I was learning to walk away from the painting before I worked hard and began to analyze better the next steps, because I was able to look at the image with new eyes after another pause in my process.

When my budget didn’t allow me to invest in new colors, I learned to mix colors which gave me the ability to substitute, improvise and find my favorite mixes rather than copying my instructors.

Drawing from the well of creativity

There’s a lot of talk these days about having an abundance mindset, and I believe that adopting a mindset of abundance is a game changer for an artist.If I can approach my painting practice with the conviction thatI have everything I need to create the art I should be doing today I can paint without reservation, trusting that the creativity I use today will provide fertile ground for tomorrow’s growth. My creativity is not a cistern, holding a finite capacity that decreases as I use it, rather, it’s a spring, flowing from deeper sources than I can imagine, welling up to replace and overflow as I draw from it.

How to paint gladioli in watercolor

“I have everything I need to become the artist I’m meant to be.” Request it. Believe it. And then act as if you believe it! Paint from this place of safety and strength.

This week’s World Watercolor Month video:Intuitive gladiolus in watercolor

Watch the video and post your artwork inspired by this week’s class on social media using the hashtag #worldwatercolormonth and #angelafehrtutorials.

How to paint gladioli in watercolor

Angela Fehr

Angela Fehris is an internationally acclaimed watercolor artist and instructor living in northern British Columbia, Canada. Teaching more than 5,000 students at her online school, Fehr places an emphasis on fluid and intuitive painting, clearly teaching the technique and encouraging students to discover their own unique style as they develop their watercolor skills.

Cool craft projects, devious recipes, and other art stuff.

Edit: My good friend and expert Cindi told me this picture shows a bridge in Southwest Harbor just off the road from Somesville. Thanks Cindi! (and you can get there from here! LOL-Maine kidding!)

Hello friends! I have to thank reader Jamie Evens for requesting this tutorial and allowing me to use her beautiful photograph she took of the Somesville bridge for today’s very long watercolor tutorial. Today I will show you the painting of this wonderful scene from my beautiful state of Maine!

How to paint gladioli in watercolor

Watch the video for a step-by-step tutorial. I’ve had a few viewers on YouTube who said they liked the longer video because as a beginner it helped them better understand the process of completing the bigger picture. I hope it will be useful to you too!

Materials for this tutorial:

  • Art Masking Fluid (also called frisket liquid)
  • Cheap soap and brush
  • Watercolor paint, under the colors I used, you can use these or similar colors:
    Cad light yellow or lemon yellow
    ocra yellow
    magenta or crimson alizarin or madder rose
    ultramarine blue
    juicy green
    constant green light
    a burnt sienna
  • Brushes: 3/4 ″ flat wash, # 10 round, # 5 hazel, # 12 flat You can choose the size up or down and it will be fine 🙂

Here is a photo of Jamie that I posted with her permission. Thanks again Jaime!

If you have any questions feel free to leave a comment and I’ll try to help you out. Use the tips and techniques I shared with you in the video to paint your next watercolor. Nothing is more difficult to paint than anything else, just break it down into small steps and go and most of all have fun! Thanks for stopping by and happy writing next time!

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Tonight I’m going to show you how easy it is to paint a calm stream with a watercolor. You don’t need to draw, all you need is paper, paint and some brushes and you can paint with me. If you try let me know how it comes!

If you enjoyed this free video tutorial, you might like Mallard Duck’s painting tutorial in PDF format. It’s only $ 3 in my shop and comes with a traceable pattern and full photo manual so you can follow along.

How to paint gladioli in watercolor

Well, I’m plumb tuckered out tonight so I will leave you to your evening. Thanks for stopping by and happy writing next time!

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Hello friends! Lately I have been having a lot of fun with water vehicles. I was surprised what to paint, so I looked at my request list and painted the hydrangea. I did it both with watercolor paints and pencils and surprisingly I preferred the soft look of the pencils for this so I’ll show you that video first:

Actually, I had no intention of posting a watercolor painting video. I was finally cut off, just before saying goodbye and the video was very clear when I hit the button for “perfect auto levels” … perfect my foot LOL! It is kinda bright but I offered to post it if anyone was interested, don’t say I didn’t warn you 😛

Well it looks like a big storm is waiting for us this week, please be careful if you are in the east especially if your neighborhood is not used to snowing, I am planning a trip to town tomorrow for needs like “shop bought” Valentine’s Day, my daughters want to give away (where did I go wrong?) and Valentine’s Day snacks for the party in case school isn’t canceled on Friday and I have to think of a Valentine’s Day gift for my husband. Some idea? I was thinking of getting him more store stuff than him, but clamps and wood glue aren’t that romantic. Oh well, i’m sure I’ll think of something:) Thanks for stopping by and happy writing next time!