How to organize your house

This article was co-authored by Julie Naylon. Julie Naylon is the Founder of No Wire Hangers, a professional organizing service based out of Los Angeles, California. No Wire Hangers provides residential and office organizing and consulting services. Julie’s work has been featured in Daily Candy, Marie Claire, and Architectural Digest, and she has appeared on The Conan O’Brien Show. In 2009 at The Los Angeles Organizing Awards she was honored with “The Most Eco-Friendly Organizer”.

There are 15 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 29,189 times.

Tackling your clutter is a big task, but it’s not impossible. Start with clear expectations and goals so you can move through each room in your home and reorganize it. Part of organizing involves getting rid of things you don’t need or want anymore, so give yourself time to sort through your belongings. Once you’re left with things you want to keep use storage systems that work for your space and style.

How to organize your house

How to organize your house

Julie Naylon
Professional Organizer Expert Interview. 18 December 2019. Then, decide what else you’d like to sell or donate. Sort items you want to keep by which room they belong in and group items together based on what they are. [3] X Research source

  • For example, put all of your office supplies into 1 pile. Once you’re in your office, store your paperwork in a filing cabinet and put your chargers and cords into a spot on your desk, for instance.
  • If you have a lot that you’d like to get rid of, consider holding a garage sale. Then, you can use some of your profits to buy organizational supplies for your home.

How to organize your house

Julie Naylon
Professional Organizer Expert Interview. 18 December 2019.

  • Walk through your home and create a list of storage solutions for each room so you don’t have to guess what you need.
  • If you’re trying to organize on a budget, shop garage sales and thrift stores. You can usually find shelving, hooks, and cabinets in a variety of styles.
  • How to organize your house

    Last update: 16 January, 2019

    Disorder has a deeper impact than just leaving things lying here and there. It’s a “lifestyle” that many times can cause confusion and tension.

    Because of this, in the following article, we want to give you some tips to help you organize your house. These pieces of advice can translate to other environments, like work, for instance.

    Disorder is a learned behavior

    For some people, being disorganized is a benefit. This is because they don’t have to spend hours and hours cleaning up. Also, in the chaos, they can find things much more quickly.

    However, to be able to have a well-kept house and have a better family life, it’s always better to put things where they belong. This makes things more efficient.

    Your mind needs order to think better. Because of this, if you have an office or a desk that’s covered in papers, folders, and books, it’ll be easier to get distracted. As a result, you aren’t paying attention like you should.

    These tips to be more organized at home have many benefits. Of course, it’s a habit that you need to change. It’ll take you time and effort to do so. However, you’ll definitely see the perks.

    There’s nothing better than getting home and everything is put away where it should be. Or, when people visit, you don’t have to worry about hiding half of your things in a closet!

    Organization takes time. No one can deny that.

    However, once you’re used to it, you can be more organized in any environment. This includes getting rid of tension and feeling less stressed.

    Advice for being more organized

    Next weekend, take a few hours to organize your house and put everything where it belongs. Of course, then you need to maintain the habit. However, when you see how nice everything looks, you’ll want to make an effort to avoid ever being disorganized.

    1. Start with just one place

    If you want you home to stay perfect, you can’t organize all of your rooms at the same time.

    Start with a specific spot, like your living room. You should start with the room you first enter when coming home. (It could be your kitchen depending on your home.)

    • Look at the things that are out of place and put them where they belong.
    • Take things from other areas back to where they belong. Then, you can take care of them when you move to the next room.

    2. Give everything a specific place

    Just keep cooking utensils and food in your kitchen, books and magazines in your library, clothes and shoes in your closet, etc… The good thing about determining a specific spot for everything is that it’ll be easier to find later.

    If you need a coat, look for it near the door, not on the sofa. This will save you a lot of time when you’re in a rush and you can’t find what you want.

    3. Follow an organizational plan

    You can also have a cleaning plan for each room. For instance, put all of your dirty clothes in a hamper and put them in the washing machine. Or, put all of your trash in a bag, make the bed, put clean clothes in the closet, and put the furniture where it belongs.

