How to make makgeolli

  • 5 glasses of short grain rice, washed and soaked in cold water for at least 2 hours
  • 1½ glasses of nuruk (early culture)
  • 1 sachet of dry yeast
  • ¼ cup of sugar (optional)

It’s tricky to make at home, but the team at Majordōmo has been trying, and failing. Here’s what we’ve learned―with a little help from their favorite food blog, Maangchi.

Step 1: cook the rice

Step 2: Dry the rice
Chances are you’re trying this at home you don’t have an electric dehydrator. Place the rice in a shallow basket in a breezy, sunny location, or put it in the refrigerator and let it dry for several hours, until each grain is firm on the outside but still moist on the inside.

Step 3: start fermentation
Put the dried rice, nuruk, baking powder, and 8 cups of water in a skillet or other clay pot. Our NGOs in Majordōmo are made by Adam Field. Breathability is important here – the vessel must be able to breathe. After you have covered it, place a cotton cloth on it to help promote even more air circulation. Then let him sit. After a few hours, mix the thick paste with a wooden spoon and then let it rest overnight.

Step 4: Continue mixing
When you discover it the next day you will see a lot of bubbles and the dough will be less frequent. Mix and cover again. And mix it several times a day for the next few days. By day 4 or 5, there will be fewer bubbles and the mixture will separate: clear liquid above, milky and more solid below. Solution: keep stirring for a few more days.

Step 5: ready to drink
By day 8 or 9 the upper liquid will be clear and amber in color. This means it is ready to drink. Transfer to a large bowl. Make sure you squeeze out the solids with a spoon before unwrapping to get as much liquid as possible. If desired, add 8 cups of water and sugar to taste.

Drain again, then the jar and drink cold. Homemade makgeolli can be stored in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 weeks.

Makgeolli

Today I’m going to show you how to make makgeolli, a traditional Korean alcoholic beverage made by combining rice, yeast, and water with a starter culture called nuruk. It’s milky-white, fizzy and refreshing. It’s also called “nongju” which means “farmer liquor” because it’s made with a lot of rice, it’s full of carbohydrates and was traditionally served to farmers as part of a midmorning snack or with lunch, giving them the strength and energy to work the rest of the day.

Korea has a long history of home brewing and every family used to make their own drink at home, this was much more common than buying it. These days you can buy makgeolli easily at a Korean grocery store or liquor store but when it comes to taste, it can’t be compared to homemade makgeolli. Homemade makgeolli are denser, less sweet, and more filling than store-bought makgeolli.

This recipe is also in my cookbook, Real Korean Cooking, and while developing the recipe, I sent a sample of the finished product to the EMSL Analytical lab for a full nutritional and toxicity analysis to see what’s really inside. . I was informed that it is completely safe to drink, 7.4% alcohol by volume, cholesterol free, fat free and contains vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5 and B6. It’s high in calories and has a lactobacillus count of 375,500 CFU/mL. Lactobacillus is a kind of lactic acid bacteria that’s good for your stomach and digestion and can boost your immune system. It’s also found in yogurt, but in much higher quantities.

So it’s great for giving you energy and is good for your stomach, but the real reason to drink it is it’s so refreshing and delicious! It’s also a great thing to have at a party, and especially when you make it yourself, your family and friends will love to drink it and have a great time doing it. Making a good makgeolla isn’t difficult, it only takes a short time, and there are some pitfalls to avoid.

I’ve been making makgeolli for special family occasions and my reader meetups for years. Some of you who came to my meetings and tasted my makgeolla have been waiting for this recipe for years. Thanks for your patience!How to make makgeolli

Make some makgeolla and enjoy life! Let me know how it comes!

