How to organize a classroom library

Accompanying Document for the English Saskatchewan Curriculum – Classes 1, 2, 3

Classroom libraries are an important aspect of providing a rich literacy environment. They offer students the opportunity to interact with texts that reflect their interests, covering a wide range of topics and genres; and read more with easy and fair access to texts that are not only on the shelf, but also displayed throughout the class. Students can play a vital role in the development of the classroom library by engaging in a continuous and changing selection of texts. Student ownership and participation in the classroom library foster engagement in reading (Early Reading Strategy, 2009).

School libraries play an important role in supporting and engaging students as readers. “They provide an environment rich in information, literature and technology that, together with effective teaching, enable students to achieve learning outcomes within the curriculum and acquire lifelong learning attitudes and skills” (Saskatchewan Ministry of Education, 2008, p. 1).

How to organize a classroom library How to organize a classroom library

“Make excellent classroom libraries one of your top priorities, before the latest technology, resources, programs and standards. Only through a broad and independent reading will we educate efficient and joyful readers and writers ”. (Routman, 2014, p. 99)

Tips for creating a class library:

• Collaborate regularly with the teacher’s librarian to create collections of multi-genre text that can be rotated in the classroom library.
• Introduce student-created books and the class into your classroom library.
• Create a wish list with text titles for families and community groups to consider making a donation to the class library.
• Collaborate with the School Community Council in establishing classroom libraries (eg book fundraising, fundraising, community sponsor, corporate sponsor).
• Connect with your local library to borrow books for the school library.

How to organize a classroom library

How to organize a classroom library

How to organize a classroom library

How to organize a classroom library How to organize a classroom library How to organize a classroom library

Resources of the School Department / Education Authority of the First Nation
What is a Classroom library and what is its purpose? (PDF)
Class libraries (editable ppt)
Class Library Survey (Word)
Priorytety bibliotek klasowych i listy książek (PDF)

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How to organize a classroom library

For young readers to get the most out of their library in the classroom, it needs to be organized in a way that makes it easier for them to find the books they want to read. Of course, there are many ways to do this, and if you are a new teacher, you may be wondering what is the most effective method.

Whether you’re thinking of sorting your books by topic, level, or alphabetically by title or author, the following questions and answers will help you find the right methods for you.

What’s the best way to organize your non-fiction books?
Many teachers organize non-fiction books by topic because interest in the topic usually exceeds the reading level. For example, if a student shows a strong interest in a subject but reads at a lower level than this book, she will most likely understand what she is reading due to interest in that subject.

Should non-fiction be further divided into sub-topics and areas of interest?
Depending on the number of books you have and the size of the library in the classroom, sorting non-fiction books into subtopics and areas of interest, such as autobiography or animals, is an effective organizational strategy. If you have a large and growing classroom library, your students will know exactly where to find the books that interest them most and can delve into their reading by exploring other related topics.

What is the most effective way to organize fiction books?
When it comes to organizing your fiction books, it all comes down to personal preference. Many teachers organize fiction books by level, genre, or alphabetically by author. Organizing books by genre is a great way to help students identify the types of books they prefer, as well as introducing new storytelling techniques. If you choose to organize your class library books by level, our bookmaker is a great resource for organizing your books and adding them to your library. Some teachers even choose to level up half of their fiction collection specifically for independent reading and set the other half aside as “free reading” books for students to choose from. This is another great strategy for encouraging students to explore new topics and areas of interest.

Should students influence the organization of their library in the classroom?
Absolutely! Students will always want to be able to find the books they want to read as quickly and easily as possible. Once you have chosen and implemented a method for organizing a library in the classroom, contact the students to see how it works for them. They may have some tips or tricks to make their class library even more effective.

When it comes to organizing your books in the classroom library, these strategies and tips are a great place to start. How you ultimately decide to organize your books in your classroom library will depend on where you need to work, the number and variety of books you have, but more importantly, your personal preferences and what works best for your students. . TO.

The library is one of the most important parts of the entry-level class. There are so many different ways to organize and organize this space in the classroom.

How to organize a classroom library

Your decision on how to organize depends on your personal preferences, class level and location. You want to make it easier for your students to use and access, while simplifying management. Check out these 10 tips below to help you set up and organize your class library!

