How to organize your personal files

How to organize your personal files

Maybe I’m fanatical, but I scan every document I want to keep. Statements, invoices, receipts, tax documents, that’s all. In fact, I was doing this even before desktop scanners were available to the masses, faxing the documents to my email address. One day I realized that faxes do nothing more than scan a document before sending it electronically. So I thought why not send the photos to my e-mail and not to another fax. I was addicted.

Thus over the past 25 years or so, I’ve shredded tens of thousands of sheets of paper. And I digitized everything I would ever need (as well as things I probably would never need) onto a tiny SD card. An added benefit is that scanned documents do not fade or tear over time, as their paper counterparts do. My friends often ask how long it takes to digitally archive documents and how to get started. A few simple tips, in any order:

1) If you haven’t ever scanned the contents of your file cabinet, don’t be overwhelmed. Start by going through and throwing out items you’ll never need — before you start scanning. This makes the task a little less daunting.

2) Scan items as soon as you get them, so they don’t start piling up. It’s a very quick process once you get into the rhythm.

3) Put everything in pdf format. It’s universal and seems like it will last a lifetime. Even if it doesn’t, there are pdf reader programs available that you can also store on the disk.

4) Keep a backup of your scans. In fact, I have a disc for the current year on my desk that is constantly being updated. Every few months, I fold its contents into another disk in the house that’s a compilation of every document I’ve ever scanned. And once a year, I back up this disk to a USB stick, which I keep in a safe place away from home. You never know when a portable memory drive fails, so it’s critical.

5) Keep everything organized and with a consistent name and you will be able to quickly locate any file forever. For example, my folders are marked with the year and then with similar themes. So there are subfolders in my “2010” folder. One is called “Checking Accounts” and has subfolders for every checking account I had at the time. And since most computers allow you to search for files by name, you can easily find your Citibank statement for March 2003 if needed in seconds. Or, she looks for a sofa account you bought from Ikea in the early 2000s. My wife is constantly amazed at how quickly she can find the old documents she needs.

6) Use cloud storage systems, if you’re comfortable storing your personal papers online. But if you do, keep a physical backup in your possession as well.

7) There are some great desktop scanners. If you decide to switch to bulk scanning, I highly recommend using one with an automatic document feeder. It will work fast, without having to keep an eye on it. And get one that can do double-sided scans. You’ll thank me later.

8) For most small tasks, I prefer to use smartphone scanning apps like Scannable, CamScanner or Scanner Pro. They are all fast, automatically crop images to size and “whiten” them well. In addition, applications export images directly to cloud storage or email.

A few years ago we had to evacuate our home due to fires in the area. As my neighbors loaded their cars with boxes of big and heavy files, I just got a pen drive with my scanned documents and was able to help some of the neighbors before getting through the city much faster and having more space in machine for other essentials.

How to organize your personal files

I am a veteran writer based in Southern California with a major background in golf and personal technology. He studied computer science in college and then worked as a

I am a veteran writer based in Southern California with a major background in golf and personal technology. He studied computer science in college and then worked as a programmer/software engineer for about a decade, triggered my passion for today’s high-end, high-tech gadgets. I can’t help myself whenever I see any kind of cool new personal technology. I feel compelled to further check it out and see what it’s all about. And even if I have no use for it personally, I’m always thinking who it might best suit. Exciting new innovations appear every day that shape the future and make life easier. And I hope to be your eyes on this world through the words of this column.

Gain control over a bunch of documents with an easy-to-use filing system. Learn how to organize important documents with these tips to create a file system that’s right for you.

Paperwork tends to accumulate quickly. Mail, receipts, school documents, bank statements, tax documents, and more can quickly clutter worktops and desk surfaces, creating a clutter of paperwork that seems unmanageable. Fortunately, creating a filesystem to help you manage all that paperwork isn’t as difficult as you might think. We walk you through the process of transforming chaotic piles of loose documents into an organized and easy-to-follow file management system.

