How to organize your fabric stash

Published: Dec 26, 2019 · Modified: Mar 1, 2020 by Melissa Mortenson · This post may contain affiliate links · This blog generates income via ads · 44 Comments

How to organize your fabric stash

Tell me I’m not the only one that has too much fabric! A few years ago it was such a mess that I had a hard time finding what I needed. So I came up with a new system to help me decide how to organize fabric. It has worked so well for me that I thought I’d share it with you today. Along with some of my favorite tips to organize fabric! If you like this post then you may also like this tour of my sewing room.

How to organize your fabric stash

Like many of you, I’ve got quite a large stash of fabrics. I love to “collect” them in little bits. A yard here, a half a yard there. I’ve been “collecting” fabric for about 8 years now and realized a couple of years ago that my organization system was NOT working.

I could never find what I needed when I needed it. Also, I ended up forgetting about certain prints until they were found months later under a pile of stuff. Previously, I kept my fabric sorted by designer/line on my IKEA bookshelf. I just haphazardly folded the yardage and piled it up.

How to Organize Fabric

As my blog grew, so did the number of projects I was completing on an annual basis. Not only was I collecting fabric, but I was also using it almost as quickly (which is good right??). I soon realized that I needed a better system. A friend of mine told me how she used quilt rulers to fold her fabric so that it was all the same size. She also mentioned that she organized it by color, not the designer.

How to organize your fabric stash

I spent an entire week refolding and organizing ALL of my fabric. I got a big folding table out and went to work. After I was done, I was so happy with the results that I don’t know why I didn’t do it earlier.

I’ve had my fabric organized that way for about 5 years now and I love the system.

How to organize your fabric stash

5 of my favorite tips for folding and organizing fabric by color

One: Don’t keep it all by color

I have separate areas for large scale novelty prints, stripes, and basics. For example, I keep all my gingham and pin dots together.

How to organize your fabric stash

Two: How to Organize Holiday Fabric

I keep my Christmas and Halloween fabric separate from the rest of my stash. I love to sew for holidays and think it’s easiest to keep all of that fabric together. Also, I keep my scraps in Ziploc bags with the fabrics. (They are the only scraps that I store WITH my stash).

How to organize your fabric stash

Three: How I organize Fat Quarters of Fabric

For the most part, I store my fat quarters with my yardage. I just unfold them so they are the same size as the folded yardage. I keep my bundles together though. After I use them I sort the extras in with my stash.

Four: Fold and Sort New Fabric ASAP

I am not a naturally organized person, but I make myself fold my new fabric and sort it as soon as I get it. I also try to refold what I don’t use after each project. Since I spend many hours a week sewing (for this blog, and for fun), it’s important for me to try to stay on top of the mess. It does get out of control at times, but I try to keep those times few and far between.

How to Fold your fabric so that it stacks and is all the same size

How to organize your fabric stash

One: Decide on the width of the fold.

You need to decide whether you want your piles to be 5″ wide or 6″ wide. For me, the 5″ width fits perfectly inside of my IKEA bookcase. I have the Expedit, I believe they have changed the name since I bought mine.

How to organize your fabric stash

Two: Fold the Fabric Selvage Edges Together

Begin by making sure that your fabric is folded with the selvage edges even and is as flat as possible. If the selvage edges are off (for example if the fabric was folded at an off-angle previously) I take the time to refold it the right way.

Three: Fold the Fabric around the Ruler

Lay your ruler on top of the fabric, with about 3″ of fabric over the top of the ruler.

How to organize your fabric stash

Fold the fabric over the top of the ruler.

How to organize your fabric stash

Then using the ruler as a guide, fold the fabric again, making sure to hold onto the part of the fabric that you folded over the first time. Keep folding until you get to the end.

How to organize your fabric stash

When you get to the end, pull the ruler out and fold the fabric in half.

How to organize your fabric stash

Four: Stack and Organize the Fabric

You now have a perfectly folded fabric, that will look great stacked up on your shelf. The best part is when you want to use it, you just unfold it and cut the part off that you want, then refold it and it keeps its shape.

