How to measure tiles

Last updated: August 3, 2019

This article has been co-written by our skilled team of editors and researchers who have endorsed its accuracy and completeness. The wikiHow content management team closely monitors our editorial work to ensure that each article is supported by credible research and meets our high quality standards.

This article was viewed 5341 times.

If you’re thinking of replacing, redoing, or just adding tile to your floor or wall, having an accurate measurement is key to buying the right amount of tile to get the job done. To accurately measure the tile you need, you need to find the square area of ​​the area you plan to lay. Then, you can divide that measurement by the square footage of the tiles themselves and you’ve got an accurate measurement of the tile that you need!

How to measure tiles

How to measure tiles

How to measure tiles

How to measure tiles

How to measure tiles

Advice:For example, if you are 20 feet (6.1m) long and 15 feet (4.6m) wide, then you have an area of ​​300 feet (91m).

While undoubtedly the easiest way to properly lay tiles on the floor is to leave it in the hands of professionals, adding floor tiles to your home can also be a fairly straightforward DIY task. You can take the worry of not measuring tiles correctly and that the end result will be completely wrong – with the right tools, patience and accuracy, you can easily master floor tile measurement.

Aside from your choice of floor tiles, you’re going to need a tile cutter or tile scorer, tape measure, string and pencil. Before you start moving furniture and taking measurements, make sure you have your floor plan ready.

Good measures

For a traditionally shaped square or rectangular room, all you’d need to do is measure the width and length of the area using the tape measure and then multiply the two. However, if the room you’re tiling is an awkward shape, you’re going to have to break it down into rectangular areas and separate them using the string.

It’s usually also useful to have a rough sketch of your floor plan with the measurements of each wall (in meters); this would make it easier to work out the total floor area of the room you’re tiling, especially if you are breaking it down into sections.

Get the correct numbers

Once you have your total floor area calculated (the multiplied length and width) and picked out the floor tiles you’d like to use, you can work out the total number of tiles you are going to need by dividing the total floor area by the tile area. You can use our tile calculator, which you can find on all of our tile assortment pages, to give you an accurate estimate of how many tiles you need.

It is always advisable to add extra resources for waste and take into account any errors – the recommended rate is 10-15 percent for standard size tiles and up to 20 percent for large size tiles.

On your signs

Sia che tu abbia intenzione di organizzare una stanza con una forma semplice o una disposizione più complessa, è probabile che ti imbatti in aree più difficili da misurare, come le rientranze e i bordi dello spazio. These types of places require more patience – mark the tiles with a pencil for the area and cut the materials into the correct shape using a tile cutter or tile cutter.

Setting upplan

Once you’ve made all your measurements and have the tiles marked, you should also check that your floor is ready before you commence the tiling work. Sometimes additional preparation may be required, for example it may be necessary to add a primer to some adhesives before applying them.

To goforward and tiles

With the right measurements and materials prepared, you have the perfect foundation and everything is ready to start tiling!

If you have any questions about the correct measurement of the floor tiles, contact our team and they will be happy to offer their help. Haven’t found the perfect tiles yet? Browse the Direct Tile magazine assortment of floor tiles for inspiration.

* We take no responsibility for additional delivery shippers that may arise in case of need to replenish the quantity as a result of incorrect measurements.

Figuring out how many tiles you need for a backsplash project can be confusing. It is important to make sure you order the right quantity and a little more to be safe. This is especially true of handmade tiles as there will always be natural color variations from batch to batch. Determining how many tiles you’ll need for your kitchen backsplash takes just a few simple calculations and we’ll walk you through the process step-by-step. However, if you have a complicated backsplash project, it’s always best to hire a professional.

Let’s start measuring!

What you will need:

– Pen or pencil and paper

First, you need to calculate the total area of ​​the backsplash in square inches. To find this number, you will need to take a tape measure and measure the height and width of the backsplash. Remember to write it down and always round up. To calculate square inches, multiply the height by the width. If there are multiple walls or sections, you can find the area of ​​each separately and add them together to get the final count. For our example in the video below, we measured the backsplash area, which measures 48 “W x 24” H. When multiplied, we get a total of 1152 square inches.