Ingredients (make 4 quarts)

    • 5 glasses of short grain rice, washed and soaked in cold water for at least 2 hours
    • 1½ glasses of nuruk (early culture)
    • 1 sachet of dry yeast
    • 5 liters of water (20 cups)
    • ¼ cup of sugar (optional)

    How to make makgeolli5 cups Korean short grain rice

    With a script by Chris Buchanan

    introduction

    Chris has been sharing his awesome libations with us for some time now, and when we tried this traditional Korean brew, we knew we had to get it down to paper so more people could make it on their own! Chris was kind enough to write his process for this article so that everyone can make this fun and delicious brew! You can use white rice or a wide variety of different rice to accomplish this and your alcohol percentage can be whatever you want! It’s a cool mix of making sake and making sour beer, and not only is it fun, it’s absolutely delicious! We’ll let Chris take it from here! If you want to go step by step and make your own makgeolli, check out our Make Your Own Makgeolli kit!

    How to make makgeolli

    Makgeolla Review

    Creamy, sprinkled and pleasantly tart; here’s how makgeolli should taste. Unlike those green bottles you find at your local Asian grocery store, makgeolli is a lively and fun drink. It’s also simple to make at home with 3 simple ingrediants: water, rice, and nuruk (sold as enzyme powder). You’re familiar with the first two no doubt, so let’s dive into nuruk first.

    Nuruk has been a traditional part of Korean alcohol production for centuries. Nuruk is a pre-fermented starter culture that contains a hodgepodge of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), brewer’s yeast, and koji. Like sake, the koji in nuruk makes the starch from the rice grains available for fermentation. The brewer’s yeast and LAB transform the rice sugars into the tart, alcoholic miracle that is makgeolli.

    How to make makgeolli

    Short grain rice’s starch content is most favorable to the fermentation process. Rice’s starches are unavailable to microorganisms’ enzymes in its dried state so its starches need to be gelatinized before koji’s enzymes can do their work. The traditional method consists of steaming the rice and then dehydrating it for several hours to remove excess water. If you’re a traditionalist, give it a shot. However, modern conveniences like pressure cookers and pressure cookers can speed up the process.

    Water problems are generally minimal. If your water tastes good, it will most likely do the job. Fermentation of makgeolla is a biological process, so water with a high chlorine or chloramine content is disadvantageous and should be treated with the preferred method.

    How to make makgeolli

    The Makgeolla trial

    This process works best for me. Follow it carefully or change the overall process for your brewery; makgeolli is quite forgiving. This will be approximately one gallon.

    Rinse the rice several times to remove excess starch and clean the grains. Cook the rice in a pressure cooker or saucepan. The 1-1 weight ratio of rice to water causes the rice to gelatinize without adding excess water. I use 1 kilogram of rice and 1 kilogram of filtered water. When cooked, mix the rice with another kilogram of cold water. Cold water quickly cools the rice to a friendly launch temperature. You want the rice to be at room temperature before mixing it with your nuruk.

    Transfer the rice to the fermentation vessel. Add 100 grams of nuruk to rice at room temperature in a ratio of 1:10 nuruk to rice. Then mix the rice and nuruk by hand to distribute the nuruk. The Nuruk comes out in lumpy pieces and will likely remain chunky after mixing. It’s normal; however, if you don’t like this you can mash the nuruk into powder prior to mixing.

    Mix the rice / nuruk mixture several times a day for the first 2 days of fermentation. This helps introduce oxygen and prevents a white koji layer from forming on top. This layer is harmless, but you may not like it. Your rice will go from solid to liquid in these 2 days. The airlock can be whipped from day one, but I only cover the top with aluminum foil to make mixing easier. Once it’s liquified, I attach a lid and airlock then leave it alone until completion.

    Ferments at room temperature. Higher temperatures can lead to unpleasant flavors. My fermentation lasts two weeks. Makgeolli is ready when it splits into three separate layers. The top layer will be a yellowish liquid, the middle layer will be a creamier liquid, and the bottom layer will be rice and nuruk debris.

    Finally, coarsely filter your makgeolli. Drain most of the rice solids and the whole nuruk. Filtering takes some effort; here are two strategies. For both strategies, mix the layers of your makgeolla and use a sanitized container to trap the liquid. If you are using a mesh bag, you can pour all the makgeolli at once. Let it drain. Twist and squeeze the bag to drain the liquid, but be careful not to squeeze out a large amount of solids or the diver. Alternatively, use a colander, starting with a less fine colander, such as a pasta strainer. Mesh screens clog if used first. Then pass the makgeolli through a colander in small batches. Gently press and shake the mixture to help the liquid flow out. Repeat with the mesh filter later to filter more accurately.