How to organize your fabric stash

The stack of fabric above was folded with a 6″ wide quilt ruler, just so you can get a feel for the difference in size from 5″ to 6″.

Do you guys have a favorite way you keep your fabric organized? What about your scraps? I’m terrible with scraps!

We’re giving some tips for organizing and decluttering your fabric stash – we promise that it’s a no-fail plan and will have you thinking about your fabric and your sewing space in a whole new way. Then, we chat with the three amazing ladies from Color of Connection quilt, a non-profit that’s doing all they can to bring together quilters from different races, genders, and backgrounds through a common love of sewing.

Listen to the show in the player at the end of this post.

*BONUS for our podcast subscribers! Get 60% off a subscription to American Patchwork & Quilting. Click here to take advantage!

*BONUS for our podcast subscribers! Get 50% off one digital quilt pattern of your choice in our online shop. Visit apqshop.com, and use coupon code PODCAST at checkout.

How to Declutter Your Fabric Stash

January is a common time of year to organize, deluctter, and have a fresh start. Lindsay shares some basic steps and tips that have worked for her over the years to declutter and organize her fabric stash. She includes tips for getting in the right mindset for the declutter, what supplies are needed, how to decide what fabric to keep and what should go, and how to rearrange fabric in a way that works best for you and your space. We hope these general guidelines help you feel inspired to tackle your fabric organization and see your space and stash in new ways.

Getting Sewcial

Lindsay chats with the three founders of the Color of Connection Quilt, a non-profit aimed at fostering relationships between quilters of all races, ages, genders, and socio-economic classes.

Porfiria, Keyana, and Michelle are hosting a Quilt Along starting February 1 to gather quilters through their love of sewing, as well as raise money through pattern sales to host workshops to making quilting accessible to all and to teach a new generation of people to sew. (Workshops will be held in the founders’ respective cities of Brooklyn, New York; Columbus, Ohio; and Atlanta, Georgia.) The quilt design was inspired by the work of a jewelry designer in Atlanta, Georgia. Influenced by her African and Indigenous heritage, Erica of On the Lookout creates stunning bead work. The Color of Connection quilt has kits available in multiple colorways, which you can buy from Michelle here or from Quilt 101 (which offers the kits with pieces already cut).

My New Years Resolution was to clean up all the piles of fabric that I had in my studio and storage closet. Like many of you I have a large stash of fabric and I was beginning to lose control of it. My issues were many…….

  • The piles were toppling over
  • I feared the folds were making permanent creases in my fabric (like in the photo below)
  • I didn’t know how many yards I had of each, or if it was 45″ wide or 60″ wide
  • I wasn’t sure of the fabric content
  • I couldn’t remember where I bought it, or who the designer of the fabric was, or how much I paid for it
  • The folded edge of the fabric which was exposed to the light and dust would fade over time, leaving a discoloration in the fabric

How to organize your fabric stash
So after much consideration I came up with the following solution: I decided to roll EACH individual fabric onto a cardboard fabric tube and catalogue each one as I went along. This is how I did it.

The first challenge was to find enough cardboard tubes. I counted how many fabric pieces were in my piles and I had at least 30. I decided to visit my local Calico Corners (a home fabric supply chain). They couldn’t have been happier to ‘get rid of’ a pile of tubes that were laying about. Although I realize that not everyone has a Calico Corners nearby, other suggestions would be to visit the local Joanne Fabric store or upholstery workrooms in your area. You can also check on eBay or post a ‘wanted’ add on Craigslist.

How to organize your fabric stash
If all else fails it is possible to buy the cardboard tubes. Check out Uline or Browncor or Papermart online. It is best to order 58″-60″ tubes as even the narrower fabrics will work on these. (If your fabric is slightly wider than 60″ it still works too.)

Before you begin rolling each piece of fabric make sure to measure the yardage (length) and mark it down.

