How to measure wet ingredients

Follow these simple steps to measuring liquid ingredients, then watch our how-to video.

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How to measure wet ingredients

Measuring liquid ingredients accurately isn’t hard to do, but it’s important to do it right — especially when you’re baking.

How to measure wet ingredients

Step 1: Get the Right Tools
First, you need the right tools: liquid measuring cups. Measuring spoons work with both wet and dry ingredients.

How to measure wet ingredients

Step 2: How to Measure
Pour the liquids into the measuring cup. When checking your measurement, be sure your eyes are even with the level of the liquid. If you look from above, you might misread the amount.

How to measure wet ingredients

Step 3: Keep It Level
Be sure to fill the spoon and keep it level when you’re measuring smaller amounts.

How to measure wet ingredients

Step 4: Measuring Honey
Here’s a trick for measuring sticky liquids like honey: Spray your spoon with an oil spray to keep the liquid from sticking.

How to measure wet ingredients

Step 5: Measure
Then measure. Your ingredient will slide out easily.

If you have kids who love to be in the kitchen or if you want your kids to help during mealtime, then proper kitchen skills are essential. Something like measuring wet or dry ingredients can be learned early on. Whether you use measuring cups or a kitchen scale, measuring ingredients the right way is a great learning experience.

Wet vs. Dry Measure

wet vs dry measure cups

There are certain measuring cups that you use for measuring wet or dry ingredients. Wet or liquid measuring cups have a pour spout and are used for all “wet” items, like water, milk or oil. For ingredients that are “dry” items, like flour or sugar, use dry measuring cups. Seems simple, but we can all admit that we all want less dishes to wash and might be tempted to let the kids use whatever measuring cups we have out to measure all ingredients. But we shouldn’t, as using the wrong cups will yield the wrong amount of whatever you’re measuring and may throw off your recipe.

The Right Way to Measure Flour

Raise your hands if you’re guilty of this…placing your measuring cup into the bag of flour and scooping or packing that flour into the cup. While your recipe may say “1 cup of flour,” measuring flour this way actually gives you more than 1 cup. So don’t let the kids do this. Teach them the right way, even if you get flour on your table or countertop. They will be more successful with what they bake.

All dry ingredients need to be measured in a way where they can be leveled off with a straight-edged tool, like a butter knife. So, use measuring cups for dry ingredients and/or measuring spoons.

Let’s measure flour in our example. Using your measuring cup, lightly spoon in the flour until the cup is full – be careful not to pack in the flour. Then use the flat edge of your butter knife and level it off by scraping the excess back into your container. Do the same with measuring spoons.

Measuring Liquids

Liquid measuring cups have the measurements written on the side of cup so that you can pour in the correct amount of water, milk or any liquid until into the cup until it reaches the right amount you need. Be sure to keep the measuring cup on a flat surface – don’t hold it while pouring – and pour until you see it reach the right amount by looking at the cup at eye level. Use measuring spoons for smaller amounts of liquid, like extracts.

Measuring Other Wet or Dry Ingredients

So you know what cups to use to measure liquid and dry ingredients. But what about those “other” ingredients like honey, molasses, corn syrup or sour cream? What set of measuring cups work best?

For ingredients like sour cream or yogurt, use a dry measuring cup. Scoop the ingredient into the cup and scrape or level off the excess like you would with flour. You can use a dry measuring cup for your nut butters too – just spray the cup with cooking spray for easy removal of sticky ingredients.

Use the liquid measuring cup for those “wet” sticky ingredients, like honey, molasses or corn syrup. Just spray the measuring cup with cooking spray and the sticky stuff will slide right out, making it so much easier to measure.

What About Butter?

How do you measure butter? No need to use a cup at all – just follow the measurements listed on the wrapper and cut straight down with a knife to get the right amount. Easy peasy.

Now that the kids can measure out ingredients right, how about they make their own snacks? Try these Three Easy Kid-Approved Snacks that they can make on their own. Or, tell me what snack they’re making up – I’d love to hear about it!

If you have kids who love to be in the kitchen or if you want your kids to help during mealtime, then proper kitchen skills are essential. Something like measuring wet or dry ingredients can be learned early on. Whether you use measuring cups or a kitchen scale, measuring ingredients the right way is a great learning experience.

