How to make edible christmas ornaments

November 20, 2018

How to make edible christmas ornaments

One of the best parts of holiday celebrations is the explosion of decorations that appear in living rooms, on shelves, in windows and all over the home. Christmas trees are hung with ornaments of all shapes and sizes and origins. Remember that second grade winter craft project with popsicle sticks? Yep, it’s hanging on your parents’ tree, right next to the store-bought glass bauble. It’s that mix of old and new, homemade and bought, that makes holiday decor so special.

This year, add a new and delicious element to your holiday plans: edible decorations! Why not create something for your home that is both lovely and tasty? Some ornament recipes are meant for the tree, while others can garnish your table’s centerpiece to be enjoyed after a meal. Some are even lovely enough to put on display, and then sent home as delicious food gifts. There are so many options to make this holiday your own.

Gingerbread House

Let’s start with this classic Gingerbread House: the ultimate labor of love. Though it involves some patience, the finished house is a wonder to behold. It’s the perfect way to get the entire family involved – plus you can use all the leftover Christmas candy you have laying around. Allspice and nutmeg along with cinnamon and ginger form the flavor base of the house while peppermints, gum drops, mini marshmallows, licorice, and mints are delicious as well as decorative additions.

Christmas Cookie Tags

There are also easier options to bring to life equally delicious decorations. We’re all familiar with gingerbread men cookies. But have you ever seen one attached to a gift? These Gingerbread Cookie Gift Tags can adorn your Christmas gifts or serve as the gift itself! Made with the warm flavors of spices like ground ginger, ground cinnamon, ground nutmeg and sweetened by pure vanilla extract, molasses, and brown sugar, these cookie tags are a delicious way to liven up the holiday spirit.

Or, try these eggnog flavored Christmas cookie tags – they’re flavored with rum extract for a rich, decadent taste.

Cinnamon Ornaments

Requiring no baking at all and just two “ingredients,” this Cinnamon Star Ornament is the perfect starter project. The assembly is simple: string 10 equal-length cinnamon sticks lengthwise with shiny copper wire, then bend into a star shape. Hang as is, or add additional shorter cinnamon sticks to the center to form the crossover lines. You don’t even need to hang this on your tree to enjoy its scent: use it as a light-duty trivet on your table where the warm pot will release a wonderland of aroma.

Keep the spices in the air with Cinnamon Ornaments that look like gingerbread but are actually a potent, oven-dried cinnamon bark. They’ll continue to smell amazing for weeks and make a thoughtful, DIY Christmas gift.

Dough Ornaments

Of course, we haven’t forgotten about the tree, where we all love to hang our most treasured ornaments. Each tree tells a story that is unique to the person or family who decorated it. Add to the sparkle with Colorful Dough Ornaments, a festive DIY project suitable for kids and grownups alike. The fun part here? Customizing the dough ornaments to showcase all of the colors of the season – just use McCormick Assorted Food Colors. Then, adorn your Christmas tree with some of the gingerbread cookie gift tags you made earlier, for extra flair.

Peppermint Popcorn

Remember the classic of stringing popcorn into a garland? This is still a popular holiday activity! Unfortunately, to last the whole season you’d have to spray a clear coating on your garland, which keeps the garland looking fresh but also makes it inedible. For the popcorn lovers out there, we have a better idea: a gift-friendly twist on colorful popcorn.

First, find some elegant quart or larger sized jars, suitable for gifting. Decorate their lids, or choose jars with frosted glass or stylish details. Then, make a huge batch of Peppermint Crunch Popcorn. Once it’s cooled, start filling containers! Tie decorative ribbon on the lid, and you’re set. Having dinner guests? Use different sizes of containers to stack into a tower for your centerpiece. At the end of the night, let each guest take one home.

However you like to do DIY, edible Christmas gifts are a thoughtful way to celebrate the holidays and share your creativity with the ones you love. The sweet treats that result are just the icing on the cake!

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Live A Sustainable Life!

Make edible Christmas ornaments this year! These 4 homemade sugar Christmas ornaments are so pretty and incredibly easy to make! DIY candy Christmas decorations are easy last-minute Christmas DIY crafts for kids.

How to make edible christmas ornaments

Sugar ornaments are traditional Christmas tree ornaments. One of the following sugar ornament recipes was even published 280 years ago in 1741!