    If you follow a plan for each room, cleaning will be much easier. Don’t forget, to be more organized, you need a strategy. This way, you won’t spend all weekend cleaning.

    4. Throw away things you don’t use

    You probably have a lot of things you don’t use. They could be old or, for one reason or another, they aren’t necessary anymore.

    This is a good time to throw them away. You can also get them repaired or donate them to an organization.

    Accumulating things is one of the triggers of disorder. This is because things that don’t have a specific place end up on the floor, on a chair, or in a corner.

    5. Clean things that are barely dirty

    One of the rules of an organized home is “If you use it, put it back. Wash what you get dirty. Organize what you make disorderly.” Everyone in the family needs to do this.

    When your house is clean and everything is put away, keeping it this way can be the most difficult. However, it’s all a question of changing your habits. You also need to understand the benefits of organization.

    6. Use boxes or file cabinets

    Many times, you have things you don’t want to throw away or donate because they’re very sentimental. This could also be because they may be necessary, even if you don’t use them often.

    It’s a good idea to buy decorated boxes or re-purpose boxes for other things (like appliances). This way, you keep yourself from being surrounded by clutter.

    Don’t forget to label them so that you know what’s in the boxes. Then, put them under your bed or up high in your closet. You can also put them in your garage or on some shelves.

    7. Buy some furniture

    Maybe the problem with your mess is that you don’t have enough places to put things.

    This doesn’t mean that you should fill your home with furniture, or even that your furniture should be the excuse for you to keep buying things you don’t need.

    However, this might solve the problem of having to shove everything into a closet.

    How to organize your house

    The Spruce / Candace Madonna

    How you organize your home ultimately comes down to preference, but there are some guidelines to help you streamline the process. It’s often best to begin with your storage areas. This will allow you to free up storage space by getting rid of stored items you don’t need anymore before you tackle the rest of your home and encounter items that need putting away. If you’re ready to go on an organizing journey, here are some tips to get you started.

    Storage Spaces

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    Tamara Staples / Getty Images

    The first step of your organizing process is to make sure your storage spaces are neat and free of clutter, so they’ll be able to accommodate items from other areas of your home. Think of it like this: Before you unload groceries, you have to create space for them to go in the fridge and pantry.

    Start with a project you can easily complete, such as organizing a junk drawer. Then, move on to a hall closet or a storage area in your basement. Divide large storage spaces into smaller zones, so the organization task doesn’t feel so daunting. And if necessary, invest in organizational systems, such as a closet organizer or storage bins, so everything has a place that will be easily accessible.

    Shared Spaces

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    Hinterhaus Productions / Getty Images

    Shared spaces—such as the kitchen, living room, and bathroom—should be organized next because they are the most trafficked areas in the home. A benefit to organizing these areas is it could prompt others in your household to be neater and join your organization efforts.

    Within these areas, plan to declutter and find a designated home for all of the items that live there. Collaborate with members of your household on where shared items should go, so you all know where everything is and everyone will return items to their proper places. For example, if you have children, let them help you pick a storage space for their toys in the living room. This might cause them to feel a sense of ownership over the project and make them more likely to work within the organizational system.

    Personal Spaces

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    PeopleImages / Getty Images

    Personal spaces—including bedrooms, closets, and home offices—can take some effort to organize because they often involve assessing many items. For instance, when organizing your closet, you have to make decisions about whether to keep, donate, or toss all of the items in your wardrobe. And in an office, you might have a lot of paperwork to go through and either file or shred.

    Plus, you’re the only one who can make decisions about how to organize your personal spaces. Set up a system that works for your lifestyle. For instance, you might prefer to organize your closet by type of clothing, such as all your shirts together and all your pants together. Or you might like to sort it by outfit to make the process of selecting something to wear easier.

    Small Spaces

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    Hero Images / Getty Images

    In general, you can save the small and out-of-the-way spaces of your home for the last step of your organization journey. Such spaces include the laundry room, linen closet, mudroom, and guest room. Unless these spaces are extremely disorganized, you probably can live with a little clutter in them as you get the main areas of your home in order. But ultimately having them organized too will lead to a more efficient lifestyle for you.