Wet vs. Dry Measure

wet vs dry measure cups

There are certain measuring cups that you use for measuring wet or dry ingredients. Wet or liquid measuring cups have a pour spout and are used for all “wet” items, like water, milk or oil. For ingredients that are “dry” items, like flour or sugar, use dry measuring cups. Seems simple, but we can all admit that we all want less dishes to wash and might be tempted to let the kids use whatever measuring cups we have out to measure all ingredients. But we shouldn’t, as using the wrong cups will yield the wrong amount of whatever you’re measuring and may throw off your recipe.

The Right Way to Measure Flour

Raise your hands if you’re guilty of this…placing your measuring cup into the bag of flour and scooping or packing that flour into the cup. While your recipe may say “1 cup of flour,” measuring flour this way actually gives you more than 1 cup. So don’t let the kids do this. Teach them the right way, even if you get flour on your table or countertop. They will be more successful with what they bake.

All dry ingredients need to be measured in a way where they can be leveled off with a straight-edged tool, like a butter knife. So, use measuring cups for dry ingredients and/or measuring spoons.

Let’s measure flour in our example. Using your measuring cup, lightly spoon in the flour until the cup is full – be careful not to pack in the flour. Then use the flat edge of your butter knife and level it off by scraping the excess back into your container. Do the same with measuring spoons.

Measuring Liquids

Liquid measuring cups have the measurements written on the side of cup so that you can pour in the correct amount of water, milk or any liquid until into the cup until it reaches the right amount you need. Be sure to keep the measuring cup on a flat surface – don’t hold it while pouring – and pour until you see it reach the right amount by looking at the cup at eye level. Use measuring spoons for smaller amounts of liquid, like extracts.

Measuring Other Wet or Dry Ingredients

So you know what cups to use to measure liquid and dry ingredients. But what about those “other” ingredients like honey, molasses, corn syrup or sour cream? What set of measuring cups work best?

For ingredients like sour cream or yogurt, use a dry measuring cup. Scoop the ingredient into the cup and scrape or level off the excess like you would with flour. You can use a dry measuring cup for your nut butters too – just spray the cup with cooking spray for easy removal of sticky ingredients.

Use the liquid measuring cup for those “wet” sticky ingredients, like honey, molasses or corn syrup. Just spray the measuring cup with cooking spray and the sticky stuff will slide right out, making it so much easier to measure.

What About Butter?

How do you measure butter? No need to use a cup at all – just follow the measurements listed on the wrapper and cut straight down with a knife to get the right amount. Easy peasy.

Now that the kids can measure out ingredients right, how about they make their own snacks? Try these Three Easy Kid-Approved Snacks that they can make on their own. Or, tell me what snack they’re making up – I’d love to hear about it!

Recipes can call for a multitude of ingredients, and with all the different measurements it can be a puzzle to solve just what you need. There are fluid ounces, weight ounces, imperial and metric systems, and liquid and dry measures. When a recipe relies on precise measurements, how you measure these ingredients really matters.

First, make sure you’re using the correct measuring cup for an ingredient. Measuring flour with a liquid measuring cup will mess up your recipe. The same goes for measuring liquid with a dry measuring cup. A dry and liquid ingredient will have differing properties, changing how they should be measured. The types of cups you’re using also matters! Sadly, decorative ceramic cups may be designed for looks instead of accuracy. Basic metal cups usually provide the best results.

Common Units of Volume

  • Teaspoons: 3 teaspoons equal 1 tablespoon
  • Tablespoons: 1 tablespoon equals 3 teaspoons
  • Cups: 1 cup equals 8 fluid ounces
  • Pints: There are 2 cups in 1 pint
  • Quarts: There are 4 cups in 1 quart
  • Gallons: There are 4 quarts in a gallon
  • Fluid ounces: Fluid ounces are not the same as weight ounces. 1 cup of water is 8 fluid ounces but weighs 8.3 ounces
  • Liters: This is metric measurement, equal to 33.8 ounces
  • Milliliters: There are 1,000 ml in a liter

Essentials for Measuring

  • Liquid measuring cups, which are made of clear glass or plastic and have a spout so you can pour from them.
  • Dry measuring cups, which are made of metal or plastic. A basic set includes 1 cup, 1/2 cup, 1/3 cup, and 1/4 cup.
  • Measuring spoons, which are used for amounts of dry and liquid ingredients. The largest measure in the set is a tablespoon. The smallest is usually 1/4 teaspoon, though some sets include 1/8 teaspoon. To measure 3/4 teaspoon, just measure 1/2 teaspoon and 1/4 teaspoon of the ingredient.