    Makgeolli starts with 10-16% vol. It’s often diluted by 3-1 or 2-1 water to makgeolli. However, I like mine richer and dilute 1-1 or even 0.5-1 of water in makgeolla. You can skip the dilution completely and mix in a glass to taste.

    How to make makgeolli

    Packaging and consumption

    Fresh makgeolli ferments again after packaging. Store the packaged makgeolli in the refrigerator to slow down the effect. Ground sugar is not necessary, but it can be used. Plastic bottles are good for packaging so you can feel the pressure build up. I use a 64-ounce growler, tapping the lid a few times in the first few days to help build up. Makgeolli in the refrigerator can last several months. The taste will change over time. Long-term storage will cause increased astringency and may become unsightly.

    Stir your makgeolli before serving to supplement sediments and liquids. Drink makgeolli with ice for a summer heat party. Mix with sparkling water for an extra spritz or combine with lemon and lime soda for citrus and spritz. Add fruit juice for dandy flavor combinations. Pour from a copper teapot into a bowl for a more traditional approach. Regardless, share and enjoy. Geonbae!

    So now that you have the step by step guide, try it for yourself! It’s as simple as you can see and perfect for summer! We have the all-inclusive Make Your Own Makgeolli package to help you get started! Don’t forget to connect with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay up to date on all our fun brews, events and everything BrewChatter related! Check out BrewChatter TV on YouTube for fun overviews of the brewing process, interviews and virtual tours of some of our favorite breweries and distilleries! If you haven’t already, subscribe to our newsletter to receive offers and updates directly to your inbox!

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    Makgeolli is a traditional Korean rice milk wine. My husband and I enjoyed makgeolli once in a while when we were living in Korea (it is especially good, half way up a mountain, fresh and cold), but didn’t think about if often. It’s been a year since we have been back to visit and we really found ourself missing the refreshing taste. My husband decided to throw a party for me (Yy thanks!) And here’s what we came up with.

    Note: All equipment and tools MUST be properly disinfected for good results. Unwanted bacteria can cause strange results.

    You will need: – 4 pounds of sweet rice (medium grain rice, sushi rice or sticky rice are fine).

    – 1 pound of Nuruk (you can buy it online at Hmart or near a Korean grocery store).

    – 1 tablespoon of yeast (any type)

    – 8 Gallon container (for fermentation) & several big bowls

    1. Wash the rice until the water is clear. It’s very important that you wash your rice very clean. You may need to wash it more than ten times.

    * if you don’t know how to wash rice, here’s a tip.

    Pour in the water and shake it with your hand several times. When the water turns milky, drain the water. Repeat the operation until the water is clear.

    2. After you have finished washing the rice, soak it in water for about two hours and drain it for about 40 minutes before steaming it.

    How to make makgeolli

    3. Add 3.5 liters of water (1 US gallon equals 4 liters), 1 pound of nuruk and 1 tablespoon of yeast to a separate bowl and mix well. Postpone for later.

    This phase is the initial activation.

    How to make makgeolli

    4. I used hot water to disinfect the fermenter (8 gallon container), but you can use any disinfectant you use to make wine or beer.

    How to make makgeolli

    5. Dry the fermenter well.

    How to make makgeolli

    6. We are now preparing Godu-bap which will be steamed rice. Godu-bap is a booster that reduces fermentation times and we want it to be really dry rice. Before steaming it, place a tea towel on the bottom of the steamer and lay the rice on top. Wrap the rice in a tea towel, cover and steam for about 40 minutes.

    How to make makgeolli

    How to make makgeolli

    7. If the rice is not well cooked, you can leave it a little longer (half an hour more).

    After the rice is well cooked, you can stir the rice and leave it until the inside of the rice has cooled.

    Note: If the rice is too hot it can kill the yeast. Even if the outside of the rice is cold, the inside may still be warm.