    For example, if you have last-minute guests coming to stay with you, you’ll be happy you already have a tidy guest room. And having an organized linen closet can make it much easier to locate extra towels and toiletries, as well as to know what you’re running out of. Plus, an organized laundry room can make doing laundry a more enjoyable chore when everything you need is at your fingertips.

    Tackle one task per day and you’ll be more organized in no time.

    How to organize your house

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    Getting your home and space organized can help you feel more in control of your environment. That sense of order can reduce stress, help you focus on your own well-being and achieve your other goals. Follow these tips to organize your whole home quickly and easily.

    Set up a no-fail garage system

    Here’s an approach that’s simple, inexpensive, and quick to accomplish.I suggest starting out in the garage, because it can be one of the most overcrowded places in the house. Picture yourself driving into your garage and seeing at least one new system set up for easy use in the coming year.

    1. Hang some peg board
    2. Put some tool hooks in the holes on the board
    3. Using a thick marker, draw an outline around each tool to reserve its location.

    Your new tool organizing system will keep you organized, and alert you when tools are missing. This garage system also helps other family members put things away because it’s easy to see where to place each item.

    Cut laundry time in half

    How can one of the smallest rooms in the house seem so chaotic? And why does doing laundry seem to take up so much time?

    Here’s a laundry system that will save you time and restore your sanity. First, provide everyone with their own laundry basket. Put family members’ names on the sides of the baskets so there are no lost items or mix-ups.

    Now here’s the sweet secret. When the wash is done, rather than placing the clean laundry on the dining room table or the stairs (and watching everyone walk by without picking up their clothes), have everyone come to the laundry room to pick up their personalized basket of clean clothing.

    Work some kitchen magic

    The kitchen is the activity hub of most homes. It’s a busy area because family members or roommates use the kitchen at least three to five times a day. We open our mail here, study, read, use our laptops and tablets here — not to mention, it’s where the food is.

    Because we have so many varied activities happening in the kitchen, it’s wise to create separate stations for those activities. One way to accomplish this is to invest in a rolling cart — whatever style and size works best in your kitchen.

    Use this cart to establish a dedicated space for one of your most common activities. For example, create a lunch-making station stocked with a cutting board and knife, salt and pepper, paper towels, and non-perishable food items (bread, oranges and apples) and snacks. Create the space for your family to assist in making your life easier while also keeping one station of like-items together.

    Put it in writing

    Whether you’re a one-person household or a family of five, one tool can save your life or home: a household manual. The beauty of this handy tool is it doesn’t have to be compiled all at one time, and it costs you nothing to create.

    Grab a three-ring binder and a three-hole punch, and keep your essential information in the binder. To get started, collect your emergency contact info and other vital information such as the name of your vet, school rosters, alarm codes, medication doses for your kids, the name of your father’s caregiver, and where your home’s gas shut-off valve is located.

    As you continue to organize your home and find more essential documents, you can add to the binder. For those who prefer a digital approach, store your manual on a highly secure cloud service.

    Get a charge

    Many people are frustrated by cell phones, iPad chargers, memory sticks and tangled cords sprinkled throughout the house. Relaxation and recreation activities often seem to need the power of a charging station that’s easily accessible — and it doesn’t hurt if it’s attractive too.

    One simple solution is to consider a charging station that conceals the cords, keeps all the electronic items together, and looks good while doing it.

    Tell a tidier toy story

    Whether it’s grandparents or new moms and dads, one of the biggest complaints of people who share their home with children is about picking up toys.

    The “putting away” task is a skill that can and should be taught to children, as it’s important for establishing personal responsibility in kids as they grow into teens and then adulthood. Besides, putting away toys can be fun.

    Here’s one idea that will shift your play storage situation from frustration to elation. Use colorful bins to hold toys, designating each bin to hold one type of toy, such as musical instruments, cars, dolls, games or Legos.

    To make it even easier, find pictures of the toys in magazines or online, and use them to label the bins.

    If you have dolls or stuffed animals in one bin, attach the matching picture to the front of the bin. Keep the number of bins small, but make sure the bins are large and easy to access.

