How to make your own pickling spice

Fermented foods are all the hype now! Roll up your sleeves and try pickling your own vegetables with our pickling spice — a mixture of whole and broken spices, seeds. Fermented foods are all the hype now! Roll up your sleeves and try pickling your own vegetables with our pickling spice — a mixture of whole and broken spices, seeds, and herbs to add the perfect flavors during the pickling process. More Less

How to make your own pickling spice

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How to make your own pickling spice

How to make your own pickling spice

How to make your own pickling spice

How to make your own pickling spice

How to make your own pickling spice

How to make your own pickling spice

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Are you out of McCormick ?</p> <p>Are you sure you want to remove</p> <h4>Own this spice?</h4> <p>Set up your Flavor Profile or log in to:</p> <ul> <li>Add this spice to “My Spices”</li> <li>Create a more personalized experience</li> <li>Manage your spices in Flavor Profile</li> </ul> <p>No spam ever! Read our privacy policy </p> <p>Sign up to save your favorite flavors.</p> <p>No spam ever! Read our privacy policy </p> <p>DON’T HAVE AN ACCOUNT? REGISTER TODAY</p> <p>Already have an account? login </p> <p>Already have an account? login </p> <h3>Social Media</h3> <p>Because we are constantly improving our products, we encourage you to read the ingredient statement on our packages at the time of your purchase.</p> <h2>Make your own pickling spice blend! Mustard seed, black peppercorns, and cinnamon (or allspice!) are essential. The rest are mix-and-match. Lasts for up to a year and makes enough for several batches.</h2> <ul> <li>Pin</li> <li>Share</li> <li>Email</li> </ul> <p>Are you planning on making lots of pickles? If so, you might want to try mixing up your own blend of pickling spice! It’s very simple to throw together, and one batch is enough for lots and lots of pickles.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/basic-pickling-spice-8A9AE7.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="2000" height="1333" class=""/></p> <h2>Spices in This Pickling Blend</h2> <p>If the ingredient list looks a little long to you, don’t worry! You really can pare it down to just the basics. For me, the essentials are the <strong>mustard seeds, black peppercorns or red pepper flakes</strong>, and at least one of the sweet spices (allspice, cinnamon, or cloves). As long as you’ve got those in the mix, you can customize your blend however you like.</p> <h2>How Much Pickling Spice to Use</h2> <p>Whatever mixture of spices you end up with, you’ll want to use about 1 1/2 teaspoons per pint of pickles (or a tablespoon if you’re canning in quart jars). Mix ‘em up and get pickling!</p> <h2>Ways to Use This Spice Blend</h2> <p>You can use this blend with cucumbers, green beans, carrot sticks, beets, or even sliced red onions, my favorite hamburger topping. It’s a versatile mix with a flavor profile that’s both savory and sweet, with a little kick of heat.</p> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/easy-homemade-pickles-89C97E4.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" class=""/></p> <p><strong>What took me so long to make classic pickles?</strong> As it turns out, homemade dill pickles are simple, easy and delicious. They’re the perfect little summertime project, if you even want to call it that. These pickles are ready after a short chill in the refrigerator (as little as one hour), and they keep for several weeks.</p> <p>These pickles are tangy and refreshing, nice and crisp, and offer garden-fresh flavor. They remind me of Claussen or Grillo’s pickles—but they’re even better. In short, I’m in love with this refrigerator pickle recipe and I think you will be, too.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/easy-homemade-pickles-670809E.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1100" height="756" class=""/></p> <p><strong>These pickles are made with simple ingredients.</strong> You’ll need vinegar (I prefer rice vinegar’s mild flavor), fresh dill (technically optional, but delicious), a couple cloves of garlic, and a few basic seasonings.</p> <p>I added a touch of sweetener, too—just enough to cut the bite of vinegar. These pickles are decidedly tangy, and nowhere near “bread and butter” territory. However, the sweetness level is entirely up to you.</p> <p>These pickles aren’t overwhelmingly salty, either, yet they’re fully seasoned. They are irresistibly <em>just right</em>—perfect for burgers, for snacking, and more.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/easy-homemade-pickles-7374736.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1100" height="756" class=""/></p> <h2>How to Make Pickles</h2> <p>These pickles are so easy to make! You’ll find the full recipe below, but here’s a preview:</p> <ol> <li>Slice your cucumbers as desired.</li> <li>Whisk together a basic brine made of water, vinegar and seasonings.</li> <li>Pack the cucumbers into a jar, add some dill and garlic, and pour the brine over it all.</li> <li>Refrigerate until the pickles taste sufficiently “pickled!”</li> </ol> <p><em><strong>Perhaps of note:</strong></em> Most of my other pickle recipes start with a hot vinegar brine, which helps the brine permeate tough vegetables. These pickles are made with a room temperature brine, which means that you can skip the stovetop step (and the intense vinegar smell that comes with it). Cucumbers are delicate and readily absorb flavor, so a cool brine yields pickles with the best flavor, texture and color.</p> <h3>Cucumber Slicing Options</h3> <p>You can use this recipe to yield any pickle shape, depending on how you slice your cucumbers. Thin slices will taste fully pickled sooner than thick spears (about one hour vs. three).</p> <p><strong>For cucumber rounds (or “chips” as they call them on the grocery shelves)</strong>: Simply cut the cucumbers into thin slices (around 1/8 to 1/4-inch thick) .</p> <p><strong>For spears:</strong> Slice your cucumber in half lengthwise, then slice the halves into quarters. Finally, slice the quarters into eighths so they yield wedge-shaped spears. If you’re using a long cucumber, cut all the slices in half through the middle so they fit into your jar.</p> <p><strong>For sandwich slices:</strong> Slice off a strip of cucumber running the length of its long side. Turn the cucumber so it rests safely on the flat side. Then slice the cucumber, lengthwise, into 1/4-inch thick slices. Depending on the length of your cucumber, you might slice them in half or into thirds to suit your purposes.</p> <h3>Watch How to Make Pickles</h3> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/easy-homemade-pickles-EAA6AB6.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1100" height="1650" class=""/></p> <h2>Pickle Serving Suggestions</h2> <p>Serve these pickles with veggie burgers and other sandwiches, like these halloumi BLT’s. Try adding pickle rounds to your garden-fresh salads (they go well with tomatoes, carrots, radishes, etc.).</p> <p>These pickles are also great light snacks on their own, and they’re nice, tangy additions to cheese boards and party spreads.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/corned-beef-spice-76251.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="720" height="1080" class=""/></p> <p>This <strong>Corned Beef Spice Packet recipe</strong> might come in handy the next time you are cooking corned beef and find that it’s missing a spice pack. Or, maybe you just want to add more corned beef spices than that little packet contains.</p> <p>My <strong>Corned Beef Spice Mix</strong> includes <em>coriander, peppercorns, mustard seeds</em>, and other herbs and spices to add <strong>amazing flavor</strong> to your corned beef. Be sure to save some of the brisket to make delicious Reuben sandwiches!