How to make a dilution using essential oils and a base material

How to make a dilution using essential oil paintings and a base material

Pure essential oils can be an effective and efficient addition to your aromatherapy, home and beauty outfit. However, these potent plant extracts carry a great responsibility in exercising moderation. A single drop of essential oil contains an incredible concentration of herbal properties, so all of this plant potential must be spread at levels that are safe for our body.

Dilute essential oils for safety

As the popularity of essential oils has increased among lovers of natural living and personal care, there is a growing number of inquiries we receive about how to incorporate safe levels of essential oils into homemade creations. While many professional herbalists and natural product manufacturers have happily shared their insights into the subject in terms of parts, percentages, and proportions, these terms can confuse and intimidate those unfamiliar with essential oils. That’s because we’ve assembled some simple guidelines and tools to get new users off to an encouraging (and safe!) start.

Essential oil dilution factors

Essential oils are powerful and must be diluted to use them safely, whether you intend to use them alone (usually in a neutral carrier oil) or as ingredients in a finished product such as massage oil, lotion, or aroma spray. Regardless of the dilution method chosen, the essential oil content should only be 0.5% to 2% of the total mixture. This equates to 3-12 drops per ounce of finished product. For simpler versions of all this math, check out our helpful charts and calculators below!

NOTE ON PERFUME DILINEENTS

For most personal care products, it is recommended that essential oils do not exceed 2% of the total volume of the final product. This dilution takes into account the fact that creams, lotions, serums and other products are often applied generously, frequently and over large areas of the body and fragrance is usually a secondary concern with respect to the primary function of the formula (moisturizing, smoothing, etc. .). .

Perfumes containing essential oils are slightly different. Since these formulations are usually applied sparingly and on limited areas, you can choose a higher proportion, up to 5%, to make your fragrance blends shine.

I love the cool mist feeling on my skin, especially when it smells of flowers, citrus and earth. As a teenager, I collected perfume bottles and savored the transformative magic inspired by aroma. The delicate amber honey, the light fruity and the floral and spicy evergreen forests create an atmosphere every morning before I leave for the world.

I did not know then that I appreciate these aromatic experiences so much. they were actually synthetic. When I found out the truth about commercial perfumes and body sprays, I was heartbroken. Over the years I have doused myself with potentially toxic petrochemicals, some of which are known allergens and hormone disruptors. Isn’t it interesting that the ingredients aren’t listed on all of these beautiful bottles? Transparency appears not to be the strong point of the industry.

I immediately abandoned designer fragrances and discovered a new passion for creating my perfumes from natural plant extracts. With so many great organic essential oils and hydrolates distilled or squeezed from fruit, bark, flowers, resins and other plant materials, it’s easy to enchant the blending process. Additionally, many of these ingredients also provide aromatherapy and care benefits. Creating beautiful fragrances that are perfect for you is a dream quest.

How to make a dilution using essential oil paintings and a base material

Basics of DIY body sprays

Supplies

To start this aromatic journey you need to stock up on some supplies. Think of the ingredients in your perfume as a collection of colors. Just like the strokes of color on the canvas, it’s nice to have a variety of fragrances that you can layer on top of each other as you blend, including a few notes on the top, middle and bottom. These essential oil kits are a great way to get started. You’ll also need some basics, such as organic hydrolates, organic witch hazel extract, or plain vodka. I really like having small amber vials on hand for making test mixes and a screw-top cobalt bottle for the finished recipe.

Test mix

  1. To make a simple test blend, choose just 2 or 3 essential oils.
  2. Carefully pour 10 drops into a small vial and write down the proportions (example: 5 drops of cistus, 3 drops of sandalwood and 2 drops of lavender). Unroll the bottle between your palms to connect.
  3. Smell or use a cotton ball to spread the mixture.
  4. Smell again after an hour or two and then again the next day to feel the aroma of the fragrance.
  5. Or you can go straight and use just one essential oil instead of mixing it.