    Declutter the grownups’ bedroom closet

    Bulging closets and growing piles of clean and dirty laundry may nix the possibility of either rest or romance. Decluttering in the bedroom creates a sanctuary for both.

    Starting with the closet is good move. Once the space is clear, it all boils down to finding what you need when you need it.

    Here’s a quick process for getting your closet in order:

    1. Clear the floor so you can move around easily.
    2. Make sure you have proper lighting.
    3. Pull everything out.
    4. Only put back in what fits you right now, is stain-free, and requires no repairs.

    Set kids’ closets straight

    For organizing kids’ clothes, there’s no better tool than a hanging shelving unit. Designate one pocket for each day of the week, and label it. Each weekend, pick out clothes for the following week, and put them in the pockets for the day your child will wear them. Imagine a calm morning without clothing conflict.

    Bundle toiletries and grooming tools

    Some bathrooms are small, and everyone seems to have their own favorite shampoo, hairbrush and brand of toothpaste. Drawer, cabinet and counter space tends to run out quickly.

    If this is your situation, try assigning everyone in the house a bathroom caddy, loaded up with all their cosmetics, toiletries and grooming tools, and labeled with their name.

    Store the caddies on a shelf in the bathroom or carry them to and from the bedroom. The bathroom stays organized, and there’s an automatic clean-up built in after every visit.

    Simplify — and go easy on yourself

    Eliminating clutter is the best thing you can do to make your home feel more manageable. Less clutter means less stuff to clean and organize in the first place; take just 10 minutes today, and eliminate 10 items you no longer need.

    Most importantly, don’t get too hung up on the details. Your home doesn’t have to be perfectly organized every day. Sometimes “good enough” is just fine.

    Want more home inspiration?

    Visit Porchlight, your source for DIY, decor, and a look inside quirky and creative unique homes.

    Tried-and-true organization tricks don’t work for you. Why? You need a system designed for your ADHD mind. Efficiency is our battle cry in this room-by-room plan that nips common clutter magnets — like the kids’ room or the hall closet — in the bud.

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    The Organization Equation

    Organization is an equation that factors in time, space, money, and effort. When we’re organizing with ADHD, we give the greatest value to time and effort. Efficiency is our battle cry. We want the fewest number of steps and the least amount of effort. Otherwise, even if we clear the clutter once, we won’t keep it up. Follow this guide on how to organize your home (for good!), room by room.

    1. Remember the 3 Rs

    To get and keep things in order, use these guiding principals in each room of your home:

    • Reduce what you have. It’s the most direct path to efficient organizing.
    • Be resourceful. When you have less, you find more creative ways to use your belongings.
    • Be resilient. If you find you don’t have something you need, don’t get bent out of shape or rush out to buy more.

    2. Inventory Your Kitchen

    Eliminate excess Tupperware. It’s better to let a drumstick roll around in a too-big container than it is to have 50 plastic boxes with no matching lids clogging your cabinet and refrigerator. Use plastic wrap, zip close bags, or tin foil if you run out. Or eat your leftovers to free up more.

    Get rid of different sized plates and bowls, and buy a uniform set. When all of the dishes are the same, it’s easy to load and empty the dishwasher or draining rack. You never have to move a dish to get to another dish.

    3. You Don’t Need So Many Shoes

    How do you keep shoes organized without making the system so overwhelming it’s ignored? For people without ADHD, stacks of clear shoe boxes might work. For us, we take one at the bottom of the pile, don’t put it back and soon the whole room is littered with shoes again. Instead, reduce the shoes you own to a number that will fit in the back of the closet in one row. Then, when you open the door, kick the ones you’re wearing inside. Simple and easy to maintain.

    4. Expose Your Garbage Cans

    If your family is leaving trash around the kitchen or living room, make it more convenient to throw away. Some families have cans under a cabinet, with a child lock, with a top that only opens halfway. Take the trash can out, put it in a central location and remove the lid. It’s not as pretty, but is litter on the counters any better? The goal is to reduce the effort needed for finishing steps — like cleaning up after cooking — so they are a short and workable sprint. It’s easy to remember to toss something out when the bin is right in front of you.

