How to make difficult decisions

Some decisions are easy while others are much more difficult. What makes decisions difficult? If there is one factor that sharpens the mind, it is the risk of failure.

Decision risk

Decision risk has three main components: investment, impact and probability.

Investment

Investment is the cost of deciding and includes the money, time and emotion required to make the decision work, and which would be lost S the decision fails to achieve the goals which provide the return on the investment. In addition, the risk assessment includes the cost of recovery in the event of a problem (and which can far exceed the initial investment).

Hit

Hit considers effect of both benefits and of failure. Hit can be measured in depths, spread and duration. Depth is the amount of benefit or harm caused. The breadth takes into account the number of other people affected and the overall spread of the benefit or harm. The duration takes into account the duration of the impact, even before recovery or its natural undamped duration.

Chance

Chance is the probability of the impact occurring. This may be well known or, more likely, just an estimate. Chance of impact may be dependent on a number of factors and other risks which themselves have their own likelihood.

Chance can also change as events occur that modSy probability. Chance can also decrease as time goes by, although this can be balance by an increasing impact.

The decision also takes into account reversibility. Can you go back after making the investment? What investments will be lost and what exactly can be recovered? Easier decisions have low-cost exit options. With more difficult decisions, all costs are irreversibly lost immediately after making a decision.

Recoverability is similar to reversibility. If there is a risk, can the situation be rectified or is it necessary to let the damage manifest itself? A recoverable risk can be planned and emergency action can now be taken to minimize the impact when a risk occurs.

The most difficult decisions

The worst kind of decision is one where it is:

  • A significant and irrecoverable personal investment, which includes money, time and emotions.
  • High-value results with little chance of success.
  • Situations where failure is very costly (even if the probability of failure is low).
  • Lack of reliable information on which to base the decision, including the likelihood of success and the necessary investments.

Decision making

Making irreversible personal decisions is very difficult. For example, whether to undergo a medical procedure such as an amputation, or to quit now and start a career now. Likewise, at work, important decisions can make or break a career, leading to major promotions or layoffs.

Emotionally, we often base decisions on anticipated regrets. We envision a vision of decision failure and experience how bad we would feel. Therefore, making difficult decisions can take courage. However, when we focus on possible failure, we see the same distorted view as when we focus, hopefully, on expected success. The best approach is to seek a balanced view in which both are viewed coldly.

Beware of intuition in difficult decisions. Find ways to test this, such as by looking for the roots of assumptions or by asking others for an independent thennt of view. In doing so, it is often best to ask those who have not invested and who will not benefit or lose from this decision.

Understanding when a decision is difficult given the investment, the impact and the likelihood of success and failure. Make decisions with that knowledge, not hope. If necessary, take some time to find it.

How to make dJeślSicult decisions

How are leaders using themselves, especially when it comes to making good decisions? The contribution of the group is very valuable in making the best decisions; however, overconfidence can cause a leader to act alone when she feels it is okay with him. This usually leads to the erosion of others’ confidence in the executive’s ability to lead.

There are two myths that distort this process:

Myth 1: Decisions should be made at the highest level.

Decisions made at the highest level aren’t always the best decisions for an organization. When this happens, the problems are not solved – they are temporarily postponed. If that person is surrounded by like-minded thinkers, the illusion of a good decision can lull them to comfort them in the situation.

Myth 2: good decisions come from consensus.

One of the things that helps you make good decisions is to look at the problem from multiple perspectives. Without this, there’s no divergence from accepted norms,without a variety of thoughts and disagreements.

This Sn’t automatically happen, nor is it our natural tendency. It has to be intentional with built-in mechanisms that provide more than one perspective. This favors creative solutions.

Abraham Lincoln was the surprise winner of a viciously contested primary filled with personal attacks and attempted coup d’états. Lincoln won and then did something that surprised everyone. He put the people he fought with in his closet. He called them his rival team.They provided different perspectives and tense solutions that avoided the groupthink that distinguishes so many presidential offices.