Tips on Measuring Dry Ingredients

How you measure ingredients such as flour, can make the difference between a dense and gluey banana bread versus a light and cakey banana bread. The best method for measuring is the fluff-and-scoop method:

  1. Lightly fluff the flour in its container.
  2. Scoop or spoon the flour into the measuring cup.
  3. Level it off with a flat edge, such as the back of a table knife. Do not pack the flour or tap the cup.

If you ever find yourself looking for the most accurate method, try a kitchen scale! Weight will give you better results as it’s an absolute measurement. It’ll eliminate any guesswork.

How to measure wet ingredients

    1. Fluff up the flour (or dry ingredient) in its bag or container, with a spoon or scoop to loosen and aerate it.
    2. Gently spoon the flour into your measuring cup until it is completely full and overflowing.
    3. Level it off, by dragging the a flat edge across the top edge of the measuring cup (back of a butter knife, metal spatula, etc.). Do not pack it down or shake it, as this will compact too much flour into your cup than desired. Repeat if necessary. Add to your recipe as directed.

NOTE: If the recipe calls for a “heaping” cup/teaspoon/tablespoon, leave a small mound of ingredient overflowing on top of your measuring cup/spoon and do not level off the top. If the recipe calls for a “scant” cup/teaspoon/tablespoon, do not fill the cup/spoon up to the top, leaving a small gap between the ingredient and the rip of the cup/spoon.

Fats: Liquid fat, such as oil or liquid margarine, should be measured using a liquid measuring cup or measuring spoons. Solid fats, such as butter, margarine or shortening in the form of a stick, can either be weighed or sliced according to the pre-measured marks on the sides of the wrapping (I always weigh out large amounts even after slicing according to the marks on the wrapper, for accuracy). Solid fats, such as margarine, lard, buttery spread, or shortening packaged in a tub are measured by scooping the ingredient into the measuring cup lined in saran wrap, for easy removal and then leveling off. You can also measure solid fats with the liquid displacement method; ex: If you need 1/4 cup shortening, fill a liquid measuring cup with 1/4 cup water, add enough shortening until the water level reaches the 1/2 cup mark. Since 1/4 cup + 1/4 cup = 1/2 cup, you know that your measuring cup now contains your desired 1/4 cup shortening. You can then pour out the water and use your shortening as directed in your recipe.

Non-Liquid, Wet Ingredients: Ingredients such as sour cream, yogurt, apple sauce, mashed banana, peanut butter, butter, etc. should be measured using dry measuring cups and measuring spoons. Sticky ingredients can also be measured this way, but you can use a spritz of non-stick spray to avoid sticking.

Contents

  1. Article
  2. Related how-tos
  3. Comments

Liquid measures for cooking conversion chart, US measurements to metric to weights. Handy chart for converting and cooking recipes.

Wondering how many oz in a cup? How many tablespoons in a cup? What about how many teaspoons in a tablespoon? What is the difference between a fluid (fl) ounce (oz) and a dry oz?

We’ve got you covered with our handy dandy conversion charts made just for cooking.

Liquid Measures

1 cup 8 fluid ounces 1/2 pint 237 ml 16 tablespoons
2 cups 16 fluid ounces 1 pint 473 ml
4 cups 32 fluid ounces 1 quart 946 ml
2 pints 32 fluid ounces 1 quart 0.946 liters
4 quarts 128 fluid ounces 1 gallon 3.785 liters
8 quarts one peck
4 pecks one bushel
dash about an 1/8 teaspoon
1 teaspoon 1/6 fluid ounce 5 grams about 5 ml
1 tablespoon 1/2 fluid ounce 15 grams 15 ml 3 teaspoons
2 tablespoons 1 fluid ounce 30 grams 29.6 ml 1/8 cup
8 tablespoons 4 fluid ounces 1/4 pint 118.5 ml 1/2 cup

Dry Measures

3 teaspoons 1 tablespoon 1/2 ounce 14.3 grams
2 tablespoons 1/8 cup 1 fluid ounce 28.35 grams
4 tablespoons 1/4 cup 2 fluid ounces 56.7 grams
5 1/3 tablespoons 1/3 cup 2.6 fluid ounces 75.6 grams
8 tablespoons 1/2 cup 4 ounces 113.4 grams 1 stick butter
12 tablespoons 3/4 cup 6 ounces 0.375 pound 170 grams
32 tablespoons 2 cups 16 ounces 1 pound 453.6 grams
64 tablespoons 4 cups 32 ounces 2 pounds 907 grams

How to measure

The Equipment:

Graduated Measuring Cups

Measuring cups that resemble small pots. They are usually made of plastic or metal and come in sets of four or five (1 cup, 3/4 cup, 1/2 cup, 1/3 cup, and 1/4 cup). They are excellent for measuring dry ingredients because they can easily be leveled off.