</p> <p> <img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/corned-beef-spice-CBD90.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1200" height="800" class=""/></p> <h2>Why This Recipe Works</h2> <p>Making your own Corned Beef Spices couldn’t be simpler! Out of my frustration of never having enough spices for my corned beef, I decided to make my own <strong>Corned Beef Spice Packet Blend</strong> instead.</p> <p>It took a little investigative work for me to figure out what spices and herbs were included in those tiny little spice packets, but in the end, I do believe I nailed it!</p> <p>Now I can generously season the corned beef with my home-made spice blend, which really enhances the flavor of the brisket. Now, you can do the same!</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/corned-beef-spice-0D9A70.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="630" height="420" class=""/></p> <h2>How Do You Make A Corned Beef Spice Packet?</h2> <p>So what spices are included in those elusive <strong>Corned Beef Spice Packets</strong>, and why are they so stingy with them? It depends on who you ask; I decided to do my own investigating.</p> <p>Upon a quick examination of the spices in the packet, I identified the following spices: <em>crushed bay leaves, coriander, crushed red pepper, peppercorns, anise seeds, and mustard seeds</em>.</p> <p>Now doesn’t that sound simple enough? The next thing I had to figure out was the correct proportions of each of the ingredients. Let’s make some together!</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/corned-beef-spice-DC6AAD.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="630" height="420" class=""/></p> <h2>Steps to Making Your Own Homemade Corned Been Spice Blend</h2> <p><strong>1.</strong> Toast coriander, peppercorns, anise, and mustard seeds in a hot cast-iron skillet for two to three minutes, until fragrant.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/corned-beef-spice-89CC8C8.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="630" height="420" class=""/></p> <p><strong>2.</strong> Add crushed bay leaves and red pepper flakes in the last 30 seconds. You are basically just trying to awaken their flavors. But be careful so that you don’t burn them.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/corned-beef-spice-F4BD555.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="630" height="420" class=""/></p> <p><strong>3.</strong> Pour the contents of the pan into a Spice Mill/Grinder or a Ninja blender. Pulse a few times, but just enough to release the flavors. You should still be able to distinguish between the various ingredients.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/corned-beef-spice-220C758.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="630" height="420" class=""/></p> <p><strong>4.</strong> Store the spice mix in an airtight container until needed. If you make extra seasoning, you can freeze what you don’t plan on using right away.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/corned-beef-spice-FE9C5FB.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="630" height="420" class=""/></p> <p><em>Be sure to use some of the Corned Beef Seasoning to make my Instant Pot Corned Beef!</em></p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/corned-beef-spice-B14873.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="630" height="420" class=""/></p> <h2>Corned Beef Spice Options</h2> <p>Besides the spices listed in the recipe, there are other spices that you can add if you’re feeling a little adventurous. Consider adding any of the following:</p> <ul> <li>cloves</li> <li>allspice</li> <li>cardamom</li> <li>cinnamon</li> </ul> <p>If you do decide to add these different spices, I would caution you to go easy at first. This is one of those cases where less is more.</p> <p>These spices all have intense flavors, so start off with small amounts and adjust the quantity if necessary. I would start with no more than a ¼ teaspoon of each.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/old-bay-style-seasoning-7496A4.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="200" height="200" class=""/></p> <p>Old Bay seasoning is a classic spice mix often used to flavor seafood dishes, including Maryland-style crab cakes. Whether you can’t find it in your local market or prefer to mix up your own spice blends to keep them fresh-tasting, it’s easy to make Old Bay from scratch. You won’t be able to tell the difference between the real thing and this recipe, and it allows you to adjust the spice mix to your taste, salt intake, and more.</p> <p>While the exact ingredients are not revealed, Old Bay reportedly has a mix of 18 spices. It has a complex savory flavor, with bay leaf, celery salt, mustard, and pepper at the forefront. Paprika and various other spices add depth and make this a well-rounded seasoning. If you don’t have every ingredient listed, make sure you include the most prominent ones and make substitutions sparingly.</p> <p>This Old Bay substitute is a very versatile spice mix. While it’s famously used for shellfish and other seafood, it works wonderfully on poultry and pork. Use it to flavor soups, stews, and creamy salads or dips, or sprinkle it on veggies, fries, or even popcorn. It has a six-month shelf life, so you’ll have plenty of time to explore its many uses.</p> <blockquote> <p>Nicely decorated bottles of chili pickles are simple, yet eye-catching gifts (or products to sell), especially when you use a whole medley of different colours and sizes of chilies.</p> </blockquote> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/quick-and-easy-5F8C.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1024" height="1024" class=""/></p> <p> Homemade chilli pickles are the perfect way to preserve the fresh just-picked flavour of chili peppers.</p> <p>It’s no secret – we love chilli peppers. And we like them as close to freshly picked as possible. Bursting with freshness, flavour, and aroma.</p> <p>Dried chillies tend to be too overpowering for us. Besides, they lack the <strong>complex flavour profile</strong> of fresh ones.</p> <p>Pickled chillies are a great way to preserve that fresh just-picked flavour, and they are quick and easy to make.</p> <p>Nicely decorated bottles of chilli pickles are a simple, yet eye-catching gift, especially when you use a whole medley of different colours and sizes of chillies.</p> <p>When making pickled chilli to give as gifts select chilli varieties to suit the receiver. For chilli heads use extra hot varieties like habanero and Tabasco. For soft mouths use milder varieties like Jalapeno and Hungarian wax.</p> <p>If you don’t grow your own chilies you’ll find a ready supply at your local greengrocer or supermarket.</p> <h2>Home-Made Chili Pickle Variations</h2> <p><strong>Cooking with herbs and spices</strong> is all about stamping your own unique personality on simple recipes. This basic recipe is no exception, it lends itself to endless variations and with that, the opportunity to create your own signature pickled chilies.</p> <h3>Pickling Spice Variations</h3> <p>English pickling spice consists of dried ginger, yellow mustard seed, mace, allspice, black peppercorns, cloves and coriander seed. If you don’t have pickling spice, add as many of these that you have on hand.</p> <p>Or make your own pickling spice. Making your own has the advantage that you can change the proportions which will result in your own unique flavour profile.</p> <p>Don’t limit yourself to the English pickling spice recipe. In the Middle East and North Africa, they make pickling spice with coriander seed, ground ginger, golpar, powdered dried lime, anise, cinnamon, cumin seed, and nigella.</p> <p>Apart from the spices mentioned above, you can experiment with: bay leaf, fresh ginger, garlic, lemongrass, lime, olives (in brine), oregano, rosemary, and soy sauce. These are all <strong>flavour pals</strong> with chilli peppers, and they all work well in a pickle.