Now, you might not put rivals on your team, but Lincoln’s thennt is well taken. There must be a sufficient amount of creative friction to generate the creative tension needed to refine the ideas of the moment and challenge the old assumptions.

A good leader will know the boiling thennt so that the tension isn’t overwhelming or melts the team.

Here’s the real danger: The discussion in teams can shut down quickly, followed by an undue pressure to act on that decision without buy-in from those doing the work. The result is slow execution that hits another domain where leaders now feel the need for micromanagement and mandate.

Organizations need to have their own decision-making process that capitalizes on their best asset: people. In this way, the director really leads everyone on the team.

As you lead your team, try these six tips for making better decisions:

1. Think back to the old solutions.

It didn’t work before, but that Sn’t mean it shouldn’t be tried again. Perhaps with the current changes and some adaptations it could work better.

2. Drive slowly to drive fast.

Don’t be in a rush; it may prevent you from asking the right questions. There is a time for expediency, but quick decisions aren’t always the best. If you feel it is urgent, ask what affects it. Why the rush? Are we able to allow for more research and input?

"Sii veloce, ma prenditi il ​​tuo tempo."– John of wood

3. Acting at the intersection of order and chaos.

There is no need to monitor yourself. Loosen the page in the discussion. Don’t focus on power—focus on leadership that welcomes alternative solutions. Develop a culture that values ​​multiple perspectives. The ego has to be checked at the door and different thennts of view are not personal attacks.

4. Listen.

The best way to do this is to ask clarifying questions. Let them know that you have listened to them and take them deeper into their thoughts.

5. Searchnormalinformation, no more information.

The best solution is to spend more time defining the problem. The explanation of a problem, purpose or purpose crystallizes the search for information.

6. Doquite gooddecisions.

We rarely make a 100% correct decision. Sometimes a good decision now is better than a perfect decision later. This is essential to remember in today’s fast-paced world.

When it comes to making decisions, effective leaders know when to release control. They delegate and build trust in others. They see their team’s successes as a way of leveraging their own leadership competencies.

This article was written by Annie Lin, MBA. Annie Lin is the founder of New York LSe Coaching, a life and career coaching service based in Manhattan. Her holistic approach to her, which combines elements of the wisdom traditions of the East and the West, has made her a highly sought after personal trainer. Annie’s work has been featured in Elle Magazine, NBC News, New York Magazine, and BBC World News. She holds a BA in MBA from Oxford Brookes University. Annie is also the founder of the LSe Coaching Institute in New York, which offers a comprehensive life coach certification program. Find out more: https: // newyorklSecoaching. com

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We make dozens of decisions every day. What to wear, what to eat, which route to work, which movie to watch on Netflix – all of these are fairly simple and straightforward choices that usually depend on your mood or preferences. Other decisions, such as choosing a course of study or moving out of the country, can be more difficult to make. Możesz być tak zaniepokojony dokonaniem złego wyboru, że doświadczasz paraliżu analitycznego i w ogóle opóźniasz dokonanie wyboru. Learn step-by-step decision making that will help you get through even the toughest choices smoothly.

Life is full of big decisions that make you think about this time of year when graduates accept their degrees and plan their way forward. With that in mind, here’s some advice to help you along the way, from deciding where to live to deciding where to work, and so on. Of course, none of these decisions need to be made normal Nowbut here are 10 decisions you will want to start planning for yourself.

Choice of a field of study

Choice of a field of study

If you’re graduating from high school, t he first big decision you’ll probably have to make in your young adult lSe is which college to attend , but that might also depend on the area you’re interested in studying. Overall, college rankings aren’t that dependable , so the more important question might be: W hat do you want to major in?

Research several majors in your early years, consider your job prospects, and do other detective work to make the best choice of field of study (taking into account the information you have at the time). It might also be worth kNowing the dJeślSerence in income for dJeślSerent college majors .