Begin rolling the fabric onto the tubes, smoothing the fabric gently from the center to the ends as you go, every turn or so. I found it easiest to begin rolling by tucking an inch of fabric under the tube on the first turn as shown in the photo below.

How to organize your fabric stash
I cut a swatch of the fabric once the fabric was completely rolled up onto the tube. This will be used to catalogue the fabric. Be sure to cut a swatch large enough so that you can really tell if a fabric will work for a project by feeling it. If the swatch is too small this will be difficult later.

To keep the fabric tight to the tube after rolling it I wrapped strips of printer paper cut lengthwise around the fabric in three or four places along the length of the tube. I taped the strips together where the ends met. This is better than using a rubber band that could leave indentations in your fabric, or pins that could tear your fabric, or tape that leaves a gooey residue after a while.

How to organize your fabric stash
I designed a template for a printable FABRIC STASH ORGANIZER to help me catalogue my fabrics. Sign up for our newsletter and an email with the link to this pdf template will be sent to your inbox. I printed it out onto 8 1/2″ x 11″ soft gloss photo paper. It can be printed onto any 8 1/2″ x 11″ paper or card stock. A fine tip Sharpie marker writes well on the photo paper.

How to organize your fabric stash

How to organize your fabric stash
This is how the rolls looked as I was working. I measured the length before rolling the fabric onto the tube and recorded this onto the FABRIC STASH ORGANIZER. I also found some receipts that helped me figure out how much I paid for some of the fabric and where I might have bought it.

I plan to print several sheets of the FABRIC STASH ORGANIZER on regular printer paper and keep them folded up in the pocket of my handbag. When I am out shopping for fabric I will be sure to mark down all the details of the fabric including the price, content, where it was purchased from, etc. When I get home I will roll the fabric onto a fresh bolt, cut a swatch, and fill out a FABRIC STASH ORGANIZER.

How to organize your fabric stash
The last step of this process is to TAG the fabrics and assign a number to each fabric. Thus when I am going through the swatches on the FABRIC STASH ORGANIZER I can decide which fabric is appropriate for my project and easily identify it from underneath my cutting table. I used key tags that I bought at our local box stationary store. I randomly assigned a number to the fabric, and then wrote this number onto the key tag as well as on the top of the FABRIC ORGANIZER CARD. Just be sure not to repeat the numbers over again. You can keep track of this on a separate piece of paper.

How to organize your fabric stash
I pinned a key tag to the fabric at the end of the bolt so it is easily visible.

How to organize your fabric stash
So there you have it. Now I can peruse my file box of FABRIC STASH ORGANIZERS for inspiration for my next project. I can check the yardages against the pattern to make sure I will have enough. If I have a pattern in mind when I buy the fabric I can make note of this on the card to remind me. I can easily identify which fabric bolt I should pull out and I am ready to cut and sew.

When I use up a fabric bolt, I will ‘reassign’ the number to a new fabric as I add to my stash.

This technique has saved me a lot of frustration and confusion already and it has only been a few weeks. I believe this is an organizational system that is easy to maintain as well.

If you are interested in the printable FABRIC STASH ORGANIZER just sign up for our newsletter and a link will be sent directly to your inbox.

How to organize your fabric stash

Picture this: you go to the fabric store, pick out the perfect materials for your next project, and come home only to realize that — doh — you already have great fabric you could have used tucked away in a forgotten corner of your sewing room.

We’ve all been there. But if you want to avoid spending unnecessary dollars — not to mention put all your pretty fabric on display — you’re gonna have to get organized. Here’s how.

How to Organize Bigger Fabrics

There are so many ways you can store and display your material, whether you’re working with fabric by the yard or precuts.

Sort By Color on Shelves

How to organize your fabric stash

For large fabric, like half- and one-yard cuts, pick up (or build!) a cubby bookshelf. Sort fabrics by color, then fold them to fit the width of your shelving. Add decorative bowls on top to hold pins and other notions — and consider those another opportunity to show off even more of your style.