Form

Now that you have your favorite blend of essential oils, it’s time to spray your body. The instructions below will get you two ounces of the finished spray, but you are free to increase or decrease your needs!

Basic body spray recipe with essential oils

About 2 oz.

ingrediants

  • 1 ounce. 190 degree vodka or 91% isopropyl alcohol.
  • 24 drops of essential oil or a blend of oils to choose from
  • 1 ounce. organic extract of witch hazel or organic hydrosol of your choice

Advice

  1. In a 2-ounce glass bottle with a bowl, mix a blend of essential oils with vodka or 91% isopropyl alcohol and shake well to dilute. This will give you a 4% solution where the oils are completely dissolved.
  2. Fill the rest of the bottle with Hydrolate (for added fragrance) or Hamamelis extract (for the neutral option).
  3. Spray on the skin or hair as desired, shaking well before each use.

Advice per professionisti

  • When making aroma sprays at home, many fragrance lovers choose to simplify their recipes by using only witch hazel / hydrosol base and up to 2% essential oils (use our dilution calculator to find the amount of carrier and essential oils! ). Since these solutions are not diluted with alcohol, they need to be shaken very well before use to physically disperse the oil in the mixture and will have a shorter shelf life than an alcohol solution.

Essential oil (with a few exceptions) should never be applied pure to the skin and should be mixedcarrier oil (also referred to as a base oil) to dilute the concentrated molecules and to help spread them over the surface of the skin, and this is done by diluting them in carrier oils. These oils are generally cold pressed and are inert and non-volatile like essential oils.

As a rule of thumb, you would normally need about 30 ml of carrier oil to perform a full body massage.

When essential oils are used, they are mainly used in aromatherapy massage because the consumption of pure essential oils is within the scope of medical science and cannot be taken by a layman.

Base oils

Carrier oils, also called base oils, are solid oils (because they are not volatile) and are of vegetable origin, extracted from nuts or seeds.

The degree of dilution of the essential oil depends on various factors such as the use and age of the client to be treated. For more information on the dilution rate of essential oils, click here.

Smell of carrier oils

Some people look for carrier oils with a specific smell – for instance, people sometimes look for “almond oil” that smells of almonds.

If you have an almond oil that smells like almonds, then you have a highly toxic oil (bitter almond oil) or sweet almond oil with a synthetic fragrance.

Our carrier oils are 100% pure base oil paintings – no preservatives, no fragrances or ANY other compounds – just the pure cold pressed oil paintings. As such, these oils NOThaving a smell – except you may smell bad if you have a keen sense of smell,

Most carrier oils are extracted using a “cold pressed method”, in which no external heat is applied to help force the oil from its oil containing cells, and it is this type of carrier oil you should buy.

Most people do not have allergic reactions to these base carrier oils, but if you have a problem with a nut allergy, it would be wise to do a skin-patch test before using a nut based carrier oil.

After a carrier oil has been extracted it can be refined through various processes to attain certain desirable (and some undesirable) effects.

Carrier oils may also have their own therapeutic properties and also increase the absorption of essential oils through the skin.

Most carrier oils are furthermore rich in fatty acids as well as other nutrients.

List of different carrier oils

Herewith, a list of the most widely used carrier oils as used in aromatherapy.

Information on carrier oils not sold by us

  • Pumpkin seed oil
  • Safflower oil
  • sesame oil
  • Macadamia oil
  • nut oil
  • Sunflower oil

For more information on any of the above oils, simply click on the hyperlink and to view the product list click here.

The above is by no means a complete list of carrier oils, but are the most used oil paintings in aromatherapy.

As can be seen from the list above there is a good variety to choose from, and although carrier oils are used for diluting the essential oil paintings in aromatherapy massage, the carrier oils as such can also impart vary valuable properties to the massage, since they all have one or more of their own characteristics.

