How to make meringues

How to make meringues

The lofty pillow-like quality of meringue is the result of whipping egg whites into a shape-holding foam, adding sugar (usually confectioners’ or powdered sugar), and baking it. Some meringues are baked lightly, so their insides are still soft, others are baked until they are crisp all the way through. Most meringues are baked at a very low temperature to keep the egg whites from browning, but when the meringue is used as a topping for other desserts (think Lemon Meringue Pie or Baked Alaska), it is put in a hot oven or even under a broiler to brown it quickly without heating up the rest of the dessert.

Watch Now: The Perfect Classic Meringue Pie Topping Recipe

Meringue Basics

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The Spruce / Molly Watson

This basic method for making meringue shows you the technique for making meringue in a general way, whether large rafts of the stuff for pavlovas, small buttons like these Forgotten Cookies, the poached “eggs” for the classic Oeufs a la Neige, the base for confections like homemade marshmallows, or meringue-as-frosting for pies and cakes.

Looking for exact amounts? For plain meringue, whether a single large raft, two 8-inch circles, 1 towering pie’s worth, or two dozen smaller cookies, use 6 egg whites, 1/8 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar (optional, but helps the eggs whip up), and 1 cup powdered sugar.

Start With Room Temperature Egg Whites

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The Spruce / Molly Watson

Fresh egg whites will whip up quicker and be more stable than whites from older eggs. Eggs are easiest to separate when they are cold but easiest to whip up effectively when they are at room temperature. So, separate the eggs when they are cold and let the whites sit out for about half an hour to take the chill off them.

Be very careful when you separate the eggs. Any yolk that makes its way into the whites will keep the whites from whipping up as big and fluffy as possible. When separating more than a few eggs, use the three-bowl method: one bowl to crack the egg into, one to put the whites in, and one to put the yolks in. That way the accumulated whites aren’t contaminated by yolk if you accidentally break one.

What to do with the yolks? Make a pudding (this Chocolate Pudding is divine) or make mayonnaise-type sauces (Aioli and Rouille are two great options).

Put the egg whites in a large bowl. If you have a copper bowl, as pictured, this is the time to use it—the chemical reaction will help them hold their volume and you can omit the cream of tartar. If you don’t, not to worry, any large bowl and the cream of tartar will do the trick.

Beat Until Frothy and Add Salt

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The Spruce / Molly Watson

Use a large, clean whisk (if you have a balloon whisk, all the better) or clean beaters or the whisk attachment on a standing mixer to whip the eggs just until a bit foamy. Then sprinkle in the salt and cream of tartar, if you’re using it (if you’re whipping the eggs in a copper bowl, skip the cream of tartar). Both salt and cream of tartar act as stabilizers and will help the egg whites hold their shape when whipped.

Whip the Egg Whites

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The Spruce / Molly Watson

Now it’s time to whip, or beat, the egg whites. You’re essentially forcing air into the egg whites, causing the protein in the egg whites to stretch and create bubbles around the water within the whites. First the egg whites will reach soft peaks (you can remove the whisk or beaters and a peak will form and then droop), then firm peaks (when you remove the whisk or beaters the peak that forms will keep its shape), and then stiff peaks (not only does the peak on the egg white surface hold, but so will the peak on the whisk or beaters when turned to peak upwards as shown above). For ​stand-alone meringue – meringue cookies and pavlovas – you want stiff peaks like those shown here. For frosting-style meringue, soft or firm peaks are usually fine.

Watch these stages carefully, because if you over-beat the egg whites the stretched protein will break and let the water in the whites out, creating a really unappetizing mix of eggy water and foam.

Add the Sugar

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The Spruce / Molly Watson

If you want to be particular, you can sift the sugar into the whipped egg whites to avoid clumps, but sprinkling it tends to work okay too.

Whip In the Sugar

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The Spruce / Molly Watson

Whip or beat the sugar in – know that the egg whites will deflate a bit, but whip to fully incorporate the sugar so it dissolves into the meringue and the egg whites look smooth, fluffy, and a bit glossy as above.

You know have meringue, it just needs to be cooked in some fashion!

Bake or Use

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The Spruce / Molly Watson

To bake meringue, prepare baking sheets by lightly greasing them, using silpat pads, or lining them with parchment paper. I’ve also been known to line sheets with foil and give the foil a light spray. Use a spatula to spread rafts or create large circles of meringue; use a spoon to dollop on small mounds of meringue; or, get super fancy and use a pastry bag to pipe out designs or shapes as you like.