Hang It Up

How to organize your fabric stash

Make use of wall space — and let fabric double as colorful art — by hanging a curtain rod into your wall studs. (That’ll make sure it stays put no matter how heavy the load gets.) Fold your fabric lengthwise, hang it on curtain rings with clips and sort in rainbow order.

Find a File

How to organize your fabric stash

Raise your hand if you have an old filing cabinet that’s filled with years of no-longer-needed paperwork. Send that stuff through the shredder and — voila! — tons of fresh space for your favorite fabrics. All you have to do is fold and drape over standard file folders (that you can cut in half to double in quantity). Extra points if you dedicate each drawer to a different-sized cut!

Repurpose an Old Crib

How to organize your fabric stash

Photo by Dwell Delightfully

Nope, that’s not a custom-made fabric rack — it’s the side of a crib! After your kiddo makes the leap to a big-kid bed, creating ideal fabric storage is as easy as leaning the crib piece against the wall. All you have to do is drape your fabric from lightest to darkest and you’ll always know exactly what’s on hand.

Go Vintage

How to organize your fabric stash

Photo by Tonya Staab

An old cassette tape tray makes it easy to sort scraps and fat quarters into each slot. Keep an eye out at antique shops, thrift stores and garage sales for shelves, small boxes, bowls and jars that are just waiting to enjoy a second life in your sewing room. Then just organize your fabric into a method that works for you and display proudly in your workspace.

How to Organize Fabric Scraps

Scraps are an inevitable part of quilting and sewing, but don’t tuck ’em out of sight. There are a variety of ways to put them on display in your craft room so they can serve as a creative source of inspiration.

Grab Resealable Bags

How to organize your fabric stash

Photo by Craft Buds

Instead of stuffing all your scraps into an overflowing bin (which could be the last you’ll see of them), sort strips by color and store in separate zippered freezer bags. Easy and effective!

Stuff Mason Jars

Use clear jars to store your smaller scraps. Arrange them by color (one jar for warm colors, one for cool, another for crazy prints) so it’s easy to eyeball what you have. Even if some scraps are too small to use, they’ll still look pretty in your DIY display.

Sew Fabric Bins

How to organize your fabric stash

If your stash is larger, sew a simple fabric bin to hold them and organize by color. You can even use your scraps to sew the actual bins — win-win!

Pro Tip: Before you tuck away your leftover fabric, it could help to cut them into commonly used sizes — think 2½”, 5″ and 6″ squares, or strips 1½” and 2½” wide. This way they’ll be ready to go when you start a new project.

How to organize your fabric stash

How to organize your fabric stash

My fabric stash.

Three years ago I gave my studio an extreme makeover. I not only redecorated in my favorite colors, I changed the layout for better function, and organized my tools and embellishments.

But the single most important change I made, and the one that has been the most satisfying, is that I organized my quilt fabric stash by color and purchased vintage locker bins to store them in.

I really like this method of storing my stash, because I can see the colors when I enter my studio, and that inspires me. I also like the fact that the bins can be taken off the shelves for use while still containing the fabrics. When I’m finished, I enjoy folding my fabrics again and putting them away for the next use.

This method works for me, but it’s not right everyone. A lot depends on how you use your fabrics.

How to organize your fabric stash

Carol Taylor organizes her fabrics by value.

Value is a key element in Carol Taylor’s quilts, so she organizes her fabrics accordingly. Carol has a wall full of shelves in her studio, and she stacks her fabrics on them by value. A sliding design wall covers the fabrics and helps shield them from dust and UV rays.

How to organize your fabric stash

Judith Trager stands her fat
quarters on end.

Judith Trager also organizes by color, but stands her folded fat quarters on their sides. Judith, who is known for her landscapes and for small art quilts that reflect her wit, sorts her novelty prints separately.

I know many artists who specialize in fiber or mixed media collage; they often keep scraps in large bins. They like the serendipity of discovering a color or print combination that they wouldn’t ordinarily think of. Designer and artist Betz White keeps her felted wool pieces unfolded in bins so she can mix-and-match patterns and colors easily.