    How to make makgeolli

    How to make makgeolli

    8. When the rice has cooled, you can add it together with the contents of step 3 and mix it well by hand.

    How to make makgeolli

    How to make makgeolli

    How to make makgeolli

    How to make makgeolli

    9. Cover the fermenter with a tea towel and place it in a warm room with a temperature between 18 and 23 C for best results. It will take seven days of fermentation.

    (I used a paper towel because I couldn’t find the napkin and placed a colander over the fermenter to secure the lid. If you have wine or beer making equipment, I would suggest using them for fermentation)

    How to make makgeolli

    How to make makgeolli

    10. Every day, at least once a day, it is necessary to mix well to facilitate the fermentation process.

    Don’t forget to disinfect the spoon before using it.

    How to make makgeolli

    If it ferments well, you can see that the makgeolli breathes like this !:

    11. A week later, after the fermentation phase, we have to filter the makgeolli.

    Add the same amount of water used (3.5 liters) to the fermenter.

    Put a large bucket (or a bowl that can hold 7 liters, just under 8 gallons of liquid) and filter the makgeolli with gauze by placing the makgeolli in the cloth and squeezing the precious liquid.

    I know it’s hard work, but it has to be done and it will be worth it.

    12. Now all you have to do is bottle. Please don’t forget, properly disinfect the bottles.

    (In my case I saved some pop bottles and disinfected them with a wine bottle disinfectant)

    You can drink fresh makgeolla if you like, or you can add an equal amount of Seven Up or fruit juice if you like. For even better taste, refrigerate for a week before consumption.

    How to make makgeolli

    How to make makgeolli

    If you’ve ever dreamed of making sake at home but were terrified of the required steps, equipment and accuracy, thenMakgeolli recipeand for you.

    This unfiltered Korean rice alcohol is creamy and sweet, just like nigori sake. It’s fermented, full of healthy bacteria, and tastes a bit like yogurt, even though it’s dairy-free. It’s good for simple sipping and can even replace saké in recipes – think nasu dengaku miso eggplant and restaurant Nobuthe famous black cod. Furthermore, thanks to natural bubbles, mixologists use it as a substitute for sparkling wine in their cocktail creations; restaurant with two Michelin stars Jungsikin New York, he blends it with soju and Korean raspberry wine as a drink on the restaurant’s acclaimed tasting menu.

    The main difference between sake and makgeolla is the yeast and the fermentation time. Makgeolli recipe is traditionally made with nu ruk, a wheat yeast, while saké uses koji and specific strains of sake yeast. Using the koji and following the instructions for the Makgeolla, on the other hand, you can make the Makgeolli flavored with sake. The yeasts can all be ordered online (or homemade). Very Makgeolli recipes also call for a pinch of instant yeastwhich is available at the grocery store to start fermentation.

    If you drain the cooked rice and koji – the sediment sediment – after fermentation, you can season them with salt or soy sauce and use them in place of miso (think again black cod) or as a coating for fish or chicken. In the case of saké, these settlements are called kazu-saké. You can also dehydrate or freeze the mud for later use.

    After fermentationif you wish, you can dilute this Korean moonshine with water at a lower alcohol levelor sweeten with honey.

    How to make Makgeolla rice wine?

    How to make makgeolli

    Makgeolli recipe: składniki i przygotowanie krok po kroku

    1 Rinse the rice at least five times or place it in a colander under running water, stirring the grains until the water runs clear, about 2 minutes. Soak the rice in 6 cups of water for 30 minutes, then bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat, cover the pot and simmer for 12 minutes. Lower the heat to low and cook for another 3 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat and leave it covered for 30 minutes.

    2 Sanitize 2 cloths large enough to fit over 2 large bowls (you can boil them, use a sterilizing solution or moisten them and heat them in the microwave for 2 minutes). Once it has cooled, use a cloth to wipe the spatula, small bowl, large bowl, spoon and hand with about 1 cup of vodka or sterilizing solution, clearly trying not to waste too much vodka. Call clothes.

    3 If your koji is not powdered, grind 1 cup and measure 100g Combine the koji in a small bowl of instant yeast and enough water to make a paste. Add 1 liter of water and half of the cooked rice to each large bowl. Re-sterilize your hands with vodka and when the rice is cold enough break the lumps.