48 "x 24" = 1152 cale kwadratowe

The tile is sold per square meter, so you need to calculate the total backsplash area from the calculated square inches. To get that number, simply divide your square inches by 144.

48 "x 24" = 1152 "/144 = 8 stóp kwadratowych.

Now, as we always recommend ordering excess stock, we suggest ordering at least 15% more. 15% of 8 square feet is 1.2, so you should round up and order at least 10 square feet of total tile. That’s all! You can start ordering your dish now! Be sure to watch the video below to read these instructions and see how to order a backsplash finish.

Need help measuring your backsplash? Call us, chat or fill out our design assistance form and one of our talented design consultants will contact you shortly.

Become friends with Fireclay!

Join our email list for a weekly dose of design inspiration, professional tips and tricks, and a first look at new products!

Enter.Please wait.

Error: Sorry, there was a problem with this email address. Please try again.

The following tool estimates the total number of tiles needed to cover a floor, roof, wall or any other surface. It also takes into account the spacing or overlapping of tiles for better accuracy, as shown in the following figure.

The size of the gap

Floor or wall tiles are usually installed with gaps between the tiles as the average tile may look quite similar to the next tile, but they are often not uniform in shape and size and would not fit properly if installed without gaps. These gaps are often filled with grout and as such are often referred to as grout sizes or grout lines. A grout is a form of concrete, and the space between the tiles can range from one-sixteenth to half an inch. Different tile sizes, materials, and design requirements affect the size of the blank. While it is typically more difficult to keep small gaps between tiles due to the lack of uniform shape and size, the use of rectified tiles (tiles that are post-treated to ensure evenness) can allow for smaller gaps, but a cost. additional. For more evenly cut tiles, such as granite, smaller gaps between the joints may result in less visibility of the seams between each tile.

In some cases, for example with tiles or wood siding, instead of a gap between them, the tiles overlap to avoid leaks. The roof calculator can take both of these situations into account. Enter a positive value if there is a gap between the tiles used and a negative value if the tiles overlap.

How to measure tiles

Tile installation options

The tile size can vary anywhere from smaller 3/8 inch mosaic tiles to 24 inch × 48 inch tiles and everything in between. Square sizes (same width and length) are the most popular, affordable and easy to install. perimeter tiles (rectangular, square, parallelogram), there are also unique tile shapes, although installation is not that easy. The large size of the tiles can make smaller rooms appear larger and also more open and clean as there there are fewer escapes. However, installing larger tiles causes more waste, while using smaller tiles can help add texture to a room.

There are many different classifications of tiles, including ceramic, porcelain, glass, quarry, and stone. Ceramic and porcelain tiles are the most affordable and come in many different styles. Glass tiles, although not suitable for a floor, because they break under pressure, are visually unique and interesting; they are most often used for kitchen and bathroom backsplashes. Quarry tiles have rough surfaces suitable for floors that require adhesion and are widely used in outdoor kitchens and restaurants. Stone tiles are marble and granite which provide unique and natural patterns, textures and colors that are difficult to achieve with ceramic. They also give the illusion of blending into the edges of the joint, giving a uniform overall look.

Layout scheme

Many different patterns are used when laying the tiles. The most common pattern is a linear grid with square or rectangular tiles, or a pattern consisting of squares or rectangles arranged at an angle to form a typical diamond shape.

Continuous constraint systems (such as those used for brick walls) involve staggered rows or columns of tiles, typically with a length-to-edge ratio of 2: 1. Running attachments generally use about 10% more material .

Herringbone involves tiling the tiles at an angle, usually 45 or 90 degrees. As with continuous bond designs, herringbone designs use more material than linear designs.

Any renovation project, from living room and bedroom floors to bathroom and kitchen wall tiles, will eventually require you to ask the question, “How many tiles do I need?” Perhaps you’re trying to figure out the budget for the tiles required in these projects. Or you’re ready to place an order but don’t know how to determine the number of tiles required for these projects? This blog aims to make the Floor Tile Calculation method as simple as possible!

How to calculate and order the tiles you need?

While it’s easy enough to overlook the most obvious factors when sorting tiles only to find there isn’t enough to arrange them, the task of calculating and sorting is simple enough.