Liquid Measuring Cups

Measuring cups that look like little pitchers with a lip/spout to aid in pouring. They are widely available in 1, 2, 4, and 8-cup measures. They come in glass or plastic, with the amounts indicated in cups, ounces, and milliliters. Pyrex is a good brand. The larger measures can double as mixing bowls.

Measuring Spoons

Come in sets of four or five (1 tablespoon, 1 teaspoon, 1/2 teaspoon, 1/4 teaspoon and sometimes 1/8 teaspoon).

Ingredients

Butter

Each 1/4 pound stick of margarine or butter measures 1/2 cup or 8 tablespoons. In the United States, the wrapping usually has tablespoons and teaspoons clearly marked. One stick usually equals 1/2 cup. If it has not been packed that way, pack margarine or butter into measuring spoon or measuring cup and level off to measure.

Sugar

Measuring Sugar

Most sugar can be measured in a graduated measuring cup. Simply spoon it in and level off with the straight edge of a knife. Most recipes usually call for certain amounts of packed brown sugar. To measure packed brown sugar, pack sugar down lightly with back of spoon, then level off.

Measuring Flour

In most recipes, flour is supposed to be measured straight from the canister or package (the flour needs to be airy, if it seems compact, stir it in the container before measuring it). NEVER pack flour down into the measuring cup or tap it excessively. Lightly spoon flour into graduated measuring cup, and level off with straight edge of knife.

It is important to measure flour correctly in low-fat bread making because when we reduce the fat (which tenderizes it), we don’t want to dramatically increase the flour (which toughens it).

How to measure wet ingredients

Whenever you want to create the best food, you have to take care of the exact measurements of the parts. It is always a good thing to learn how to measure the weight wet and dry ingredients separately. Today we are mostly going to talk about the procedure so that you do not have any problems being a beginner. Now you will be able to bake in the picture-perfect manner and make great cookies as well.

Starting With Measurement- Measure Wet And Dry Ingredients

If you think that one cup comprises 8 ounces, then you are only a little correct. It depends on the kind of thing that you measure since wet ingredients will weigh a lot more. If you want to make the best cookies, you should be able to measure the weight instead of the volume.

Volume is the space that is occupied by the ingredients. If you want to get the most accurate measurement, then you should measure the liquid by the fluid ounce. Then you will be able to measure the volume of the liquid with perfect accuracy.

Here Is The Correct Way To Measure Wet And Dry Ingredients

Learn To Use The Measuring Cup

If you measure any wet ingredients like milk water or oil, then you should learn the use of measuring cups. You have to put the liquid like oil or milk into the measuring cup and put it to the eye level. There is a measurement that is marked, and you have to make sure that the liquid level matches the size. All the wet ingredients can be measured easily, and you will be able to get the correct amount.

Measuring The Dry Ingredients

You have to measure the dry ingredients with the help of its heaviness. There is a very accurate way to measure ingredients like flour or sugar. You can do it with the help of a digital scale and even with the help of measuring cups. Not only that, but you can always use the marking on the measuring cup to weigh the ingredients. It will also help you in measuring the other ingredients like icing sugar and brown sugar.

Borosilicate Glass Measuring Cup– Measure Wet And Dry Ingredients

Borosilicate glass measuring cup is one of the best kitchen accessories which will bring out the accurate measurement. It is one of the best products that you can use to measure the liquids. It is available at only $40, and you will be able to put the liquid quickly. It is effortless to maintain and clean, and it will not absorb any stain or color.

How to measure wet ingredientsBorosilicate Glass Measuring Cup

Bamboo Steamer For Fish Rice Vegetable Snack Basket Set

It is one of the best kitchen tools that will help you in steaming all kinds of foods. You will be able to make dumplings and momos, and it is straightforward to use. Not only that, but it is only available at $70, and there are various sizes. You will be able to cook a lot of food, and the material is bamboo.

There are a lot of measuring products that you can find in the market, and you should buy them to bake correctly. So what are you waiting for?