How to organize a classroom library

10 tips for building a class library

  • From my experience, I’ve found that having an elaborate check-out system is not necessary. A few books may be lost or damaged over the course of the year, but the time necessary to manage a check-out system doesn’t always prevent this from happening. Instead, establish expectations and procedures for respecting books and using the library. See this blog post to learn more about library checkout systems.
  • I’ve recently broken my library up and spread it around the classroom. I like it a lot because it allows more children to see it comfortably. I have a section for my layered picture books, a section for my chapters (organized by series, genre and favorite authors), and a non-fiction section. I also have a section for the text books and reference books (i. e. dictionaries and thesaurus). I love that my children are “surrounded by literature”.
  • Schedule lessons to teach students how to take out and return books.
  • Find a way to make your books face forward. Students are unlikely to select them if spikes are visible. The covers are much more inviting.
  • Consider rotating your books or creating a topic section to increase interest and keep things fresh.
  • Choose how to sort and tag your books and plan how this will affect adding books in the future. If you want to sort them by genre, get these FREE labels!
  • The use of uniform baskets / baskets ensures a neat and consistent appearance.
  • Create a “return basket” where students can place books. Ask the volunteer parent or librarian in charge to return them from there to the appropriate bin.
  • Establish rules and guidelines for the use of the library. In my class, each student is given a day to access the school library and choose the books for their bags. They may also request a conference with me to discuss what they’ve read and can pick books afterwards.
  • Add words: “The class library is CLOSED when I am absent from your custodial teacher’s plans.” Just believe me on this!

Follow me on Instagram and Facebook for ideas for your class library and more!

The library is one of the most important parts of the entry-level class. There are so many different ways to organize and organize this space in the classroom.

How to organize a classroom library

Your decision on how to organize depends on your personal preferences, class level and location. You want to make it easier for your students to use and access, while simplifying management. Check out these 10 tips below to help you set up and organize your class library!

How to organize a classroom library

10 tips for building a class library

  • From my experience, I’ve found that having an elaborate check-out system is not necessary. A few books may be lost or damaged over the course of the year, but the time necessary to manage a check-out system doesn’t always prevent this from happening. Instead, establish expectations and procedures for respecting books and using the library. See this blog post to learn more about library checkout systems.
  • I’ve recently broken my library up and spread it around the classroom. I like it a lot because it allows more children to see it comfortably. I have a section for my layered picture books, a section for my chapters (organized by series, genre and favorite authors), and a non-fiction section. I also have a section for the text books and reference books (i. e. dictionaries and thesaurus). I love that my children are “surrounded by literature”.
  • Schedule lessons to teach students how to take out and return books.
  • Find a way to make your books face forward. Students are unlikely to select them if spikes are visible. The covers are much more inviting.
  • Consider rotating your books or creating a topic section to increase interest and keep things fresh.
  • Choose how to sort and tag your books and plan how this will affect adding books in the future. If you want to sort them by genre, get these FREE labels!
  • The use of uniform baskets / baskets ensures a neat and consistent appearance.
  • Create a “return basket” where students can place books. Ask the volunteer parent or librarian in charge to return them from there to the appropriate bin.
  • Establish rules and guidelines for the use of the library. In my class, each student is given a day to access the school library and choose the books for their bags. They may also request a conference with me to discuss what they’ve read and can pick books afterwards.
  • Add words: “The class library is CLOSED when I am absent from your custodial teacher’s plans.” Just believe me on this!

Follow me on Instagram and Facebook for ideas for your class library and more!

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How to organize a classroom library

Books are for fun and learning. Either way, there isn’t a single soul on earth whose books won’t benefit you. They broaden a person’s learning horizons and strengthen their cognitive strengths. Gli studenti devono essere in grado di sviluppare le proprie capacità accademiche e i libri sono un modo per aiutarli a farlo.

Organizing your library in the classroom may seem a little tricky, but all it takes is a little effort before you’re done. At the end of the day, it will be worth it as your students will choose to read more and have fun reading books of their choice.

Select books

For many students, the books from the school library are mixed with other books. Stamping library books that distinguishes them will help students recognize the library book and reduce errors.

In addition, it will be easier for the parents of the children to find the library book and return it on time and make sure that their child does not spoil the book.

Create book labels

You can complete the activity on your own or with a little help from your students. Whichever method you choose to organize your books, create an eye-catching label to attract students.

Sorting system to organize your book

There are many ways to organize books that students will enjoy and make them want to reach. Dirty book organization will discourage students from borrowing books from the library as they will be left with a lot of clutter and many options to choose from.

Organizing books by genre, topic, topic, or author can help students recognize their interest in books more quickly. This would leave them with far fewer options to choose from as they will have a shortened section of the books from which they can decide what they want to read.

Involve the students

The involvement of the students in the organization of the books will involve them in the class library. Books that may be difficult for you to organize will be a difficult challenge for you. A little help from the students could be of benefit to you.

They can find a creative solution that can be beneficial to both you and your students and will also create the potential to increase the wonder of children in the classroom. This will further generate group discussions in your classroom to develop students’ problem-solving skills from an early age.