</p> <p><em>TIP:</em> You can add the pickling spice in a muslin bag and remove the bag before gifting or selling your pickles. It makes the final product look ‘cleaner’, and it keeps your recipe a secret. You can still add a few carefully selected individual pickling spices for decorative effect if you like.</p> <h3>Vinegar Variations</h3> <p>The vinegar is a key flavouring component (and the only preservative) in your pickles.</p> <p>Most store-bought pickles are made with ‘cheap’ vinegar. This gives you another opportunity to make your home-made chili pickles stand out from the crowd. Use vinegar with a good flavour profile. And don’t be shy to experiment with blending the vinegar. For example, if you are on a budget blend a cheap white vinegar with small amounts of good quality red wine or sherry vinegar and a bit of balsamic vinegar. If budget is not a concern, go all out on a good quality red wine or sherry vinegar.</p> <h3>Sugar Variations</h3> <p>You can also use the sugar to give your pickles a unique twist. Experiment with brown sugar, castor sugar or any other sweetener that tickles your taste buds.</p> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-dill-3622348.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" class=""/></p> <p><strong>Learning how to make dill pickles is so worth it! If you loved the taste of grandmas old fashioned homemade garlic dill pickles when you were a kid then this easy recipe will become your new favorite. Enjoy this super easy canning recipe on your hamburgers and sandwiches all year long.</strong></p> <p>Dill pickles have always been one of my favorite snacks even when I was a kid I would always be into the pickles especially the garlic dill pickles!</p> <p>They are cold and crunchy with a slightly sour taste and perfect for serving with a wide range of meals or enjoying on their own.</p> <p>So it’s no wonder that I just couldn’t get enough of them. I’m still the same way!</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-dill-B7E55AD.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="600" height="900" class=""/></p> <p>Of all the different things we can each year I always look forward to making many different types of pickles.</p> <p>The good news is, that it’s so easy to make homemade dill pickles! You can make up a few pint or quart jars in only 40 minutes or less including the processing time.</p> <h2>Tips For Making Perfect Dill Pickles</h2> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-dill-0FA63.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1399" height="933" class=""/></p> <p>Homemade dill pickle spears</p> <h3>Use The Best Cucumbers</h3> <p>One of the most important parts of making great homemade pickles is to start off with the right cucumbers.</p> <p>Make sure you are using pickling cucumbers as many types sold as slicing cucumbers don’t hold up well to pickling and canning.</p> <p>Select fresh cucumbers that feel firm, avoid cucumbers that feel limp, wrinkly or soft.</p> <h3>What Size Of Cucumbers Are Best For Pickles?</h3> <p>Cucumbers for pickling are best picked between 2 and 5 inches long. The smaller sized ones are perfect for making baby dill pickles and the larger ones work great cut into rounds, pickle spears or long slices.</p> <h3>Trim Off The Flower Ends</h3> <p>Always remove a thin slice from the end of the cucumber that had the flower growing. It contains enzymes that can cause the cucumbers to go soft.</p> <h3>How Long Until Homemade Dill Pickles Are Ready?</h3> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-dill-AC9B18C.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1400" height="933" class=""/></p> <p>Sliced round dill pickles perfect for hamburgers</p> <p>Have you been wondering how long does it take for a cucumber to pickle? Once the jars have been processed and stored, let them sit for 4 to 5 weeks before opening.</p> <p>Cucumbers need at least this long to allow the brine to fully soak in and develop that great pickle taste.</p> <h3>Do I Need To Sterilize Jars For Pickles?</h3> <p>The jars you use to pack your pickles in need to be clean but according to current standards, there is no need to sterilize them if you are processing the jars for 10 minutes or more. The jars will be sterilized during the canning process.</p> <h2>How To Substitute Dill Heads?</h2> <p>I love using dill heads in my pickle jars because they look pretty and add a great flavor. But if you don’t have any fresh dill then substitute 1 tsp. of dill seed for each head of dill.</p> <h2>How To Make Dill Pickles</h2> <h3>Supplies You Need For Canning Pickles:</h3> <p>Before starting make sure to wash and remove the spines from the pickling cucumbers and then set them aside.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-dill-85BEBA.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="700" height="1050" class=""/></p> <p>Add the dill, garlic, and pickling spice in your canning jar.</p> <p>Wash your quart-sized canning jars and set them on top of a towel or wooden surface. Then into each quart jar place 1 fresh dill head, 2 cloves of peeled garlic and 1 tbs. pickling salt.</p> <p>Next, get your cucumbers and take a thin slice (1/16th) off the blossom end of each cucumber and then pack into your prepared jars.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-dill-896E4.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="700" height="1050" class=""/></p> <p>Packing cucumbers into jars</p> <p>You can cut the cucumbers into any shape you like. I use this same recipe for making icicle pickles, rounds, long thin slices that are perfect for burgers and yes even whole pickles.</p> <p>This homemade pickle recipe is very flexible so just cut them up any way you like or do a mixture of styles.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-dill-2468E8.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="700" height="1050" class=""/></p> <p>Homemade whole dill pickles</p> <p>To make the brine combine the vinegar and water in a large pot and bring to a boil. Pour the brine over the pickles, leaving 1/2 inch of headroom.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-dill-AAC08.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="700" height="467" class=""/></p> <p>Easy homemade dill pickle recipe</p> <p>Remove any air bubbles from the jars and wipe the rims clean and place the lids on finger tight. Place the jars into a water bath canner and process for 15 minutes adjusted for your altitude.</p> <p>See making your own homemade dill pickles wasn’t hard, was it? With just a few minutes in the kitchen, you can easily make up a few batches of pickles and enjoy their tangy, crunchy taste all year!</p> <h3>More Yummy Pickle Recipes</h3> <h2>Easy Garlic Dill Pickles Recipe</h2> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-dill-2C8A08.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="300" height="300" class=""/></p> <p>If you loved the taste of grandmas old fashioned pickles when you were a kid then you will love this garlic dill pickle recipe! Packed with just the right amount of garlic, dill, and spice to give it a classic taste that you will love on hamburgers, sandwiches and more! Learn how to make these easy pickles in 40 minutes or less!</p> <p>Pickling with vinegar is a really simple and quick way to preserve foods. Choosing the right vinegar to use can easily transform a pickle and there are plenty to choose from on the market so how do you decide which vinegar to use. In this article, we will look at what is required of a pickling vinegar and which vinegars are best for different types of pickles.</p> <p><em>We will be looking at making long-lasting preserved pickles refrigerator or quick pickles.