Decide on a career

Decide on a career

College majors and degrees often correlate with occupation, but not always (see every English major like myself who isn’t doing something directly related to English literature). Degree or not, at one thennt or another you’re going to have to decide what to do with your lSe . Connect with others or find a mentor who can help you better understand what it’s like to work in different professions. More generally, here are the things to consider when making a decision about your career path.

Make a career change

Make a career change

M aybe it’s time to jump ship to a dJeślSerent, more rewarding career—which is a lot more common today than it was our parents were growing up. These are the things you should kNow before making the switch — not just income changes, but also whether you have the skills and experience to hit the ground running. Changing jobs is a big decision, but the inspiring stories of people attending medical college in their forties or otherwise pursuing their vocation later in life remind us that changing jobs can definitely be worth it if you can focus on the job you love.

Back to school or obtaining a higher academic degree

Back to school or obtaining a higher academic degree

If you’re making a career change, you might want or need to go back to school. Or perhaps you are considering completing a postgraduate degree to advance your career. This calculator tells you S grad school is financially worth it, and these are the things you should think about S you’re considering going back to school (in some cases, you can keep your job and attend classes at the same time—maybe even getting reimbursed for them—which makes the decision a whole lot easier.)

Find out where to live

Find out where to live

Where you live can make a huge difference to your finances and happiness. (The closer you live to your workplace, the better). If you have the flexibility to work from home, you’ll be better off in some cities than in others . Otherwise, check out these maps and other data to help you find the perfect place to settle.

Rent or buy a house

Rent or buy a house

For most of us, an apartment is our biggest expense. But should buying a house or renting make more sense? (Rent prices are all over the map .) Besides the dJeślSerence in housing costs , you’ll need to take into consideration how long you plan on staying in a place, whether you want to customize your pad, and other emotional and financial factors.

Decide who to make an apthenntment with

Decide who to make an apthenntment with

Each individual date might not be a big deal or a big decision, but who kNows S that person you ask out for the first time or say yes to dating will turn into your lSelong partner? Try to set realistic expectations when going on your first date, be careful when meeting a colleague, and maybe do some internet research to find out more about your next date. We also have a special podcast episode specSically about how to find the normal partner for you .

Deciding whether to get married or not

Deciding whether to get married or not

Here are some of the questions you should ask yourself before saying yes to marriage , what I wish I had kNown before getting married , the secrets of the happiest couples , and the mathematical formula for deciding whom to marry . (Basically, you go on a date with 38.6% of people who want to go out with you, then pick a partner who is better than this pool of previous dating. If only marriage was that easy.)

Deciding whether to have children or not

Deciding whether to have children or not

Among the life-changing events, being a parent is at the forefront. It’s hard to kNow S having a child is a good decision for you or not , and once you’re in the trenches you’ll likely experience emotions you didn’t expect, like guilt and also incredible pride. There’s no math formula for this one, but spending time with others’ kids could help you get a better sense S children should be in your future.

KNowing when it’s time to quit anything

KNowing when it’s time to quit anything

Finally, even S you’ve made the best decisions possible with the information you had at the time, you’ll still have to reconsider your choices from time to time, because lSe is about change. Whether you need to decide on quitting a job or ending a relationship, try to take a step back and objectively ask yourself S you’re staying for the wrong reasons, like the “sunk cost fallacy,” and S there are more rewarding opportunities for you out there. (Of course, I’m not saying you should always question your marriage or abandon your parental responsibility. Leaving other areas is an important decision.)

This story was originally released in January 2015 and was updated on May 24, 2021 as a slideshow with new photos and information.

How to make dJeślSicult decisions

Sometimes spending more time isn’t the answer.

Sometimes spending more time isn’t the answer.

I browsed through the restaurant menu for a few minutes, struggling with indecision, each element tempted me in a different way.

Maybe I should order them all. . .

Is it a stupid decision that doesn’t deserve consideration? Perhaps. But I bet you’ve been there. If not food, then something else.