First, you need to designate a place to collect all the new documents that will appear in your home. It will be your primary paper handling center where you will sort out your inbox, documents, receipts, invitations, and other documents as you decide what to do with each item. Then you will create separate files or folders depending on what you need to do next and when you need to do it. Questo ti aiuterà a dare priorità agli elementi che richiedono attenzione ora, come le ricevute, e a conservare con cura elementi come i documenti fiscali di cui potresti aver bisogno in futuro. By defining a specific paperwork management process, you can prevent big buildups with small steps every day. Use these tips to create a file organization system that’s right for you.

How to organize your personal filesToo much paper can cause unnecessary clutter and anxiety. That’s why it’s extremely important to keep your documents and records organized.

They store some of the most valuable and private information, including social security numbers, health and financial information, and real estate records.

When your data is organized, you will know exactly where everything is and you will be able to find it quickly, and it is unlikely that anything will be lost or lost.

You’ll also have an easy way to quickly locate important documents, especially in an emergency.

Here are some steps you can take to make sure your personal or professional records are organized, classified, and easy to find.

5 ways to better organize your recordings

1) Rank your records

How to organize your personal filesBefore creating a dataset, it is important to sort all existing records to determine whether to keep or delete them.

The next step is to collect everything you’ve decided you want or need to keep and sort them into piles based on categories.

You can choose the things that make the most sense to you, but the most common categories are financial, medical, real estate, and personal.

Each set of documents can be organized and sorted into categories and subcategories. For example, you can sort financial records by years, accounts, or amounts due.

2) Check your details for personally identifiable information (PII)

Once you’ve sorted everything out, check each item for personal information like social security numbers, account numbers, and credit card numbers. To ensure your safety from identity thieves, if you’re not going to save it, then shred these sensitive records .

3) Sort and organize everything

How to organize your personal filesKeep your information organized so that it is easier to find out what still needs to be done and what needs to be submitted.

Sort the bills in stacks that indicate which ones have been paid and which have yet to be paid.

If you are ambitious, you can separate them by due date with the bills to be paid at the top of the stack or in front of the folder.

Keeping the latest records in front of each folder will help you organize them by date without having to go back and reorder them. Documents in the miscellaneous category can still be divided into general heaps such as “To archive”, “Destroy” or “Throw”.

Medical records can be organized by the relevant family member, while ownership records can be organized by location or value.

Organized financial records will relieve stress and headaches as they will be in one place and will only benefit you in the long run.

4) Find a place to store your files and backup them

How to organize your personal filesNow that you’ve separated, organized, and classified your files, you need to find a safe place to store them. A filing cabinet, large binders, or fireproof boxes are some good options for storing large amounts of files.

Keep extra copies of your most important documents elsewhere in case the original is lost. For added security, you can keep an electronic copy of all your documents as a backup.

Converting documents and files will eliminate paper and free up space in the filing cabinet.

When setting up your organizational system, make sure it’s easy to understand so that if someone needs to find something, they can locate it quickly and easily. If you choose to use folders or file dividers, mark the vertices with categories and subcategories.

You may want to keep a journal that tells others what you’ve done so far, a brief summary of how your records are organized, and what else needs to be done. This simplifies things and allows you to make progress in improving your file system.

5) Document your system and maintain it

Once you’ve organized your records, the last step is to organize them without clutter. To keep your documents organized and in the right place, remember to immediately post new accounts or postings in the system.

Well-organized documents can save you time and reduce the stress of finding lost documents when you need them quickly.

Get free quotes for archiving records today!

Information management is an ever-changing field as federal and state regulations require more storage space and faster discovery. Our experts will help you maintain your data storage needs regardless of format.

We can help you manage your paperwork and even guide you through the transition to a paperless office. Record Nations has been providing document management solutions for over a decade. Let us help you find the right document archiving solution for your business.

To start,fill out the form on the website or call (866) 385-3706.

In a few minutes you will have a choice between several companies in your area.