How to measure wet ingredientsThere are three main methods for measuring ingredients for cooking and baking, and conveniently they use three corresponding tool sets. The methods are: 1) measuring dry ingredients, 2) measuring wet ingredients, and 3) measuring dry or wet ingredients. In this lesson, we go over these tasks and cover when to use each.

Measuring Wet Ingredients

One of the most classic tools in the kitchen, a measuring cup helps you quantify wet ingredients, things like water, olive oil, milk, cream, yogurt and more. We have a small clear glass Pyrex measuring cup, but they come in all sizes, even giant ones. Let’s measure out 1 cup of water:

Stand near you kitchen sink and hold the cup firmly by the handle. Turn the faucet on, starting the water at pretty good clip at first. It might be a good idea to let it run for 2-3 seconds. Move the measuring cup under the stream and hold it there until the water gets to about the 1-cup line marker on the side of the cup. If you’re feeling lucky you can try to get it dead on the line the first try. Wherever the water line lands after you turn the water off, place the cup on a counter or convenient level surface. Position your eye at an even level with the cup and look at the water’s relative position to the marker on the side of the cup. That’s the important part–you want to make sure that you’re taking the reading of the measurement from a still cup on a level surface. Now, in some recipes, a difference of a few milliliters (mls) won’t make much of a difference, but this move is important for getting it right when you need to. If the water line is above the 1-cup mark at the center of the reading line, take the cup back to the sink and carefully pour some water out, reading the line with the cup back on the level surface. If the water line is below the 1-cup line, take the cup back to the sink and carefully add some with the faucet until you’ve got enough. Sweet, we did it! Now let’s do flour.

Measuring Dry Ingredients

Dry ingredients use a set of contraptions that are also called measuring cups(!), wicked confusing I know. Not sure who named these the same thing…anyway, they help measure things like flour, sugar, diced onions, walnuts and more. Usually they come in sets of four sizes, 1/4 cup, 1/3 cup, 1/2 cup, and 1 full cup. We just measured a cup of water; let’s now measure 1/2 cup of flour.

Start by putting the 1/2 cup measure in one hand, and a large spoon in the other. Pull flour from your source of flour with the large spoon. I’m using these large ingredient storage jars where we keep our flour. If you don’t have those, no worries, you can pull the flour right out of the bag. Pay no attention to how the flour gets into the spoon, but rather how it falls as your pour it into the 1/2 measuring cup. You want to coat it as evenly as possible scoop after scoop, but make sure you don’t pack it in. When the measuring cup is filled to its top, add a little more. That’s right, go on, you deserve it. Add more until the flour sits slightly above the top of the cup, spilling over a little bit. Now take the spoon and flip it in your hand so you can use the back of it, or some other device, as a straight edge with which to scrape the excess flour from the top of the 1/2 measuring cup. Make sure to do this scraping while positioning the cup over the source (in my case the jar) bag of flour to catch the excess. This technique will ensure an accurate amount that is easy to read; if the flour is even with the top of the 1/2 measuring cup, then you’ve got a 1/2 cup of flour!

Measuring (small amounts of) Wet and Dry Ingredients

Sometimes you’ll need to measure small amounts of ingredients, both dry and wet, all within the same recipe. That calls for measuring spoons. They’re much like the cups, but measure smaller amounts of water, sugar, olive oil, flour, yogurt, baking power and more. Typically they are in 1/2 teaspoon, 1 teaspoon, 1/2 tablespoon, and 1 tablespoon sizes. Let’s get ourselves a 1/2 tablespoon of sugar:

Take the 1/2 tablespoon in your hand and reach it into your source of sugar. Because of the smaller measurement size, it’s safe to dip the measuring spoon into the sugar, as long as it’s clean and dry. Get enough in the spoon that it spills just over the top. Now you can take one of the other measuring spoons (or straight-edge equivalent), and use the non-business end to scrape the sugar clear of the top edge of the 1/2 tablespoon. Again, this technique will give you an accurate measurement because we’re using the tool to mark the amount for us.

Summary

Measuring cups (the large, liquid-measure ones) are great for calculating a large amount of wet ingredients; just be sure to take your reading while the cup is resting on the counter so that the liquid is still, to ensure an accurate reading.

Measuring cups (the dry-measure set) are used for solids, and are fun and give accurate measures if the scraping technique is used.

You’ll probably want to use the wet/dry measuring spoons when you’re in need of smaller amounts of both liquid and solid ingredients, like when you’re baking.