First, to determine the number of tiles needed, measure the area to be tiled and add the waste factor, which is the percentage of tiles wasted during cutting or trimming. The waste factor must take into account the size of the joints as larger joints inevitably mean fewer tiles and a different laying pattern. For example, a horizontal pattern requires fewer tiles than a diagonal style.

The size of the tiles also affects the waste factor. Smaller tiles (e. g., 20×20 cm or 30×30 cm) produce lower waste than larger ones. Also, take into consideration all the important elements that you will have to work around when laying the tiles. For example, oddly shaped pillars, sections, columns or rooms indicate a higher waste factor. As a general rule, the larger the tile surface, the smaller the waste factor.

The industry practice is to provide an 8-10% margin for “waste”. However, if the place to be tiled is a bathroom with many intricate shapes, such as boxes covering the pipes or recesses in the shower area, then 15% is a reasonable figure.

If you are laying floor tiles in multiple rooms and need a smooth flow between them, add 15% more if the rooms vary greatly in shape and size and include a corridor that tends to have a distorted shape compared to one. more uniform kitchen or dining area so more cuts are needed which usually means more waste.

Suppose we need to clad a 200 sq m house with a standard rectangular room with no pillars or other key elements. You have chosen medium-sized stoneware tiles (for example 60 × 60 cm) to arrange them straight. The tile-floor waste factor to be considered is 10%, so it is necessary to order 220 m2 of tiles. Now suppose we want to cover the walls of a small bathroom (8 m2) with 60 × 60 cm tiles. Here the waste factor to be considered is 20%, so it is necessary to order tiles with an area of ​​9.6 sq m.

Secondly, if the tile you are buying is about to be discontinued, it is always a good idea to purchase more as that tile or batch of tiles may no longer be available from your supplier if you need more!

To determine the number of porcelain tiles needed to make the bathroom walls, we must first calculate the perimeter of the room and multiply it by the height of the surface to be covered. To keep things simple, we recommend adding the 8% waste factor instead of subtracting the size of the door and window openings.

Finally, once you’ve ordered the tiles, we recommend not changing the laying pattern. If you choose a horizontal pattern but then switch to a diagonal pattern, you’ll run out of tiles while laying them.

Roz Roz Rozrzutna Ceramika Sp. Ltd. is a famous brand as a tile manufacturer, tile exporter and is committed to providing high quality ceramic tiles, dual load tiles, honed stoneware tiles, kitchen design tiles, tiles for bathrooms, glazed porcelain tiles, wooden tiles, soluble salt tiles and polished porcelain tiles.

Contact Sumptuous for the best glazed tiles, digital wall tiles, dual loading tiles.

Summary

Free tile cost calculator to help you plan your next project

Doing a DIY home project like tiling a tile floor can be a great way to save money. But you want to make sure you have the right amount of tiles before heading out. Here are our ceramics calculator for tileswhich will help you find out how many tiles you will need and how much it will cost you.

That’s right; it’s too much tile cost calculator! This calculator will help you calculate the cost of the tile and what you will need to take for this project. You can use it to calculate floor tiles, wall tiles, and any other areas you want to organize.

And if you want to know how much it will cost someone to do it for you, just add labor costs to the equation.

What you will need to use the calculator for tiles

There are a few things you need to know to use this calculator. This will work for tiled floors and can work for all sizes.

Tile size

Use this section to show the size of a single tile. You can measure your tile in any unit of measurement. This calculator will accommodate inches, feet, meters, centimeters and yards. This way, you can calculate the area a single tile will have in your project and how much square area (or square inches, square feet, or square meters) you are working with will need to be covered.

Area to be covered

This is the total area you intend to cover. Most people will use square feet, but they will also make other dimensions to help you get an accurate picture of the surface of the tile you need to cover.

The size of the space between the tiles

Your tiles will need spacers between them, which means you will need fewer tiles than if they were all adjacent to each other. The spacers’ size is important because you will want to know how big your grout lines are going to be.

Number of boxes

To help you out with your shopping, we’ve added a box count. You can buy several tiles separately, but they usually sell them in a box.