These edible Christmas tree decorations glitter like ice and snow. But these sparkling candy Christmas ornaments aren’t just pretty: When Christmas is over, you can eat the sugar ornaments (or use them for cakes and cookies in place of regular sugar)!

History Of Sugar Christmas Ornaments

Did you know that edible sugar and candy ornaments are one of the most traditional Christmas tree decorations? Long before glass baubles were used to decorate the Christmas tree, molded sugar ornaments were already used as edible Christmas tree decorations. In the Middle Ages, edible Christmas ornaments were made with sugar, gum tragacanth and rosewater (recipe below) and shaped with wooden and metal cookie molds. And in the Victorian era, the Christmas tree was often simply called “sugar tree” because it was decorated with apples, nuts and candy. Christmas candy and sugar decorations could be bought in the store or be made at home:

‘It was the Christmas of [18]67 […] the good mother secured a bit of old-fashioned New Orleans sugar, and out of it she manufactured some candy and moulded it into fantastic shapes. […] There must have been a couple of pounds of it upon this particular Christmas tree.’ (The Commoner, 1904).

Sugar Christmas Ornaments From The 1740s

This recipe for molded sugar Christmas ornaments was published 280 years ago in the old German cookbook “Freywillig-Aufgesprungener Granat-Apffel” in 1741! I often try historical recipes. However, really old recipes like this one don’t always work. But this not only worked perfectly, it was also really easy and fast to make. To be precise, it was a lot easier to make than other homemade fondant, sugar paste or gum paste. And it’s made with just three ingredients: powdered sugar, gum tragacanth and rosewater. Like pastillage or gum paste, these 18th century sugar ornaments dry rock-hard.

  • about 1 cup (120g) powdered sugar
  • 4 tsp rosewater
  • 1/2 tsp gum tragacanth

1. Combine Gum Tragacanth & Rosewater

Combine gum tragacanth and rosewater in a bowl. Cover the bowl and let it stand overnight at room temperature.

By the way, if you don’t have rosewater at home you can simply use water instead. And instead of gum tragacanth, gum arabic should also work.

2. Add Powdered Sugar

The next day, knead powdered sugar into the gum tragacanth mixture.

3. Make Sugar Ornaments

Roll out the sugar dough to 1/4″ (1/2cm) thickness on powdered sugar. Sprinkle the cookie mold with powdered sugar and press it onto the sugar dough. Cut out the sugar ornaments with a knife. Poke holes into sugar Christmas ornaments with a skewer. Then let the edible Christmas tree decorations dry at room temperature for about two days.

After two days, thread yarn through the holes of the candy Christmas ornaments.

How to make edible christmas ornaments Hand-painted sugar ornaments

How To Make Hand-Painted Sugar Ornaments

Molded cookies – such as Springerle – and sugar ornaments were often painted with natural food coloring such as vegetable and fruit juices. Inspired by these traditional hand-painted cookies and sugar ornaments, I painted some sugar ornaments with beetroot, red cabbage and plantain (Plantago lanceolata). I also tried painting the edible Christmas ornaments with butterfly pea tea but that was too pale on the sugar.

I just used a piece of raw beetroot and red cabbage and bruised plantain leaves to paint the historical sugar ornaments. But you can also extract the juice and paint the edible Christmas tree decorations with a brush. Click on the links below for more recipes on how to make homemade natural food coloring.

Homemade Natural Food Coloring

How To Make Easy Sparkling Sugar Ornaments

These edible Christmas tree decorations sparkling and glitter almost like real snow or ice. And you only need two ingredients that you already have at home to make these sugar snowflake ornaments: granulated sugar and water. These sparkling sugar Christmas ornaments are even faster to make than the historical sugar ornaments above. But the sugar mixture is crumbly and therefore more difficult to shape into edible Christmas decorations.

How to make edible christmas ornaments Easy sparkling sugar ornaments

  • 1/2 cup (100g) granulated sugar
  • about 2 tsp water

1. Combine Sugar & Water

In a bowl, stir together granulated sugar and some drops of water. Add just a drop of water at a time and don’t add too much water: the sugar shouldn’t melt. It should look and feel like wet sand.

