How to make a pencil

A pencil case is something you use every day at school and giving it your cute style is a lot easier than you might think!

Contrary to popular opinion, you don’t need to sew to make a sturdy and cute pencil case. You can make a DIY pencil case without sewing in an hour, maximum!

Passionate DIY youtuber Janice of the jayjaypearl YouTube channel shows us how easy it is to make a pencil case with a nice lining in her DIY pencil case without a sewing tutorial.

In this post, we take a look at how she made a cute and lively summer pineapple pencil case.

Supplies

You don’t need anything more than a few DIY essentials, but if you’ve never worked with fabrics before, you’ll probably need to visit the shop.

The only two things you need to collect are:

  • White fabric
  • Zipper (Janice uses an 18cm zipper)

Steps to make a do-it-yourself pencil case

01 Cover the case

Place the zipper on one end of the fabric, take the marker and mark the ends of the zipper on the fabric.

Lift the fabric off the end, holding the zipper in place, then fold the fabric inward. Adjust the crease until you get the desired size of the case.

Mark the ends of the zipper inside the fabric, unfold the fabric and use a ruler to connect the marks to form a rectangle.

Cut the rectangle – this is the lining of your pencil case!

Watch Janice make a seashell at 1:17 in her video.

02 Make a lining and a fold

In the video, Janice explains that you need to cut two more pieces of fabric for your pencil case: one for the inner lining of the pencil case and one for the overlay.

The inner lining is 2 cm shorter than the case. Janice’s pencil case shell measures 30cm x 20cm, so she cuts a piece of fabric to measure 28cm x 18cm.

Don’t worry if your shell is different in size – just make sure the liner is 2cm shorter.

Janice also cuts another 8cm x 3.5cm piece of fabric, but if you don’t want to overlap the case, you can skip this step.

Janice explains this step at 1:45 in her video.

03 Paint the shell and lining

Use a brush and paint of your choice to paint the pineapples on the shell. Janice improvises and uses five different colors to bring pineapples to life.

On the lining, he paints a cute pattern that alternates straight and dashed lines.

Go to 1:54 to check out Janice’s design.

04 Glue the pieces together

First, glue the cover to the shell, then glue the two short edges of the case to the inside.

Then, glue the hinge to the case and glue the edges on the inside for a better finish.

Finally, seal the corners of the gut by folding and gluing them inwards. If you made an overlay, glue it before closing the case.

And there you have it: your seamless DIY pencil case is ready!

Janice hides her bonding at 3:17.

Full movie

Watching the entire movie will help you understand what kind of look Janice was looking for. Give a summer atmosphere!

You can also use the timestamps above to go to the steps you need a demonstration for.

I don’t have a hot glue gun. What glue should I use?

You can use Beacon Fabri-Tac permanent adhesive: it dries quickly, is waterproof, does not stain the fabric and the flexible bond lasts a long time.

Which material is best to use for the casing and lining?

Most DIYers, including Janice, use whatever fabric they have at hand, or buy fabric that suits the look they’re going for – there’s no set type of material that you must use. However, if you need strength and shape, you can use upholstery fabrics or canvas for the lining of the suitcase.

It’s easier to use quilted cotton for the lining, but you can always think and use satin or something similar to the bright, geometric fabric Janice uses for her minimalist pencil case.

Additional tips

The Janice method is flexible: you can make a bag as large or portable as you wish, design your own fabric or use a fabric that suits your tastes.

There are tons of customizations you can do!

While Janice is preparing the pineapples in her pencil case, you can create an emoji, paint your favorite character or sprinkle it with different colors for a fresh look.

You can also completely change the functionality of the pouch. If you bring a lot of pencils, rulers, and more, you can make a great folding pencil case.

If you wear a limited amount of stationary materials, you can completely remove the Janice design zipper and create an attractive zippered case, just like YouTuber CraversBeau did.

Make sure you use the flexibility Janice’s tutorial offers to make the pouch unique to your taste and needs. Don’t be afraid to give it your own spin!

And don’t forget to check out Janice jayjaypearl’s YouTube channel for more cute DIY projects!

Introduction: Make wooden pencils

How to make a pencil

How to make a pencil

How to make a pencil

A quick and easy woodworking project anyone can do with a table saw and router. The perfect way to get rid of leftovers lying around.

Step 1: Cut out the blanks of the pencil

Cut two thin strips of your favorite wood. Size doesn’t matter yet as we will reduce it at a later stage.

Step 2: Path of the groove

Using a V-groove tip, lead a very small channel into each piece. It will be used to hold the pencil.

