How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

When I was a kid, my mom chastised me for running in the house, but I’d run even faster towards the kitchen when the fragrant smells of her savory joong filled the air. I couldn’t wait to dig into the fat, pillow-shaped Toisanese joong the size of my dad’s hand.

My mom's joong are hefty bundles filled with lightly salted glutinous rice, studded with split mung beans, and generously stuffed with delectable slabs of cured pork belly, juicy slices of salty-sweet lap cheong, golden, creamy orbs of salted duck egg yolks, pungent dried baby shrimp, and flavorful shredded dried scallop all snugly wrapped in aromatic bamboo leaves and tied with string. I anxiously watched her joong boil in a large pot of water on the stove, waiting for the time to pass when each ingredient melded together to create a delicious package.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

She only made joong during the Double Fifth Festival, also known as the Dragon Boat Festival, which falls on the fifth day of the fifth lunar month in the Chinese lunar calendar. The fact that she prepared joong only once a year made them even more special. My mom always made enough joong to feed an army, but unfortunately half were earmarked for the annual exchange between our relatives and friends.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

I didn't like it when someone else's joong came into our house. Not that I was a picky eater, but her friends' joong (and some of our relatives') just didn't cut the mustard. Some made their joong with just plain, unseasoned pork, or—even worse—only lean pork, and some joong were just wee, palm-sized bundles, too small to be a meal by themselves. The greatest tragedy of all: the joong with no salted duck egg yolk. A salted duck egg yolk is a happy, tasty, gloriously rich ball of sunshine, and the disappointment of eating a joong and not finding a salted duck egg yolk is like going to bed expecting no school from a forecasted blizzard then waking up to just rain. My mom's joong never disappointed me.

Variations of Joong

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

As I got older, I learned there are many regional variations and different family recipes for joong (Cantonese; joong; Mandarin: zongzi; Taiwanese: bah-tzang; Toisanese: doong). Typically, joong are considered a homemade food and not something found in restaurants or fine dining, but they're Chinese rustic food at its best. There is no one standard joong recipe, but what they all have in common is the basic bundle of rice, stuffed with a filling, wrapped in bamboo leaves and then cooked. A few regional styles* of joong are:

Cantonese: Raw glutinous rice seasoned with salt, mixed with split mung beans and stuffed with salted duck egg yolk, sliced lap cheong, cured pork belly, dried shrimp, and dried shiitake mushrooms then boiled.

Nyonya (Chinese in Malaysia): Raw glutinous rice colored blue with butterfly pea flower (Malay: bunga telang) and stuffed with sweet candied winter melon, peanuts and pork seasoned with a spice paste featuring coriander, ginger, shallots, and garlic. Pandan leaves may be added in the filling or as part of the outer wrapping in order to enhance the fragrance before the final product is boiled.

Shanghainese: Raw glutinous rice seasoned with soy sauce, dark soy sauce, rice wine, star anise, five-spice powder, and cinnamon, stuffed with fatty pork, then steamed.

Taiwanese: Pre-cooked regular short grain rice or raw glutinous rice seasoned with soy sauce and stuffed with a mixture containing stir fried shallots, dried shrimp, dried shiitake mushrooms, seasoned lean pork and fatty pork, and peanuts, then steamed or boiled.

*(Please note these are very bare bones overviews because, as mentioned above, every family will have their own recipe.)

The dried scallops in our family’s recipe are my mother’s substitution for dried shiitake mushrooms. For a treat, my father likes to add Chinese-style roasted pork (Cantonese: siew yook) to make the joong extra special (a.k.a. the supreme porky joong, aka The Robyn Lee joong).

How to Make Toisan-Style Joong

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Every region and every family has different methods and recipes for making joong. My parents are from Toisan (Mandarin: Taishan), a coastal city in the Guangdong providence of China. I am sharing my mom's joong recipe, which is a variant on the Cantonese style, with you. I learned this recipe by watching her make joong each spring and pestering both of my parents with many questions. (In our household, the rule is watch first, hands-on training comes later.)