    5. Streamline Your Socks

    Just thinking about laundry is enough to make you groan. First you sort it, then you wash it, then you sort it again only to fold it and put it away. To avoid towering laundry piles, save yourself some steps. Start by getting rid of all of your socks, and buying new ones in only the two colors you wear most often. You’ll never have to match and roll socks again.

    6. Don’t Shred It All

    Instead of shredding anything with an account number on it, only eliminate papers with a Social Security number.

    Put a bin in your office and your child’s homework space that you’ll empty just once a year. Unload any paid bills or just-in-case receipts in a stack. Have kids put finished homework there as well. Since the papers lay flat, they won’t take up too much space. Then, if you need to go back and look something up, it’s there waiting, and filed chronologically.

    7. Prioritize the Playroom

    Put toys like LEGOs in bins that are shallow and wide, so kids don’t have to dump them all out to find the one they want. Get rid of excess toys. When your kid has fewer, he’ll play with certain ones more. When they break you can purchase new ones. Cutting back keeps them interested, and your house uncluttered. Then, set a timer for three minutes, and have kids race to see how much they can pick up in that time. You’ll be surprised!

    8. Heed the Golden Rule

    The golden rule of organizing is that inventory must conform to storage. Your goal should be empty shelf and drawer space. Schedule a time on your calendar, go through each room in your home, and reduce. Start with the floors, then move to surfaces, then empty out drawers and interiors. A bedroom will take two days, kitchens take three. If you need help the first time, hire a professional organizer for one project. The skills you learn may be enough to get you through the house.

    9. Take 3 Minutes Each Day

    There is no organizational system in the world that will work if it’s not maintained. Aim for a system, or level of belongings, that will let you pick up any room in three minutes. Then, after dinner, have the family pitch in with clean up. Before sitting down for TV or relaxation time, walk around and put everything away so you’re not leaving it until just before bed when you’re too tired to move.

    10. Less Is More

    If you’re going to reduce the items in your home so you can clean up in three minutes, don’t bring excess into the house. Make it a rule that nothing is purchased that is not on the shopping list. If you’re at the store and think you might need milk, don’t buy it if it’s not on the list. It saves having excess products, and it encourages your family to be resilient by eating toast instead of cereal. If you are at the store and see a buy one, get one half off deal, don’t do it unless you have two on your list. Get out of the habit of tying up your money, space, and effort in a bunch of items you don’t need or can’t use before their expiration date.

    11. Set a Routine

    It’s too much to reinvent the wheel every day. Instead, create systems that support your newly organized life. Make Wednesday bill-paying day. It will avoid paper pile-up on your desk, and make it easier to remember. If you forget one week, when the next Wednesday rolls around, you’ll have a sense of urgency to do it. And then, you can relax the rest of the week because you’ll know you have a set time to pay bills.

    12. Use Supports

    Use a timer to help your child clean his room. Hire a neighborhood kid to help you clean the garage. At work, team up with someone who can dot the i’s and cross the t’s on all of your creative ideas. When you are looking for systems to streamline your home, ask yourself, “Is it efficient? How much work does it take? Can I do it in one step?” Use this guide as a template, and adjust it and customize it to fit your life.

    This article was co-authored by Julie Naylon. Julie Naylon is the Founder of No Wire Hangers, a professional organizing service based out of Los Angeles, California. No Wire Hangers provides residential and office organizing and consulting services. Julie’s work has been featured in Daily Candy, Marie Claire, and Architectural Digest, and she has appeared on The Conan O’Brien Show. In 2009 at The Los Angeles Organizing Awards she was honored with “The Most Eco-Friendly Organizer”.

    There are 15 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

    This article has been viewed 29,189 times.

    Tackling your clutter is a big task, but it’s not impossible. Start with clear expectations and goals so you can move through each room in your home and reorganize it. Part of organizing involves getting rid of things you don’t need or want anymore, so give yourself time to sort through your belongings. Once you’re left with things you want to keep use storage systems that work for your space and style.