How to organize your fabric stash

Betz White sorts scraps by color,
but doesn’t fold.

Fabric artists who work with pieces larger than fat quarters often hang them, using tiered skirt hangers. Or, they roll and stack their fabrics. We’ve seen many different ways to organize fabric stashes, thread hoards, loose fibers, and more in the pages of Studios magazine. If you’re looking for a better way of containing your stash (the better to use it!), be sure to check out these artists’s spaces and many more in back issues of Studios .

Posted on Published: May 3, 2016 By: Author Melanie

Thank you so much for sharing!

Today I wanted to share how I organize my fabric! I have been reorganizing my studio and really needed to revamp how I was organizing my fabric. I was using more of a bin system before, which worked well for my set up before I had this bookcase. I still used that method after I purchased this Billy bookcase with doors from ikea a few years ago and decided recently that it really wasn’t working well for me anymore. I need to be able to see my fabric so that I can think creatively without digging through bins and also know how much I have. I also was not putting my fabric away consistently with the other system because it was annoying to have to pull out the bins each time and fold everything just right. Not that any of us are perfect about keeping things tidy in our creative spaces (I know I’m not!) but I think this will help with that too.

How to organize your fabric stash

Here is my fabric stash! I love how it functions and looks and not as importantly but even from a business and branding perspective it’s much more appropriate for the look of my business.

The top 2 shelves contain quilting cotton fabric no smaller than a fat quarter. If it is smaller than a fat quarter, it goes in the scrap bins (figuring out how to organize that currently, so stay tuned for what I end up doing with that!). I imagine at some point the bolts will fill the space, but for now there is enough room for some of my precut bundles. The top shelf as the fat quarter size Polar Notion bolts in the front because I wanted to try out the size. I like them, but I think I would prefer to have them on the other boards in with the rest of the stash. The first set of fat quarter bolts came in my quilty box subscription.

The larger boards I am using on the top 2 shelves are comic book board inserts that I purchased on Amazon. You can get 100 for $10, so that’s a pretty good deal. A lot of people say they use foam core from the dollar store or flat rate boxes from the post office to make their own bolts. Word of caution: the comic book board inserts are archival, so they will not damage your fabric over time. The foam core and boxes are not. So if you don’t hang on to your stash for long, that is a find option. But, if you are like me and have some fabric from 2010 and 2011 or earlier then it may not be the best option.

On the bottom shelf, I have my larger cuts of fabric, minky, flannel, upholstery fabric, faux fur, faux leather (vinyl) type of fabrics. I don’t keep a ton of this type of fabric on hand, but the larger Polar Notions bolts (the original size) were really handy for this. The comic book boards would not have been able to handle this weight of fabric and the Polar Notion bolts are archival and safe for fabric so that is great. They are a bit expensive, so I will only use them on these types of fabrics, it seems unnecessary for smaller sizes of quilting cottons. Polar notions also sells bolt buddy clips, but I am a bit of a minimalist and don’t think these are super necessary however if you have a smaller stash, they might be handy if there are not other bolts right up next to the fabric helping to keep the fabric in place.

How to organize your fabric stash

Ultimately, the best way to organize your fabric is what works best for you. People have different preferences in how they can think and work creatively not to mention different amount of space and set up to store fabric. Here are a few tips that anyone can apply.

  1. Keep your fabric safe. Use it up, keep it free from dust and damage. Most likely you spent good money on this fabric, so we want to keep it nice.
  2. Be able to see and find what you need. Whether thats in a bin or on a shelf, utilize your space in a way that works best for you so that you can find fabric and don’t end up re-buying fabric you don’t need.

How to organize your fabric stash

I hope this was helpful for you! The video below explains in more detail how I organize and fold different sizes of fabric on the bolts. Enjoy!

*This is not a sponsored post. It does contain affiliate links at no extra cost to you. Thank you for the support in this way!