2. Make Sugar Ornaments

Now flatten the sugar dough with a rolling pin or your hands. Using a snowflake-shaped cookie cutter cut snowflakes from the sugar dough. I used my DIY snowflake cookie cutter that I made from a tin can. By the way, you can also form the sugar mixture into edible icicle ornaments instead!

Carefully transfer the sugar snowflake ornaments to baking paper or a greased plate. And carefully push them out the cookie cutter.

Let the edible sugar snowflakes dry for some days at room temperature. After they’re dried, the sugar snowflakes have the consistency of regular sugar cubes.

How To Make Colorful & Flavored Sparkling Sugar Ornaments

The edible sugar Christmas ornaments don’t have to be white: Instead of sparkling snow-white Christmas ornaments you can also make all-natural red, green or even blue sugar ornaments – naturally dyed with homemade natural food coloring! For example, you can dye the sugar ornaments red with red beets, blue with red cabbage or green with spinach. You can create almost any color with vegetables, berries and herbs! Click on the link below for the recipes.

And you can even flavor the sugar snowflake ornaments with organic essential peppermint oil, ground cinnamon, rosewater, almond extract, vanilla powder or vanilla extract.

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These decorative tre(eats) are perfect for the holidays.

Caroline Alexander

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It’s that time of the year where Starbucks changes their specialty drinks from a PSL to a peppermint mocha. Every radio station is now playing holiday songs like “Frosty the Snowman” or “Deck the Halls.” ABC Family (aka Freeform) is playing their 25 Days of Christmas movies. The holiday season is full of iconic moments, like decorating your Christmas tree.

If you’re anything like my family, the Christmas festivities commence the day after Thanksgiving. This all starts with us rushing to the tree lot the morning after and picking out the perfect Christmas tree. But what’s a tree without its ornaments?

Now, we’re going to take a step back from the classic hanging ball ornaments or the dreaded possibility of breaking “grandma’s 40-year-old ornament” and make easy and edible christmas decorations that will give your tree an original touch.

Peppermint Wreaths

  • Prep Time: 5 mins
  • Cook Time: 5 mins
  • Total Time: 10 mins
  • Servings: 1
  • Easy

    Ingredients

    Step 1

    Preheat oven to 325°F.

    Step 2

    Unwrap peppermint candies.

    Caroline Alexander

    Step 3

    Lay foil out on a cookie sheet and start assembling your peppermint candies into a circle (make sure they’re touching each other).

    #SpoonTip: use 6 peppermint candies to form circle.

    Caroline Alexander

    Step 4

    Bake wreaths for 5 minutes.

    Step 5

    Once completely cooled, tie a ribbon around the wreaths and hang!

    Caroline Alexander

Salt Dough Ornaments

  • Prep Time: 15 mins
  • Cook Time: 1 hr
  • Total Time: 1 hr 15 mins
  • Servings: 10
  • Easy

    Ingredients

    Step 1

    Preheat oven to 300°F.

    Step 2

    In a large mixing bowl, add the flour, salt, and water until well incorporated.

    Caroline Alexander

    Step 3

    On large piece of parchment paper, knead and roll out the dough.

    Caroline Alexander

    Step 4

    Using cookie cutters, cut the desired shapes out of the dough and then remove the excess dough scraps.

    Step 5

    At the top of your cookie ornament, take a straw or a pencil and poke a hole (this is where the ribbon will hang from).

    Caroline Alexander

    Step 6

    Transfer the parchment paper with cookie ornaments shapes onto a baking sheet and bake in the oven for 1 hour.

    Step 7

    Let the ornaments cool completely before decorating.

    Caroline Alexander

    Step 8

    Decorate and hang!

    Caroline Alexander

This next recipe is a little more time consuming compared to the other ornaments, but this creative tree addition will last throughout the entire holiday season.

Popcorn Garland

  • Prep Time: 5 mins
  • Cook Time: 40 mins
  • Total Time: 45 mins
  • Servings: 1
  • Medium

    Ingredients

    Step 1

    Pop the popcorn according to the package instructions.

    #SpoonTip: For longer-lasting garland, use unflavored popcorn.

    Caroline Alexander

    Step 2

    Start with a long length of thread, depending on the size of your tree.

    Step 3

    Put the thread through a needle and pull it halfway through so it’s the same length on both ends.

    Caroline Alexander

    Step 4

    Tie a knot roughly one inch from the end of the thread. For a more secure knot, tie multiple knots at the end.