How to organize your personal files

I’ve been thinking about file formats lately, specifically in the context of digital preservation. (For reference I’m writing this section on January 5, 2021). Now that we have a file saving system, what formats do we save them in? I’ve taken a look at archival recommendations such as those from the Smithsonian Institute. Here are some thoughts on the two types of data.

Images

When I save photos from around the web, I usually convert them to HEIF to save storage space. But HEIF is proprietary. There are a lot of arguments about open source formats versus proprietary ones and which of these probably has the longest support. In my research to date, open formats seem to be preferred.

The Smithsonian Institution’s archives list TIFF as the preferred storage format, with acceptable formats such as JPG, DNG, PNG, and JP2 (Jpeg2000). TIFF, o Tagged Image File Format, non è compresso e i moderni sistemi operativi indicizzano i tag TIFF come metadati per cercare i file.

TIFF is great for exporting original images such as graphic design and photography. But converting is different from exporting. If I starting converting saved images to TIFF instead of HEIF, I don’t think that’s the same as an original quality TIFF image. You’re going from lossy compression to lossless compression, which doesn’t work. So we can stick to JPG and PNG to save the images.

If you have an iPhone 12 Pro or iPhone 12 Pro Max, you could start taking your photos in Apple’s new ProRAW format. This is based on DNG and is the closest we’ll get to an uncompressed photo using a smartphone. You can keep ProRAW versions as original storage format and share JPG versions as access format.

For text documents, presentations, and spreadsheets, PDF is listed as the preferred format. Acceptable formats are TXT and RTF. I can see the benefits of the former in my workflow. Saving an article in PDF format gives you the original document with images. However, if I use my shortcuts to save the article, I will get only text with no images.

However, saving an article on TXT or Apple Notes gives me something that PDF cannot. At the top of each saved article, I like to mention some data about it: title, author, date of writing, saved data and URL. I haven’t yet discovered if it’s possible to include that in a PDF using shortcuts, like as a first page, while maintaining the original layout. I want automation instead of manually editing each saved PDF. Alternatively, we could save both formats as text files take up almost no space.

Application

For now, I think formats like HEIF and TXT are acceptable. It would be different if you were to work like a real archivist, but the files I save are for personal use. Ultimately, these are the types of questions you need to ask yourself about digital preservation; I think they call it “risk assessment”. Are you going to give your files to friends and family? Do you want the historian in 2100 to have access to your file?

This guide has been a work in progress since I created it in 2018, and I’ll keep it updated as I make changes. And if you’ve created your own personal information management system, mention it in the comments. I’d love to read about it.

Pages:

  • previous
  • 1
  • 2

How to organize your personal filesToo much paper can cause unnecessary clutter and anxiety. That’s why it’s extremely important to keep your documents and records organized.

They store some of the most valuable and private information, including social security numbers, health and financial information, and real estate records.

When your data is organized, you will know exactly where everything is and you will be able to find it quickly, and it is unlikely that anything will be lost or lost.

You’ll also have an easy way to quickly locate important documents, especially in an emergency.

Here are some steps you can take to make sure your personal or professional records are organized, classified, and easy to find.

5 ways to better organize your recordings

1) Rank your records

How to organize your personal filesBefore creating a dataset, it is important to sort all existing records to determine whether to keep or delete them.

The next step is to collect everything you’ve decided you want or need to keep and sort them into piles based on categories.

You can choose the things that make the most sense to you, but the most common categories are financial, medical, real estate, and personal.

Each set of documents can be organized and sorted into categories and subcategories. For example, you can sort financial records by years, accounts, or amounts due.

2) Check your details for personally identifiable information (PII)

Once you’ve sorted everything out, check each item for personal information like social security numbers, account numbers, and credit card numbers. To ensure your safety from identity thieves, if you’re not going to save it, then shred these sensitive records .

3) Sort and organize everything

How to organize your personal filesKeep your information organized so that it is easier to find out what still needs to be done and what needs to be submitted.