Joong aren't complicated to make—the most critical ingredient is time. You'll need some planning and a bit of work. It seems daunting at first, but don't worry! Once your joong are done, you'll understand why people greatly appreciate receiving these tasty bundles—they really are a labor of love. I recommend making these as part of a group because it's a great way to spend time together and to ensure you have plenty of help assembling and wrapping the joong.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Happy Chinese New Year! Though I won’t be with my family in Houston to trade hong bao or to eat a bunch of dumplings this weekend, I’ll be keeping the festivities alive here in the Great Northwest by devouring some homemade zongzi (pronounced “joong-juh”). I’ve always had trouble describing these things to people until it hit me: these are basically the Chinese versions of tamales!

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Instead of masa, we use a sticky rice, and instead of being wrapped in a corn husk, these are wrapped in bamboo leaves, which keeps everything together and also imparts a subtle tea-like taste to the rice. The filling can be anything, though traditionally it always involves a fatty piece of pork belly to keep it luscious. My favorite fillings are shiitake mushrooms, the aforementioned piece of pork belly, cured pork sausage, and a salted duck egg yolk, so that is exactly what I’ve made here.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

This incredible recipe from Use Real Butter is one of the tastiest and least fussy recipes I’ve found so far for zongzi! These things do take a bit of prep work to get the rice, meat, and bamboo leaves ready, but it’s not at all complicated. I should also note that while there are excellent tutorials available on the art of wrapping and tying the string around a zongzi, I have never actually paid attention to any of them and just tie it all like a total amateur. And yet they still turn out fine!

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Also like tamales, these freeze well for later consumption, which is handy given that you can’t just make a zongzi or two. After making your batch, let them cool down to room temperature, wrap them individually in foil, put them into a freezer-safe bag, and stash them in the freezer until the mood strikes for feasting. To reheat, let it thaw in the fridge until it’s no longer frozen solid, remove the foil (but keep it wrapped in the banana leaf and string!), and then either steam it or (my preferred method) microwave it for about 2-3 minutes. Then, unwrap everything and enjoy!

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Zongzi
Barely adapted from Use Real Butter‘s recipe

Yield: 8-12 zongzi, depending on how big you make them
Prep Time: 1 day (overnight soaking for rice) and 1 hour
Cook Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 day and 2 hours

For the filling:
1 lb pork belly, cut into 1-inch pieces
3 tbs soy sauce
2 tbs fried shallots (sold prepackaged at most Chinese markets)
½ tbs Shiaohsing cooking wine
1 tsp sugar
¼ tsp ground black pepper
6 dried shiitake mushrooms, rehydrated and sliced into halves
1½ cured Chinese sausages, sliced into ½-inch pieces
6 salted duck eggs, only yolks and sliced in half

For the rice:
3 cups sweet rice (also known as glutinous or pearl rice)
4 tbs vegetable oil
dash soy sauce
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp ground black pepper

16-20 dried bamboo leaves

Rinse the rice until the water runs clear. Soak it overnight in cold water.

Marinate the pork in soy sauce (the 3 tbs amount), fried shallots, Shiaohsing cooking wine, sugar, and black pepper. Keep it all in the fridge in a zip-top bag overnight.

Get a large pot of water boiling and boil the bamboo leaves for about 5 minutes to soften them. Put them in tepid water until you’re ready to use them.

Drain the rice and set aside. In a small saucepan, simmer the pork, marinade, and mushrooms for 30 minutes with the lid on until the pork is mostly cooked through and the marinade has reduced.

In a wok, heat the vegetable oil until it’s shimmering. Add the rice, soy sauce, and black pepper and stir it all to combine.

Wipe off two bamboo leaves and using the base of the leaf, curl it into a cone. Fill it halfway up with the rice, and then place the filling in the middle. Top it with more rice. Pull the top leaves down over the opening of the cone, and make sure there are no holes in the bamboo leaf. Refer to the step-by-step guide above.

Tie it all with butcher string to keep the bamboo leaves intact. Place them into a large pot and cover them with water. Bring the water to a boil and then lower the heat so that it simmers for an hour. Drain them all and serve warm. Of course, remove the string and bamboo leaves before eating!

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

We went to May May Food on Pell Street to pick up some steamed vegetable buns when this display caught our eye. Chinese-style tamales?

