How to make pea protein powder

We love these plant-based vegan protein powders for their clean ingredients and taste.

Protein powder is an easy, no-prep way to boost your protein content for the day. Choosing a vegan brand simply means that the protein is coming from plants (think nuts, seeds, grains, legumes) rather than animal products (like dairy, meat, and eggs).

Soy, hemp, pea, rice, and peanut are all examples of vegan protein powders. However, it’s important to keep in mind that soy is the only complete vegan protein, containing all nine essential amino acids, says Leslie Bonci, RD, a nutrition consultant for the Kansas City Chiefs. “The other plant-based proteins are missing at least one of the essential amino acids.”

So if you’re not using a soy product, look for a powder that combines protein sources, such as pea and rice. Or, you can combine the powder with another food, suggests Bonci. Mix hemp protein powder into oatmeal, for example, or put pea protein powder in a smoothie with nut butter.

It’s also worth noting that not everyone loves the aftertaste of vegan protein powder. “But that can be improved by adding things like spices such as pumpkin pie spice, cocoa powder, some citrus such as grated orange peel, or extracts such as vanilla, almond, or lemon,” Bonci says.

Want some recs? Below, check out the 15 best vegan protein powders you can buy online. These are our favorite powders based on their ingredients, consistency, protein content, and taste.

How to make pea protein powder

Pea protein is extracted from yellow pea

The pea is a member of the food legume family and historically was first cultivated as a protein-rich crop primarily in west Asia and North Africa.

Pea protein is extracted from golden or yellow pea (Pisum sativum). It is mostly produced from plants cultivated in the USA, Canada and Europe. Golden pea crops from Northern European countries such as France and Belgium are known to be of the best quality.

Extraction process of pea protein

Pea protein is obtained through a gentle water-based isolation process without the use of chemical solvent. It includes dry and liquid phases. First, during a dry process, the outer shell of the pea (essentially consisting of insoluble fibres), is removed by mechanical action.

After grinding and milling, a flour retaining soluble fibres, starches and proteins, vitamins and minerals is obtained. Being water-soluble, pea proteins are therefore easily separated from fibre and starch by wet filtration and centrifugation.

The next stage of the process is to precipitate the protein to its isoelectric point. It is then finally dry sprayed. The end product is a fine white powder of purified protein that can be used in human nutrition: pea protein isolate.

Pea protein isolate is the final product of pea protein extraction from golden peas. It’s a highly concentrated protein substance with exceptional digestibility (98%). It is the main ingredient of our pea protein blends. It is also interesting to note that most of the carbohydrates are removed in manufacturing pea protein isolates.

The better the quality of the protein isolate, the higher the protein content. Measured on dry matter, Go Good’s pea protein isolate has a protein content of about 85 to 90%, which makes it one of the best in the world. It does not impact the colour, taste or texture of products and is commonly used as a meat replacement and alternative protein source in many foods.

Properties of pea protein isolate

Recent studies regarding pea protein functionalities have revealed unique properties compared to soybean protein isolates.

Pea protein is first used for its high protein content, good digestibility and well-balanced aminogram which covers 95% of the daily needs in essential amino acids of an adult. Pea protein isolate is also both gluten-free and exhibits low incidents of allergen which makes it interesting for the nutrition, particularly for child nutrition, elderly, food without lactose, veganism, etc.

The lysine content of pea protein helps with the building of muscle protein and which is required for growth and bone development.

Moreover, good solubility, outstanding dispersion in water and easy mixing, the fluidity of powder. are all features of pea protein. With very little taste or smell, pea protein isolate is used is an amazing plant-based alternative to whey or soy protein to include in your protein shakes, smoothies and baking recipes.

Go Good uses Pisane pea protein isolate made by Cosucra, in Warcoing, Belgium. This private company has been in business since the early 1850s and producing plant protein isolate for more than 30 years. All of the yellow pea used for its Pisane pea protein is obtained from within 250km of the factory site. Stringent European farming and transforming laws ensure that the highest standards are upheld.

Go Good Pea Protein Powder

Go Good mix the isolate with only a minimal number of ingredients, all 100% natural: organic raw cacao or organic vanilla bean, natural flavour, thaumatin (a natural sweetener extracted from the Katemfe fruit) and sunflower lecithin.