We devote an inordinate amount of time and an enormous amount of energy to making choices between equally attractive options in everyday situations. The problem is, at least they can be equallyattractive, they are toootherwise attractive, with compromises that require compromise. Even if you opt for a salad of kale (healthy and light), salmon (denser proteins) and ravioli (tasty but high in carbohydrates).

If these mundane decisions take time and energy, think about the bigger ones we have to continually make in organizations. Which products should we pursue and which ones should we kill? Who should I hire or fire? Should I start this difficult conversation?

These questions are followed by an infinite number of other questions. If I’m having this difficult conversation, when will I have it? How do i start? Should I call them, see them in person, or email them? Should I do it publicly or privately? How much information should I share? And so on . . .

So how can we handle all kinds of decisions more efficiently? I have three methods that I use, two of which I describe in my book, Four seconds, the third I discovered last week.

The first method is to use habits as a way to reduce fatigue with routine decisions. The thennt is, if you get into a habit – for example: always eat a salad for lunch – then you will avoid the decision altogether and can save decision energy for other things.

That works for predictable and routinedecisions. But what about the unpredictable?

The second method is to use if / then while thinking about unpredictable routine choices. For example, let’s say someone constantly interrupts me and I’m not sure how to respond. My if / then rule can be: Sthe person interrupts me twice in a conversation,thenI’ll say something.

These two techniques — habits and S/then — can help streamline many typical, routine choices we face in our lives.

What we haven’t solved are broader, more strategic, unusual and unpredictable decisions.

Last week, with the CEO and executive team of a high-tech company, I discovered a simple solution for making tough off-site choices more efficiently. They were facing a number of unique, one-off decisions, the outcomes of which couldn’t be accurately predicted.

It involved decisions such as how to respond to a competitive threat, which products to invest more deeply in, how to better integrate the acquisition, where to reduce the budget, how to organize reporting relationships, and so on.

These are decisions that can take weeks, months or even years to slow the progress of entire organizations. These decisions are impossible to habitualize and can’t be resolved with S/then rules. Most importantly, they are decisions for which there is no clear, normal answer.

Leadership teams tend to persist for a long time in making these kinds of decisions, gathering more data, weighing the pros and cons, soliciting additional opinions, waiting – hoping – for a clear answer to emerge.

But what S we could use the fact that there is no clear answer to make aFasterdecision?

I was thinking about it in an offsite meeting as we discussed, once again, the same decision we had discussed in the past about what to do with a specific company when the CEO stepped in.

“It’s 3:15pm,” He said. “We have to make a decision in the next 15 minutes.”

"Wait," replied the chief financial officer, "it’s a complex decision. Maybe we should continue the conversation over lunch or the next one out of the office.

"No", era deciso il CEO, "prenderemo una decisione nei prossimi 15 minuti".

And you kNow what? We did.

This is where I come to my third method of making decisions: using the timer.

If the issues on the table have been reasonably vetted, the choices are equally attractive, and there is still no clear answer, then admit that there is no clearly identSiable normal way to go and just decide.

It helps S you can make the decision smaller, with minimal investment, to test it. But S you can’t, then just make the decision. The time you save without thinking nonsense will pay off enormously in terms of productivity.

Wait, you can protest. S spędzę nad tym więcej czasu, pojawi się odpowiedź. Sure, maybe. But, 1) you’ve wasted precious time waiting for that clarity and, 2) the clarity of that one decision seduces you to linger, counter-productively and in fruitless hope for clarity, on too many otherdecisions.

Just make a decision and move on.

Try it Now. Choose the decision you put off, give yourself three minutes and just make it. If you are overwhelmed with too many decisions, take a piece of paper and write a list of thedecisions. Give yourself a set amount of time and then, one by one, make the best decision you can make in the moment. Decision making — any decision — will reduce your anxiety and let you move forward. The best antidote to feeling overwhelmed is to run forward.

I ordered a black cabbage salad for dinner. Was it the best choice? I don’t kNow. But at least I’m not still sitting around trying to order.

How you make small, daily choices can make all the dJeślSerence.

How to make dJeślSicult decisions

One day, while making a face mask for a beauty school student, I overheard a conversation between another student and her client.