    Step 5

    Pierce the popcorn at the center of the kernel, pull the needle through and then slide the popcorn down to the knotted end.

    Caroline Alexander

    Step 6

    Repeat until your garland strand is full of popcorn, then tie a knot at the end once you’re finished.

    Step 7

    Hang popcorn garland on the tree!

    #SpoonTip: Put the Christmas lights on before you hang your garland.

    Caroline Alexander

As you trim the tree, use these easy and homemade ornaments to start your holiday season off right. Whether that be giving these ornaments as gifts or hosting your own holiday party and sharing these recipes with friends, these will get you into the holiday spirit.

Live A Sustainable Life!

Make edible Christmas ornaments this year! These 4 homemade sugar Christmas ornaments are so pretty and incredibly easy to make! DIY candy Christmas decorations are easy last-minute Christmas DIY crafts for kids.

How to make edible christmas ornaments

Sugar ornaments are traditional Christmas tree ornaments. One of the following sugar ornament recipes was even published 280 years ago in 1741!

These edible Christmas tree decorations glitter like ice and snow. But these sparkling candy Christmas ornaments aren’t just pretty: When Christmas is over, you can eat the sugar ornaments (or use them for cakes and cookies in place of regular sugar)!

History Of Sugar Christmas Ornaments

Did you know that edible sugar and candy ornaments are one of the most traditional Christmas tree decorations? Long before glass baubles were used to decorate the Christmas tree, molded sugar ornaments were already used as edible Christmas tree decorations. In the Middle Ages, edible Christmas ornaments were made with sugar, gum tragacanth and rosewater (recipe below) and shaped with wooden and metal cookie molds. And in the Victorian era, the Christmas tree was often simply called “sugar tree” because it was decorated with apples, nuts and candy. Christmas candy and sugar decorations could be bought in the store or be made at home:

‘It was the Christmas of [18]67 […] the good mother secured a bit of old-fashioned New Orleans sugar, and out of it she manufactured some candy and moulded it into fantastic shapes. […] There must have been a couple of pounds of it upon this particular Christmas tree.’ (The Commoner, 1904).

Sugar Christmas Ornaments From The 1740s

This recipe for molded sugar Christmas ornaments was published 280 years ago in the old German cookbook “Freywillig-Aufgesprungener Granat-Apffel” in 1741! I often try historical recipes. However, really old recipes like this one don’t always work. But this not only worked perfectly, it was also really easy and fast to make. To be precise, it was a lot easier to make than other homemade fondant, sugar paste or gum paste. And it’s made with just three ingredients: powdered sugar, gum tragacanth and rosewater. Like pastillage or gum paste, these 18th century sugar ornaments dry rock-hard.

  • about 1 cup (120g) powdered sugar
  • 4 tsp rosewater
  • 1/2 tsp gum tragacanth

1. Combine Gum Tragacanth & Rosewater

Combine gum tragacanth and rosewater in a bowl. Cover the bowl and let it stand overnight at room temperature.

By the way, if you don’t have rosewater at home you can simply use water instead. And instead of gum tragacanth, gum arabic should also work.

2. Add Powdered Sugar

The next day, knead powdered sugar into the gum tragacanth mixture.

3. Make Sugar Ornaments

Roll out the sugar dough to 1/4″ (1/2cm) thickness on powdered sugar. Sprinkle the cookie mold with powdered sugar and press it onto the sugar dough. Cut out the sugar ornaments with a knife. Poke holes into sugar Christmas ornaments with a skewer. Then let the edible Christmas tree decorations dry at room temperature for about two days.

After two days, thread yarn through the holes of the candy Christmas ornaments.

How to make edible christmas ornaments Hand-painted sugar ornaments

How To Make Hand-Painted Sugar Ornaments

Molded cookies – such as Springerle – and sugar ornaments were often painted with natural food coloring such as vegetable and fruit juices. Inspired by these traditional hand-painted cookies and sugar ornaments, I painted some sugar ornaments with beetroot, red cabbage and plantain (Plantago lanceolata). I also tried painting the edible Christmas ornaments with butterfly pea tea but that was too pale on the sugar.

I just used a piece of raw beetroot and red cabbage and bruised plantain leaves to paint the historical sugar ornaments. But you can also extract the juice and paint the edible Christmas tree decorations with a brush. Click on the links below for more recipes on how to make homemade natural food coloring.