</em></p> <p>Table of Contents</p> <h2>How Vinegar Preserves Food</h2> <p>Vinegar has been used as a preservative for centuries and it is highly effective. The reason that it is highly effective as a preservative is because of the pH. The acid in vinegar is acetic acid created by acetobacter, a type of acid producing bacteria.</p> <p>The acidity of vinegar inhibits the growth of bacteria and foods stored in vinegar will be able to last much longer sometimes even many years without refrigeration.</p> <p>Acidity is, therefore, a key requirement when choosing a vinegar to preserve foods. As some types of bacteria are able to grow in slightly acidic solutions we need to ensure the vinegar we use to pickle with is acidic enough to start with.</p> <h2>The acidity of Vinegar For Pickling</h2> <p><strong>To ensure that pickles preserved properly you need to ensure that the acidity of the vinegar you are using is at least 5% acidity or higher.</strong></p> <p>5% acidity means that for a specific volume of vinegar, 5% of that volume will be acetic acid. At this level, you will ensure that the pH is low enough after processing and cooking the pickles and they retain their texture and crunch.</p> <p>All vegetables, fruits and fish or meat will contain liquid. When you process the pickles it is inevitable that water will dilute down the vinegar so, some vegetables also contain quite a lot of water. This dilution means that the acidity may not be as strong as we think it is. If we use a strong enough vinegar to begin with this water dilution is not a problem as there will still be enough acidity to preserve the food.</p> <p>Typically most flavoured vinegar such as salad vinegar will be less than 5% acidity so these are not appropriate for pickling.</p> <h4>Beware Adding Water To Pickles <em>(unless stated in the recipe)</em> </h4> <p>It is usually a bad idea to dilute the vinegar with water if you are pickling unless your recipe explicitly states to do so. It is for the above reason; acidity. If you dilute down the vinegar the pH in the final pickle may not be high enough to ensure proper preservation and long and stable shelf life.</p> <h2>Vinegar Can Be Neutral or Add Flavour</h2> <p>The vast majority of recipes you find will suggest using distilled white vinegar for making pickles. This is often a good choice as it is almost always over 5% acidity which is vitally important for ensuring your produce is preserved properly and the flavour is neutral.</p> <p>Many of the foods that we might consider pickling will have a delicate flavour we want to retain as much as possible. If you consider the cucumber, it is a subtle flavour, if you use a strongly flavoured vinegar the delicate flavour of the cucumber will be nearly absent in the finished pickle.</p> <p>On the other hand, onions typically call for malt vinegar as the primary choice for pickling. Onions are clearly very strongly flavoured and can hold their own against a strong flavoured and spiced malt vinegar.</p> <p>Cider vinegar is another popular candidate for pickling as long as the acidity is high enough. It goes well with moderately flavoured produce but can dominate the more subtle flavoured foods you might consider pickling. I like using it for pickling beetroot.</p> <h2>Good Vinegars For Pickling</h2> <p><strong>Distilled White Vinegar</strong>: This is by far the most common choice for pickling. The acidity content is nearly always high enough and the flavour is mellow and the colour of your produce is going to stay the same because it is clear.</p> <p><strong>Malt Vinegar</strong>: This vinegar made from malted barley is another prime contender. It is often quite a dark brown so will colour the food you are pickling a shade of brown and it has a fairly bold flavour so is best used with high flavoured produce.</p> <p><strong>Cider Vinegar</strong>: Cider vinegar is a moderately coloured vinegar. It is important to check the acidity before using cider vinegar for pickling as some may not be over 5% acidity. It has a fairly distinct flavour so it is best used to pickle produce that can stand up to the flavour.</p> <p><strong>Wine Vinegar</strong>: It is important again to check the acidity here which may be either higher than 5% or lower if the vinegar has been made to dress salads it could only be 4% so should not be used. Wine vinegars are usually delicately flavoured and of course, red wine vinegar is coloured but can be used in combination with flavourful vegetables to make some great pickles.</p> <p>Published: Nov 9, 2015 · Modified: Sep 11, 2020 by Laura · This post may contain affiliate links.</p> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/bottled-gherkins-homemade-0C654D4.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" class=""/></p> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/bottled-gherkins-homemade-C7FBFF2.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" class=""/></p> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/bottled-gherkins-homemade-6D0E1F9.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" class=""/></p> <h2><strong>A simple to follow tutorial for how to make your own bottled gherkins! Make the most of that summer harvest and enjoy homemade dill pickles all year round!</strong></h2> <p><strong>Update September 2020:</strong> <em>I now exclusively use the water bath method for canning/bottling everything as an extra layer of food safety. I will be updating instructions over the next few months to share how I do that. I have never had any problems bottling them this way but now prefer the water bath method in terms of ease and having a higher success rate with jars sealing. Laura</em></p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/bottled-gherkins-homemade-8F64398.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1920" height="999" class=""/></p> <p>In my experience, there is no fence sitting in the gherkin debate. You either love them or hate them. While Josh falls very firmly into the haters category I am a ‘can’t get enough – eat them whole out of the jar – put them with everything’ – true gherkin lover! So of course when I found out I could grow them and pickle my own it had to be done.</p> <p>A couple of years ago I tried. I bought 1 gherkin plant and planted it in a spot that just happened to miss the part of the garden that was watered. I ended up with a very sad looking plant and about 3 gherkins to show for my efforts. Fail.</p> <p>This year I planned ahead. I planted 8 seeds, reserved a spot up a trellis smack bang in the middle of our big vege garden and ended up with a gherkin forest and kilos of gherkins from 8 epic plants!</p> <p>I spent ages on the internet trying to find a recipe to pickle gherkins and in the end gave up. They had long lists of ingredients and some of them even said to brine the gherkins for 7 days. 7 DAYS!! I don’t know about you but when I’m pickling stuff I don’t have 7 days to wait. I also don’t have the bench space to leave a tub of brining pickles sitting around for 7 days. So I made up a recipe. I still brined (is that even a word) the gherkins, but only for a few hours. Much more like it!</p> <p>I made a couple of different batches of gherkins as I didn’t know how they would turn out. In some I added pickling spice and some I left plain. I wasn’t sure about the flavour of the pickling spice to begin with, but it definitely grew on me and after eating some of the plain gherkins, I decided that I prefered the ones with the spice – they are a little different than the ones you buy but I think the spice added something special.</p> <p>It’s a bit of a long process so if you know what you’re doing feel free to skip to the recipe, otherwise here are the step-by-step instructions.</p> <p>Wash the gherkins, rub off the spiky bits and pat them dry with a paper towel. Trim the gherkins at both ends, put in a clean bowl, sprinkle them with salt (not iodised) and store in a cool place until the salt has liquidized.