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

According to The Oxford Companion to Food by Alan Davidson, tamales are “an important feature of Mexican food and date back to pre-Columbian times. A specially prepared cornmeal dough, usually stuffed with something but something cooked ‘blind’, is steamed inside little (or not so little) package of carefully trimmed corn husks or similar wrapping such as banana leaf.” So the tamale comparison certainly works: A Chinese “tamale,” or zongzi (or joong), is filled with glutinous rice and a stuffing (savory like pork or sweet like sweetened red bean paste), wrapped in bamboo leaves. Tied with a string, they are steamed or boiled and traditionally eaten during the Dragon Boat Festival.

You may have seen and/or eaten nor my gai, a lotus leaf-wrapped sticky rice filled with things like chicken, vegetables, pork, or shrimp, at dim sum in Chinatown. Nor my gai is the “Cantonese style tamale”, usually steamed because the lotus leaf delicately wraps around the rice.

MayMay sells a variety of zongzi as well as other dumplings and dim sum favorites. And here’s a San Francisco Chronicle article about zongzi, with some great pictures and a recipe.

Our favorite zongzi usually fall on the savory side of the palate, which ones do you like?

How to Make the Best Chinese Rice Dumplings (Joong)

Cooking with Alison’s Grandma (Part 4 of 4)

‘Joong’ or Chinese rice dumplings have also been called Chinese tamales. My grandma makes the best joong in the world. I can’t eat other peoples’ or restaurants’ joong, because nothing comes close to grandma’s joong. So I was very happy when she agreed to teach me how to make them. It takes a lot of work and the preparation starts days in advance, but her recipe makes 32 and they can be frozen for future meals.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

The first joong that I ever wrapped.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

The first joong that I ever wrapped.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

This photo was taken after we had already started eating the joong. Note that they don’t come out of the wrapping broken like this.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

This is how my grandma sets up her kitchen twine so that she can easily pull out more string as she wraps her joong.

Joong (Chinese Rice Dumpling) Recipe

makes 32; adapted from Alison’s grandma

5 pounds long grain glutinous rice (‘lo mai fan’)

3 to 4 dried bamboo leaves per joong, so at least 96 total

32 uncooked salted duck/chicken eggs, yolks only (see recipe here)

32 pieces of boneless pork belly with the rind on, approximately 1 1/2 pounds, cut into 1/3 inch thick slices which are then cut into 3/4 inch wide pieces (Note: In Chinese, this cut of meat is called ‘five flower meat’ because it should contain 3 layers of fat and 2 layers of meat.)

8 Chinese sausages (lap cheong), cut in half lengthwise and then cut in half crosswise, yielding 32 pieces total

1 1/2 pounds of shelled and peeled raw peanuts

1/2 pound Chinese dried shrimp

coarse Kosher sea salt

Four days ahead of time, wash the bamboo leaves under cool running water and then boil them until the colour of the leaves turns very green. Then soak the leaves in water at room temperature for 4 days. Replace the soaking water with fresh water once a day. On the day of assembly, use a cloth or paper towel to wipe the leaves clean.

Three days ahead of time, massage a few pinches of salt into the pieces of pork belly. Keep the salted pork belly in the refrigerator, covered, until the day of assembly.

On the day of assembly: Place the rice in a very large rice cooker with enough water to reach a level of 1/2 inch above the rice. Soak the rice for 2 hours and then cook it until soft using the rice cooker. Meanwhile, wash the dried shrimp under cool running water and then soak it in luke warm water for 1 hour. Wash the peanuts and soak them in luke warm water in a separate bowl for 1 hour. Heat a wok over high heat. Add a few light drizzles of vegetable oil to the wok and then stir fry the drained peanuts with a pinch of salt until heated through. Dish out and set aside. Add more vegetable oil to the wok if necessary and then stir fry the dried shrimp until it starts to crisp up. Dish out and set aside. Once the rice is finished cooking, dump it out into a large heatproof container and toss in 1 tablespoon of salt. Set aside to cool slightly. Meanwhile, rinse the salted pork belly pieces well under cool running water. Drain, dry off with a paper towel, and then set aside.