Homemade Natural Food Coloring

How To Make Easy Sparkling Sugar Ornaments

These edible Christmas tree decorations sparkling and glitter almost like real snow or ice. And you only need two ingredients that you already have at home to make these sugar snowflake ornaments: granulated sugar and water. These sparkling sugar Christmas ornaments are even faster to make than the historical sugar ornaments above. But the sugar mixture is crumbly and therefore more difficult to shape into edible Christmas decorations.

How to make edible christmas ornaments Easy sparkling sugar ornaments

  • 1/2 cup (100g) granulated sugar
  • about 2 tsp water

1. Combine Sugar & Water

In a bowl, stir together granulated sugar and some drops of water. Add just a drop of water at a time and don’t add too much water: the sugar shouldn’t melt. It should look and feel like wet sand.

2. Make Sugar Ornaments

Now flatten the sugar dough with a rolling pin or your hands. Using a snowflake-shaped cookie cutter cut snowflakes from the sugar dough. I used my DIY snowflake cookie cutter that I made from a tin can. By the way, you can also form the sugar mixture into edible icicle ornaments instead!

Carefully transfer the sugar snowflake ornaments to baking paper or a greased plate. And carefully push them out the cookie cutter.

Let the edible sugar snowflakes dry for some days at room temperature. After they’re dried, the sugar snowflakes have the consistency of regular sugar cubes.

How To Make Colorful & Flavored Sparkling Sugar Ornaments

The edible sugar Christmas ornaments don’t have to be white: Instead of sparkling snow-white Christmas ornaments you can also make all-natural red, green or even blue sugar ornaments – naturally dyed with homemade natural food coloring! For example, you can dye the sugar ornaments red with red beets, blue with red cabbage or green with spinach. You can create almost any color with vegetables, berries and herbs! Click on the link below for the recipes.

And you can even flavor the sugar snowflake ornaments with organic essential peppermint oil, ground cinnamon, rosewater, almond extract, vanilla powder or vanilla extract.

Please Pin It!

How to make edible christmas ornaments

The winter holidays bring many opportunities for families to take part in traditions. Food is a big part of this, from turkey and pumpkin pie on Thanksgiving to eggnog and fruitcake at Christmas. Decorating houses is also a long-standing tradition in the United States. Some families go for broke with garish displays that cover their entire property. Others keep it a little more low-key and stick to decorating the inside of the house, especially the Christmas tree. If you feel like getting crafty this Christmas, you can combine the food and the decorating with some edible homemade ornaments. This is a fun activity that the whole family can be involved in.

5: Popcorn String

It’s a holiday classic — the popcorn string around the Christmas tree. Nobody knows exactly how this tradition started, but it’s still alive and well in homes all over the United States. For best results, pop your popcorn the day before, because stale popcorn holds up a little better. But since it’s fun to eat the popcorn as you string, you can pop some more while you’re decorating. If you want to get fancy, you can color the popcorn green and red using vegetable dye. You should make sure the popcorn you use for the tree is plain and not flavored with butter or salt. For best results, use a size 14 needle and white, green or red thread. For ease of use, try to make one long string of popcorn, tie it off at the end and then get some help from your kids layering it around the tree. To add additional color, alternate the pieces of popcorn with cranberries.

How to make edible christmas ornaments

This ornament is so easy to make, it’s a great project for kids of all ages. All you need is some 1- to 3-inch (5- to 7-centimeter) Styrofoam balls, a bag of colored gumballs, a box of toothpicks, a spool of ribbon and some ornament hooks. Take the gumballs and stick them into the foam ball using the toothpicks, one at a time. Keep going, alternating colors until the foam is completely covered in gumballs. Next, you need to hang it, so take the ribbon and tie it around the center of the gumball drop. Then, add your hook hanger and find a firm branch to hang it on. Try using traditional Christmas colors for the best effect.

3: Lifesaver Wreath

Lifesavers, the colorful, round hard candy with the hole in the middle, have been used for all kinds of crafty projects because of their vibrant colors and appeal to children. You can use these fruit-flavored candies to make an edible ornament for your Christmas tree. All you need to make these holiday treats is some black string licorice and a lot of Lifesavers. If you want to stick to red and green, you’re going to need to weed through the bag and pick those out. A rainbow-colored wreath is a good option if you don’t want to go through the trouble of fishing out the Christmas colors. Cut the licorice into foot-long strips and loop the Lifesavers through until the section of string is full. This should take about 12 to 15 candies. Then, simply tie the string off and hang it on your tree.