The choice of a carrier oil will also depend on the therapist giving the massage, as heavier oil paintings give more “traction” on the skin, which helps when giving a deep massage, while other lighter oil paintings provide more “slide” which is useful when giving a relaxing massage.

For this reason, professional therapists normally have a selection of carrier oils on call, to mix as required for the specific massage to be performed.

“Technical oil paintings” sometimes used in normal body massage are not used in aromatherapy massage, and although far cheaper than vegetable carrier oils, do not give the client the same effect, and also leave the skin feeling “tacky” and like baby oil, is a mineral oil, which forms a barrier and will prevent the essential oil paintings from penetrating and being absorbed by the skin. This in itself is opposite to the therapeutic effect of essential oils and should be avoided.

How to make a dilution using essential oil paintings and a base material

So, you’ve fallen in love with essential oil paintings for everything from brushing your teeth and making citronella candles to relaxing tense muscles, soothing bug bites, lifting your mood and more? I understand it perfectly. Personally, all I need now is one that washes dishes and I’m pretty much set.

However, understand how to use them SAFELY. . . well, for me it was a journey. When I first started out, I didn’t receive much guidance about how to use them appropriately. That’s because last year I began working toward an aromatherapy certification through Aromahead Institute. Safety is my top priority, so whether it’s this vapor rub, or another natural remedy or beauty recipe, I always consult Essential Oil Safety while creating products for my family and yours.

If you’re not familiar with it, Essential Oil Safety was written by world renowned essential oil expert Robert Tisserand and his co-author, Rodney Young. Considered the most accessible evidence-based resource, it took over 10 years to write and includes over 4,000 citations.

I’ve already shared with you my lists of safe essential oil paintings for children and pregnant/nursing mamas, both of which were compiled based on Tisserand’s and Young’s book. In this post we’ll cover some guidelines I’ve found helpful for determining how much to use for specific situations. Ready to jump? Good. . .

Why dilute essential oils?

Although there are occasions when some oils may be applied “clean” or undiluted, topical dilution is generally recommended. Dilution has two main advantages:

  • It can increase absorption by spreading the oil over a larger area
  • It reduces the likelihood of a negative reaction

Quando dovresti usare gli oli "puri"?

In some situations that affect small areas, such as burns, insect bites, or forehead fatigue, the occasional use of undiluted oils can be helpful.

I used an undiluted drop of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) to soothe an insect bite. Tea tree and lavender (Lavandula augustifolia) are generally considered to be the safest options to be applied carefully. Some oils, such as ylang ylang and lemongrass, can cause a reaction and should never be used undiluted.

How to dilute for regular use?

Carrier oils such as avocado, grape seed, sweet almond, hazelnut, jojoba, coconut, and fractionated coconut oil are ideal for safe dilution. We’ll cover how many drops of essential oil to add to your carrier oil later in this post.

Diffusion or topical application: which is best?

It depends on what you want to achieve. According to Robert Tisserand, inhaling essential oils is a very effective way to quickly absorb them into the bloodstream.
“The inhaled substances pass through the trachea into the bronchi and from there towards ever finer bronchioles, ending up in microscopic alveoli where the gas exchange with the lungs mainly takes place.
The alveoli are extremely efficient at carrying small molecules, such as components of essential oils, into the blood. ‘ (Safety of essential oils, p. 49)
A good rule of thumb is 30-60 minutes on, one hour off, then repeated as needed.

Topical application is considered the best choice when you want to directly benefit the skin or when you prefer absorption to take place over a longer period of time. (It takes time for essential oils to pass through the skin.)

How to make a dilution using essential oil paintings and a base material

How to dilute topical essential oils?

The following dilution guide is based on the information contained in Essential Oil Safety along with information provided by a clinical aromatherapist. Remember these are guidelines, not rules. The individual needs of the person and the oil used must also be considered.