For classic meringue, bake at 225 F until the meringue is crisp at least on the outside, or all the way through, if you like. This time will vary from 30 minutes to over an hour depending on how big the meringues are and how baked you want them. To dry meringues out further, you can leave them in the turned-off oven for several hours or up to overnight.

Do not try to bake meringues if it’s raining or otherwise humid outside – they will simply keep absorbing moisture when you take them out of the oven and get all sad and weepy.

by Jackson Hudson

How to make meringuesMeringues

Hello everybody, I hope you’re having an amazing day today. Today, we’re going to make a distinctive dish, meringues. One of my favorites food recipes. For mine, I am going to make it a bit unique. This will be really delicious.

Meringues is one of the most well liked of current trending foods in the world. It’s easy, it’s quick, it tastes yummy. It’s enjoyed by millions daily. They are nice and they look fantastic. Meringues is something that I’ve loved my entire life.

Перевод слова meringue, американское и британское произношение, транскрипция, примеры использования. Because of their sugar content, meringues want to glue themselves to whatever. Meringues are a traditional French dessert made with whipped egg whites and just a few additional ingredients. The airy texture of meringues pairs well with a richer filling.

To get started with this recipe, we must first prepare a few ingredients. You can have meringues using 5 ingredients and 4 steps. Here is how you can achieve that.

The ingredients needed to make Meringues:
  1. Take 4 Egg Whites
  2. Get 1 pinch salt
  3. Make ready 150 g Caster sugar
  4. Prepare 1/2 tsp Vanilla extract
  5. Prepare 1 tsp Cream of tartar

The Meringues are the personification of ragged, unbridled energy, both on stage and in the music th. Whether huge, chewy clouds or crisp shells bound by thick whipped cream Make them into pavlova, Eton mess, baked Alaska, lemon meringue pie or individual desserts covered in. A mixture of egg whites and sugar beaten until stiff and baked. Examples of using Meringues in a sentence and their translations.

Steps to make Meringues:
  1. Whisk egg whites until stiff peaks are about to form.
  2. Add in cream of tar tar and salt. Slowly add in sugar 1 tbsp at a time while whisking at high speeds.
  3. Continue whisking while adding vanilla until stiff peaks form.
  4. Pipe and sprinkle chocolate powder. Bake for 40 mins at 120 degrees.

A mixture of egg whites and sugar beaten until stiff and baked. Examples of using Meringues in a sentence and their translations. How to Make Perfect Meringue for Pies, Cookies, and More. There is an art and a science to making perfect meringue. By Melanie Fincher and Allrecipes Editors.

So that is going to wrap this up with this exceptional food meringues recipe. Thanks so much for your time. I’m sure you will make this at home. There’s gonna be interesting food in home recipes coming up. Remember to bookmark this page on your browser, and share it to your family, colleague and friends. Thanks again for reading. Go on get cooking!

Follow our easiest basic meringue recipe to see how to make meringues using sugar & egg whites. Crisp outside & chewy inside.Ideal for pavlovas, Eton Mess, meringue kisses

How to make meringues

How to make meringues

How to make meringues using sugar and egg whites. Crisp on the outside and chewy inside. Perfect for making pavlova, Eton Mess, meringue kisses and much more.

How to make meringues

Meringues are such a wonderful thing! I knew they were an old recipe, but I didn’t realize the first recipe using meringues dates back to an old French recipe book written in 1692!

Meringues can come in all shapes and sizes, often used in Pavlovas, or as little meringue nests, or broken up into bite-size pieces to make up an Eton Mess recipe.

In most cases, meringue is usually eaten with fresh whipped cream and fresh fruits, such as strawberries, raspberries, soft summer fruits etc.

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It’s an easy recipe consisting of 2 ingredients. Egg whites and sugar.

Some cooks add stabilizers to the recipe, but I have found it not necessary when I make this, so I will show you how I make meringues.

Follow the easy step by step instructions and you’ll have perfect meringue, crispy on the outside and chewy on the inside. Delicious!

    Read more articles about kidssweet toothtips and tricks

Meringues are a delicious and pretty easy to make dessert. They have a crispy exterior and a soft interior, and a rich taste. Not to mention that after cooked, you can break them up and use the dust as a topping. Or you can just take the meringues mix and pour it over other desserts. So learn how to make meringues, because it is so worth it!

They are loaded with sugar, indeed. But meringues are delicious on that one day when you can afford to let go of the diet and indulge yourself. They are basically made from foamy egg whites and sugar, but their final consistency after ready is unparalleled. So let’s pamper ourselves and learn how to make meringues!