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/bottled-gherkins-homemade-5B0C0D7.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1330" height="1080" class=""/></p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/bottled-gherkins-homemade-8D771E9.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1440" height="1080" class=""/></p> <p>When you’re just about ready to go, make up your bottling liquid. Just add water and vinegar to a large pot and bring it to the boil.</p> <p>Rinse the gherkins with boiling water, drain and then rinse again.</p> <p>Pack the gherkins into hot jars that have been sterilized. To sterilise the jars I run them through the dishwasher. That way they are still hot when you go to use them. If you are only using a few jars though, wash them thoroughly and keep them filled with hot water until you are ready to use them. At this point I also added the pickling spice and fresh dill.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/bottled-gherkins-homemade-1554.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1440" height="1080" class=""/></p> <p>Fill the jars almost to the top with the water/vinegar liquid and run a knife around inside the jar to get rid of any air bubbles. Top up the jar with liquid until it is just overflowing and using a cloth (as the jars will be very hot) tightly screw on the lids.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/bottled-gherkins-homemade-5D9F.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1297" height="1080" class=""/></p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/bottled-gherkins-homemade-FBBA.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1497" height="1080" class=""/></p> <p>Wipe down the jars and leave to cool on the bench.</p> <p>Leave the jars for a couple of weeks to pickle away and put them in the fridge to cool down before opening. These are best eaten on a burger, on crackers, in a sandwich or just straight out of the jar. YUM!</p> <p> <img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/insanely-easy-old-943EF.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="1080" height="675" class=""/></p> <p>Sometimes you need a nostalgic fix. This recipe for Old Fashioned Pickled Eggs is a recipe that takes care of that. It’s INSANELY EASY and that’s only one awesome thing about the recipe. I’ve got changes that take this recipe from my recipe to a recipe that’s yours, in an instant.</p> <p>Pickled eggs are in bars, convenience stores, and grocery store shelves. I know pickled eggs because my mom has made them for years. They would sit in a pickle jar on the counter in a corner of the kitchen.</p> <p>My old fashioned pickled egg recipe is simple with 4 ingredients you have in your kitchen right now. What makes this recipe even more appealing is that it really is a recipe that adapts to what <strong>YOU</strong> want. Let’s get started.</p> <h2><strong>How are Old Fashioned Pickled Eggs Made?</strong></h2> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/insanely-easy-old-5A56.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="225" height="149" class=""/></p> <p>The most difficult part of pickled eggs, if you can call it difficult, is making hard boiled eggs. Let’s get that out of the way. Find tips <strong>HERE</strong> for perfect hard boiled eggs. Don’t worry about messing them up though, hard boiled eggs that don’t peel well and don’t look perfect make great <strong>Egg Salad</strong>!</p> <p>The eggs are boiled, peeled and ready. The next steps are easy.</p> <ol> <li>Add vinegar and salt into a jar. A <strong>canning jar</strong> with a <strong>plastic lid</strong> or an old pickle jar work great!</li> <li>Put the eggs in the jar.</li> <li>Top off with water.</li> <li>Put the lid on the jar.</li> <li>Refrigerate for safety. You don’t want botulism.</li> <li>Wait at least 5-7 days and enjoy! The longer they pickle, the more potent they will be.</li> </ol> <p>That’s how insanely easy this old fashioned pickled egg recipe is. If that’s all you want, scroll down for the recipe. You’ll find specific ingredient amounts and directions.</p> <p>For the rest of you that want more info, keep reading. I’ve got answers to pickled egg questions and ways for you to have all the credit for the recipe.</p> <h2><strong>Pickled Egg FAQs</strong></h2> <p><strong>Do These Old Fashioned Pickled Eggs Require Canning?</strong></p> <p>No. This recipe for pickled eggs is not canned. How’s that for easy?</p> <p>For those of you that are familiar with canning, I do have a couple of canning recipes that I’ve placed at the end of the post for you</p> <p><strong>How Many Calories Are in Pickled Eggs?</strong></p> <p>Large eggs have <strong>about 78 calories</strong> in them. A Tablespoon of White Vinegar has around 3 calories. Salt doesn’t have any calories. That means a pickled egg has around 78-79 calories. Remember, you’re not not getting a tablespoon of vinegar in each egg.</p> <p><strong>Are Pickled Eggs Healthy?</strong></p> <p>Pickled Eggs are protein filled and a low calorie snack. They are a good option as part of a healthy diet.</p> <p><strong>How Do These Old Fashioned Pickled Eggs Taste?</strong></p> <p>These pickled eggs taste like salt and vinegar potato chips, only they’re eggs.</p> <p><strong>When Are Pickled Eggs Ready to Eat?</strong></p> <p>Let your eggs pickle for <strong>5-7 days, and up to 2 full weeks</strong>, before enjoying them. The salty, vinegar taste gets more potent as the eggs sit in the brine.</p> <p> <strong>Do Pickled Eggs Need to Be Refrigerated?</strong></p> <p>According to the National Center for Home Food Preservation, Pickled Eggs need refrigeration to prevent botulism.</p> <p><strong>What Is the Shelf Life of Pickled Eggs?</strong></p> <p>Refrigerated pickled eggs will last <strong>3 to 4 months</strong>.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/insanely-easy-old-DC8F.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="554" height="451" class=""/></p> <h2><strong>Ingredient Add-Ins and Swaps</strong></h2> <p>Ok, Pickled egg questions have been answered. Here are easy ingredient additions and swaps that make this recipe yours!</p> <p><strong>How to Make Pickled Eggs with Beets</strong> </p> <p>Follow my pickled egg recipe and top the eggs with beet juice instead of water. It makes the eggs a pink/purple color.</p> <p><strong>Use Apple Cider Vinegar</strong></p> <p>Change up the flavor some and use Apple Cider Vinegar instead of White Vinegar</p> <p><strong>How to Make Spicy Pickled Eggs</strong></p> <ul> <li>Slice up a jalapeno or other hot pepper and pickle it with your eggs for spicy pickled eggs.</li> <li>Replace some of the vinegar the juice from the jar of jalapenos in your fridge.</li> <li>Add a few peppercorns to the vinegar brine as the eggs pickle.</li> </ul> <p><strong>How to Make Dill Pickled Eggs</strong></p> <p>Add a couple teaspoons of pickling spice, some fresh dill and sliced garlic to your eggs for a dill pickle taste.</p> <p>You are now ready to make these insanely easy old fashioned pickled eggs my way or your own way!</p> <p>Here are the recipes I mentioned above for those of you that enjoy the canning process.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/insanely-easy-old-943EF.jpg?w=505&ssl=1" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="150" height="147" class=""/></p> <h2>Old Fashioned Pickled Eggs</h2> <p>This Old Fashioned Pickled Egg Recipe is insanely easy. Simple changes make it your own. Add jalapenos for spicy eggs, use beets, or try dill pickled eggs!</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/pickled-peppers-recipe-689C1.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="900" height="1350" class=""/></p> <p>Pickling peppers is one of the most popular and traditional methods of preserving your chili pepper harvest. I’ve pickled so many peppers over the years, I can hardly count, and I’m always happy to have them around.