Also, just because 1% dilution. (1 drop of essential oil per teaspoon of carrier oil) is considered appropriate for a situation does not mean that all essential oil paintings can be used at that concentration. For example, clove bud essential oil can be irritating if used over a 0.5% dilution (1 drop in 2 teaspoons of carrier oil). If you don’t have a copy of Essential Oil Safety, you can find the maximum recommended dilution for many popular essential oil paintings here and here.

How to make a dilution using essential oil paintings and a base material

Overall, here are some tips that were helpful in deciding how much to use in a particular situation:

dilution 1%. – For children aged 2 to 6 and people who need to take a softer path, for example those who are working to recover from serious health problems or who may have compromised immune function. This dilution is also a good rule of thumb for pregnant / breastfeeding women, but in some cases a dilution of up to 2.5% may be appropriate.

Dilution 1,5%. – From six to fifteen. For ease of use, I sometimes round down to a dilution 1%.. It’s hard to measure out half a drop!

Dilution 2.5%. – This is the usual dilution recommended for most adults. It is also commonly used in daily body care products and massage oils. 1% is better for facial skin care. Since half a drop is difficult to measure, I usually round this dilution to 2%.

Dilution 3 – 10%. – Used most often as a support during certain acute injuries or illnesses. The degree of dilution depends on the situation, the age of the person and the type of oil used.

25% dilution.– Used on rare occasions to relieve muscle spasms / cramps, bruises etc.

Do you need a specific dilution not covered here?

Do you need a printable guide to refer to later?

No problem, I’ve created one for you as a gift for signing up for my newsletter. You’ll also get updates when I post about natural remedies and other topics, exclusive gifts and coupons (I was able to give away a jar of free coconut oil to anyone who wanted it recently!), plus other goodies.

How to make a dilution using essential oil paintings and a base material

Katie Morton ・ August 8, 2018

How to make a dilution using essential oil paintings and a base material

Essential oils are like a pocket knife of wellness tools that help with everything from stress and anxiety to PMS and serve as a non-toxic cleansing product. Sure, it’s nice to have a few go-tos on hand in the form of a roll-on, but not every essential oil is safe to put on your skin (or ingest). One of the simplest and safest ways to use essential oils is with a spray.

Even if your DIY abilities aren’t going to win any Pinterest board awards anytime soon, this is one project anyone can master. It’s super simple: All it takes is a little know-how, a bottle, water, and your essential oil (or oil paintings if you like) of your choice. Read on to find out everything you need to know.

Here’s how to make the spray oil in five easy steps.

How to make a dilution using essential oil paintings and a base materialPhoto Getty Images / Katarzyna Bialasiewicz

1. Decide what the purpose of your base spray is

When creating an essential oil spray, the first step is to decide what the spray is for. Here are some ideas for inspiration:

  • Improve sleep
  • Insect repellent
  • Deodorant or deodorant for rooms and fabrics
  • Relief from depression
  • Cleaning or disinfectant solution
  • Body oil or perfume
  • Untangle the hair
  • Hormonal balance

Once you’ve decided because you want to make your spray and how you plan on using it, it’s time to choose your oil paintings.

2. Investigate the properties of essential oils

Now you knowbecause you want to make an essential oil spray, but how do you know which oil paintings to use for the best effectiveness? When you’re doing your research, make sure the sources you’re using link to scientific studies backing up their claims. For example, if you’re doing a deep dive into essential oil paintings for anxiety, make sure the sites you’re reading link out to sound evidence that their recommendations have merit.

Or iftrulyyou want to broaden your knowledge, delve into a book written by a respected holistic healer like Eric Zieliński, DC’sThe healing power of essential oilso Josh Ax, MDEssential oils: ancient medicine.

3. Experiment with fragrances

Now that you’ve discovered which essential oil paintings you can use as a remedy, it’s important to make sure the scents work for you. Scent is tied so much to memory that it’s very individualized. What’s soothing to you might not be for someone else. Your research provides a solid foundation, but experimentation is key.