Step 3: drawing guides

For graphite, I use thumbtacks that I bought from Amazon.

Step 4: gluing

Add plenty of wood glue to each half and insert the cord into the groove.

Step 5: Tighten it

Now squeeze it tightly and let it dry for at least an hour.

Step 6: Reduce the size

Now you can cut the pencil to the size you want. I found an existing pencil and used it as a size guide.

Step 7: Cut to size

Then cut the pencil to the correct length. Here in the photo, I cut out all the pencils at once.

Step 8: rectification

Using a tool with glued sandpaper and two pieces of wood placed at a 120 ° angle, I sanded several angles to create a hexagonal shape.

Step 9: finishing

Optional: Add a layer of polyurethane to bring out the beauty of the wood and add some protection.

Step 10: Soak in the paint

Optional: Dip the end in white paint for a decorative look. I bent at an angle for that extra effect.

Step 11: Sharpen the pencil

And finally sharpen! I have found that some exotic woods are very hard and it takes some strength to sharpen them.

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23 comments

How to make a pencil

Question 1 year ago on step 11

how long does it take to make a pencil

How to make a pencil

These guys almost look too cute to use! Thanks for sharing 🙂

How to make a pencil

These guys almost look too cute to use! Thanks for sharing 🙂

How to make a pencil

Fresh! Fantastic “also talented 🙂

How to make a pencil

How to make a pencil

Reply 4 years ago

And that movie was great too

How to make a pencil

Cute! You can also try inserting a pencil into an electric screwdriver and smooth it out as if you were using it on a lathe.

How to make a pencil

Cute! Your video editing skills are really good!

Just a little problem. Will you use them at all? Why destroy them? 😉

How to make a pencil

This drawing will really put the lead in the pencil.

How to make a pencil

I would like to buy them. You don’t have something to sell, do you? For those of us who love recycling, it’s a brilliant idea for a small business.

How to make a pencil

Reply 4 years ago

those of us who don’t have table saw, router or any idea that are kidding but serious about buying!

Introduction: How to make a pencil case

How to make a pencil

How to make a pencil

How to make a pencil

If you’re anything like me, you basically save every useful piece of hardwood you have for that mythical “might need” time. Well, follow us to see how I really needed it! Below I’ve created this beautiful pencil case that I’ve made from a relatively small amount of scrap wood.

Being able to take beautiful pieces of otherwise unusable wood and make them something special is so rewarding. This case was highly appreciated by the new owner. One point for a carpenter!

• Be sure to check out my accompanying YouTube video of this compilation!
Where to track along with my work:

My website (full tutorials, plans, videos): https: // www. mwawoodworks. com

My Instagram (behind the scenes): https: // www. mwawoodworks. com

My Pinterest (things I find inspiring): https: // www. mwawoodworks. com

Supplies:

Here are the tools I used specifically for this build (affiliate link):

Step 1: Milling the sides of the box

I started here by taking my crepe maple scrap and scoring a line with my gauge to cut the piece in half. With the band saw, I set the fence at the correct distance and made sure my magnetic board was snug against the piece. So I punched the piece in half. I then took it to a drum sander to clean up any traces of the bandsaw and get my final thickness. I chose the 3/8 ″ thickness for this case

Step 2: Cut the top and bottom grooves

So I set the table saw blade 3/16 ″ and 1/4 from the fence. The blade is a standard 1/8 ″ blade. I cut grooves on the top and bottom of the sides. You can see the final effect here.

Step 3: Cut the bevels

So I set my table saw blade to 90 degrees with THIS DIGITAL ANGLE GAUGE. Using my fence, I started cutting the bevels on the sides of the box. As I cut the short ends, I used a pencil to hold the work so that I could keep my hands off the blade. A quick dry fit showed me the cut gloves were good. No emptiness!

Step 4: Cut the bottom panel

I used a walnut for the bottom of the case. First, I cut it in width according to the internal dimensions of the box and the grooves. Then I cut a shallow beat on all four sides. These circles will fit into the groove at the bottom of the pouch. Finally, I cut the short end of the box so that the place for the lid slides into the groove at the end of the process.

Step 5: Assembling the pouch

I stacked my parts on blue tape. Then I put some glue on the joints. Eventually I added a bottom to the bottom groove and started rolling it. I rolled it up easily. The tool I created helps make sure everything is set up as it should. I have now checked that all connections are secure and set it aside to dry.

Step 6: Create a lid for the pencil case

I used a decorative piece of walnut for the lid of the box. I wrote a line to sew it. With the band saw, I set the fence at the correct distance and made sure my magnetic board was snug against the piece. So I punched the piece in half. I then took it to a drum sander to clean up any traces of the bandsaw and get my final thickness. And then I took it to a table saw to cut it to its final width.