The quality of our pea protein powder is also reflected by what you won’t find in it. Our blends gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free and lactose-free. They contain no emulsifiers, no gums, no added sugar, no fillers or preservatives. Absolutely nothing your body doesn’t need.

Nutrition Facts about pea protein

Nutrition facts can vary between brands, but — for example — one 30-gram serving of Go Good Organic Vanilla Pea Protein Powder contains:

  • Calories: 118
  • Protein: 22.7 grams
  • Carbs: 1.7 gram
  • Total fat: 2.1 grams
  • Sodium: 39.9 mg

How to make pea protein powder

Pea protein is extracted from yellow pea

The pea is a member of the food legume family and historically was first cultivated as a protein-rich crop primarily in west Asia and North Africa.

Pea protein is extracted from golden or yellow pea (Pisum sativum). It is mostly produced from plants cultivated in the USA, Canada and Europe. Golden pea crops from Northern European countries such as France and Belgium are known to be of the best quality.

Extraction process of pea protein

Pea protein is obtained through a gentle water-based isolation process without the use of chemical solvent. It includes dry and liquid phases. First, during a dry process, the outer shell of the pea (essentially consisting of insoluble fibres), is removed by mechanical action.

After grinding and milling, a flour retaining soluble fibres, starches and proteins, vitamins and minerals is obtained. Being water-soluble, pea proteins are therefore easily separated from fibre and starch by wet filtration and centrifugation.

The next stage of the process is to precipitate the protein to its isoelectric point. It is then finally dry sprayed. The end product is a fine white powder of purified protein that can be used in human nutrition: pea protein isolate.

Pea protein isolate is the final product of pea protein extraction from golden peas. It’s a highly concentrated protein substance with exceptional digestibility (98%). It is the main ingredient of our pea protein blends. It is also interesting to note that most of the carbohydrates are removed in manufacturing pea protein isolates.

The better the quality of the protein isolate, the higher the protein content. Measured on dry matter, Go Good’s pea protein isolate has a protein content of about 85 to 90%, which makes it one of the best in the world. It does not impact the colour, taste or texture of products and is commonly used as a meat replacement and alternative protein source in many foods.

Properties of pea protein isolate

Recent studies regarding pea protein functionalities have revealed unique properties compared to soybean protein isolates.

Pea protein is first used for its high protein content, good digestibility and well-balanced aminogram which covers 95% of the daily needs in essential amino acids of an adult. Pea protein isolate is also both gluten-free and exhibits low incidents of allergen which makes it interesting for the nutrition, particularly for child nutrition, elderly, food without lactose, veganism, etc.

The lysine content of pea protein helps with the building of muscle protein and which is required for growth and bone development.

Moreover, good solubility, outstanding dispersion in water and easy mixing, the fluidity of powder. are all features of pea protein. With very little taste or smell, pea protein isolate is used is an amazing plant-based alternative to whey or soy protein to include in your protein shakes, smoothies and baking recipes.

Go Good uses Pisane pea protein isolate made by Cosucra, in Warcoing, Belgium. This private company has been in business since the early 1850s and producing plant protein isolate for more than 30 years. All of the yellow pea used for its Pisane pea protein is obtained from within 250km of the factory site. Stringent European farming and transforming laws ensure that the highest standards are upheld.

Go Good Pea Protein Powder

Go Good mix the isolate with only a minimal number of ingredients, all 100% natural: organic raw cacao or organic vanilla bean, natural flavour, thaumatin (a natural sweetener extracted from the Katemfe fruit) and sunflower lecithin.

The quality of our pea protein powder is also reflected by what you won’t find in it. Our blends gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free and lactose-free. They contain no emulsifiers, no gums, no added sugar, no fillers or preservatives. Absolutely nothing your body doesn’t need.