The price of the tiles

It is best to do this at the expense of a single card. By entering the cost of the tiles, you can calculate how many tiles you will need for your project and get the estimated labor cost before entering the labor cost for the project.

Please note this does not include sales tax or any environmental taxes that may be charged.

Cost of labor and materials

If you want to save on hiring a tile installer, you can enter the amount here. If you prefer to install the tile yourself, you can simply enter the amount for the materials (other than the tile) you are budgeting for. Some installers charge per square foot and others charge for all work.

How to measure the tiles?

When measuring an area, choose a unit of measurement (square feet are the most common, but you can also do cm, meters, inches and yards). Take note of the area’s length and the width that you will need to cover with your tile.

For example, if you are installing a backsplash in a kitchen, you will measure the total length of the backsplash and the width you intend to cover.

How to measure tiles

Let’s say you’re using inches, it’s 72 inches long and 22 inches tall in total.

Then measure the size of the tiles. If the tile is 3 inches high and 6 inches long, you would make a note and enter the in the calculator for tiles above.

So pay attention to how large the spaces are. The tiles will have spacers between them to keep the joints uniform and maintain symmetry.

What about the cost of laying the tiles?

Knowing the area you want to tile and the price range, you can enter the installation costs. Tile designs may vary by state, so you will need to enter an amount that you think is correct.

It’s important to note that the cost of using a tile contractor can vary depending on the project. For example, making a new kitchen floor is much easier than installing shower tiles.

Also, there may be discrepancies depending on the type of material used by the contractor. If you know what you want and where you want, you can call them and talk to them calmly and say something like, “I want a 1,200 square foot ceramic tile floor.” This way, you will know the tile installation’s actual cost because you already know the rest of the project cost.

Are you also thinking of installing a carpet? Here is our carpet calculator.

What type of tile will it work with?

You can use different types of cards in this calculator. It will work on porcelain tile, natural stone tile, rectified tile, or any other type you can think of.

What materials and materials will you need for the tiles?

Necessary tile materials

  • Floor tiles
  • Concrete
  • Sealing
  • Spacers

Tile tools

  • Tile cutter
  • Tile saw (wet saw)
  • Trowel
  • Level
  • Tape measure
  • Drop the clothes
  • Tile adhesive or adhesive mat

How much more card to buy?

When buying a card, make sure you buy 10-20% more cards. The additional amount will depend on the complexity of the project and the level of knowledge.

With every tile installation project, you will have some tiles that break or that don’t cut properly. Make sure you have enough tiles for your project and you can always return unopened boxes at the end if there are any. You don’t want to run out of tile 80% of the way to find out that your tile is no longer in stock.

Tile calculator for your next tile project.

Welcome to the homeowner of the millennium!

We exist to make life easier for homeowners. Vogliamo aiutarti a diventare proprietari di case più intelligenti e felici e condividere tutti i suggerimenti e i trucchi per aiutarti a portare la tua casa a un livello superiore.

Any renovation project, from living room and bedroom floors to bathroom and kitchen wall tiles, will eventually require you to ask the question, “How many tiles do I need?” Perhaps you’re trying to figure out the budget for the tiles required in these projects. Or you’re ready to place an order but don’t know how to determine the number of tiles required for these projects? This blog aims to make the Floor Tile Calculation method as simple as possible!

How to calculate and order the tiles you need?

While it’s easy enough to overlook the most obvious factors when sorting tiles only to find there isn’t enough to arrange them, the task of calculating and sorting is simple enough.

First, to determine the number of tiles needed, measure the area to be tiled and add the waste factor, which is the percentage of tiles wasted during cutting or trimming. The waste factor must take into account the size of the joints as larger joints inevitably mean fewer tiles and a different laying pattern. For example, a horizontal pattern requires fewer tiles than a diagonal style.

The size of the tiles also affects the waste factor. Smaller tiles (e. g., 20×20 cm or 30×30 cm) produce lower waste than larger ones. Also, take into consideration all the important elements that you will have to work around when laying the tiles. For example, oddly shaped pillars, sections, columns or rooms indicate a higher waste factor. As a general rule, the larger the tile surface, the smaller the waste factor.