    4 Add the koji and mix. Clean the edges of the bowls with a cloth or paper towel moistened with alcohol and cover the bowls with sterilized cloths. Keep clothes in place with rubber bands, twine or twine. Put the bowls in a dark place between 20-25 ° C. Mix the liquid morning and evening with a sterilized spoon. Leave for 3-5 days. Add more water if it dries.

    5 During fermentation, the rice particles will float up and down in the liquid and gases will be heard. The makgeolla is ready when most of the kernels have fallen to the bottom of the bowls with only a few kernels left on top. The liquid should no longer boil. If inside it is warmer than 25 ° C, fermentation can only take 2-3 days.

    6 Decant the liquid by pouring sterilized gauze into sterilized glass bottles, plastic bottles or glass jars. If necessary, dilute with water to reduce the alcohol level or dilute. Add honey to taste (it may be sweet enough already). Do not over tighten the lids as some unpasteurized deposits are still present and gas can build up. If you are using plastic lids, drill holes to release the gases. You can also suck the liquid from the sediment before bottling, or bring it to 70 ° C to pasteurize if you want the fermentation to stop completely and the Makgeolli to be stable during storage. Refrigerate for a few days to soften it before drinking.

    How to make Makgeolli recipe at home: check out the step-by-step recipe for a creamy and traditional Korean rice wine.

    How to make makgeolli

    is used for

    total time

    ingrediants

    Preparation

    To doMakgeolli recipe at homestart rinsing the rice at least five times or place it in a colander under running water, stirring the grains until the water is clear, about 2 minutes.

    Soak the rice in 6 cups of water for 30 minutes, then bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat, cover the pot and simmer for 12 minutes. Lower the heat to low and cook for another 3 minutes.

    Remove the pot from the heat and leave it covered for 30 minutes.

    Sanitize 2 cloths large enough to fit over 2 large bowls (you can boil them, use a sterilizing solution or moisten them and heat them in the microwave for 2 minutes).

    Once it has cooled, use a cloth to wipe the spatula, small bowl, large bowl, spoon and hand with about 1 cup of vodka or sterilizing solution, clearly trying not to waste too much vodka.

    Call clothes.

    If your koji isn’t powdered, grind 1 cup and measure 100g.

    Combine the koji in a small bowl with instant yeast and enough water to make a paste.

    Add 1 liter of water and half of the cooked rice to each large bowl. Re-sterilize your hands with vodka and when the rice is cold enough break the lumps.

    Add the koji and mix. Clean the edges of the bowls with a cloth or paper towel moistened with alcohol and cover the bowls with sterilized cloths.

    Keep clothes in place with rubber bands, twine or twine. Put the bowls in a dark place between 20-25 ° C. Mix the liquid morning and evening with a sterilized spoon.

    Leave for 3-5 days.

    Add more water if it dries.

    During fermentation, the rice particles will float up and down in the liquid and gases will be heard. The makgeolla is ready when most of the kernels have fallen to the bottom of the bowls with only a few kernels left on top. The liquid should no longer boil. If inside it is warmer than 25 ° C, fermentation can only take 2-3 days. Decant the liquid by pouring sterilized gauze into sterilized glass bottles, plastic bottles or glass jars. If necessary, dilute with water to reduce the alcohol level or dilute. Add honey to taste (it may be sweet enough already). Do not over tighten the lids as some unpasteurized deposits are still present and gas can build up. If you are using plastic lids, drill holes to release the gases. You can also suck the liquid from the sediment before bottling, or bring it to 70 ° C to pasteurize if you want the fermentation to stop completely and the Makgeolli to be stable during storage. Refrigerate for a few days to soften it before drinking.

    By Zoe Stephens

    Whether you know it as Makgeolli, 막걸리, No. ongju or Fight Milk, this Korean alcohol is a drink you need to know more about.

    Makgeolli (막걸리) is a traditional Korean alcoholic. It is a kind of cloudy, sweet and good rice bubbly for you. It is the perfect partner for many Korean dishes and is also quite simple to prepare at home.

    In other words, it’s one of the best drinks around. So why have so few people heard of this Korean alcohol?