Sort the bills in stacks that indicate which ones have been paid and which have yet to be paid.

If you are ambitious, you can separate them by due date with the bills to be paid at the top of the stack or in front of the folder.

Keeping the latest records in front of each folder will help you organize them by date without having to go back and reorder them. Documents in the miscellaneous category can still be divided into general heaps such as “To archive”, “Destroy” or “Throw”.

Medical records can be organized by the relevant family member, while ownership records can be organized by location or value.

Organized financial records will relieve stress and headaches as they will be in one place and will only benefit you in the long run.

4) Find a place to store your files and backup them

How to organize your personal filesNow that you’ve separated, organized, and classified your files, you need to find a safe place to store them. A filing cabinet, large binders, or fireproof boxes are some good options for storing large amounts of files.

Keep extra copies of your most important documents elsewhere in case the original is lost. For added security, you can keep an electronic copy of all your documents as a backup.

Converting documents and files will eliminate paper and free up space in the filing cabinet.

When setting up your organizational system, make sure it’s easy to understand so that if someone needs to find something, they can locate it quickly and easily. If you choose to use folders or file dividers, mark the vertices with categories and subcategories.

You may want to keep a journal that tells others what you’ve done so far, a brief summary of how your records are organized, and what else needs to be done. This simplifies things and allows you to make progress in improving your file system.

5) Document your system and maintain it

Once you’ve organized your records, the last step is to organize them without clutter. To keep your documents organized and in the right place, remember to immediately post new accounts or postings in the system.

Well-organized documents can save you time and reduce the stress of finding lost documents when you need them quickly.

Get free quotes for archiving records today!

Information management is an ever-changing field as federal and state regulations require more storage space and faster discovery. Our experts will help you maintain your data storage needs regardless of format.

We can help you manage your paperwork and even guide you through the transition to a paperless office. Record Nations has been providing document management solutions for over a decade. Let us help you find the right document archiving solution for your business.

To start,fill out the form on the website or call (866) 385-3706.

In a few minutes you will have a choice between several companies in your area.

Posted on January 5, 2021 by Madalina Dinita Leave a comment

If you carefully filter and organize your files, you’ll quickly find the documents you’re looking for. Another advantage is that you’ll keep your folders clutter-free.

If you’ve received hundreds of files through Microsoft Teams and didn’t have a clear plan from the start, things can seem a little chaotic now. Users often feel overwhelmed with the task of organizing their files, so they prefer to put them back in place again and again. Indeed, organizing files is a time-consuming task, but the benefits that come with it are worth it.

To make the whole process easier for you, we’ve created this guide. We’ll share a series of handy tips and tricks to help you better organize your MS Teams files.

Best practices for organizing files in MS teams

Choose your primary cloud storage service

Microsoft Teams uses a variety of archiving services to store files and documents. By default, your files are stored on OneDrive and SharePoint. Files shared in team threads are stored in SharePoint. All files exchanged in chats are stored on OneDrive.

But you can also manually add a cloud storage service you already know.How to organize your personal files

Sync files with OneDrive

We suggest using Microsoft’s cloud storage service to store Teams files. Both services are developed by Microsoft and there are no integration or compatibility issues between them.

When you sync your Teams files with OneDrive, you can access them directly from File Explorer. In other words, you no longer need to open Teams to view these files.

Create specific folders

Irrespective of the cloud storage service you use to store your Teams files, it’s important to create specific folders. Then add all your files to the appropriate folders. The most important thing is to decide on a structure and stick to it.

For example, you can create a separate folder for each person you contact frequently. And save the files you get from them in the appropriate folder. Or you can use descriptive filenames like reports, contracts, activities, marketing, finance, presentations, etc.

You can also organize your folders by project, client, date, due date, etc.

Use clear and specific channel names

All team-related files are stored in SharePoint. Whenever you create a new team in Microsoft Teams, a new SharePoint team site is automatically created. When you create a SharePoint channel, a new document library is automatically created for that channel.