Final thoughts

An attractive library is a great way to motivate students to read to create an engaging environment for students. High school students with higher GPAs have been shown to develop a reading habit since the early days of school. Therefore, reading to all students is strongly encouraged because the benefits are far-reaching.

Of all the decisions I made regarding my first grade, organizing my school library was by far the most difficult. I have been to so many classrooms over the years and have found that the most common place for chaos is a small corner of the school library. When I was designing my library, I knew a few things:

1. I wanted it to be organized (who doesn’t!)

2. I wanted students to have an easy guide to finding and storing books.

3. I wanted to put all the books back in the right place (who doesn’t!)

4. I wanted it to be organized by fiction / non-fiction and genre

I’m not saying my way is the only or even the best way to organize a library. I think every teacher has their own style and it also depends a lot on the grade you teach. This year I am in fifth place and I mainly deal with chapters and non-fiction books (books with strange shapes) as well as picture books (they are really the best). For me, this meant that I needed a clean and organized space for my classroom library.

How to organize a classroom library

How to organize a classroom library

So I went the long way of labeling not only all the boxes in my books, but all my books as well! That’s right, every single book in my library has its own label! Honestly, it was a bit time-consuming (around 2 hours), but now I just have to take care of the new books coming up (which is very simple since my system is already set up).

Here is my organized library system:

-The blue containers (fiction) are for a series of books and authors that I wanted to highlight. Examples: Roald Dahl, The Babysitters Club, Jerry Spinelli etc.

-The green containers (fiction) are sorted by genre and then in alphabetical order.

Examples: Genre: mystery, sports, animals

-The black (non-fiction) containers are sorted by non-fiction themes and then in alphabetical order for all random topics.

Examples: biographies, marine life, presidents etc.

How to organize a classroom library

Now comes the time-consuming (and DOC!) Part!

How to organize a classroom library

I explained all the labels (before placing them on the baskets) and sorted them alphabetically. From there, each label received a sticker that matched its color, in this case blue. On each sticker, I wrote a letter that would be that basket. The lists did not correspond at all to the titles or authors of the books.

Once all three sections were tagged and attached to the bin, I started tagging each book.

How to organize a classroom library

Questa fa parte della mia sezione di saggistica, e poiché il cestino in cui finiscono questi libri è etichettato come "G", hanno anche una "G" sull’etichetta.

How to organize a classroom library

How to organize a classroom library

As you can see in the image above, there are two different labels with the letter “B”, but due to the color of the label, they are in different containers. Each book in the bathtub will match the appropriate label!

Uff! Hope it all makes sense! I am so happy with this system and how it turned out! I think this will keep the books tidy and be an easy system for students to use! I will keep you updated on how this system works! My fifth classes start wednesday!

Of all the decisions I made regarding my first grade, organizing my school library was by far the most difficult. I have been to so many classrooms over the years and have found that the most common place for chaos is a small corner of the school library. When I was designing my library, I knew a few things:

1. I wanted it to be organized (who doesn’t!)

2. I wanted students to have an easy guide to finding and storing books.

3. I wanted to put all the books back in the right place (who doesn’t!)

4. I wanted it to be organized by fiction / non-fiction and genre

I’m not saying my way is the only or even the best way to organize a library. I think every teacher has their own style and it also depends a lot on the grade you teach. This year I am in fifth place and I mainly deal with chapters and non-fiction books (books with strange shapes) as well as picture books (they are really the best). For me, this meant that I needed a clean and organized space for my classroom library.

How to organize a classroom library

How to organize a classroom library

So I went the long way of labeling not only all the boxes in my books, but all my books as well! That’s right, every single book in my library has its own label! Honestly, it was a bit time-consuming (around 2 hours), but now I just have to take care of the new books coming up (which is very simple since my system is already set up).

Here is my organized library system:

-The blue containers (fiction) are for a series of books and authors that I wanted to highlight. Examples: Roald Dahl, The Babysitters Club, Jerry Spinelli etc.

-The green containers (fiction) are sorted by genre and then in alphabetical order.

Examples: Genre: mystery, sports, animals

-The black (non-fiction) containers are sorted by non-fiction themes and then in alphabetical order for all random topics.

Examples: biographies, marine life, presidents etc.

How to organize a classroom library

Now comes the time-consuming (and DOC!) Part!

How to organize a classroom library

I explained all the labels (before placing them on the baskets) and sorted them alphabetically. From there, each label received a sticker that matched its color, in this case blue. On each sticker, I wrote a letter that would be that basket. The lists did not correspond at all to the titles or authors of the books.

Once all three sections were tagged and attached to the bin, I started tagging each book.

How to organize a classroom library

Questa fa parte della mia sezione di saggistica, e poiché il cestino in cui finiscono questi libri è etichettato come "G", hanno anche una "G" sull’etichetta.