2: Edible Christmas Tree

How to make edible christmas ornaments

This isn’t one you can hang on your tree. Instead, it’s a miniature, edible version of the tree. For this one, you need some ice cream sugar cones, green cake frosting, M&M candies and some Popsicle sticks to do the messy work. Lay out some wax paper on the counter, and unwrap and lay out all of your ingredients. Invert the cone so that it’s point-side up, and then use a Popsicle stick to spread on the green icing. Make sure it’s completely covered, but don’t glob on too much. You want a nice, even coating. Then press the M&Ms into the tree as your candy ornaments and you’re finished. You can also use gummy bears or any other small candy as your ornaments. The only problem with this decoration is that your kids will probably eat it long before it lands on the mantle.

This edible, decorative ornament is fun because of the transformation that takes place in the ingredients. Take your kids to your local cooking or holiday store and have them pick out their favorite Christmas cookie cutters. Then, buy a nice assortment of colorful hard candies. For best results, stick to Jolly Ranchers and Lifesavers. When you get home, wrap the cookie cutters in foil and spray them with cooking oil to avoid sticking. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (176.6 degrees Celsius) and lay the cookie cutters out onto a cookie sheet lined with foil. Then lay out the colored candies in a single layer inside each cutter. You can sift through to get single colored ornaments or go for multi-colored. Bake the ornaments for about 10 minutes, or until all the candies are melted. Remove the ornaments from the oven and poke a hole for your ribbon hanger near the edge of each one while it’s still hot. Once it’s cooled, string some ribbon through the hole and hang it on the tree.

November 30, 2011

Welcome back to Kids Get Crafty and our “Edible Christmas Ornaments“… ok ok… they are just cookies on a ribbon, but seeing as they are for hanging in the tree, surely that makes them and ornament? And as they are for eating.. surely that makes them edible. So therefore – edible ornaments? No?

How to make edible christmas ornaments

These ornaments feature in our new Christmas Ornament Book. 30 of our favourite ornaments brought together in one place. Sorted by age. Each craft is shared on one page – making the perfect worksheet print outs. Lovely to have them all in one place too!
How to make edible christmas ornaments

Get yours today and keep it forever!

Christmas to me is all about tradition and time together. A big focus of our Christmases are the “once a year” cookies that you bake. And we have been making Vanille Kipferl and Husarenkrapfen and Schoko Macronen and if we have time will make some Zimt Sterne and Linzer Augen. Well, we haven’t made them all yet, but they are on the list.

How to make edible christmas ornamentsFrom a child’s perspective, the edible ornaments are the best: The dough is easy. You get to cut out cookie shapes AND you get to decorate. There is lots of spoon licking and sprinkle snaffling. What more do you want?

Ok, I totally admit, that baking with children is messy and CAN BE stressful. They want to do things. And then they don’t want to things. And then they want to eat EVERYTHING. And then they complain that the sibling had more. Messy. Stressful and yet strangely fun and rewarding.

My top tip for baking with young kids:

How to make edible christmas ornaments

1. Be prepared. Get everything you need out before you let the kids near the baking. Clear you surfaces as best you can.

2. Give each child their own bowl (yes, it is worth it).

3. Less is more. Don’t be ambitious. If need be make more cookies when the kids are in bed. Also limit the number of sprinkles (they will want to add all of them at once) and stick to one type of icing/ colour of icing.

4. If need be, start chanting: This is fun.This is fun. This is for the children. This is for the children. Making childhood memories. Making childhood memories.

We by accident (don’t ask) made double the amount. So I put some in the fridge and finished it off when the kids were not around. Same goes for the decorating. I did 2/3s of the decorating after the children went to bed and saved some for them to do.

Firstly Our Easy Cookie Recipe:

  • 250g plain flour
  • 125g sugar
  • 125g butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 packet of vanilla sugar (or a few drops of essence)

If you prefer no eggs, you can use our shortbread recipe too.. it is fabulously versatile and has no eggs in it. But the additional egg and vanilla sugar make it that little bit more special for Christmas! You can of course add some cinnamon too. Your call. A totally flexible recipe.