Like perfumes, essential oil fragrances can be grouped by type, such as floral, citrus, spicy, woody and herbaceous. Oils of the same type tend to blend well with each other.

You can also look up commercial products that achieve the effect you’re after and see what oil paintings the pros blended together. You can use existing products as a guide to create different essential oil blends for yourself. But of course, everyone’s nose is different. A combination of fragrances can make someone ecstatic, leaving someone else wrinkling their nose in disgust. So you have to experiment a little to find out what smells good for you.

4. Decide on the proportions of essential oils

If you’re an essential oil newbie, it’s probably best to start with just one or two oil paintings for your first spray. As you gain more confidence, experience, and you grow your collection of oil paintings, you can experiment with using a variety of oil paintings in one mixture.

As you blend different oil paintings to discover what scent profile you want to achieve, start with a 1:1 ratio of different oil paintings. See what it smells like, then adjust the profile and proportions of the perfume from there. Typically, when making an essential oil blend, there will be one or two oil paintings you use more of as your main scent. Other oil paintings added are complimentary and in lesser ratios, depending on your scent preferences and the properties you’re after.

5. Create your spray

When choosing your spray can, glass may be a little pricier than plastic, but since essential oil paintings can degrade plastic, it’s worth the few extra bucks—especially if you’ll be using the spray on your skin; you don’t want any nasty chemicals from the plastic to make their way onto you.

To make a spray, mix your essential oil paintings with purified or distilled water, which you can buy in the grocery store. The strength of the blend is entirely up to you. Depending on the size of the bottle, play with the number of drops of each essential oil and the amount of water added. For a stronger fragrance, mix 2 oz. of water in your spray can with 15 to 25 drops of essential oil paintings. For a more delicate fragrance, a good tip is 20 drops of essential oil per 4 oz. From the water.

You can add more water or oil to increase or decrease the proportions. Record how much water and how much of each oil you’ve added to the bottle to keep track. That way once you’ve nailed your recipe, you’ll be able to recreate it.

To use the spray, remember that oil and water do not mix: shake well before each use.

Essential oil paintings have so many natural benefits. Once you get started making and using your own essential oil sprays, you’ll be hooked on how easy it is to concoct your own remedies at home.

I love the cool mist feeling on my skin, especially when it smells of flowers, citrus and earth. As a teenager, I collected perfume bottles and savored the transformative magic inspired by aroma. The delicate amber honey, the light fruity and the floral and spicy evergreen forests create an atmosphere every morning before I leave for the world.

I did not know then that I appreciate these aromatic experiences so much. they were actually synthetic. When I found out the truth about commercial perfumes and body sprays, I was heartbroken. Over the years I have doused myself with potentially toxic petrochemicals, some of which are known allergens and hormone disruptors. Isn’t it interesting that the ingredients aren’t listed on all of these beautiful bottles? Transparency appears not to be the strong point of the industry.

I immediately abandoned designer fragrances and discovered a new passion for creating my perfumes from natural plant extracts. With so many great organic essential oils and hydrolates distilled or squeezed from fruit, bark, flowers, resins and other plant materials, it’s easy to enchant the blending process. Additionally, many of these ingredients also provide aromatherapy and care benefits. Creating beautiful fragrances that are perfect for you is a dream quest.

How to make a dilution using essential oil paintings and a base material

Basics of DIY body sprays

Supplies

To start this aromatic journey you need to stock up on some supplies. Think of the ingredients in your perfume as a collection of colors. Just like the strokes of color on the canvas, it’s nice to have a variety of fragrances that you can layer on top of each other as you blend, including a few notes on the top, middle and bottom. These essential oil kits are a great way to get started. You’ll also need some basics, such as organic hydrolates, organic witch hazel extract, or plain vodka. I really like having small amber vials on hand for making test mixes and a screw-top cobalt bottle for the finished recipe.