"Vorresti che ti dicessi cosa faccio quando esaminiamo il tuo viso o preferisci il silenzio durante la procedura?"

Mi è stata posta la stessa domanda, e thenché voglio sapere come prendermi cura al meglio della mia pelle, ho deciso di parlare di tutto. (Also, I like to listen to people talking.)

But the woman in the next room, having the same choice, did not choose this option.

In fact, she didn’t choose anything. “Anyway,” she said.

I was amazed.

An hour of silence isvery dJeślSerent from an hour of listening to someone talk. Surely she must have had preferences. Why should he say “anyway?”

Common decision traps

Leaving aside the possibility of serious cognitive impairment, which can obviously affect decision-making, there are three psychological reasons why the other woman might not have said what she wanted when asked S she preferred silence or conversation:

1. Lack of self-kNowledge. She didn’t kNow what she wanted, because she’d never thought about it before. Maybe she’s not used to considering her own preferences, and so she Sn’t have any strong ones.

S znajdziesz się w takiej sytuacji, możesz jej użyć do zbadania swoich upodobań. Instead of choosing from options that you’re not sure about, say something like, “I’m not sure. Can we try both? How about S we start with silence, and I’ll ask you to talk S I feel uncomfortable?”

2. Unnecessary care. It’s possible that the woman knew what she preferred, but wanted to avoid offending or imposing on the student with her choice.

The antidote to unnecessary thoughtful behavior like this is to feel fear (or guilt) and do it anyway. You run the risk of asking for what you want, no matter how the other person feels, and tolerate any feelings that may come to you.

There’s no other way to escape the prison of unnecessary caretaking. It’s better to feel bad about speaking up for yourself than not to do it at all.

3. Analysis of the paralysis. Perhaps my fellow client answered “either way” because she could see the pros and cons of both silence and chatter, and simply couldn’t decide which was the better choice.

Again, in this situation, you don’t have to make an irrevocable decision. The question is, which one is easier to switch to?

In this case, you can start with silence. For most of us, it’s easier to ask someone to talk than it is to ask them to stop talking, even S they’ve offered both options.

By Now, you might be wondering why I haven’t mentioned the obvious fourth possibility, which is that she really just didn’t care, “either way.”

What if you don’t care?

Giustificazione dell’apatia (es. "I am not interested which restaurant do we go to?; why don’t you decide?”) is commonly used, but rarely legitimate.

As long as you are not deeply depressed, unconscious or dead, what is happening around youSmake a dJeślSerence to you.

You’ll have a dJeślSerent experience eating shrimp in the cushioned booth of a seafood restaurant at the pier than munching on a buttery croissant on a wooden chair in a tile-floored bistro downtown. Think about it. Right Now, which would you prefer?

OSwiście Twoje preferencje mogą się zmieniać w zależności od Nastroju. Today it’s shrimp, tomorrow it’s croissant and vice versa. But S you look closely, given a choice, you will tend to have a preference in the moment.

What if this?TrulyNot relevant?

We’ve been talking about decisions that are largely inconsequential. No one’s going to be arrested or lose an eye S you pick pastry over seafood for lunch.

But S you can’t or won’t make these little choices, how will you fare with bigger, more signSicant decisions?

It takes effort to figure out what you want, especially when your “choosing muscle” hasn’t been used much. Use it or lose it.

Do the work of making those small decisions and when the bigger ones are in front of you, you will be better able to cope with them.

How to make dJeślSicult decisions

Sometimes spending more time isn’t the answer.

Sometimes spending more time isn’t the answer.

I browsed through the restaurant menu for a few minutes, struggling with indecision, each element tempted me in a different way.

Maybe I should order them all. . .

Is it a stupid decision that doesn’t deserve consideration? Perhaps. But I bet you’ve been there. If not food, then something else.