To assemble and wrap the joong, see the video here where my grandma demonstrates how to fill and wrap a joong. Note that you will need kitchen twine.

To cook the joong, place them in a very large stock pot and fill the pot with water so that the joong are at least almost completely covered by the water. You may need to do this in batches if you do not have a pot that is large enough to hold all 32 of the joong. Then bring the water to a rolling boil. Reduce the heat to maintain a gentle boil for four hours, covered. Remove from the hot water and enjoy immediately. You could serve this with soy sauce and/or hot sauce on the side. Once the cooked joong has cooled completely, these may be frozen. Simply defrost completely and then reheat by steaming (see here for How to Steam Cook Food) or by boiling.

One of the famous festivals in China is Dragon Boat festival (端午節). This festival commemorates the patriotic poet Qu Yuan (屈原) who died on the fifth day of the fifth month in the Chinese lunar calendar. Like other Chinese festivals, there is also a legend behind it. You can read the long story online and learn why Dragon boat racing and eating Zongzi have become the central customs of the festival.

This year, the festival falls on June 12 and I can see a lot of Chinese people at the market getting ingredients to make Zongzi. Zongzi (also called Zong) has different shapes and various fillings and the main ingredients are sticky rice, green beans, fresh meat and salted duck egg yolk. People also added red beans, dried shrimp, peanuts, chestnuts, Chinese sausages, shiitake mushrooms etc. I have made these Zongzi for many years (only once a year though) and I’m sharing my mom’s secret recipe today. Every year she makes a lot and gives them to friends, relatives and neighbours. Her Zongzi were fabulous and never disappointed anyone!

Ingredients (makes 20 Zongzi) :

5 lbs
2 bags (14oz each)
10
2 pounds
11 oz
7 oz
1 bag (14oz)
20
3 ½ Tbsp
6 Tbsp
Sticky rice (Glutinous rice) (糯米)
Peeled split mung bean (去皮開邊綠豆)
Salted Duck Egg Yolks (halved) (咸蛋黃)
Pork belly
Peanuts
Miniature dried shrimp
Bamboo leaves (荷葉)
Long strings
Salt
Vegetable oil

Marinate for Meat :

1 teaspoon
2-3
1 Tbsp
1 Tbsp
4 Tbsp
Salt
Red fermented beancurd (南乳)
Light soy sauce
Water
Five spice powder (五香粉)
  1. Cut pork belly into approx. 1.5” cubes and marinate with 1 teaspoon of salt for 20 minutes. In a small bowl, mash the red fermented beancurd and add light soy sauce and water, mix well.
  2. Heat the wok with 1 tablespoon of oil and stir in the beancurd mixture, add pork belly and stir fry until the meat gets a nice coat of the sauce – about 5 minutes (the meat is not completely cooked). When the meat is cool, cover and refrigerate overnight.
  3. After the meat is marinated overnight, take it out from the fridge, roughly rinse off the beancurd mixture and pad dry. Sprinkle about 4 tablespoons of five spice powder and mix well. The pork pieces should have a nice coat of powder, add more if necessary. Set aside.
  4. Soak rice in water for 4 hours, drain.
  5. Add 3 ½ tablespoons of salt and 6 tablespoons of oil to the rice, mix well (taste the rice, add more salt if necessary). Set aside.
  6. Soak Green mung beans in water for 2 hours, drain and set aside.
  7. Wash dried shrimp, pad dry and set aside.
  8. Boil a pot of hot water and put the bamboo leaves in, soak for 20 minutes. Wash each one with a brush.
  9. Wrap ingredients with bamboo leaves (see instructions below). Boil Zongzi for 4 hours.

These are all the ingredients you will need:

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

If leaves are very dirty, you may want to use a clean brush to brush each leaf. After washing and boiling the bamboo leaves, choose two large ones, make a small cross with the leaves. Bend and twist the leaves in the center to make a funnel shape (see pictures below).