    Makgeolli is the oldest Korean alcoholic drink, dating back to the Koryo dynasty (918-1320). Traditionally made at home and drunk by farmers, Makgeolli is making a comeback in Korea and around the world. Makgeolli, along with beer and soju, is one of the most popular Korean spirits in both North and South Korea.

    Makgeolli is also known asMakkeoli, No.ongju (lit. “farmer’s drink”). By the Brits it’s nicknamed ‘Drunken Rice’, and also goes by the bizarre name of ‘Fight with milk’, as christened by Scottish band Colonel Mustard & The Dijon 5 in 2018.

    Che tu lo conosca come Makgeolli, 막걸리, No. ongju oFight with milk, this Korean alcohol is a drink you need to know more about.

    How to make makgeolli

    Taste of Makgeolla

    Makgeolli has a distinctive and complex flavor that is unique to Makgeolli. There really is no such thing.

    Drinking it for the first time can be a great experience. Milky, sweet and bubbly, this Korean alcohol is a drink that confuses your senses.

    Makgeolla can come in a variety of flavors and your Makgeolla drinking experience will likely continue on a unique taste journey through many of them. Bittersweet, sour, creamy, bitter, fruity and floral notes seasoned with a splash of chalk. Your first consumption of Makgeolla will make you question its cloudy appearance produced by the chalky sediment and whether it actually has an alcohol content due to its sweetness.

    The best way to really understand Makgeolla’s taste is to try it for yourself. If you are put off by the thought of fizzy milk, close your eyes on the first sip to truly appreciate the experience.

    Makgeolla alcohol content

    Don’t be fooled by the sweet and easy-drinking ability of this Korean alcohol.(The mistake I made in the beginning. I guessed 2-3% alcohol – let’s drink it all!)

    Makgeolli can contain from about 6-18% alcohol. Currently, however, commercially produced Makgeolli sticks are found inside with an alcohol content of around 6-9%.

    How to drink Makgeolli

    Makgeolli is served in small cups. Not small soju-style glasses, but rather rounded cups made of various materials.

    This Korean alcohol can be served as an everyday drink, but also for special occasions such as weddings.

    It should be served cold. If you drink it from a bottle, remember that it is carbonated. But there will also be sediments that need to be shaken. Then shake – gently – let it sit for a minute and slowly open the lid.

    Makgeolla history

    Makgeolli is the oldest Korean alcohol. Sięga ona czasów dynastii Koryo – a niektórzy twierdzą, że sięgają nawet ery Trzech Królestw (57 p. n.e. – 668 r.).

    Originariamente era chiamato "nongju" o "bevanda del contadino / alcol del contadino" perché era la bevanda di agricoltori e contadini a causa del suo alto contenuto di nutrienti e di carboidrati.

    Due to the stigma of being a peasant drink, Makgeolli has fallen out of favor over the years and drinks such as beer have become increasingly popular.

    It is now back in Korea and many companies are mass producing it. Makgeolli is readily available bottled in nearly all South Korean grocery stores and in a variety of flavors and varieties. Since it is commercially produced, it has obviously lost some of its quality – and some of its alcohol content as well. Originally, this Korean alcohol would have been around 12-18%. To accommodate a larger market, many companies stick to an alcohol content of 6-9%.

    Many of the Makgeollas you find for export are pasteurized, thus losing many of their health and flavor benefits. This is due to the short shelf life of unpasteurized Makgeolla.

    How to make makgeolli

    Makgeolla Health Benefits

    Makgeolli has many advantages if it is produced in the traditional way, that is, without pasteurization.

    This Korean alcohol is rich in fiber, vitamins B, C and low in cholesterol.

    The sediment on the bottom, on the other hand, means that it is high in carbohydrates, which is around 54 kcal per 100ml. You can get around this by not shaking it before drinking it and then drinking only the pure drink from above.

    Makgeolli in North Korea

    Makgeolli comes from the Koryo dynasty, before the separation. His foundation and his culture are deeply rooted in Korean culture and society, including North Korea and South Korea.

    Makgeolli can be found in many North Korean restaurants, as well as commercially produced bottles in supermarkets.