How to make meringues in 9 easy steps

1. Gather your ingredients and equipment

You will need some eggs, three bowls to crack them in, and some sugar. You will need about 1/4 of a cup of sugar (50 grams) for every egg white. So if you use four egg whites, use a cup of sugar, too.

As for equipment, a mixer will do. Let’s not complicate things with a simple whisk, because your arms will get tired pretty fast. Don’t forget a baking sheet and some parchment paper.

2. Separate the eggs

You will only need the egg whites for the meringues. So crack the eggs, store the yolks somewhere for other dishes and keep the whites in a large bowl. Be careful not to drop any yolks in there.

3. Beat the egg whites

Make sure that the bowl and your mixer’s whisks are not greasy in any way. Start at a low speed to build up a foam. Then increase the speed of the mixer.

4. Reach stiff egg whites

Continue to beat the egg whites, faster and faster, until the whites reach a stiff consistency. They can hold up their form on their own. And if you turn over the bowl, nothing drips out!

5. Start adding sugar

Add a tablespoon of sugar at a time and whisk the sugar in, until the consistency of the mix is even. Then add the next tablespoon.

Once you’ve finished adding the sugar, the mix should look glossy, almost like shaving foam.

6. Preheat the oven

Preheat the oven to 230 º F/110 º C.

7. Prep the baking sheet

Line the baking sheet with some parchment paper.

8. Form the meringues

Use a spoon to form the meringues on the parchment paper. You can form little swirls on the top of the meringues if you wish.

9. Pop in the oven

Pop the baking sheet with the meringues in the oven. And let them cook for about one hour, but check on them, to make sure they don’t get burned. They should sound hollow when tapped on the bottom. That’s how you know they’re ready.

Keep them in an airtight container, if you want them to taste as good!

A simple recipe for white, crispy meringue cookies that will melt in your mouth. You can make them any size or shape you want. Make sure to read all the tips below on how to make meringue perfectly.

How to make meringues

Egg white to sugar ratio

While there are many ways to make meringue, there is one important rule to remember in making it the authentic way, and that is the 1:2 ratio of egg whites to sugar. Meringue should be on the sweet side, with a crisp texture that will instantly melt in your mouth. After being given plenty of time to slowly bake, finished meringue will be white, shiny, and smooth.

How to make meringues

Ingredients

Egg whites: Separate the eggs while they are still cold as that’s when it’s the easiest. Then, cover and let sit to reach room temperature. Room temperature egg whites will whip up best and reach their highest volume.

Salt: We use just a pinch, but don’t leave it out. The salt cuts the sweetness and helps in stabilizing the egg whites so that they can reach their full volume.

Sugar: Don’t be tempted to use less sugar to cut the sweetness since it plays a big role in the meringue’s texture. It also helps with the stabilization of the egg whites, both while whipping and during baking. If you don’t use the amount suggested, the meringue may be too soft and eventually collapse.

How to make meringues

Cookie size

I usually go for either large meringue cookies or traditional mini cookies called kisses. However, you can make them in any size or shape you want, just change the amount of baking time accordingly (shorter baking time for smaller meringues). Temperature will stay the same.

Piping or spooning

For perfectly shaped and even meringues, pipe the meringue using a pastry bag fitted with a round or star tip. Otherwise, drop mounds of meringue onto the baking sheet, using the help of 2 tablespoons.

How to make meringues

How to make meringue kisses

Use a pastry bag fitted with a ½-inch round or star tip. Hold the piping bag at a 90 degree angle from the surface (your hands will be vertical to the surface). Keep the tip close to the surface, and squeeze for a count of 3. Stop squeezing, and lift the bag straight up while releasing pressure to let a peak form.

How to keep meringue cookies white

I usually bake the cookies at 200F/90C and they turn out white. However, if your cookies have a slight tint after baking, decrease the temperature to 175F/80C next time – no lower than that – and increase the baking time. Also, be sure to bake the cookies in the lower part of the oven.

How to know when they are ready

Meringues are usually ready once they appear dry and are easily lifted from the parchment paper with their bases intact. Sometimes, though, especially for large meringues, it’s hard to know if the center has baked properly. It’s ok if it’s quite soft and marshmallow-like, but it shouldn’t be sticky like gum. If you don’t care how white your meringues are, you can slightly increase the temperature and bake for less time.

How to make meringues

1. This must be the most popular egg-white recipe of all, whipped with fine sugar into tall, stiff, shining peaks, then very lightly baked so that the surface is crisp and the centre is soft and chewy. The tricky bit is whisking the egg whites, but the way the meringues are cooked is important, too. The oven should be pre-heated to gas mark 2, 300°F (150°C) but do make sure you are not going to be using it for anything else, since the meringues stay in the oven until it is completely cold, so that they partly bake and then slowly dry out.