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Fill the funnel shape with a few tablespoons of sticky rice, top with a sprinkling of mung beans. Add meat, egg yolk, peanuts, dried shrimp, etc. Now the ingredients are heavy enough to hold the funnel shape, add one leaf to each side and top with more sticky rice, mung beans, peanuts and dried shrimp (the meat and the egg yolk should be in the middle part of the Zongzi). The mound should be generous but not overflowing. Carefully fold the sides in over the mixture (folding both sides first), then fold the bottom over. (see pictures below)

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Now you fold the top leaf flap downwards to make a package. Take a long string and wrap the Zongzi firmly.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Place Zongzi in a large pot and fill the pot with water (water should cover all Zongzi), cover and bring it to a boil. Reduce heat and cook for four hours. You will need to check the water level, add water as necessary.

One of the famous festivals in China is Dragon Boat festival (端午節). This festival commemorates the patriotic poet Qu Yuan (屈原) who died on the fifth day of the fifth month in the Chinese lunar calendar. Like other Chinese festivals, there is also a legend behind it. You can read the long story online and learn why Dragon boat racing and eating Zongzi have become the central customs of the festival.

This year, the festival falls on June 12 and I can see a lot of Chinese people at the market getting ingredients to make Zongzi. Zongzi (also called Zong) has different shapes and various fillings and the main ingredients are sticky rice, green beans, fresh meat and salted duck egg yolk. People also added red beans, dried shrimp, peanuts, chestnuts, Chinese sausages, shiitake mushrooms etc. I have made these Zongzi for many years (only once a year though) and I’m sharing my mom’s secret recipe today. Every year she makes a lot and gives them to friends, relatives and neighbours. Her Zongzi were fabulous and never disappointed anyone!

Ingredients (makes 20 Zongzi) :

5 lbs
2 bags (14oz each)
10
2 pounds
11 oz
7 oz
1 bag (14oz)
20
3 ½ Tbsp
6 Tbsp
Sticky rice (Glutinous rice) (糯米)
Peeled split mung bean (去皮開邊綠豆)
Salted Duck Egg Yolks (halved) (咸蛋黃)
Pork belly
Peanuts
Miniature dried shrimp
Bamboo leaves (荷葉)
Long strings
Salt
Vegetable oil

Marinate for Meat :

1 teaspoon
2-3
1 Tbsp
1 Tbsp
4 Tbsp
Salt
Red fermented beancurd (南乳)
Light soy sauce
Water
Five spice powder (五香粉)
  1. Cut pork belly into approx. 1.5” cubes and marinate with 1 teaspoon of salt for 20 minutes. In a small bowl, mash the red fermented beancurd and add light soy sauce and water, mix well.
  2. Heat the wok with 1 tablespoon of oil and stir in the beancurd mixture, add pork belly and stir fry until the meat gets a nice coat of the sauce – about 5 minutes (the meat is not completely cooked). When the meat is cool, cover and refrigerate overnight.
  3. After the meat is marinated overnight, take it out from the fridge, roughly rinse off the beancurd mixture and pad dry. Sprinkle about 4 tablespoons of five spice powder and mix well. The pork pieces should have a nice coat of powder, add more if necessary. Set aside.
  4. Soak rice in water for 4 hours, drain.
  5. Add 3 ½ tablespoons of salt and 6 tablespoons of oil to the rice, mix well (taste the rice, add more salt if necessary). Set aside.
  6. Soak Green mung beans in water for 2 hours, drain and set aside.
  7. Wash dried shrimp, pad dry and set aside.
  8. Boil a pot of hot water and put the bamboo leaves in, soak for 20 minutes. Wash each one with a brush.
  9. Wrap ingredients with bamboo leaves (see instructions below). Boil Zongzi for 4 hours.

These are all the ingredients you will need:

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

If leaves are very dirty, you may want to use a clean brush to brush each leaf. After washing and boiling the bamboo leaves, choose two large ones, make a small cross with the leaves. Bend and twist the leaves in the center to make a funnel shape (see pictures below).