    The best Makgeolli are homemade Makgeolli made in the traditional way. You can find it at Folklore Park in Kaesong. If you’re lucky, an elderly Korean couple will welcome you and here you can buy a bottle of their homemade Makgeolla or try a cup first. A bottle of this specialty drink costs less than $ 1.

    How to make Makgeolli

    Makgeolli gets pretty fast. Its fermentation process lasts only 7-10 days.

    Questo alcol coreano è prodotto con riso e "nuruk" come starter di fermentazione.

    It’s a simple combination of cooked rice, water, and a diver. Of course, recipes and ratios of this content vary, and you can also add in various other ingrediants for different flavours or varieties.

    Watch Park and her son brew a milky, slightly sweet alcoholic drink

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    Share All sharing options for: How Korea’s Makgeolli Master Park Bok-soon Perfected the Fermented Rice Beverage

    At Boksoondoga brewery in South Korea, makgeolli — an alcoholic fermented rice beverage that’s milky, effervescent, tangy, and sweet — is hand-brewed with a lot of tender loving care. As owner Park Bok-soon enters her brewery’s fermentation room, she greets the onggi pots with a friendly “Hey guys, how have you been?” to which the sweet tapping of gurgling and fermenting rice responds. This is just one example of how she treats her product with respect. “Also treat a grain of rice as precious,” she purrs as her partner dumps the grains into the bowl.

    The park starts the day by hand washing the local rice 10 times before steaming it al dente. The rice is left to cool while it prepares the nuruk, or fermentation starter. In the case of the Diver, the wheat flour is fermented for 20 days and hermetically pressed into a square shape that sticks like a dough. Once the nuruk dough is ready, it goes to a room with controlled humidity and temperature, where it can flourish and produce the bacteria necessary for the production of makgeolla. “It has a direct effect on flavor,” Park explains. “It’s very hard to get the nuruk to flower, so a lot of people use artificial bacteria.” The starter stays in the nuruk room for 15 days before it’s mixed with the cooled rice and water. The entire mixture is then added to huge onggi pots and left to ferment for 15-20 days.

    Upon entering the fermentation chamber, you can hear the sound of rain hitting the floor. Except it’s not rain, but the crackling of rice fermenting and bubbling in the pots. After 15-20 days of full fermentation, the liquid is filtered out of the rice and the rice is used as feed for cows, pigs and chickens. The liquid is then mixed with water, bottled and ready to drink.

    “Japan has sake, Europe has wine, but there was no real traditional Korean makgeolla,” says Park. “We put a lot of love and care into making the makgeolla by hand to make it delicious”

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    Community

    Susubori Makgeolli Brewer’s Club A Facebook group for graduates of the Susubori Academy, but anyone can join the group. It’s a great place to learn from more experienced brewers.

    Makgeolli Brewer’s Hub by The Company of the Sun. Dedicated forum and networking platform for brewers from all over the world.

    blessed

    Takjoo Journals A wealth of knowledge about brewing at home, makgeolli history & news, and reviews of commercially-available brews.

    Moon & Lion Brian Romasky’s longstanding blog offers deep technical expertise and helpful homebrewing information.

    Educational resources

    Jeff Rubidge Youtube Channel The most comprehensive and thoughtful collection of makgeolli video content you’ll find. Check out Jeff’s review of our kit!

    Makgeolla Brewing Primer This is a must-read and the best place to start for anyone looking to delve into makgeolla making.

    Company of the Sun(formerly Makgeolli Mamas & Papas Korea, MMPK) Their mission is to develop and nurture the multicultural community of traditional Korean brewers and alcohol enthusiasts. They’re known for accurate and entertaining education via modern media, local discovery tours, and interactive hands-on classes.

    Alternative Fermentations: How to make Makgeolli This is a great overview (especially if you already have some home brewing experience) from our friends at BrewChatter in Nevada.

    Commercial breweries in North America

    Makku Marketed primarily in Los Angeles and New York City, Makku is currently America’s best opportunity for mainstream makgeolla.

    Hana Makgeolli Brooklyn-based Hana Makgeolli is a craft brewery and is about to open a tasting room.