Test mix

  1. To make a simple test blend, choose just 2 or 3 essential oils.
  2. Carefully pour 10 drops into a small vial and write down the proportions (example: 5 drops of cistus, 3 drops of sandalwood and 2 drops of lavender). Unroll the bottle between your palms to connect.
  3. Smell or use a cotton ball to spread the mixture.
  4. Smell again after an hour or two and then again the next day to feel the aroma of the fragrance.
  5. Or you can go straight and use just one essential oil instead of mixing it.

Form

Now that you have your favorite blend of essential oils, it’s time to spray your body. The instructions below will get you two ounces of the finished spray, but you are free to increase or decrease your needs!

Basic body spray recipe with essential oils

About 2 oz.

ingrediants

  • 1 ounce. 190 degree vodka or 91% isopropyl alcohol.
  • 24 drops of essential oil or a blend of oils to choose from
  • 1 ounce. organic extract of witch hazel or organic hydrosol of your choice

Advice

  1. In a 2-ounce glass bottle with a bowl, mix a blend of essential oils with vodka or 91% isopropyl alcohol and shake well to dilute. This will give you a 4% solution where the oils are completely dissolved.
  2. Fill the rest of the bottle with Hydrolate (for added fragrance) or Hamamelis extract (for the neutral option).
  3. Spray on the skin or hair as desired, shaking well before each use.

Advice per professionisti

  • When making aroma sprays at home, many fragrance lovers choose to simplify their recipes by using only witch hazel / hydrosol base and up to 2% essential oils (use our dilution calculator to find the amount of carrier and essential oils! ). Since these solutions are not diluted with alcohol, they need to be shaken very well before use to physically disperse the oil in the mixture and will have a shorter shelf life than an alcohol solution.

Essential oil (with a few exceptions) should never be applied pure to the skin and should be mixedcarrier oil (also referred to as a base oil) to dilute the concentrated molecules and to help spread them over the surface of the skin, and this is done by diluting them in carrier oils. These oils are generally cold pressed and are inert and non-volatile like essential oils.

As a rule of thumb, you would normally need about 30 ml of carrier oil to perform a full body massage.

When essential oils are used, they are mainly used in aromatherapy massage because the consumption of pure essential oils is within the scope of medical science and cannot be taken by a layman.

Base oils

Carrier oils, also called base oils, are solid oils (because they are not volatile) and are of vegetable origin, extracted from nuts or seeds.

The degree of dilution of the essential oil depends on various factors such as the use and age of the client to be treated. For more information on the dilution rate of essential oils, click here.

Smell of carrier oils

Some people look for carrier oils with a specific smell – for instance, people sometimes look for “almond oil” that smells of almonds.

If you have an almond oil that smells like almonds, then you have a highly toxic oil (bitter almond oil) or sweet almond oil with a synthetic fragrance.

Our carrier oils are 100% pure base oil paintings – no preservatives, no fragrances or ANY other compounds – just the pure cold pressed oil paintings. As such, these oils NOThaving a smell – except you may smell bad if you have a keen sense of smell,

Most carrier oils are extracted using a “cold pressed method”, in which no external heat is applied to help force the oil from its oil containing cells, and it is this type of carrier oil you should buy.

Most people do not have allergic reactions to these base carrier oils, but if you have a problem with a nut allergy, it would be wise to do a skin-patch test before using a nut based carrier oil.

After a carrier oil has been extracted it can be refined through various processes to attain certain desirable (and some undesirable) effects.

Carrier oils may also have their own therapeutic properties and also increase the absorption of essential oils through the skin.

Most carrier oils are furthermore rich in fatty acids as well as other nutrients.

List of different carrier oils

Herewith, a list of the most widely used carrier oils as used in aromatherapy.

Information on carrier oils not sold by us

  • Pumpkin seed oil
  • Safflower oil
  • sesame oil
  • Macadamia oil
  • nut oil
  • Sunflower oil

For more information on any of the above oils, simply click on the hyperlink and to view the product list click here.