Nutrition Facts about pea protein

Nutrition facts can vary between brands, but — for example — one 30-gram serving of Go Good Organic Vanilla Pea Protein Powder contains:

  • Calories: 118
  • Protein: 22.7 grams
  • Carbs: 1.7 gram
  • Total fat: 2.1 grams
  • Sodium: 39.9 mg

  • How to make pea protein powder
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    Skip the Store and Try These DIY Vegan Protein Powders Instead

    By Heather McClees

    How to make pea protein powder

    Support OneGreenPlanet

    Do you want to make your own protein powder instead of buying the pre-made stuff? That’s awesome, because it’s actually so easy! I won’t lie – I’m a real die-hard fan of clean, vegan protein powders. In fact, I love one brand so much that I have six month’s worth stocked up in my fridge – I’m not even kidding. As someone who’s not too fond of beans or grains, and someone that likes healthy things that are quick and easy to use and make, I find that a clean, vegan protein powder helps fill in the gaps to make me feel and look my best. However, I understand some people want a do-it-yourself option, which is why I thought I’d share a recipe with you that I made about a year ago for my own DIY protein powder.

    This recipe is really a mistake that happened by chance when I had an abundance of ingredients running out of my fridge and a mental need to do something with them. (I can’t stand having perfectly healthy superfoods and vegan ingredients go to waste.) So, I took nothing more than some of my overflowing stock of mason jars and started adding ingredients in them to make my own protein mix. What I came up with isn’t only a great way to use up ingredients, but also gives you a way to customize your own flavors and protein powder bases at home.

    Just keep in mind that you’ll need some BPA-free containers like mason jars or other jars to hold your powders in. If you’re not afraid of using plastic baggies, those can work, too. Get creative with these and try a new one out each day to see what you like best.

    Here are some key ingredients you’ll need to get started with:

    A High Protein BaseHow to make pea protein powder

    First, select one of the following, which all have a high protein content in a relatively small serving:

    • 2 tablespoons chia seeds
    • 1/4 cup hemp protein powder or 3 tablespoons hemp seeds
    • 1/4 cup sprouted brown rice powder
    • 1/4 cup pumpkin seed protein powder
    • 1/3 cup pea protein powder
    • 1/4 cup raw flax seeds (ground)

    All of these have anywhere from 8-16 grams of protein per serving. You can always use more than one to increase that ratio even more.

    Add-InsHow to make pea protein powder

    You can also add in any of the following to increase the protein content, since these all have extra amino acids (which are easy to get on a vegan diet):

    • Spirulina (4 grams per teaspoon)
    • Cacao (10 grams per ounce)
    • Maca (5 grams per two tablespoons)
    • Oats (5 grams per 1/3 cup rolled)
    • Pumpkin seeds (7 grams per 1/4 cup)
    • Almonds (7 grams per 1/4 cup)
    • Quinoa flakes (5 grams per 1/4 cup)
    • Coconut flour (6 grams per 1/4 cup)
    • Sunflower seeds (7 grams per 1/4 cup)

    FlavorsHow to make pea protein powder

    Now it’s time to add some flavor and nutrition with some especially awesome superfoods. Some of these are repeated from above, in case you didn’t use them. If you did, don’t feel the need to repeat them, however, do feel free to use more than one of these if you wish (I always do!) Here are some of my favorites:

    • raw vanilla bean powder (1/2 teaspoon)
    • cocoa powder or raw cacao powder ( 1 tablespoon)
    • maca powder (1 teaspoon)-adds a caramel like flavor
    • mesquite powder (1 teaspoon- adds a smokey, maple flavor)
    • lucuma- (1 teaspoon – adds a maple, vanilla flavor)
    • acai powder (1 teaspoon- for extra nutrition and a chocolate-berry taste)
    • goji (1 teaspoon -for extra nutrition and a tart taste)
    • cinnamon (1/4 teaspoon)
    • ginger (1/4 teaspoon)
    • stevia powder (1 teaspoon)
    • green superfood powder of choice (1 serving)

    Just add any of more than one of these to each jar to customize your powder and come up with new flavors so you never get bored. You’ll find the perfect protein powder for you and won’t ever have to buy any again, unless you just want to.

    NutritionHow to make pea protein powder

    Are you wondering why protein is important to begin with? Check out this body builder’s perspective and how to get enough on a vegan diet.

    Also, to find out the calorie content of your protein powder, plug the ingredients into a handy online tool known as Cronometer, or feel free to add them up according to the serving sizes on the nutrition panel of each ingredient according to what you use.