The industry practice is to provide an 8-10% margin for “waste”. However, if the place to be tiled is a bathroom with many intricate shapes, such as boxes covering the pipes or recesses in the shower area, then 15% is a reasonable figure.

If you are laying floor tiles in multiple rooms and need a smooth flow between them, add 15% more if the rooms vary greatly in shape and size and include a corridor that tends to have a distorted shape compared to one. more uniform kitchen or dining area so more cuts are needed which usually means more waste.

Suppose we need to clad a 200 sq m house with a standard rectangular room with no pillars or other key elements. You have chosen medium-sized stoneware tiles (for example 60 × 60 cm) to arrange them straight. The tile-floor waste factor to be considered is 10%, so it is necessary to order 220 m2 of tiles. Now suppose we want to cover the walls of a small bathroom (8 m2) with 60 × 60 cm tiles. Here the waste factor to be considered is 20%, so it is necessary to order tiles with an area of ​​9.6 sq m.

Secondly, if the tile you are buying is about to be discontinued, it is always a good idea to purchase more as that tile or batch of tiles may no longer be available from your supplier if you need more!

To determine the number of porcelain tiles needed to make the bathroom walls, we must first calculate the perimeter of the room and multiply it by the height of the surface to be covered. To keep things simple, we recommend adding the 8% waste factor instead of subtracting the size of the door and window openings.

Finally, once you’ve ordered the tiles, we recommend not changing the laying pattern. If you choose a horizontal pattern but then switch to a diagonal pattern, you’ll run out of tiles while laying them.

Roz Roz Rozrzutna Ceramika Sp. Ltd. is a famous brand as a tile manufacturer, tile exporter and is committed to providing high quality ceramic tiles, dual load tiles, honed stoneware tiles, kitchen design tiles, tiles for bathrooms, glazed porcelain tiles, wooden tiles, soluble salt tiles and polished porcelain tiles.

Contact Sumptuous for the best glazed tiles, digital wall tiles, dual loading tiles.

Calculate how many tiles you will need

Calculation of the square footage of your project

To help you determine the number of tiles for your needs, here’s an easy-to-use area calculation tool. First, provide area measurements.

Measurement
The length of the area Area width
Feet All Feet All
Zone 1
Zone 2
Zone 3
Zone 4
Options
Totals

Estimation of the number of cards

The rule of thumb for measuring floor tiles is:

Length x width + offset = quantity needed

The percentage of waste will vary based on tile size, layout, room configuration, patterns, etc. A typical waste rate is around 10%. Add 15% for diagonal tiles or a room with many steps and corners. These installations will require more cuts and therefore more waste.

Example:

Actual room size: 8ft 7in x 5ft 2in

Convert to Inches, Actual Room Size: 103 ” x 62 ”

103" x 62" = 6386 cali / 144 (1 sf) = 44,50 sf + współczynnik strat (44,50 x 1,10) = 49 sf

The same method is used for wall measurements. Measure the area to be tiled on each wall. Add them together and calculate the square material. Add up your waste factor and that’s the amount you need.

Most vertical applications require trim elements with finished edges, which requires a line measurement. Finishing elements will be used:

  1. 1. When the tiled surface ends at an open wall, leaving the edge of the tile exposed,
  2. 2. Dove la superficie verticale incontra l’orizzontale, come il bordo di un plan di lavoro,
  3. 3. Where the vertical surface forms an angle, such as the outside corner of a wall.

Ornaments and ornaments are usually sold by the piece. To figure the quantity you have to establish the length of the trim piece (i. e. 6″ bullnose, 8″ decorative liner), then the rule is: Linear All/Piece Length = Quantity

Example:

10ft exposed edge requiring bullnose: 10ft x 12in = 120in.

If using 6 inch bullnose = 120 inch / 6 inch = 20 bullnose required

If you are using 8-inch = 120-inch / 8-inch decorative insert = 15 pieces of decorative insert will be needed

These formulas will help you estimate the quantities you need. We recommend using a professional tile installer to check the work to see if the subfloor is suitable and also to measure and plan any special conditions that may exist.

Your resource for tiles, stone and installations

Visit the showroom and let us help you realize your vision!