    How to organize your house

    How to organize your house

    Julie Naylon
    Professional Organizer Expert Interview. 18 December 2019. Then, decide what else you’d like to sell or donate. Sort items you want to keep by which room they belong in and group items together based on what they are. [3] X Research source

    • For example, put all of your office supplies into 1 pile. Once you’re in your office, store your paperwork in a filing cabinet and put your chargers and cords into a spot on your desk, for instance.
    • If you have a lot that you’d like to get rid of, consider holding a garage sale. Then, you can use some of your profits to buy organizational supplies for your home.

    How to organize your house

    Julie Naylon
    Professional Organizer Expert Interview. 18 December 2019.

  • Walk through your home and create a list of storage solutions for each room so you don’t have to guess what you need.
  • If you’re trying to organize on a budget, shop garage sales and thrift stores. You can usually find shelving, hooks, and cabinets in a variety of styles.
  • All the solutions you need to declutter your closet, bedroom, kitchen and other small spaces.

    How to organize your house

    How to organize your house

    They don’t call it the Life-Changing Magic of Tidying up for nothing. Whether you’re all in on the Marie Kondo craze or simply need some mess-clearing solutions before guests arrive, follow these expert-approved organizing tips to tackle clutter in every part of your home. There are hacks for spaces of varying shapes and sizes: the most-visited rooms (bedrooms, bathrooms and kitchens), popular nooks and crannies (drawers, closets and kitchen cabinets), and places that become the catch-all for, well, everything (desks, dresses and shelves). The choice is yours: Declutter your entire home or pick a few organizing methods to take control of your home one small step at a time. As a result, you might even free up some extra space . which isn’t an excuse to fill it with more stuff, just sayin’.

    Serious about getting organized? Our 14-Day Declutter Challenge offers all the tools and tips you need to get started — and have your life organized for good. Join this special program designed exclusively for GH+ members today!

    How to organize your house

    Some kitchen items, like cutting boards and baking pans, are best kept upright, whether for visual appeal or to make them easy to grab.

    How to organize your house

    Boost your laundry room’s functionality by mounting a few drying racks straight to the wall. When they’re not in use, you can fold them up, so they don’t get in the way of washing, drying and folding.

    How to organize your house

    Group similar items into categories, you can find exactly what you need in a pinch. In this case, the most-used baking tools were kept together, along with a range of sprinkles and sugars for decorating sweet treats.

    How to organize your house

    If you tend to keep your closet door open, make it a focal point — and a charming haven for your kids. Paint walls in a daring hue to serve as a stylish backdrop for bookshelves.

    How to organize your house

    A piece of copper pipe from your local hardware store can create space for hanging pots, measuring cups and other kitchen essentials.

    How to organize your house

    If you can’t designate an entire room for a home office, add a flip-down work area to just about any corner. Even when your work day is over, you can keep your notebooks, laptop and other supplies tucked inside — out of sight, out of mind.

    How to organize your house

    Outfit pull-out storage with dividers for spools of ribbon and use a slide-out system for wrapping paper to keep your craft supplies nice and organized.

    How to organize your house

    Keep your furry friends beside you at all times without letting their beds, food bowls and toys cramp your style. Here, a monochrome approach disguises a dog bed inside a lower cabinet space and a drawer for pet food bowls.

    How to organize your house

    Photographer and author Alyssa Rosenheck enlisted professional organizers from The Home Edit to get her office supplies in order. They added a mix of sleek boxes and acrylic organizers for storing everything from stationery to invoices and created a small gift station down below.

    How to organize your house

    Stick adhesive pockets to the inside of your spice cabinet to keep all of your grocery lists, coupons, and recipes in one spot. Add a pen loop, so you don’t have to go searching to jot something down.

    How to organize your house

    Shelf risers give you double the space for storage. Keep short jars underneath and taller sprays and bottles up top so you can easily spritz and go.

    by Keri Houchin 8 Comments

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    Learn how to organize your house and keep it that way using these 10 simple organizers and a foolproof method that anyone can do.

    How to organize your house

    Disclosure: This blog post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase from one of these links, Keri Houchin earns a small fee at no additional cost to you. Read more.

    Organizing is simple, but that doesn’t mean it is easy.