Step 7: Making the Lid Part II

I placed the router table so that the ribs were cut to the top. I set the tip height to where it would leave 1/8 of the material (polished to fit the groove at the top of the box). And I set the fence 3/16 ″ from the front edge of the drill. This would cut just enough to slide the box well between the two sides of the box. I passed the top of the tip to create the tabs for the lid of the case. To avoid tearing, I used a support plate for the wheat cuts.

Step 8: Making the Lid Part III

Then I glued the oblique key with CA glue. This would fill the void where the lid would slide into the open end of the box and lock it in place. After sliding the lid into the grooves, I sanded the key flush with the side of the box.

Step 9: finishing the Pencil Box

After I sanded using 120,180 and 220 grit paper, I applied an oil/wax finish called Tried & True. Adoro la sensazione di legno grezzo che dà e la morbidezza setosa della cera è ottima al tatto. When I finished the inside and outside of the box, I made sure I also had the lid. And here’s the lid sliding home into the top of the box. I just filled this box with my favorite writing pencils. There’s plenty of room for erasers and sharpeners too! Well, that closes the lid of this pencil case design! Excellent use of waste wood, if I say so myself.

Step 10: THANK YOU !!

If you enjoyed this tutorial and found it useful, you can view my other works in the following places:

My website (full tutorials, plans, videos): https: // www. mwawoodworks. com

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Did you carry out this project? Share with us!

As with all other manufactured products, the economics of pencil manufacturing depend on many factors.

These cost factors include:

  • cost of raw materials (wood, graphite, clay, brass or aluminum for fittings, painted elements, etc.)
  • the cost of the parts or other finished components used to assemble the pencil
  • the cost of transporting and handling the various materials used and the finished product to the factory
  • labor costs and employee benefits for blue-collar workers
  • energy cost
  • the cost of consumables used to maintain the equipment
  • costs of government regulations (taxes, duties, compliance with safety, work or environmental protection regulations)
  • cost of capital (money spent on purchasing equipment, purchasing and maintaining stocks of raw materials, parts, consumables, and finished product)
  • management cost

Pencil companies make a number of important decisions about these costs as part of their business. Some of the most important decisions are:

  • the quality of the product they want to produce will have an impact on which raw materials and parts they buy
  • alternative suppliers of raw materials
  • whether to make internally or buy externally various components such as strips, inserts, caps and erasers and even raw pencils from other pencil manufacturers (NOTE: read the famous essay Вme, a pencilВ learn more about the important economic principle of production specialization and how the free market price system leads to the best organization and allocation of resources to companies in the sector)
  • where to locate your pencil factories, which result from the relative difference in labor and material costs between cities, states or countries, inbound and customer freight costs, regulatory and energy costs, as well as duties and taxes
  • the amount of product to be produced affects the level of investment required in the factory and inventory and can also affect the unit cost produced through economies of scale.

The pencil manufacturer strives to minimize the cost of manufacturing the pencils to the level of quality and quantity desired to be produced and to sell all of these pencils at a cost above the cost to make a profit.

All these decisions are made within the market and the competition that the pencil manufacturer faces with other manufacturers. The level of competition can have a large impact on the profitability of a pencil industry or market segment. Each company tries to focus on the competitive advantage it has over other pencil manufacturers and what it can do better than the others. Therefore, different companies only specialize in certain markets or ranges to stand out.

These days, typical yellow writing pencils and children’s coloring pencils are generally considered to be a commodity. This means that a product from one producer is more or less considered by one customer as good as another, just as corn from one company is roughly the same as corn from another company. In this case, price often becomes a key factor in purchasing pencils. So it’s harder to make a profit without a strong brand or another point of difference in terms of product features or performance.

A key factor affecting competition is the growing level of international trade. As more and more markets open up to more manufacturers from more countries around the world, the pencil industry, like many others, has globalized. Many poorer countries such as China, Indonesia and India have significantly increased their production and exports of pencils due to the overall benefit in terms of material costs, labor and a limited regulatory environment.

Have you ever wondered how pencils are made? Read on to learn about the 10-step pencil making process that turns a tree into a pile of pencils.

The process of making pencils

Our story of how cedar pencils are made is a tribute to the old in combination with modern manufacturing facilities. The journey begins at a sawmill where cedar incense logs are cut into lumber called “Pencil Stock” or “Pencil Squares”. This wood product is then dried in a dry oven to achieve a uniform moisture content before being sent to the lamella plant.