For the Decorations:

  • Icing sugar, lemon, flavours, a bit of water if necessary, sprinkles, silver balls, choc sprinkles… whatever takes your fancy!

Preheat oven to 180C and bake until golden (20-30min)

How to make edible christmas ornaments

1. Place all ingredients in a bowl and mix. If you find it easier, crumble butter, sugar, flour, baking powder, vanilla sugar together first. Add the egg second. Each child got their own bowl. Reduced mess and squabbling. Red Ted (3 .75yrs) is now able to do all the mixing. Pip Squeak (2yrs) played more and then I helped her finish it off.

How to make edible christmas ornamentsHow to make edible christmas ornaments

2. Roll out. Cut out your shapes. Once on tray, make a large hole in your cookies. This hole WILL get smaller as the cookie bakes and you may well have to give it ANOTHER prod once you have taken the cookies out of the oven!

How to make edible christmas ornaments

3. Make your icing sugar. I made 3 types:

  • Pink (& red) with rose flavouring – hearts & mushrooms. Watch any red food colouring a wee drop is plenty for pink. If you add too much you end up with lots of blood like icing.. not too Christmassy. More for Halloween!
  • Yellow with orange juice/ flavouring & choc chips – stars – in retrospect I would have used chocolate sprinkles and not the choc chips. Sprinkles would have looked better!

How to make edible christmas ornaments

How to make edible christmas ornaments

  • White with lemon juice (my favourite) & lots and lots of sprinkles and silver balls – these are the ones the children made!

How to make edible christmas ornaments How to make edible christmas ornaments

4. Oh yes. It was messy. But they loved it. There were sprinkles everywhere. In fact we had a sprinkles explosion. Life was good.

How to make edible christmas ornaments How to make edible christmas ornaments How to make edible christmas ornaments How to make edible christmas ornaments

5. When it is time to decorate your tree, thread them and hang (maybe make this part of your advent activities with the children!). You may find that you will have to use a needle and thread for some of the children’s cookies, as icing and sprinkles will be covering the holes. Keep in an air tight container until you put your tree up. Remember to keep the “flavours” separate – rose in one tin, orange another and lemon a third. Else the flavours will mix and not be as delicious!

We also like to make small cookie packages for friends that we visit during the Christmas season and our neighbours. In fact, with one of these packages in our hands, is how we first introduced ourselves to our neighbours when we first move to our current home! And I would like to think that 6 years later, we are good friends!

Read more about our Advent Ideas & Traditions of at Life at The Zoo.

Here are lots more edible christmas ornaments to take a peak at and have a go!!

How to make edible christmas ornaments

Here are some of my mummu’s ornaments 🙂

How to make edible christmas ornamentsFor this project you will need:

  • Roll out cookie dough (my Orange Vanilla Spice recipe is available in my tutorial shop)
  • 3″ round cookie cutter
  • Heart cutter
  • Paring knife to cut out the 6 pointed star shape
  • Decorating tip #8, #3 and #1
  • Flood consistency royal icing
  • Medium consistency royal icing
  • Scribe tool
  • Embroidery thread

Colors:

  • Red = Americolor tulip red + burgundy + a touch of black

Watch the video below to see how to make these cookie ornaments.If you’d like more information on the techniques shown here, visit my tutorial shop to download the following videos:

  • How to make royal icing
  • Flooding with royal icing
  • Cookie decorating basics
  • Quilting

Merry Chrismas! How to make edible christmas ornaments— Click on the images below for more cookie decorating tutorials! How to make edible christmas ornamentsHow to make edible christmas ornamentsHow to make edible christmas ornaments

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20 thoughts on “ Edible Christmas Ornaments! ”

How long ! Can we eat these ornaments?

It depends! If you hang them on the tree, they’ll go stale within a couple of days (although they’ll still taste good!). If they’re wrapped in an air tight container, they’ll stay fresh for about a week and if they’re heat sealed in individual bags, they’ll stay fresh for up to 4 weeks 🙂

I’m the Senior Social Producer for Good Morning America and we love all your cookies! I’m writing in because we’re doing a big 25 Days of Cookies series in December for GMA and were wondering if you’d would like to be a partner of sorts on it.