The above is by no means a complete list of carrier oils, but are the most used oil paintings in aromatherapy.

As can be seen from the list above there is a good variety to choose from, and although carrier oils are used for diluting the essential oil paintings in aromatherapy massage, the carrier oils as such can also impart vary valuable properties to the massage, since they all have one or more of their own characteristics.

The choice of a carrier oil will also depend on the therapist giving the massage, as heavier oil paintings give more “traction” on the skin, which helps when giving a deep massage, while other lighter oil paintings provide more “slide” which is useful when giving a relaxing massage.

For this reason, professional therapists normally have a selection of carrier oils on call, to mix as required for the specific massage to be performed.

“Technical oil paintings” sometimes used in normal body massage are not used in aromatherapy massage, and although far cheaper than vegetable carrier oils, do not give the client the same effect, and also leave the skin feeling “tacky” and like baby oil, is a mineral oil, which forms a barrier and will prevent the essential oil paintings from penetrating and being absorbed by the skin. This in itself is opposite to the therapeutic effect of essential oils and should be avoided.

Because essential oil paintings are so concentrated, dilution is one of the most important safety measures you can take when using essential oil paintings.

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Because essential oil paintings are so concentrated, dilution is one of the most important safety measures you can take when using essential oil paintings.

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Dilution guidelines for the safety of essential oils

Essential oil paintings are incredibly potent plant essences. It can take hundreds of pounds of plant material to make a bottle of essential oil! Below we’ve summarized dilution guidelines for common essential oil uses, as well as extra precautions to take with children and pregnant or lactating women.

Using essential oil paintings on your skin

The recommended dilution ratios depend on the specific situation and application as described in the table below. It is also important to consider the strength of the specific oil you are using, for example you can use a few drops of lavender for each drop of rose. Carrier oil paintings (vegetable-based oil paintings like jojoba oil or avocado oil or unscented lotion should be used as a base when applying essential oil paintings to skin.

Using essential oil paintings in a bath

Essential oil paintings can be added to a bath when combined with salts, milk, and a carrier oil like jojoba oil.

Salts

  • 5-6 total drops of essential oil paintings + 2 ounces of Pink Himalayan salt + 1 Tbsp of castile soap or a carrier oil such as jojoba.
  • Mix well until combined before pouring the mixture into the bathtub.
  • 3-4 total drops of essential oil + 1 cup organic whole milk or cream + 1Tbsp carrier oil such as jojoba
  • Mix well and add the mixture to the bath.

Vector oils

  • 3-4 total drops of essential oil + 1 Tbsp carrier oil (We recommend jojoba oil).
  • Mix well and add the mixture to the bath.

Using essential oil paintings in a spray

  • 10-15 drops of essential oil paintings + 1-2 drops Solubol (Dispersant) for every 5 drops of essential oil + water or hydrosol to fill a 2 fl oz. spray can
  • Spray liberally in any room or on bedding.

Using essential oil paintings in a steam

  • 1 drop of essential oil or 1 drop of essential oil blend + a bowl of steaming water.
  • Make sure the water is simply steaming, not boiling. CLOSE YOUR EYES and lean over the bowl to breathe in the oil. You can make a curtain that will hold a couple by wrapping a towel around your head and bowl. If it feels too hot, let the water cool down.

Using essential oil paintings in an inhaler

For adults

  • 15-18 drops of essential oil + cotton wick for the inhaler

For children aged 5 and up

  • 4-5 drops of essential oil + cotton wick for the inhaler

Using essential oil paintings for children over 5 and pregnant or lactating women

Essential oil paintings are very helpful for children as well as pregnant or lactating mothers, however, the safety information for each blend or essential oil should be carefully reviewed. We provide safety information on all pages of our products. We also recommend reviewing our simple guidelines for using essential oil paintings with pregnant or lactating women by reading our blog, Essential oil paintings & pregnancy: What you need to know.