</p> <p>Pickled peppers of any type are welcomed to many a meal.</p> <h2>Using Pickled Chili Peppers</h2> <p>You can chop and stir them into soups or stews, use them as a condiment by topping sandwiches, cook them into pizzas. Go crazy, really. I prefer pickling a variety of chili peppers, though you can keep one type all to itself in its own jar.</p> <p>Pickled jalapenos, anyone? Yeah! Jalapenos are crazy popular any time of year.</p> <p>This truly is a quick and easy recipe.</p> <h2>Pickled Peppers – The Recipe Method</h2> <p>Always be sure to wash and dry your chili peppers before pickling them. Also, sterilize any jars and jar lids before using. Boil them on the stove for a half hour, or throw them in the dishwasher for a cycle or two.</p> <p>The basic steps for making pickled peppers include chopping your peppers, then bringing a seasoned brine solution to a boil. The brine consists of vinegar and salt.</p> <p>From there, you’ll add your own preferred pickling spices, which you can use coarsely chopped or whole. Typical pickling spices include All Spice, Bay leaves, Cardamom, Cinnamon, Cloves, Coriander, Garlic, Ginger, Mustard seeds, Peppercorns, and more.</p> <p>Below is a super easy recipe to get you going. Add in whatever pickling spices you prefer.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/pickled-peppers-recipe-352F.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="900" height="600" class=""/></p> <p>Pickling your chili peppers is a great way to preserve your chili pepper harvest. Here are a couple of pickling recipes to help get you started:</p> <h2>Simple Pepper Pickling Recipe</h2> <p>This is a bit like you’ll find in Mexican restaurants. Great when you want to serve the peppers as a side dish or at a picnic, especially if you like spicy carrots like I do.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 pound chili peppers, quartered</li> <li>1 pound sliced carrots</li> <li>1 clove garlic, chopped</li> <li>2 tablespoons salt</li> <li>2 tablespoons peppercorns</li> <li>1 teaspoon white pepper (optional)</li> <li>2 cups white vinegar (or enough to cover the peppers)</li> <li>Dash of your favorite hot sauce</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Bring the white vinegar to a boil in a small pot.</li> <li>Add the sliced carrots, boil 10 minutes.</li> <li>Add remaining ingredients. Simmer 10 minutes.</li> <li>Remove from heat. Pour Contents into a jar (or several jars), screw on jar lid, and let cool.</li> </ol> <h2>Pickled Chili Peppers – Another Recipe</h2> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 pound chili peppers</li> <li>3 one-pint jars with lid (sterilized)</li> <li>1 small onion, chopped</li> <li>1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>1/2 tbsp fresh garlic, chopped</li> <li>dash of basil</li> <li>dash of oregano</li> <li>dash of thyme</li> <li>Boiling brine solution (1 pint 5% vinegar, 1 pint water, 2 tbsp sugar, 5 tbsp salt)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Instructions:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Poke a small hole in each jalapeno, then blanch for 4 minutes in boiling water. The holes will keep the peppers from collapsing.</li> <li>Add the peppers to the jars.</li> <li>Before the peppers cool, add onion, garlic, basil, oregano, thyme, and olive oil.</li> <li>Pour in boiling brine solution. Ideally, you will have this mixture begin to boil as you begin to blanch your peppers.</li> <li>Cap the jar tight and boil in boiling water for 15 minutes.</li> <li>Allow to cool and store in a cool, dark place.</li> </ol> <p>NOTE: You can skip the additional boiling in step 5 if you keep your pickled peppers in a refrigerator. It is best to boil, however, for longer term storage outside of the fridge.</p> <h2>Additional Resources for Pickling Your Chili Peppers</h2> <h2>Additional Resources for Preserving Chili Peppers</h2> <h2>Related Pickled Chili Pepper Recipes and More</h2> <p><strong>If you enjoy this recipe, I hope you’ll leave a comment with some STARS.</strong> Also, please share it on social media. Don’t forget to tag us at #ChiliPepperMadness. I’ll be sure to share! Thanks! — Mike H.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/homemade-spice-mixes-5A8386.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="800" height="1200" class=""/></p> <p>Homemade spice mixes are the perfect last minute gift. They are very quick, and usually very cheap, to make. Package a variety of spice mixes in glass bottles or jars, add a bottle of good olive oil, and you have a lovely foodie gift with minimal effort.</p> <p>To keep costs down when making large amounts of spice mixes, try to purchase spices from a bulk supplier. Choose one with a high turnover, which will ensure the spices are fresh. I like to grind my spices in a dedicated coffee grinder as I think this produces the finest grind. I have also made large quantities in a blender or food processor with great success.</p> <p>To make life just that little bit easier, I have put together this handy list of homemade spice mixes, all of which would make an excellent gift. Or even just a wonderful addition to your own pantry.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/homemade-spice-mixes-F45BBF.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="650" height="241" class=""/></p> <p>1. <strong>Dukkah</strong>: Great as an appetiser, paired with good olive oil and bread for dipping. I also use dukkah to coat meats for grilling or as a seasoning for lamb koftas.</p> <p>2. <strong>Homemade Spice Mix</strong>: A good general purpose seasoning. Use it to rub over chicken before roasting, or to season a meat before grilling.</p> <p>3. <strong>Everything Seasoning</strong>: Perfect for everything. Sprinkle over poached eggs, mix with cream cheese to slather on bagels, or mix it with butter for fresh popcorn.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/homemade-spice-mixes-052D7D.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="722" height="241" class=""/></p> <p>4. <strong>DIY Gluten Free Taco Seasoning Mix</strong>: Most packaged taco mix is full of fillers and additives. Allow the spices to shine by making your own.</p> <p>5. <b>Aaron’s Mexican Dry Adobo Seasoning:</b> A fusion of Mexican and American spices. Use it as a dry rub, for seasoning stews and chillis or for adding a little spice to black bean soup.</p> <p>6. <strong>Homemade Fajita Seasoning</strong>: Traditional fajitas without the chemicals and additives. Or stir this mix into chillis, rub over chicken or use it to spice up chilli.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/homemade-spice-mixes-41F2C0.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="650" height="241" class=""/></p> <p>7. <strong>Jamaican Jerk Seasoning</strong>: Treat yourself to some true jerk chicken in the comfort of your own home. Use as either a dry rub or wet marinade.</p> <p>8. <strong>Seafood Rub</strong>: Fabulous to quickly pep up fish or shrimp.</p> <p>9. <strong>Cajun Spice Mix</strong>: Add to any dish that calls for bold seasoning or a flavour boost. Pair it with fish, chicken, potatoes or anything that takes your fancy.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/homemade-spice-mixes-A38278C.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="650" height="241" class=""/></p> <p>10. <strong>Tuscan Herb Spice Mix</strong>: Add to pasta sauces, homemade breads or even just scatter it over homemade pizza. Toss vegetables in the mix prior to roasting or use it to marinade meat.</p> <p>11. <strong>Homemade Italian Seasoning</strong>: An extremely handy spice to have in the cupboard.Sprinkle it into pasta sauces and stews. Add it to pizza sauce or scatter it over steamed vegetables to give them a little boost.</p> <p>12. <strong>Herbes de Provence</strong>: I use this tasty spice mix to quickly season chicken pieces before roasting. It is also great added to long simmering soups and stews.