We’re planning on rolling out a new cookie recipe and video every day [hands and pans style top down video] that lives on [GoodMorningAmerica.com].

Would you be interested in sharing two or three original cookie recipes with us for this that we can reprint on our website and use for the video?

We would link out to your website in the article, tag you on the Facebook and Instagram social posts and credit you in the video as well. If you are interested – would you share the video on Facebook as well?

Let me know – Thanks!

Caterina Andreano
Senior Social Media Editor
Good Morning America
Office: 212-456-3704
Cell: 551-427-9014

hola, soy de argentina, hermoso todo lo que haces, quiero comprar tu libro, sabes si se consigue en argentina?

TRANSLATION: She asks…
Hello, I’m from Argentina. It’s lovely what you do. I want to buy your book, is it available in Argentina.

I need help my colors keep running even if one color drys overnight what am I doing wrong

Ive just discovered your blog after seeing the snow globe cookies and I’m having a go. My little gingerbread men runouts are drying and the dough is in the fridge. Your cookies look amazing. Thank you for sharing. I’m in Wales, UK.

I was mesmerized from the moment I began watching these videos. I’ve been baking since I was about 10 years old always dreamed of making cookies that looked like these. I am BEYOND inspired!

Thank you so much, Pamela!

Hi Amber, I just viewed your Christmas Ornaments tutorial! I really had such a wonderful time in your class and I am still being impressed by your talent. These cookies are soo gorgeous!

Thank you so much, Valerie.

These are gorgeous, Can you still eat them? If so how long do they last and what recipe do you use 🙂

I love the elegant simplicity of using just two colours, it is so effective! Well done, you are such an inspiration!

Amber, I know I have said this before and I hope you never tire if hearing it. Your work is unbelievably gorgeous. You are untouchable when it comes to cookie decorating. Even though you are far from where I live, Northeast Ohio, I am going to have to make the trip for your decorating classes. I will be getting in touch with you after the first of the year to check on the availability of those classes. Thank you. Susan

I’d love to have you in a class, Susan!! Thank you!!

Hi Amber, I am trying to mix the colour, but not having much luck. What ratio of tulip red to burgundy is it? My seem really orange and I have tried mixing it 3 times . I hope you can help. Thank you.

Hi Michelle! It’s mostly tulip red with a little bit of burgundy. Try adding a little black, too.

Thank you Amber. I wish I could come to one of your classes, but I am in Tasmania, Australia. The other end of the earth really .

These are just gorgeous !

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How to make edible christmas ornaments

In the spirit of giving, Longwood Gardens adorns a Wildlife Tree with edible ornaments for our furry friends every holiday season. The Wildlife Tree is a 20-foot tall Douglas fir from Longwood’s own nursery. It is decorated in ornaments handcrafted from natural materials—Crabapple Bundles, Raisin Icicles, Bird Seed Ornaments, Cranberry Wreaths and Pine Cone Feeders. These ornaments are not only decorative, but serve the greater purpose of feeding birds and squirrels during the harsh winter months. The Wildlife Tree attracts many different birds, including Blue Jays, Finches, Chickadees and Cardinals. Our Longwood staff and volunteers handcraft all the edible natural ornaments, and replenish daily.

Below we share how to make edible ornaments for your own Wildlife Tree so you can watch in wonder as birds and squirrels enjoy your treats throughout the winter.

Raisin Icicles

Using a needle and waxed dental floss, thread raisins to form 1.5 to 2-foot lengths. Start with a knot at the end of the string or tie and knot the floss around the first raisin and continue stringing raisins. Tie the top end with raffia or a colorful ribbon to hang.

Bird Seed Ornaments

Ingredients
3/4 Cup flour
1/2 Cup water
1 pkg knox gelatin (2 ½ teaspoons)
3 Tablespoons corn syrup
4 Cups birdseed
Loops of string or Raffia for hangers

Add gelatin to boiling water, and mix until fully dissolved.
Add corn syrup and remove from heat
Pour into bowl with the flour and mix lightly
Mix in birdseed

To shape: press dough firmly into lightly oiled cookie cutter on waxed paper or into a muffin tin. Fill shape halfway with dough, and then place the loop of string in the center, before filling to the top. To finish, gently pull off the cookie cutter and allow birdseed cookie to dry before hanging. Note: To form sphere-like shapes, you can also mold birdseed cookies by hand.