How to make meringues

2. The eggs must be spanking fresh as this makes them easier to separate. Separate 3 large eggs, one at a time, placing each white in a cup or small bowl before adding it to the whisking bowl. This means that if an accident occurs with, say, the third egg and you break the yolk, the other two are safe.

How to make meringues

3. The proportion of sugar is always 2 oz (50 g) for each egg white. So, for 3 whites weigh out 6 oz (175 g) caster sugar onto a plate and have ready a clean, grease-free tablespoon.

How to make meringues

4. Switch the whisk on to a slow speed and begin whisking for about two minutes, or until everything has become bubbly (this timing will be right for 2 to 3 egg whites; you’ll need slightly more time for 4, 5 or 6).

How to make meringues

5. After that, switch to a medium speed for a further minute, then whisk at the highest speed and continue whisking through the soft peak stage until stiff peaks are formed. The whites should be all cloudy and foamy at this stage. Another test is to look at the whites on the end of the whisk – they should form a stiff peak without falling off the whisk. It’s very important not to over-whisk the whites – this will stretch the surface of the bubbles that have formed and they will burst and collapse into liquid.

How to make meringues

6. Next, whisk the sugar in on fast speed, about a tablespoon at a time, until you have a stiff and glossy mixture with a satin sheen. Spoon onto baking sheets lined with silicone paper (baking parchment) ready for baking.

How to make meringues

7. My own method of baking has stood the test of time and, provided your oven temperature is correct, it will never let you down. You will find the exact temperatures and timings in each individual recipe. These differ according to the size of the meringues and the degree of colour called for, but the general principle is – they go into the oven at gas mark 2, 300°F (150°C), the temperature is then immediately reduced to gas mark 1, 275°F (140°C) for the actual baking and, once baked, the oven is turned off and the meringues are left in there, undisturbed, until the oven is completely cold.

No huge secret here: the answer lies in temperature and cooking time

Achieve a truly chewy meringue, like Anna Jones’s pavlova. Photograph: Matt Russell/The Guardian. Food styling: Rosie Ramsden. Prop styling: Anna Wilkins.

Achieve a truly chewy meringue, like Anna Jones’s pavlova. Photograph: Matt Russell/The Guardian. Food styling: Rosie Ramsden. Prop styling: Anna Wilkins.

I prefer meringues with a chewy centre, but mine are often too dried out. How can I ensure chewy ones?
Karen, Glasgow

As we’ve noted before, baking is the most precise of all culinary endeavours, but that doesn’t really apply to meringues. There are almost as many ways to make meringues as there are dishes that feature them.

But, first off, there may be a very simple solution to your predicament. Most of us tend implicitly to trust our oven settings, but the temperatures in domestic ovens vary much more than we’re led to believe – just because you’ve turned that knob to, say, 120C/250F, doesn’t mean the oven is actually at 120C. (On top of which, the heat isn’t consistent, either, with variations from top to bottom, front to back and side to side.) And that can make a world of difference with meringues, which need baking at low temperatures – 93C, ideally, according to kitchen geek supreme Harold McGee in his landmark 2004 book On Food and Cooking: An Encyclopedia of Kitchen Science, History and Culture, which devotes all of five pages to the subject. Even so, that’s perhaps a tad too precise for the domestic kitchen – I don’t know about you, but the temperature gauge on my cooker isn’t anywhere near that exact – which is where an oven thermometer comes in handy. This isn’t your typical piece of expensive kitchen kit that you use once before sticking in the back of the cupboard; you can pick one up for as little as £5, and it’ll help you keep on top of what’s going on in that hot, dark place (I’m assuming that you, too, haven’t yet got round to replacing that blown oven bulb).

That said, not everyone agrees with McGee where temperature is concerned. Former Guardian baking columnist Dan Lepard, among many, many others, goes for an hour and a half to two hours at 120C (100C fan)/gas ¼, while Feast’s own Yotam Ottolenghi gives his meringues a short, sharp shock: “The old trick of whisking in a dash of vinegar and a little cornflour once the meringue is nice and airy always does the trick, and helps give the meringue a short, brittle texture on the outside. I heat the oven to relatively high, then turn it right down as soon as the meringue is in, so it puffs up.” As Lepard says, “You are not so much cooking meringue as drying it out, so there’s no great mystery to a chewy one: just cook it for less time than you normally do.”