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Fill the funnel shape with a few tablespoons of sticky rice, top with a sprinkling of mung beans. Add meat, egg yolk, peanuts, dried shrimp, etc. Now the ingredients are heavy enough to hold the funnel shape, add one leaf to each side and top with more sticky rice, mung beans, peanuts and dried shrimp (the meat and the egg yolk should be in the middle part of the Zongzi). The mound should be generous but not overflowing. Carefully fold the sides in over the mixture (folding both sides first), then fold the bottom over. (see pictures below)

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Now you fold the top leaf flap downwards to make a package. Take a long string and wrap the Zongzi firmly.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Place Zongzi in a large pot and fill the pot with water (water should cover all Zongzi), cover and bring it to a boil. Reduce heat and cook for four hours. You will need to check the water level, add water as necessary.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

The leaf-wrapped sticky rice dumplings zongzi (in Mandarin) or joong (Cantonese) are a snack enjoyed year-round in China, though they are especially popular in the spring. The long bamboo leaves are filled with either sweet or savory ingredients, and often made and enjoyed by families in the weeks leading up to the Dragon Boat Festival, which falls on the fifth day in the fifth month of the lunar calendar. We learned how to make these with Chinese home cook Mei Zeng, who’s perfected her zongzi recipe after years of practice.

A pressure-cooker is not essential for preparing zongzi, however it will cut the already lengthy cook time down significantly. If you do have one, the larger the better. If you don’t have one, pack dumplings snugly into a large, heavy pot and add enough water to reach about 1/2″ from the highest layer of dumplings. Simmer the dumplings, covered, over medium-low heat for 3 ½ hours before draining and serving.

Keep extra bamboo leaves on hand as they tend to crack easily along their veins during shaping, and unbroken leaves make for the tidiest dumplings.

Dried chinese sausage, bamboo leaves, sticky rice, dried shiitake mushrooms, and raw peanuts can be found in most Chinese grocery stores, but if you don’t have a large Chinese community near you, many of the ingredients can be found at your typical grocery store, and the rest are available online.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

The leaf-wrapped sticky rice dumplings zongzi (in Mandarin) or joong (Cantonese) are a snack enjoyed year-round in China, though they are especially popular in the spring. The long bamboo leaves are filled with either sweet or savory ingredients, and often made and enjoyed by families in the weeks leading up to the Dragon Boat Festival, which falls on the fifth day in the fifth month of the lunar calendar. We learned how to make these with Chinese home cook Mei Zeng, who’s perfected her zongzi recipe after years of practice. Get the recipe for Chinese Sticky Rice Dumplings (Zongzi) »

What You Will Need

Chinese Sticky Rice Dumplings (Zongzi) How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

Have you ever tried Chinese Zongzi, a classic Chinese holiday food for Dragon Boat Festival?Zongzi, Chinese sticky rice dumpling or sometimes called as Chinese tamales, go hand in hand with the Dragon Boat Festival (also known as the Duanwu festival, usually celebrated on the 5th day of the 5 th month of the traditional Chinese lunar calendar). The fresh and unique fragrance of the reed leaves or bamboo leaves can greatly set the pure aroma of the glutinous rice off. Zongzi is a traditional family festival food in most provinces. They may be different from filling, taste and shape.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

The filling of Zongzi can be very complex for example one of the most famous Zongzi—Jiangxi Zongzi. Usually pork, mung bean paste, red beans paste and salted duck eggs are all wrapped in a small and tinny Zongzi. During my childhood, my grandma used to make pure Zongzi without any filling and then top with sugar or honey before serving. That’s the best flavor in my mind.However you can try your combinations!! There are over 30 Zongzi fillings in China.

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

The leaves used for wrapping Zongzi can be reed leaves or bamboo leaves. And the principle is that fresh ones are better than dried ones. If fresh ones are too difficult to find, you can buy packaged dried ones and then soak them in clean water overnight. Then the leaves will turn green again. Wash them carefully with a clean towel. The upper green ones are fresh leaves while the lighter ones are dried leaves. The two sides are different. Front side is much smoother than the back side. When overlay the leaves in following wrapping process, remember to overlay back to back so we can have smooth Zongzi!

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

How to make zongzi (chinese tamales)

I soak around 3 cups of glutinous rice this time and make three filling. For each of the filling, I am using 1 glutinous rice. For how to wrap a Zongzi, please refer to the following video.