How to organize your fabric stash

Last week I talked on instagram stories about my stash and my unsuccessful attempt at organizing it. For years I have been folding and storing all of my stash fabric (which I embarassingly have way too much of) in bins tucked under my cutting table. The problem is that although it was nice and safe in there, I never remembered what I had so I would buy more and more. I also couldn’t easily locate fabric when I needed it. Enough was enough so I decided to take everything out of my bins, organize it, donate the fabric I was never going to sew, (I was able to donate it to my local library for their creative space) and get all of the stash fabric organized onto shelves. I started using the rolling method because I had heard it was easier to see your fabric, but as I kept going I realized it was way too messy for my liking.

How to organize your fabric stash

They I shared it on instagram and a bunch of you replied that you used the comic board method. I had never heard of this method before so I went to youtube where I found this great instructional video from Sew Sweetness. I was immediately hooked and decided to change my methods. The only issue I anticipated was that all of the tutorials I found were geared towards quilting and therefore 44 inch wide stable cotton fabrics. Most of my stash consists of 54-60 inch wide apparel fabrics. Some of them are super thick, others are slippery, and most are in 2-5 yard cuts. So I wanted bigger boards right off the bat.

Instead of the smaller comic book boards, I went with these 8.5 x 11 inch magazine boards. This little bit of extra size gives just enough extra room to help with my wider fabric. They also happened to fit the height of my Ikea shelves better. This is definitely something I would consider when choosing the size of the boards you use. Magazine boards are kinda like a thick cardstock, pretty inexpensive, and most importantly are acid free. This is something I would highly recommend thinking about because you do not want the cardboard you are using to damage your fabric if it stays on there for a long time.

How to organize your fabric stash

I also ordered these clear plastic alligator clips which come in a big package and are pretty cheap. I do wish that they had bigger ones for the thicker fabrics in my stash and I am still on the lookout for those. So far I have only found metal ones that are bigger and I don’t feel comfortable using metal on my fabric in case it rusts. I know a lot of shops also use T pins which are a great option if you are not worried about rust or the pin damaging your fabric. I decided to stick with the clear plastic ones and make them work.

How to organize your fabric stash

Now that you know what I am using, here is the step by step of how I folded my fabric. Keep in mind that I am no perfectionist when it comes to folding these. I always wash and dry my fabric right after buying it so I am left with some wrinkly fabric and frayed ends. This doesn’t bother me at all. You could certainly go the extra mile and iron your fabric before folding but personally I think this makes the whole process too long and more of a hassle. That’s just me though.

For this demo I am using 2 yards of denim that is 60 inches wide. For each cut of fabric you need one board and two alligator clips.

How to organize your fabric stash

Start by folding your fabric lengthwise with selvages touching. I choose to have the right side of the fabric out so that it’s easier to see the fabric for what it is on the shelf, but that is up to you.

How to organize your fabric stash

Take your magazine board and place it in the middle of the fabric between the selvages and the fold and about 5 inches in from the cut edge.

How to organize your fabric stash

Fold down the top selvage edges over the magazine board. Make sure to continue the fold all of the way down the length of the fabric (2 yards in my case). This can get a little tricky if you have more yardage. On my rayons when I had 4 yards I folded the whole thing in half widthwise so it was like I was dealing with 2 yards wide.

How to organize your fabric stash

Fold up the bottom folded edge over the magazine board. Make sure to continue the fold all of the way down the length of the fabric (2 yards in my case).

How to organize your fabric stash

Fold in the 5 inches to the left of the magazine board.

How to organize your fabric stash

Flip the magazine board with the fabric over and over until you get close to the end of your yardage. Keep it nice and tight.

How to organize your fabric stash How to organize your fabric stash

Fold in the cut edges at the end of your yardage so that they are not hanging out.

How to organize your fabric stash

Now fold this last fold in so that everything is nice and neat.

How to organize your fabric stash

Take your alligator clips and slide them into the second two layers of fabric up against the last fold you made. This will hold your fabric tight on the roll without having to expand the small alligator clip too much.