The type of sugar you use, and when you put it in, are also factors. “If the sugar is added after the egg whites have been whipped, the meringue will be relatively light,” McGee writes, whereas mixing it in earlier leads to a denser end result. Lepard urges you to add it gradually, “just a few spoonfuls at a time, to make sure the foam stays as light and aerated as possible”. Also, granulated sugar doesn’t dissolve sufficiently at such low temperatures, leaving what McGee calls “weeping sugar drops” in the finished meringue, which is why professional bakers prefer caster, a mix of caster and icing, or even sugar syrup, to guarantee consistency. (The standard ratio is two parts sugar to one part egg white by weight.)

The temperature of the whites is important, too. Lepard leaves his out overnight, to make them easier to whip, adding that “you’ll get more volume this way”. In his book Short & Sweet, he recommends using a machine to whisk the whites, in part to save on elbow grease, but mainly to ensure they’re whipped to the required consistency, namely “very thick, smooth and glossy”. How you cook them after that, however, is up to personal taste. “Just be sure to bake them just until the middle is set and chewy – no more – to get that perfect, nougat-like texture.”

No huge secret here: the answer lies in temperature and cooking time

Achieve a truly chewy meringue, like Anna Jones’s pavlova. Photograph: Matt Russell/The Guardian. Food styling: Rosie Ramsden. Prop styling: Anna Wilkins.

Achieve a truly chewy meringue, like Anna Jones’s pavlova. Photograph: Matt Russell/The Guardian. Food styling: Rosie Ramsden. Prop styling: Anna Wilkins.

I prefer meringues with a chewy centre, but mine are often too dried out. How can I ensure chewy ones?
Karen, Glasgow

As we’ve noted before, baking is the most precise of all culinary endeavours, but that doesn’t really apply to meringues. There are almost as many ways to make meringues as there are dishes that feature them.

But, first off, there may be a very simple solution to your predicament. Most of us tend implicitly to trust our oven settings, but the temperatures in domestic ovens vary much more than we’re led to believe – just because you’ve turned that knob to, say, 120C/250F, doesn’t mean the oven is actually at 120C. (On top of which, the heat isn’t consistent, either, with variations from top to bottom, front to back and side to side.) And that can make a world of difference with meringues, which need baking at low temperatures – 93C, ideally, according to kitchen geek supreme Harold McGee in his landmark 2004 book On Food and Cooking: An Encyclopedia of Kitchen Science, History and Culture, which devotes all of five pages to the subject. Even so, that’s perhaps a tad too precise for the domestic kitchen – I don’t know about you, but the temperature gauge on my cooker isn’t anywhere near that exact – which is where an oven thermometer comes in handy. This isn’t your typical piece of expensive kitchen kit that you use once before sticking in the back of the cupboard; you can pick one up for as little as £5, and it’ll help you keep on top of what’s going on in that hot, dark place (I’m assuming that you, too, haven’t yet got round to replacing that blown oven bulb).

That said, not everyone agrees with McGee where temperature is concerned. Former Guardian baking columnist Dan Lepard, among many, many others, goes for an hour and a half to two hours at 120C (100C fan)/gas ¼, while Feast’s own Yotam Ottolenghi gives his meringues a short, sharp shock: “The old trick of whisking in a dash of vinegar and a little cornflour once the meringue is nice and airy always does the trick, and helps give the meringue a short, brittle texture on the outside. I heat the oven to relatively high, then turn it right down as soon as the meringue is in, so it puffs up.” As Lepard says, “You are not so much cooking meringue as drying it out, so there’s no great mystery to a chewy one: just cook it for less time than you normally do.”

The type of sugar you use, and when you put it in, are also factors. “If the sugar is added after the egg whites have been whipped, the meringue will be relatively light,” McGee writes, whereas mixing it in earlier leads to a denser end result. Lepard urges you to add it gradually, “just a few spoonfuls at a time, to make sure the foam stays as light and aerated as possible”. Also, granulated sugar doesn’t dissolve sufficiently at such low temperatures, leaving what McGee calls “weeping sugar drops” in the finished meringue, which is why professional bakers prefer caster, a mix of caster and icing, or even sugar syrup, to guarantee consistency. (The standard ratio is two parts sugar to one part egg white by weight.)

The temperature of the whites is important, too. Lepard leaves his out overnight, to make them easier to whip, adding that “you’ll get more volume this way”. In his book Short & Sweet, he recommends using a machine to whisk the whites, in part to save on elbow grease, but mainly to ensure they’re whipped to the required consistency, namely “very thick, smooth and glossy”. How you cook them after that, however, is up to personal taste. “Just be sure to bake them just until the middle is set and chewy – no more – to get that perfect, nougat-like texture.”