10 steps to perfect a pencil

  1. In the stamping factory, the pencil stock is cut into “pencil blocks” slightly longer than the normal pencil length. The small amount of extra length is called the “cutting allowance,” which is important later in the process.
  2. Pencil blocks are cut into “pencil strips” with specially designed circular saws. These saws are very thin to reduce the amount of “waste” in the form of “sawdust”. Due to the natural grain and defects of the wood, the lamellas are sorted according to their width and quality for further processing. Flawless lamellae are called “full ply”. Some baseboards are cut to smaller widths (called “narrow ply”) or shorter lengths (called “notes”) to eliminate defects and produce various useful grades and layers of pencil molding.
  3. The pencil strips are treated with wax and stain to achieve a uniform color and improve the cutting and sharpening properties of the wood for future processing. Moldings undergo a final inspection process, then are packed and shipped to “pencil factories” around the world.
  4. Alla Pencil Factory, la "Groover Machine" taglia le scanalature nelle lamelle per accogliere il nucleo di scrittura (o "piombo").
  5. В In the grooves the writing cores are placed, made with a mixture of graphite and clay. Pastels can use wax-based cores, while many other formulations are used in cosmetic pastels.
  6. The second grooved strip is glued to the first – creating a “sandwich” – by a machine called the “lead layer”. The buns are then “stuck” and held together while the glue dries.
  7. Once the glue has dried, the buns are transferred to the “Shaper” and first “trimmed” to make sure the sandwich is square and all pencils are the correct length. The sandwich is then machined into pencil shapes such as hexagonal, round or triangular.
  8. The individual pencils cut from the sandwich are ready for further processing. Any pencils with defects such as off-center inserts or chipped wood are discarded at this point.
  9. Then each pencil is painted in the machine with 4-10 coats of paint, depending on the desired finish quality and color depth. A recess is cut for the ferrule. (After painting, some pencils are wrapped in decorative foil or patterned paper; although most pencils have the brand name embossed on the surface of the pencil.)
  10. In the inversion machine, the eraser and ferrule (the metal ring that holds the pencil eraser in place) are attached to each pencil.

Groove and lead layer combined in one process – steps 4 to 6

Collect some inexpensive materials at home and create a stylus that will work with your phone or tablet in under 2 minutes.

How to make a pencilSharon Vaknin / CNET

At some point, you will realize that your finger isn’t always perfect for use on a phone or tablet.

For me, the revelation came when I realized that the stylus would help me draw more accurately on the tablet. But since I didn’t want to spend $ 10 to $ 30 on a piece of metal or wait for the product to ship, I opted for a do-it-yourself solution.

To function, the stylus must be able to transfer static electricity from the finger to the conductive material and screen. With that in mind, I made a stylus out of super cheap materials that I had at home.

In minutes, I created a free stylus to do everything from web browsing to drawing masterpieces. I call it “Two Minute Stylus”.

Here’s what you need:

  • Tampone di cotone (noto anche come "punta Q")
  • Aluminium sheet
  • Shears
  • Tape
  • Pen

1. Remove the ink from the pen.

2. Cut the swab at an acute angle and insert it into the opening of the pen. Secure with tape.

3. Wrap the film around the neck of the pen, a few centimeters above the tip of the swab. Wrap tight and secure with tape at the top.

4. Moisten a cotton ball with a drop of water. (No, it won’t damage your tablet or phone screen.)

That’s all! The stylus is ready for use. Remember that your finger should always touch the film and if the stylus stops working, wet it again with water.

Have you ever wondered what a pencil is like? Read on to learn about the 10-step pencil making process that turns a tree into a pile of pencils.

THE PROCESS OF MAKING THE PENCIL

Our story of how cedar pencils are made is a tribute to the old in combination with modern manufacturing facilities. The journey begins at a sawmill where cedar incense logs are cut into lumber called “Pencil Stock” or “Pencil Squares”. This wood product is then dried in a dry oven to achieve a uniform moisture content before being sent to the lamella plant.