How to organize your fabric stash How to organize your fabric stash

That is it! I am so excited about how nice and neat it looks.

How to organize your fabric stash

They stack perfectly on my shelf and keep it looking tidy, while still allowing me to see all of my fabric. I love it so much.

How to organize your fabric stash

Folding all of my stash only took a few hours, cost about $30 US and was weirdly relaxing. I am hooked. It is how I plan to organize my fabric stash from here on out. I hope this was helpful for you as well.

Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that at no additional cost to you, I receive a commission if you click through and make a purchase. All opinions are honest and my own.

How to organize your fabric stash

Picture this: you go to the fabric store, pick out the perfect materials for your next project, and come home only to realize that — doh — you already have great fabric you could have used tucked away in a forgotten corner of your sewing room.

We’ve all been there. But if you want to avoid spending unnecessary dollars — not to mention put all your pretty fabric on display — you’re gonna have to get organized. Here’s how.

How to Organize Bigger Fabrics

There are so many ways you can store and display your material, whether you’re working with fabric by the yard or precuts.

Sort By Color on Shelves

How to organize your fabric stash

For large fabric, like half- and one-yard cuts, pick up (or build!) a cubby bookshelf. Sort fabrics by color, then fold them to fit the width of your shelving. Add decorative bowls on top to hold pins and other notions — and consider those another opportunity to show off even more of your style.

Hang It Up

How to organize your fabric stash

Make use of wall space — and let fabric double as colorful art — by hanging a curtain rod into your wall studs. (That’ll make sure it stays put no matter how heavy the load gets.) Fold your fabric lengthwise, hang it on curtain rings with clips and sort in rainbow order.

Find a File

How to organize your fabric stash

Raise your hand if you have an old filing cabinet that’s filled with years of no-longer-needed paperwork. Send that stuff through the shredder and — voila! — tons of fresh space for your favorite fabrics. All you have to do is fold and drape over standard file folders (that you can cut in half to double in quantity). Extra points if you dedicate each drawer to a different-sized cut!

Repurpose an Old Crib

How to organize your fabric stash

Photo by Dwell Delightfully

Nope, that’s not a custom-made fabric rack — it’s the side of a crib! After your kiddo makes the leap to a big-kid bed, creating ideal fabric storage is as easy as leaning the crib piece against the wall. All you have to do is drape your fabric from lightest to darkest and you’ll always know exactly what’s on hand.

Go Vintage

How to organize your fabric stash

Photo by Tonya Staab

An old cassette tape tray makes it easy to sort scraps and fat quarters into each slot. Keep an eye out at antique shops, thrift stores and garage sales for shelves, small boxes, bowls and jars that are just waiting to enjoy a second life in your sewing room. Then just organize your fabric into a method that works for you and display proudly in your workspace.

How to Organize Fabric Scraps

Scraps are an inevitable part of quilting and sewing, but don’t tuck ’em out of sight. There are a variety of ways to put them on display in your craft room so they can serve as a creative source of inspiration.

Grab Resealable Bags

How to organize your fabric stash

Photo by Craft Buds

Instead of stuffing all your scraps into an overflowing bin (which could be the last you’ll see of them), sort strips by color and store in separate zippered freezer bags. Easy and effective!

Stuff Mason Jars

Use clear jars to store your smaller scraps. Arrange them by color (one jar for warm colors, one for cool, another for crazy prints) so it’s easy to eyeball what you have. Even if some scraps are too small to use, they’ll still look pretty in your DIY display.

Sew Fabric Bins

How to organize your fabric stash

If your stash is larger, sew a simple fabric bin to hold them and organize by color. You can even use your scraps to sew the actual bins — win-win!

Pro Tip: Before you tuck away your leftover fabric, it could help to cut them into commonly used sizes — think 2½”, 5″ and 6″ squares, or strips 1½” and 2½” wide. This way they’ll be ready to go when you start a new project.