The library is named after the channel name. So make sure you choose specific channel names to avoid confusion.

Use file filters

Microsoft Teams offers a number of filters that you can use to list your files in a specific order. For example, you can list files in chronological order. You can also filter them by the name of the person who edited them.

How to organize your personal files

Write it down

Or you can pin the file at the top. This feature allows you to mark very important or urgent files. In this manner, you’ll know exactly where to find that file.

First you need to select the file and then clickWrite it downoption.

How to organize your personal files

Quick tips for organizing files efficiently

  • Don’t store your files on your desktop. A cluttered desktop looks cluttered and generates visual noise.
  • Archive your files as soon as you receive them. Don’t wait until you get 5o files to start organizing them. Put them in the appropriate folder as soon as you receive them.
  • Use clear and descriptive filenames. Using generic names such as “Files,”, “Documents”, “Stuff” doesn’t help at all.

What tips and tricks do you use to organize Microsoft Teams files? Share them in the comments below.

How to organize your personal files

You may be wondering … why should I put extra effort into organizing and tagging my files if something is working for me right now? It’s too late, I have too many files now on my laptop/desktop…I’ll take me forever to organize my files now.

While it is true that it will take quite a bit of effort to rearrange everything, it will be worth it once the organization is complete. The earlier you start, the better you will be to yourself and the work you’ll do in the future. Basically, this is Marie Kondo-ing from your computer.

Here are some of the benefits of being organized:

  • You will save A LOT of time and use that to do what you actually need to do.
  • You will know exactly where to find a particular file when you need it (instead of taking more than a few minutes to find just one file).
  • You will know which file is the most recent version, instead of having to open each file to look (takes a long time and it’s tedious).
  • Best of all, you will feel better to first see your folders and desktop being neat.

First, you’d need to learn how to label things before you learn how to organize. This is mainly because if you don’t get good at labeling your files and folders, it will be hard for you to set a system to organize those items. Labeling is easy for natural organizers, but even if you aren’t great at it, you can practice to become awesome at it. First, learn how to use the underscore for any of the labeling methods:

Once you understand the purpose of underlining, here are 4 ways to tag files:

Label with tags

  • This is to organize your files by tags or types
  • The idea is that it will be easier on your eyes if your files are automatically sorted alphabetically by your computer
  • Examples of using tags:

Label with dashes

  • This method is the most common and the easiest to learn.
  • The trick is to avoid leaving spaces between letters in the file name (because computers don’t translate well when there are empty spaces between letters, especially when transferring files).
  • There are no capital letters in the file name.
  • Examples with dashes:

Camel pouch label

  • This method is often used in scripts and programming.
  • The idea is also to avoid leaving spaces between letters in the file name.
  • Think of a camel with a hump on its back – the idea is to always make the first letter lowercase, so the first letter of each word would be capitalized.
  • Examples using the camel case:

Mark with dates

  • An easy way to tag files is with a date. There are also many ways to mark dates.
  • The best way to use dates without international date formatting problems is to first use [Year], then [Month], then [Date] – this will also help you when your computer automatically organizes files for you.
  • You can use hyphens or not hyphens.
  • Examples using dates:

20200520_bill-pay-tracking. xls (given without hyphens)

2020–05–20_bill-pay-tracking. xls (dates with dashes)

2020–05_bill-pay-tracking. xls (month only)

Labeling with a version

  • Versioning is a great way to keep track of what you’ve done in the past so you know what the most recent file is.
  • It’s a good idea to get in the habit of keeping backups in case you accidentally delete the current file or the file gets damaged for any reason.
  • Examples of using versioning:
  • Labels that use versions have many advantages, as you can continue adding versions without stopping subsequent versions:
  • If you have “V1.0_myAnatomyClassProject. Doc”, you have something different between V1.0 and V2.0, you can “V1.1_myAnatomyClassProject. Doc” and keep adding a period next to the number, eg. “V1.1.1”
  • It really depends on your situation, but you are free to choose what is best for you.