How to make a pencil

10 steps to perfect a pencil

  1. In the stamping factory, the pencil stock is cut into “pencil blocks” slightly longer than the normal pencil length. The small amount of extra length is called the “cutting allowance,” which is important later in the process.
    How to make a pencil
  2. Pencil blocks are cut into “pencil strips” with specially designed circular saws. These saws are very thin to reduce the amount of “waste” in the form of “sawdust”. Due to the natural grain and defects of the wood, the lamellas are sorted according to their width and quality for further processing. Flawless lamellae are called “full ply”. Some baseboards are cut to smaller widths (called “narrow ply”) or shorter lengths (called “notes”) to eliminate defects and produce various useful grades and layers of pencil molding.
    How to make a pencil
  3. The pencil strips are treated with wax and stain to achieve a uniform color and improve the cutting and sharpening properties of the wood for future processing. Moldings undergo a final inspection process, then are packed and shipped to “pencil factories” around the world.
  4. Alla Pencil Factory, la "Groover Machine" taglia le scanalature nelle lamelle per accogliere il nucleo di scrittura (o "piombo").
    How to make a pencil
  5. In the grooves there are writing cores, made with a mixture of graphite and clay. Pastels can use wax-based cores, while many other formulations are used in cosmetic pastels.
    How to make a pencil
  6. The second grooved strip is glued to the first – creating a “sandwich” – by a machine called the “lead layer”. The buns are then “stuck” and held together while the glue dries.
    How to make a pencil
  7. Once the glue has dried, the buns are transferred to the “Shaper” and first “trimmed” to make sure the sandwich is square and all pencils are the correct length. The sandwich is then machined into pencil shapes such as hexagonal, round or triangular.
    How to make a pencil
  8. The individual pencils cut from the sandwich are ready for further processing. Any pencils with defects such as off-center inserts or chipped wood are discarded at this point.
  9. Then each pencil is painted in the machine with 4-10 coats of paint, depending on the desired finish quality and color depth. A recess is cut for the ferrule. (After painting, some pencils are wrapped in decorative foil or patterned paper; although most pencils have the brand name embossed on the surface of the pencil.)
  10. In the inversion machine, the eraser and ferrule (the metal ring that holds the pencil eraser in place) are attached to each pencil.

How to make a pencil

Groove and lead layer combined in one process – steps 4 to 6

Have you ever wondered what a pencil is like? Read on to learn about the 10-step pencil making process that turns a tree into a pile of pencils.

THE PROCESS OF MAKING THE PENCIL

Our story of how cedar pencils are made is a tribute to the old in combination with modern manufacturing facilities. The journey begins at a sawmill where cedar incense logs are cut into lumber called “Pencil Stock” or “Pencil Squares”. This wood product is then dried in a dry oven to achieve a uniform moisture content before being sent to the lamella plant.

How to make a pencil

10 steps to perfect a pencil

  1. In the stamping factory, the pencil stock is cut into “pencil blocks” slightly longer than the normal pencil length. The small amount of extra length is called the “cutting allowance,” which is important later in the process.
    How to make a pencil
  2. Pencil blocks are cut into “pencil strips” with specially designed circular saws. These saws are very thin to reduce the amount of “waste” in the form of “sawdust”. Due to the natural grain and defects of the wood, the lamellas are sorted according to their width and quality for further processing. Flawless lamellae are called “full ply”. Some baseboards are cut to smaller widths (called “narrow ply”) or shorter lengths (called “notes”) to eliminate defects and produce various useful grades and layers of pencil molding.
    How to make a pencil
  3. The pencil strips are treated with wax and stain to achieve a uniform color and improve the cutting and sharpening properties of the wood for future processing. Moldings undergo a final inspection process, then are packed and shipped to “pencil factories” around the world.
  4. Alla Pencil Factory, la "Groover Machine" taglia le scanalature nelle lamelle per accogliere il nucleo di scrittura (o "piombo").
    How to make a pencil
  5. In the grooves there are writing cores, made with a mixture of graphite and clay. Pastels can use wax-based cores, while many other formulations are used in cosmetic pastels.
    How to make a pencil
  6. The second grooved strip is glued to the first – creating a “sandwich” – by a machine called the “lead layer”. The buns are then “stuck” and held together while the glue dries.
    How to make a pencil
  7. Once the glue has dried, the buns are transferred to the “Shaper” and first “trimmed” to make sure the sandwich is square and all pencils are the correct length. The sandwich is then machined into pencil shapes such as hexagonal, round or triangular.
    How to make a pencil
  8. The individual pencils cut from the sandwich are ready for further processing. Any pencils with defects such as off-center inserts or chipped wood are discarded at this point.
  9. Then each pencil is painted in the machine with 4-10 coats of paint, depending on the desired finish quality and color depth. A recess is cut for the ferrule. (After painting, some pencils are wrapped in decorative foil or patterned paper; although most pencils have the brand name embossed on the surface of the pencil.)
  10. In the inversion machine, the eraser and ferrule (the metal ring that holds the pencil eraser in place) are attached to each pencil.

How to make a pencil

Groove and lead layer combined in one process – steps 4 to 6