    I’ve lived in half a dozen houses and apartments as an adult and there has been one thing consistent about each one. I’ve always struggled to get organized. Then I figured out this system. No matter how big or small your house is, you can make it work!

    Organization strategy

    The trick to getting organized is a 4-step method. This will work in every room. You can go big and do a whole room at once or start smaller and organize a single closet or area.

    1. Gather everything.

    This is the messy part. Gather up everything in the room. Empty closets and cabinets, look under the bed, etc., and put it all in the middle of the room.

    While your spaces are empty, now is a good time to give them a good cleaning.

    2. Sort into 3 piles.

    Sort your stuff into (1) things you want to keep in this room, (2) things that you want to keep somewhere else, and (3) things to get rid of.

    As a general rule, if you haven’t used it in a year and it’s easy to replace – let it go.

    3. Purge the clutter.

    Take your pile of things to get rid of and… get rid of it. Some things will probably really be trash, but recycle or donate what you can. If you think something is valuable enough that it’s worth your time, sell it.

    4. Organize what you keep.

    Everything that’s left needs a home. Take the things that go somewhere else to the room where they belong. For the things staying in this room, put like items together so you can see how much space they take up.

    Essential organizing supplies

    Once you have your room clean and can see how much space you need, it’s time to use a few organizer to make things stay tidy. Here are the top ten organizers that I use in my house.

    1. Closet door organizers

    Closet door organizers can go in any room. In the bedrooms, use them for shoes and small accessories. In a hall closet, sort cleaning supplies. They’re also handy for small items like office or craft supplies.

    How to organize your house

    2. Metal sliding organizers

    Metal sliding organizers are ideal in cabinets that are a bit too deep to easily reach the back. I used this organizer for the cleaning supplies under my kitchen sink.

    How to organize your house

    3. Baskets

    I have baskets in just about every room. The ones with lids are a good way to hide items. This blue woven basket sits under my microwave and holds all of our reusable food containers.

    How to organize your house

    4. Photo boxes

    Photo boxes are good for more than just photos. They are really sturdy and are great for keeping things hidden in plain sight. Make cute labels for all of the boxes so you remember what’s inside at a glance.

    How to organize your house

    5. Magazine files

    Magazine files are perfect for office paper, card stock, printer paper, notebook paper, and construction paper. They also work nicely for kids’ books if your child is likely to knock over a whole shelf to get one out.

    How to organize your house

    6. Plastic containers

    Plastic containers are great in the pantry. They keep food fresh, help everything fit neatly, and look cute. Sometimes I buy food in bulk or I just feel like the packaging isn’t really secure.

    Decanting food into containers has become a part of my grocery shopping routine. I do it when I bring the food home and it only takes about 5 minutes each week. Just make sure you clip the cooking instructions from the box or label foods that might be hard to identify. (ie. What kind of rice is that and how long does it cook?)

    How to organize your house

    7. Wire storage cubes

    I like wire cubes because you can take them apart and change them as much as you like. They are also durable, but make sure you don’t stack them too high for safety. Anchor them to the wall if you have small children.

    How to organize your house

    8. Fabric storage cubes

    I put fabric storage cubes in my wire cubes, above. They also look nice sitting on other shelves. Use them to hold larger items – like bathroom appliances – or put smaller containers inside for dividers so that the things inside don’t become a jumbled mess.

    How to organize your house

    9. Plastic shoe boxes

    Plastic shoe boxes are great in kids’ rooms, where you need a container to sort and label lots of small toys. We use these for LEGO storage and organizing. My son also has some that he uses for action figures, plastic animals, and desk supplies.

    How to organize your house

    10. Wall hooks

    I use both permanent and temporary hooks. I use temporary Command hooks for holiday decorating indoors and outside. In the bathroom, we’ve always preferred towel hooks, so when we remodeled the bathroom we replaced small white hooks with bigger metal ones.

    How to organize your house

    Organizing is a process. Start with a small project or one room. Set aside a few minutes each day or a whole weekend. Little by little, you’ll see a difference. And the more you organize your house, the more organized it will stay.

    Like this post? Pin to save it and follow me on Pinterest for more creative ideas.

    How to organize your house

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