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/homemade-spice-mixes-FE634DA.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="650" height="242" class=""/></p> <p>13. <strong>Moroccan Ras el Hanout Spice Mix</strong>: Use this amazing spice mix to perk up a chicken tagine, or to coat lamb prior to grilling.</p> <p>14. <strong>Classic Lebanese Zaatar Spice Mix</strong>: Scatter over oiled flatbread, hummus, salads or anything else that needs a zesty hit.</p> <p>15. <strong>Baharat</strong>: This spice mix is great in kebabs, koftas and other Middle Eastern dishes.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/homemade-spice-mixes-49F688E.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="650" height="242" class=""/></p> <p>16. <strong>Homemade Garam Masala Powder</strong>: A staple of Indian Cooking. I have tried many pre-purchased blends over the years, but a homemade mix is far better.</p> <p>17. <strong>Chai Ka Masala</strong>: If you know a chai tea drinker, then a jar of this spice mix would make the perfect gift. Chai tea is easy to buy, but will never be as good as a cup of chai made with fresh spices.</p> <p>18. <strong>Pickling Spice Blend</strong>: Know someone that makes their own pickles? A jar or two of this homemade pickling spice will be well received.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/homemade-spice-mixes-6656743.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="650" height="242" class=""/></p> <p>19. <strong>Homemade Lemon Pepper Seasoning</strong>: A perennial favourite that pairs particularly well with chicken.</p> <p>20. <strong>Pasta Salad Seasoning Mix</strong>: This seasoning mix is new to me but this pasta salad is likely to go into high rotation this summer.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-preserved-1355093.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="200" height="200" class=""/></p> <p>Preserved lemons are an essential ingredient in Moroccan kitchens, where they’re used to enhance many traditional dishes, from tagines to salads, both as a garnish and as a key ingredient. Traditionally they are made with two simple ingredients—lemon and coarse kosher salt—with the salt acting as a curing and preserving agent.</p> <p>For those who don’t live in Morocco, you can certainly buy preserved lemons online. But they are so easy and inexpensive to make yourself, why not give it a try? Moroccan preserved lemons have a unique pickled taste that cannot be replicated by simply adding freshly squeezed lemon juice.</p> <h2>What You Need</h2> <p>To preserve five lemons, you’ll need 1/4 to a 1/2 cup of the salt and the juice of two lemons. You’ll also need a sterile glass jar that is just large enough to accommodate the lemons as well as a sharp knife. You can prepare the lemons in 10 minutes or less, but the longer the lemons are left to age, the more intense the flavor.</p> <p>If you’re in Morocco, try to select doqq or boussera lemons, which are sold as citron beldi. Outside of Morocco, Eureka or Meyer lemons are favored for preserving, but truly any variety will work.</p> <h2>Prep the Lemons</h2> <p>The preparation method is a little different depending on the variety of lemon. If you're using the small Moroccan doqq or boussera lemons, remove the stems, make an incision or two near the top of the lemon, but otherwise leave the lemons whole.</p> <p>If you're using any other variety of lemon, remove the stems and cut off the tips. Cut each lemon lengthwise into quarters, but be very careful not cut all the way through—about three-quarters of the way down is enough. This way the quarters should still be attached at the base.</p> <h2>Pack in the Jar</h2> <p>The next step is to pack the lemons with salt and stuff them into the jar. Again, the method varies depending on the variety of lemon. Moroccan doqq and boussera lemons which have been left intact need only to be placed in the jar with ample additions of salt layered between each lemon. If you've partially quartered the lemons, pack the crevices with lots of kosher salt, close the lemons and place them in the jar.</p> <p>Make sure the lemons are packed in tightly so that they can't move freely. Compress the lemons as you add them to the jar to squeeze them in and release their juices. Add enough fresh lemon juice to cover the lemons as well as a generous sprinkling of the salt. Cover the lemons tightly and set aside in a cool, dark place. A cupboard or food pantry is fine.</p> <h2>The Preservation Process</h2> <p>Every two or three days, open the jar and compress the lemons to release more juices. If you have room to add another lemon, do so. The idea here is that tightly packed lemons won't be able to rise to the surface. Do this for the first week, or until the jar is packed as full as possible and the lemons stay submerged in juice.</p> <p>At this point, you now want to leave the lemons undisturbed. The lemons will be preserved and ready to use in about four to five weeks, once the rinds are very soft. You can continue to preserve them longer if you like, up to a year or more.</p> <h2>Using the Lemons</h2> <p>Once opened, transfer the jar to the refrigerator, where the preserved lemons should keep well for several months. Rinse the lemons before using to remove excess salt and any film that may have formed in the liquid.</p> <p>Use the rind, finely chopped, in salads. In tagines, stews, and sauces, remove the seeds and use the quarters, with or without flesh. Leaving the flesh will impart a stronger lemon flavor. Remember to watch the salt in recipes which call for preserved lemon, as the lemons will add their own unique saltiness to the dish.</p> <p>Let our <strong>dip mixes</strong> help you to remember those summer days by the pool. Combine sour cream, cream cheese, and a cup of natural black raspberry dip together to create a <strong>dip mix</strong> that’s yummy for dipping in strawberries, bananas, and bagel slices. Add our dips and their various tastes to your cart, today!</p> <h2><strong>Dip Mix for Game Day</strong></h2> <p>Whether you’re tailgating or entertaining at home, create a “dip mix bar” with various selections of dips parceled into individual plastic cups with labels or ceramic dip bowls. Add sliced celery, tomatoes, and veggie chips to the display.</p> <p>Whip up spinach dip quickly and easily with our Spinach Dip Mix. It will be ready to serve within minutes, and it tastes great with chips, pretzels, and crackers.</p> <p>Cucumber Dip Mix is a popular flavor with sliced cucumbers, cauliflower, and carrots. Customers love this dip mix, writing, “This cucumber dill dip is by far the best dip I have ever had.” Another says, “We actually used it as a dip for our homegrown sliced cucumbers, whole wheat bread and blanched asparagus spears. What are you waiting for? Delicious, homemade dip is just a cup of sour cream and a cup of mayonnaise away!</p> <h2><strong>Dip Mixes for Fruit</strong></h2> <p>Not all dip mixes are for chips or veggies. We also carry dip mix for creating delicious sweet dips for fruits. Our Natural Strawberry Dip Mix is a hit at girlfriend parties and kids’ slumber parties. Try using the mix in this dip recipe:</p> <h3><strong>Strawberry Dip</strong></h3> <p>8 oz. cream cheese</p> <p>8 oz. sour cream</p> <p>1 cup strawberry mix</p> <p>Blend softened cream cheese and sour cream until smooth. Add dip mix and combine thoroughly. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Strawberry dip is delicious for dipping strawberries, pineapple, grapes, bananas, or apples.</p> <p>Create fruit pizza by baking sugar cookie dough in a round shape. After it cools, top the “pizza” with prepared fruit dip and then garnish with the fresh fruits of your choice. This dessert is popular with those trying to avoid too many cookies, cakes, and candies.