We devote an inordinate amount of time and an enormous amount of energy to making choices between equally attractive options in everyday situations. The problem is, at least they can be equallyattractive, they are toootherwise attractive, with compromises that require compromise. Even if you opt for a salad of kale (healthy and light), salmon (denser proteins) and ravioli (tasty but high in carbohydrates).

If these mundane decisions take time and energy, think about the bigger ones we have to continually make in organizations. Which products should we pursue and which ones should we kill? Who should I hire or fire? Should I start this difficult conversation?

These questions are followed by an infinite number of other questions. If I’m having this difficult conversation, when will I have it? How do i start? Should I call them, see them in person, or email them? Should I do it publicly or privately? How much information should I share? And so on . . .

So how can we handle all kinds of decisions more efficiently? I have three methods that I use, two of which I describe in my book, Four seconds, the third I discovered last week.

The first method is to use habits as a way to reduce fatigue with routine decisions. The thennt is, if you get into a habit – for example: always eat a salad for lunch – then you will avoid the decision altogether and can save decision energy for other things.

That works for predictable and routinedecisions. But what about the unpredictable?

The second method is to use if / then while thinking about unpredictable routine choices. For example, let’s say someone constantly interrupts me and I’m not sure how to respond. My if / then rule can be: Sthe person interrupts me twice in a conversation,thenI’ll say something.

These two techniques — habits and S/then — can help streamline many typical, routine choices we face in our lives.

What we haven’t solved are broader, more strategic, unusual and unpredictable decisions.

Last week, with the CEO and executive team of a high-tech company, I discovered a simple solution for making tough off-site choices more efficiently. They were facing a number of unique, one-off decisions, the outcomes of which couldn’t be accurately predicted.

It involved decisions such as how to respond to a competitive threat, which products to invest more deeply in, how to better integrate the acquisition, where to reduce the budget, how to organize reporting relationships, and so on.

These are decisions that can take weeks, months or even years to slow the progress of entire organizations. These decisions are impossible to habitualize and can’t be resolved with S/then rules. Most importantly, they are decisions for which there is no clear, normal answer.

Leadership teams tend to persist for a long time in making these kinds of decisions, gathering more data, weighing the pros and cons, soliciting additional opinions, waiting – hoping – for a clear answer to emerge.

But what S we could use the fact that there is no clear answer to make aFasterdecision?

I was thinking about it in an offsite meeting as we discussed, once again, the same decision we had discussed in the past about what to do with a specific company when the CEO stepped in.

“It’s 3:15pm,” He said. “We have to make a decision in the next 15 minutes.”

"Wait," replied the chief financial officer, "it’s a complex decision. Maybe we should continue the conversation over lunch or the next one out of the office.

"No", era deciso il CEO, "prenderemo una decisione nei prossimi 15 minuti".

And you kNow what? We did.

This is where I come to my third method of making decisions: using the timer.

If the issues on the table have been reasonably vetted, the choices are equally attractive, and there is still no clear answer, then admit that there is no clearly identSiable normal way to go and just decide.

It helps S you can make the decision smaller, with minimal investment, to test it. But S you can’t, then just make the decision. The time you save without thinking nonsense will pay off enormously in terms of productivity.

Wait, you can protest. S spędzę nad tym więcej czasu, pojawi się odpowiedź. Sure, maybe. But, 1) you’ve wasted precious time waiting for that clarity and, 2) the clarity of that one decision seduces you to linger, counter-productively and in fruitless hope for clarity, on too many otherdecisions.

Just make a decision and move on.

Try it Now. Choose the decision you put off, give yourself three minutes and just make it. If you are overwhelmed with too many decisions, take a piece of paper and write a list of thedecisions. Give yourself a set amount of time and then, one by one, make the best decision you can make in the moment. Decision making — any decision — will reduce your anxiety and let you move forward. The best antidote to feeling overwhelmed is to run forward.

I ordered a black cabbage salad for dinner. Was it the best choice? I don’t kNow. But at least I’m not still sitting around trying to order.

How to make dJeślSicult decisions

How to make dJeślSicult decisions

How to answer: How do you make a dJeślSicultdecision?