Mark with a number

  • This is one way to organize folders
  • Examples

Label with colors

  • The color code would be great if you and the people who used it responded well to the colors. However, from an accessibility standpoint, it’s not universally used well because of color-blind users, so think about whether or not you’d like to use this method
  • Assign a color to each type of label
  • All files within each label type are marked with the appropriate assigned color
  • Examples using colors

Design Y = blue

Sort by numbers

  • This is some sort of your choice that makes sense to you.
  • Computer alphabet sorting doesn’t always work with what you need, so this method may be useful for you.
  • Examples with organizing by numbers:

Sort by chronology

  • Chronological order is best for photos and financial documents / files, especially by month or year.
  • Examples with organization by chronology:

Sort by category

  • Categories are useful when you want to group files of the same type.
  • You can also organize categories by history so you can sort them by the most recent.
  • Examples with organizing by categories:

Organize by process / structure

  • Sometimes, in a business or work environment, it would be more appropriate to organize by process / structure.
  • Again, you can use this method of arranging, combining it with numbers, so that you can arrange it in the order that makes sense to you.
  • Examples with organizing by process/structure:

If you want to learn more about how other experts manage digital organization on their laptops, desktops, etc., we recommend two books:

How to organize your personal files

I’ve been thinking about file formats lately, specifically in the context of digital preservation. (For reference I’m writing this section on January 5, 2021). Now that we have a file saving system, what formats do we save them in? I’ve taken a look at archival recommendations such as those from the Smithsonian Institute. Here are some thoughts on the two types of data.

Images

When I save photos from around the web, I usually convert them to HEIF to save storage space. But HEIF is proprietary. There are a lot of arguments about open source formats versus proprietary ones and which of these probably has the longest support. In my research to date, open formats seem to be preferred.

The Smithsonian Institution’s archives list TIFF as the preferred storage format, with acceptable formats such as JPG, DNG, PNG, and JP2 (Jpeg2000). TIFF, o Tagged Image File Format, non è compresso e i moderni sistemi operativi indicizzano i tag TIFF come metadati per cercare i file.

TIFF is great for exporting original images such as graphic design and photography. But converting is different from exporting. If I starting converting saved images to TIFF instead of HEIF, I don’t think that’s the same as an original quality TIFF image. You’re going from lossy compression to lossless compression, which doesn’t work. So we can stick to JPG and PNG to save the images.

If you have an iPhone 12 Pro or iPhone 12 Pro Max, you could start taking your photos in Apple’s new ProRAW format. This is based on DNG and is the closest we’ll get to an uncompressed photo using a smartphone. You can keep ProRAW versions as original storage format and share JPG versions as access format.

For text documents, presentations, and spreadsheets, PDF is listed as the preferred format. Acceptable formats are TXT and RTF. I can see the benefits of the former in my workflow. Saving an article in PDF format gives you the original document with images. However, if I use my shortcuts to save the article, I will get only text with no images.

However, saving an article on TXT or Apple Notes gives me something that PDF cannot. At the top of each saved article, I like to mention some data about it: title, author, date of writing, saved data and URL. I haven’t yet discovered if it’s possible to include that in a PDF using shortcuts, like as a first page, while maintaining the original layout. I want automation instead of manually editing each saved PDF. Alternatively, we could save both formats as text files take up almost no space.

Application

For now, I think formats like HEIF and TXT are acceptable. It would be different if you were to work like a real archivist, but the files I save are for personal use. Ultimately, these are the types of questions you need to ask yourself about digital preservation; I think they call it “risk assessment”. Are you going to give your files to friends and family? Do you want the historian in 2100 to have access to your file?

This guide has been a work in progress since I created it in 2018, and I’ll keep it updated as I make changes. And if you’ve created your own personal information management system, mention it in the comments. I’d love to read about it.

Pages:

  • previous
  • 1
  • 2