</p> <h3><strong>Wholesale Dip Mixes</strong></h3> <p>Sometimes customers like to make their own variations of our dips using our mixes as their bases. That’s fine with us. If you’d like to buy our dip mixes in bulk to sell in bags or bottles at craft shows or in your own boutique store, check out our private labeling options.</p> <p>Make a jar of tangy pickle by preserving vegetables or fruit in vinegar. Our pickled recipes include piccalilli, courgettes, red cabbage, onions and beetroot.</p> <p>Showing items 1 to 24 of 45</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/pickle-recipes-bbc-67C7.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="440" height="399.52000000000004" class=""/></p> <h2>Autumn piccalilli with pear</h2> <p>Eaten immediately, this pickle will have a punchy tang, perfect with strong cheeses, but by winter the flavours will mellow, ideal for sliced ham.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/pickle-recipes-bbc-BCB0.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="440" height="399.52000000000004" class=""/></p> <h2>Crunchy courgette pickle</h2> <p>Try this fresh, sharp pickle with cold poached salmon, burgers off the barbecue or just buttered bread</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/pickle-recipes-bbc-8762.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="440" height="399.52000000000004" class=""/></p> <h2>Easy piccalilli</h2> <p>Make some homemade piccalilli to serve with cold meats and cheese. It will keep for up to three months and makes a great gift for chutney lovers</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/pickle-recipes-bbc-193F.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="440" height="399.52000000000004" class=""/></p> <h2>Quick pickled onions</h2> <p>These colourful, spiced sweet and sour onions add piquancy to a ploughman’s, or a sharp finish to Mexican food – an ideal edible gift to make ahead and pop in a homemade hamper</p> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-pomander-967DF.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" class=""/></p> <p>Here’s how to make pomander balls, which are simply oranges pierced by cloves. As the fruit dries, it releases a lovely fragrance. Pomanders make beautiful centerpieces, gifts for friends, tree ornaments, and air fresheners.</p> <h3>What Is a Pomander?</h3> <p>Medieval herbalists used <strong>pomanders</strong>—mixtures of fragrant, dried herbs in cloth bags or perforated boxes—to ward off illness or bring strength and good fortune.</p> <p>The word “pomander” derives from the French <em>pomme d’ambre</em>, meaning “apple of amber”—a reference to the round shape of the object and the occasional addition of ambergris (an aged substance from the bile duct of a sperm whale). Strongly scented pomanders of ambergris were used in Europe during the time of the Black Death to (unsuccessfully) cover up and purify “bad air.”</p> <p>Today, pomander balls are usually a lot simpler; most consist of an orange or other citrus fruit studded with cloves and dusted with other spices. See our own recipe below!</p> <p><img src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/how-make-pomander-DF07A.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" class=""/></p> <p> Orange and clove pomander. Photo by Wendy Piersall/Wikimedia Commons.</p> <h3>How to Make Orange and Clove Pomander Balls</h3> <ul> <li>Take firm oranges and stud them with whole cloves. That’s it!</li> <li>You can also use a toothpick to make pre-made holes; this is helpful for children because the cloves can hurt their little hands (and ours).</li> <li>Be creative and arrange the cloves in diamonds, circles, or other patterns. As the orange dries, it will release a delicate, spicy fragrance.</li> <li>For a stronger aroma, cover the entire orange with cloves, and then roll it in a mixture of spices such as: 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1 teaspoon ground cloves, 1 tablespoon ground nutmeg, 1 tablespoon allspice, 1/4 cup powdered orris root. Leave the orange in the mix for a week, turning once a day.</li> <li>To hang your pomander, run a long wire through the orange; make a knot at the bottom and a loop at the top for hanging. Or, you can tie red ribbon around your pomander for a festive look!</li> </ul> <p><strong>How to Make It Last</strong></p> <p>If you want your pomanders to last, store in a paper bag for a few weeks. Use lots of cloves which are a natural preserving agent. The cloves will draw out the juices and they’ll shrink in size. Dusting with cinnamon helps, too, as cinnamon functions as an anti-fungal.</p> <h3>Ideas for Using Pomanders</h3> <ul> <li>Arrange the cloves in special shapes and patterns. For Halloween, make a jack-o’-lantern; for Thanksgiving, try a turkey; for Christmas, a Christmas tree!</li> <li>Create a centerpiece for your next holiday meal.</li> <li>Give to friends, teachers, and neighbors in a plastic bag with a red ribbon!</li> <li>Try putting an orange pomander at the bottom of your Christmas stockings.</li> <li>Use small oranges (or other small citrus) to create a fragrant ornament for the Christmas tree.</li> <li>Once dried, hang pomanders in your closet or add to your drawers like a sachet.</li> </ul> <p>If you have cinnamon left over, try making these Cinnamon Ornaments.</p> <p>Want more fresh scents in your home? Check out our Old Rose and Lavender Potpourri or learn How to Make Lavender Sachets. See all of our Seasonal Crafts!</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/authentic-homemade-mexican-00F8B.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="495" height="400" class=""/></p> <p>Today I will be sharing one of my favorite Mexican recipes with you, <strong>Chorizo</strong>. When Europeans hear this word they think of a fermented cured red sausage (Spanish chorizo). But when North Americans hear chorizo they think of a spicy, crumbly meat, red sausage (Mexican chorizo). Spanish chorizo and Mexican chorizo are very different from each other in looks, texture and taste. Since the Spanish chorizo is cured it can just be sliced and eaten. Mexican chorizo must first be removed from its casings then cooked before eating. <strong>No matter what you may find on the Internet the two are not interchangeable.</strong> I love both types of chorizo but for very different reasons and to eat or cook with in different ways. This recipe is my own trusted recipe, one I’ve been using for a long time, one I love so much that I included it in my cookbook.</p> <p><strong>The key ingredient</strong> that gives Mexican chorizo its red color and spiciness is the Ancho chile powder. But depending on where you live Ancho chile may or may not be available. Below I have listed a way of substituting the Ancho chile with other chile powders. Using the substitute will yield a slightly different tasting chorizo but it will still be very close in taste and can be used just the same. Another great thing about this recipe is that it doesn’t use sausage casings, you only need to cook it before enjoying it.</p> <p><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/authentic-homemade-mexican-17A38.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="495" height="400" class=""/><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/authentic-homemade-mexican-162FC2.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="400" height="270" class=""/> <br /><img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/authentic-homemade-mexican-5151C.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="400" height="135" class=""/> <br /> <img loading="lazy" src="/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/authentic-homemade-mexican-B278F7.jpg" alt="How to make your own pickling spice" title="How to make your own pickling spice" width="400" height="268" class=""/></p> 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