How to organize a classroom library

How to organize a classroom library

As you can see in the image above, there are two different labels with the letter “B”, but due to the color of the label, they are in different containers. Each book in the bathtub will match the appropriate label!

Uff! Hope it all makes sense! I am so happy with this system and how it turned out! I think this will keep the books tidy and be an easy system for students to use! I will keep you updated on how this system works! My fifth classes start wednesday!

Class libraries are such an important resource! On this page, you’ll learn how to obtain inexpensive books for children, organize them, level them, create book labels, and organize them in book bins. You’ll also find resources to help you introduce your class library to students and teach kids how to care for and utilize the books.

How to organize a classroom library

Class Library FAQ

How can I create a functional display for my books?

How to organize a classroom library

My classroom library was great in the days before the fire marshal started cracking down. How many violations do you see in this photo? Sofa, carpet, rug, curtains, lamps … those times are long gone. Sigh.

How to organize a classroom library

When you’re setting up a classroom library, consider having books displayed in other ways than just spine out. These early childhood style shelves are great for displaying multiple books with the covers facing out and can be used for author exhibits, student book selection, etc. I took a year for this shelf after the kindergarten teacher retired.

How to organize a classroom library

A few years later, I presented various types of books on this shelf. Each row has a category: Student of the week’s picks, Mrs. Watson’s picks (books I want the kids to read that they might not choose otherwise), social studies connection, science connection, and genre of the week (other books of the same genre we are reading in our anthology for whole class reading instruction). Kids can put them in their own book boxes just like any other book in the class library. Each book has a color-coded bookmark inside, so when the kids are done with them, they know they need to place them on a dedicated shelf and not in the general collection. I keep LOTS of extra bookmarks because they do get misplaced, and if a child accidentally puts the book on the regular shelf, I don’t mind, because I change the assortment pretty regularly.

Here’s one way to store menus, brochures, maps, magazines, and other texts that don’t fit easily or attractively on conventional bookshelves. You can purchase this pocket card here. There are so many ideas for classroom libraries – get creative with your materials!

Do I need to align my class library?

Depends. Some researchers believe that a leveling system limits students’ reading possibilities (both real and perceived). Personally I like to give kids a general idea of ​​the difficulty of the books before selecting them, which is why I have always used a very simple leveling system with colored adhesive dots. I place green dots on the upper left-hand corner of my easiest books, yellow dots on the ‘medium’ books, and red dots on the most challenging titles. Some experts are even more specific (most notably Patricia Cunningham, who believes leveling is a key tool in helping children choose books). If you agree with this theory, check out these free book leveling resources. Keep in mind that leveling your classroom library will takes a very, very long time, and don’t have to start the year with every book leveled. It’s okay to work on the project slowly.

How do I tag and organize my books?

How to organize a classroom library

Regardless of whether you level your books, you’ll still want to categorize them. Here are free, colorful, illustrated classroom library labels for your book baskets from various sites: thematic early-childhood labels from Our School Family, thematic labels from Kelly’s Kindergarten, and versatile classroom library book bin labels from Teaching Heart (which are what I used in the photo–I just typed in the genres I wanted and replaced the pics). Book labels for the classroom library can be really easy to make!

How can I keep track of the books the children have borrowed?

How to organize a classroom library

I also kept it simple. For the books they read in class, I didn’t use the publication tracking system. Books couldn’t leave my class, so I’ve lost little over the years. For home use I have a notebook with a sheet for each child in the class. In the morning, the children chose a new book and signed it. I’ve explained this system in detail in my book. You might find another interesting idea to check out on Share2learn.

How to teach children to handle books correctly?

Here is an adorable, free printable book from Cherry Carl called Madame Libearian’s Guide to the Care and Handling of Books (it’s a large PDF file and takes awhile to download, but be patient because it’s worth it). You can also take advantage of these creative, clickable online stories for kids about Richmond Public School Book Care and William Breitsprecher Library Book Sharing.

E-book resources

Have you started building a digital library for children? SnapLearning has been supporting for a long time Cornerstoneand I strongly believe in the value of their digital assets. They provide hundreds of relevant eBooks, both fiction and non-fiction, that you can assign to your students and send to their devices! The e-books contain interactive exercises and assignments that you can review and evaluate later. Above all, the content is adapted to a common core. If you want to take a closer look at their portfolio (which is a fantastic interactive exercise set), you can request the free demo.

On the truth for teachers

Angela Watson is the founder of Truth for Teachers, a podcast + collective of teachers that transparently shares the realities of teaching in primary and secondary schools. Check out our printable teaching materials, online courses, books, the Truth for Teachers podcast and the 40-hour Teacher Workweek Club.