    How to Use Your Protein PowderHow to make pea protein powder

    The easiest way to use your protein powder is in a smoothie, but here are some other ideas if you’re looking for more options:

    • Raw Vegan Superfood Protein Bars
    • Protein pudding – Just mix your protein powder with nondairy milk, some coconut flour to thicken or even oats and some water. Add stevia to sweeten and maybe a sliced banana for good measure.
    • Crunchy Raw Vegan Protein Balls- Gluten Free
    • Sugar-Free Vegan Protein Bars
    • Protein Balls- Raw, Vegan and Soy-Free
    • Stir it into oatmeal
    • Bake with it
    • Find a new way to use it and share with the rest of us!

    Have you ever made your own DIY protein powder? What did you use?

    If you enjoy articles and recipes like these and want more, we highly recommend downloading the Food Monster App, which is available for both Android and iPhone , and can also be found on Instagram and Facebook . The app has more than 15,000 plant-based, allergy-friendly recipes, and subscribers gain access to new recipes every day. Check it out!

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    The clue is in the tittle,
    Im trying to be as plant based as possible which doesnt leave me with many protein powder choices (soy, pea and a few others) but pea seems to be the cheapest with the most protein and the least calories.

    However whenever ive put it in smoothies it just tasted like dirt!
    Anyone has any suggestions on what would make it taste good?
    recipes?

    Replies

    How to cook carp.

    4 cups bread crumbs
    3 tablespoons finely chopped onion
    3/4 cup finely cut celery
    6 tablespoons melted butter
    3/4 teaspoon salt
    1/8 teaspoon pepper
    1 teaspoon sage

    Cook celery and onion for a few minutes in the butter. Mix the other ingredients and add them to the butter mixture. Wipe dressed fish with damp cloth and salt lightly inside and out. Stuff with dressing and sew or tie with string to retain stuffing. Place in preheated oven and bake at 375 degrees for one hour.

    When the fish is done, remove it from the oven, throw it out and find an acceptable fish to eat. Stop trying to dress up something that’s terrible to begin with.

    No matter how much lipstick you put on this pig it’s going to taste blah. I don’t see any compelling reason to avoid whey protein.

    How to cook carp.

    4 cups bread crumbs
    3 tablespoons finely chopped onion
    3/4 cup finely cut celery
    6 tablespoons melted butter
    3/4 teaspoon salt
    1/8 teaspoon pepper
    1 teaspoon sage

    Cook celery and onion for a few minutes in the butter. Mix the other ingredients and add them to the butter mixture. Wipe dressed fish with damp cloth and salt lightly inside and out. Stuff with dressing and sew or tie with string to retain stuffing. Place in preheated oven and bake at 375 degrees for one hour.

    When the fish is done, remove it from the oven, throw it out and find an acceptable fish to eat. Stop trying to dress up something that’s terrible to begin with.

    No matter how much lipstick you put on this pig it’s going to taste blah. I don’t see any compelling reason to avoid whey protein.

    Here’s the dietitian’s recipe for simple homemade protein powder – using a surprise budget-friendly protein source and a natural thickener.

    How to make pea protein powder

    This recipe was originally published in 2014 – and has become our most popular recipe. I’ve updated the post with new photos and recent information (and side note: people often ask me what blender I use – here’s the $40 Black & Decker Blender I’ve used for decades now! [affiliate link].

    So, over the years, dozens of friends have told me this homemade protein powder is a favorite for their kids and even for sick relatives. Here’s how it all began…

    My sister wanted a grab-and-go breakfast for herself and her teenager; she thought a fruit smoothie with a scoop of protein powder would combine all the components of a balanced breakfast. But…she wanted a more affordable option than most store-bought varieties – and she doesn’t care for the artificial sweeteners in lots of the powders.

    Here’s the recipe she texted me for my dietitian approval: “dry oats + brown rice + raw lentils: grind to powder”

    Yikes. I texted back “breakfast #bellyache” as raw lentils are indigestible. In fact one of the reasons you cook them is to destroy some of the anti-nutritional factors that makes them inedible when raw.

    How to make pea protein powder

    So, instead, here’s the wholesome recipe I came up with using an under-utilized, convenient and super-nutritious item in the supermarket: instant nonfat dry milk – it’s actually just milk with the water removed – thus powdered milk. So, just like a glass of liquid milk, it contains whey. And according to a growing group of researchers, high-quality protein like dairy (whey) and eggs yield the best results in terms of muscle growth, muscle recovery, and may be beneficial for weight loss.