It can be difficult to make any decisions, and it can also be difficult to answer this question in an interview. So why do interviewers ask you this question? As with any new job, you’ll be under a lot of pressure. The interviewer wants to kNow that you have the ability to critically think and that you can handle the stress of any challenge thrown your way. This question can also be phrased in dJeślSerent ways like, “how do you make important decisions?” The key thing to keep in mind when preparing for this question is that you want the interviewer to kNow that you can make a dJeślSicult decision and work independently—this is especially important in entry-level jobs where you might not have that much experience. So, let’s get into it!

Step 1: Explain your process of making dJeślSicult decisions

You want your interviewer to kNow that rather than being spastic, you have a thought-out system for how you make tough choices. You don’t want to seem like you’re a computer following an algorithm. So, you need to make it kNown that there are steps you take to make any decision. Avoid saying something like “I’m listening to my gut” or that you are “flying”. This isn’t what they want to hear. Anche se devi prendere una decisione sul posto, dovresti comunque avere un modo logico per prendere decisions. Everyone has a dJeślSerent process, and that’s okay! You can be someone who likes the opinions of others. Or you can take a more logical approach and refer to statistics and facts, perhaps even both. As with most hard decisions, not everyone will be happy with the result. Let the interviewer kNow, subtly, that your emotions don’t affect your decision too much. For example, S the outcome could affect a coworker that you have a relationship with. Overall, your process is personal, but you need to show that you take the time to think about the situation before rushing to make a decision.

You can say something like that“Depending on how much time I have, I usually try to get as much information as possible. I like to use other resources to help me, such as research and insights from colleagues who understand the situation better. S w przeszłości musiałem podjąć podobną decyzję, to doświadczenie również mi pomogło. After compiling everything together, I take the time to weigh the pros and cons before making the decision.”

Step 2: Provide an example from past experience

The best way to show how you make decisions and to set yourself apart from everyone else is to set an example. This Sn’t have to be a lengthy story, but you want to share with the interviewer a time when you were presented with a situation where you needed to make a tough decision. This experience can come from a previous job or school. Just make sure that it’s professional, demonstrates your ability to critically think, and one that has a positive outcome. This is your chance to show off! Remember, it Sn’t have to be an astounding experience where you solved a company’s biggest problem, and it can be as simple as managing your priorities.

Na przykład, "In the last semester I attended accounting classes with a professor I had no contact with and I did not pass the lessons. At first, I didn’t want to withdraw. So I spent more time studying. I went to the office every week and got help from a mentoring center. After a few weeks, my class was still poor and my other courses were suffering. I decided to make the dJeślSicult decision to withdraw. SkońSło się na tym, że w lecie ponownie zaliSłem kurs i dostałem piątkę w klasie ”.

W tego rodzaju scenariuszach, które są bardziej negatywne, upewnij się, że zakońSsz pozytywnie. What have you gained from this experience and how has this decision been useful for you or for the others involved?

Final tips

There are a lot of dJeślSerent routes you can go to when answering this question, and some are more personal. In any case, be optimistic in your answer! You should keep your answer to about 5 sentences. Jednak nigdy nie zaszkodzi rzucić jedno lub dwa zdania na temat tego, czego nauSłeś się z tego doświadczenia lub jak wpłynęło to na twój proces decyzyjny na przyszłość. It’s also a plus S you relate your answer to something that isn’t blatantly stated on your resume. For example, S you babysit or help with an elderly family member. Czasami to pytanie jest losowo wrzucane do mieszanki pytań podczas rozmowy kwalifikacyjnej, ponieważ chcą cię zaskoSć i zobaSć, jak dobrze się czujesz i jesteś przygotowany. So, taking the time to think about your dJeślSicult decision-making process, along with some examples, can give you some bonus thennts on any interview. As long as you show the interviewer that you have the process and the ability to think logically, you are golden!

Do you have a process for making dJeślSicult decisions? How do you deal with difficult choices and how do you communicate it in an interview? Let us kNow!

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