    Each 1/2 cup-scoop of my Homemade Protein Powder has 180 calories and 12 grams of protein. To make it I combined:

    • Dry milk powder: A 1/3 cup serving has just 80 calories, a whopping 8 grams of protein, including whey protein, AND 8 essential nutrients.
    • Dry oats: A natural thickener because oats ‘plump’ in liquid. All oats are a healthy whole grain with significant amounts of fiber. Plus some researchers have show oatmeal has a special type of fiber that helps you feel fuller longer.
    • Almonds: Contains fiber and heart-healthy fats.

    How to make pea protein powder

    Combine my Homemade Protein Powder (recipe below) in the following quick recipes for a protein-packed grab-and-go-breakfast that will do your body good plus keep you going all morning. These are also some of this dietitian’s favorite ways to refuel after a workout. Use a 1/2-cup scoop (46.2 gm) of Homemade Protein Powder:

    • Berry Berry Smoothie: 1 scoop Homemade Protein Power + 1/2 cup plain (or flavored) Greek yogurt + 1 cup milk + 1 cup berries = 31 g protein
    • Extra Creamy Chocolate Smoothie: 1 scoop Homemade Protein Power + 1 cup milk + 1/4 avocado +1 tablespoon cocoa powder = 18 g protein
    • Sweet Potato Pie Smoothie: 1 scoop Homemade Protein Power + 1 cup milk + 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice + 1/4 cup canned sweet potatoes = 17 g protein

    Print

    Plus, no weird chemicals

    An extra boost of protein is usually a good thing, but there are only so many eggs a person can eat in the morning. A shake or bar packed with protein powder seems like a natural solution, but the options in the supplement section can be a little chemical-laden. Plus, since most protein powders are sold in massive containers, you may just be out the money if you don’t like the flavor you bought. Plan B: DIY protein powder. Whether you’re looking for a whey-based protein powder, a gluten-free one, or a completely plant-based vegan situation, here’s how it’s done.

    Start with a protein base. Classic protein powders are made with dairy, so if you’re looking for something like that, dry milk or whey is the answer. For plant-based protein, you can also use whole nuts or seeds, like almonds, sunflower seeds, or hemp hearts. Protein rich flours like quinoa, chickpea, or yellow pea are also a great option. Scoop about ½ cup of whichever interests you into a blender or food processor, and feel free to mix a few different options.

    Next, pour ½ cup oats into the blender or food processor. Not only will oats help thicken a smoothie, they’re backed with fiber and carbs that will keep you full for longer than a simple smoothie of ice and fruit.

    For an extra nutritional boost of fiber, add ⅓ cup chia seeds, ground flaxseed, wheat germ, or hemp hearts if you didn’t use them earlier.

    Finally, flavor. For chocolate protein powder, toss in 2 tablespoons cocoa (or cacao, or carob) powder. For vanilla, use the scrapings of ¼ of a vanilla bean or ½ teaspoon vanilla powder. For coffee, 1 tablespoon instant espresso powder. For berry, use 2 tablespoons ground freeze-dried raspberries.

    Grind the mixture until a smooth-ish powder forms—depending on the ingredients you used, it may not be perfectly powdery, and that’s OK.

    Transfer the protein powder to an airtight container or jar and store in the fridge, For a smoothies, use about 2 tablespoons protein powder in a standard smoothie recipe.

    Protein powders have become an essential part of bodybuilding, losing weight, and pursuing a healthy lifestyle. Their prevalence at the gym is testament at just how effective they can be at helping you achieve body goals.

    In this article, we are going to look at the why, how, and of when to make your own DIY vegan protein powder. Read on to find out more.

    Why Make Your Own Vegan Protein Powder?

    There are many reasons you might want to make your own vegan protein powder; it’s cost effective, gives you complete control over ingredients, and is shockingly easy.

    I always start the day with a protein shake: protein powder mixed with water, peanut butter, and yoghurt to thicken it up
    Greg Rutherford, MBE, track and field athlete

    Savings: Protein powder can get expensive, and even when the cost of producing vegan-friendly powders is typically less, the companies that make them still seem happy to charge more for the privilege [1]. Making your own means, you can choose a price per scoop that suits you instead of having it dictated to you.

    Simple Ingredients: Making your own protein powders means that you have complete control over what is and isn’t going into it. If you are particular about the effects you want and the ingredients you would rather avoid, it can save a lot of time scanning packaging for only natural healthy ingredients.

    It’s Easy And Fun: When presented with the concept of making your own vegan protein powder at home, you might think that it is a lot more complicated than it actually is. In reality, you can create your own delicious and nutritious protein powders with relative ease as long as you have the equipment and time to do so.

    So how do you make homemade protein powder? Read on, and we’ll tell you.

    3 Things You Need

    So what do you need to make your own protein powders at home?

    1. High Protein Source

    How to make pea protein powder

    At the heart of your powder, you need something that is going to pack a protein punch, which typically means ingredients that provide a decent portion of protein for a relatively small serving. They should also be ingredients that are fairly common and easy to obtain. Some of our favorite examples are as follows:

    2. Additional Protein & Nutritional Bonuses

    How to make pea protein powder

    After you’ve picked a good base, you’ll want to consider some optional ingredients that can help to supplement the protein content of your powder but also provide other nutritional benefits as well as filling in the BCAA profile of your powder.

    If you can complement your chosen protein source with another that provides something it doesn’t, the benefits will stack. Great examples of additional ingredients include:

    For the best taste, we recommend you to add Navitas Naturals cacao powder.

    3. Flavor

    How to make pea protein powder

    Finally, it comes to the all-important taste test. It’s perfectly feasible that with a clever combination of the above ingredients, you could make a perfectly tasty protein powder. But here are some extra suggested ingredients if you want to make your DIY powder as delicious as it is nutritious.

    Unless you want to be working the pestle and mortar for hours on end, it might be a good idea to invest in a coffee or spice grinder. You can get pre-powdered ingredients or variations of most of the food above.

    In which case, the only items you really need is an airtight container to store your DIY vegan protein powder in and a decent scoop to portion it out with.

    Vegan Protein Powder Recipe

    How to make pea protein powder

    If you’d like a specific recipe to give yourself a good idea just how easy it is to make your own protein powder try this one we found over at Fork And Beans.

    Ingredients

    Instructions

    Grind up the chia seeds and hemp hearts into a fine powder, but be careful not to over grind them. A coffee or spice grinder is the recommended tool but do your best with what you have or use already powdered forms of protein.

    Mix the resulting powder with the rest of the ingredients and then store it in an airtight container in a dry and dark place.

    Use the protein powder in baking, for smoothies, or however, you would normally take it. It’s important to note that if adding to breakfast smoothies, you should add the powder last to stop the chia from expanding in the water or dairy-free milk too much.

    Nutritional Information

    How to make pea protein powder

    Tips and Possible Variations

    Using the above recipe as a basic blueprint, you can replace the flavors and protein sources to your liking and experiment with different recipes. A really quick, easy, and protein-packed favorite of ours is hemp protein powder, cacao, cinnamon, and mesquite.

    If you track the nutritional value of the ingredients you put into your powder, you can make yourself a perfect blend that suits your needs as well as your tongue.

    Apps like Noom or sites like Cronometer are great for this.

    If you want some tips on ideas for using your protein powder, you should give our articles on the best protein shake, protein cookie, protein bar, and protein ball recipes a quick read.

    Other Posts You May Like:

    The Bottom Line

    How to make pea protein powder

    So there you have it, making your own protein powder at home is a lot easier than you might think.

    Using food that you have chosen for yourself means you can choose every aspect of your protein powder’s nutritional worth and save yourself a fair few dollars vs. the per scoop cost of store-bought protein powders.

    However, there are those amongst us who don’t have the time and energy for even that, and working out the exact amounts and nutritional worth of the food you’re putting in there can be taxing.

    The convenience of ready-made and ready-to-use protein powder still has a lot of appeal, and if you wanted to check out a selection of the best there are, then read our article on the best vegan protein powders here.

    And for budget-friendly choices, you can check out the list here.

    Want to try some vegan muscle building recipes? Check out out article here.