How to knit a headband

It’s getting cold outside. You want your ears to be warm but you also want to look cute.

Try a headband! I’ve rounded up the best headband patterns from across the web and they are all free patterns.

This collection includes easy and simple headbands that are suitable for beginners as well as projects that are a bit more challenging including cables and Fair Isle.

Some headbands are knitted in-the-round on circular needles while others are knit back and forth on straight needles.

You’ll find ear warmers using a variety of weights from double knit to bulky yarns.

How to knit a headband

#1. Fresia Headband Free Knitting Pattern

Whip up cute headband knitting patterns with just one ball of Berroco Coco! Add a twist, or don’t—the choice is yours!

Get Berroco Coco Yarn for this project

How to knit a headband

#2. Hot Mess Headband Free Knitting Pattern

Is your hair a mess? Not anymore! The Hot Mess Headband is here to save you and your hair from a bad day. Add this cute little accessory to any outfit for a touch of color and cute. The Hot Mess Headband will keep your ears warm and make you the snappiest girl on the street. One skein project!

There’s also a free tutorial for this headband to help you through any tricky parts.

Designed by Heather Walpole

How to knit a headband

#3. Easy Headband (Ear Warmers) Free Knitting Pattern

Very easy rib-knit headband (ear warmers) to use on walks or bike rides. Just add or subtract 4 stitches to make smaller or larger headband. Headband is knitted in the round and suitable for men or women.

Designed by Laura’s Knits

How to knit a headband

#4. Leopard Print Headband Free Knitting Pattern

Worked in two-color stranded knitting, the fierce look of this headband is complete with duplicate stitches in a third color, making the piece really leopard-like.

How to knit a headband

#5. Horseshoe Cabled Headband Free Knitting Pattern

A traditional horseshoe cable provide the perfect texture for this cozy headband wrap with 2-button closure. Uses bulky weight yarn.

Designed by Sarah Gettel

How to knit a headband

#6. Stranded Colorwork Headband Free Knitting Pattern

Knitting perfectly neat stranded colorwork is a skill that requires a bit of practice. This is the perfect small project for working on your technique as it’s relatively fast to make. The colorwork chart eases you in with two colors in each round and then steps things up with three colors in each round. When you’re all done, you’ll have a cheerful headband to keep your ears warm on a winter day. Uses sport weight yarn.

Designed by Andi Satterlund

How to knit a headband

#7. Vanessa Headband Free Knitting Pattern

The Vanessa headband is very cozy for those cold winter days when you need some protection for your head and ears. If you wish, you can also wear your Vanessa headband as a cowl. Very versatile little knitted piece! Includes instructions to make a narrow or wide version. Uses bulky weight yarn.

Designed by Nancy Ricci

How to knit a headband

#8. Headband with a Twist Free Knitting Pattern

The headband is knit back and forth in the English rib, which is very warm and comfortable to wear. It has a twist in the middle – not only this looks classy, but it’s also a clever way to hide the seam. Uses DK weight yarn.

Designed by Mirella Moments

How to knit a headband

#9. Moss Stitch Bow Headband Free Knitting Pattern

Here’s what, designer, Stefanie Fail has to say about her project. “After seeing a crochet version of this little headband, I created a knit version and used moss stitch to give it a bit of texture. I originally created the headband, but the bow can be used in many ways. Necklaces, bowties, etc….”

Let’s face it: as much as I love the idea of gearing up with a slouchy hat in the fall and winter, I can’t stand the staticky hat hair that always comes after taking it off again. There’s nothing worse than showing up to work or wherever you’re going only to be stuck with a frizzy hairdo that you just can’t shake. After one too many bad hair days, I made the switch to wearing a knit headband instead of a full-on hat and I have to say, my life is forever changed! These cozy knitting projects keep your ears warm but don’t squish your overall ‘do, and they can be removed with no hassle – leaving your hair exactly how it was when you left the house.

How to knit a headband How to Knit a Headband: 13 Free Patterns

These 13 free knitting patterns will show you how to knit a headband in no time! They make wonderful holiday gifts, but once you see these easy knitting patterns you’ll want to keep them all for yourself. These knit headbands are always on trend and are super practical if you like to spend some time styling your hair in the morning. They’re also small enough to throw in your handbag once you take if off – no more carrying around a chunky hat! From more basic designs that make for great beginner knitting patterns to ones that are a little more complicated, you’re sure to find a knitted headband pattern in this list that’s exactly what you’re looking for!

How to knit a headband

  • Dark Leaf Ear WarmersHow to knit a headband
  • Gypsy Queen Headband
  • Scarlet Swirl Knit Headband
  • Goldenrod Cinched Headband
  • Wine Harvest Headband
  • Pretty Girl Chic Headband
  • Crowning Moment Knit Headband
  • Arrow Design Knit Headband
  • Ridiculously Easy Knit Headband
  • Call Me Duchess Knit Headband
  • One Skein Braided Headband
  • Twisted Sister Knit Headband
  • Crimson Berry Headband

What are your favorite accessories to make?

April 17, 2020 by Johanna Wehrmann categories: Household

  • Newsletter

How about a knitted headband to keep your ears warm? Get creative with our easy DIY beginner’s guide on how to knit a headband and personalize your newest accessory.

Are you feeling like crafting? Then knit your own homemade headband in no time! This simple and easy guide will walk you through the process step-by-step. Basic knitting skills are definitely a plus, however the simple stitches used in this how-to guide on headband knitting won’t throw any first-timers overboard either.

Utopia’s tip: DIY headbands make great eco-friendly gifts! Buy less, make more – that’s what becoming minimalist is all about. Check out our guide on how to consume less for more green living ideas.

How to Knit a Headband: Materials

You’ll need the following materials for crafting your own warm and cozy knitted headband:

  • ball of yarn
  • circular knitting needle
  • stitch holder, a pen or hair clip
  • needle for stitching
  • tape measure
  • around 2-3 hours time

In our instructional example we’ll be using a thick wool. This is in no way a must: choose a wool that you like and go from there. If you’re really unsure about your pick, talk to a store assistant about how to knit a headband with various types of yarn. Here’s a piece of advice: The thicker the wool, the quicker you’ll be done!

This how-to guide skips over the very first step of the knitting process known as the cast on – or beginning your first row of stitches. Check out this guide if you’re new to the game.

Utopia’s tip: Pick an easily combinable color and integrate your handmade headband in your new minimalist wardrobe. Committing to a well organized minimalist closet carries with it a number of perks: a minimalist wardrobe consisting of a few easily combinable and practical clothing items will save time getting dressed, save money while shopping as well as the resources required to produce these items in the first place.

1. Making a Knitted Headband: The Gauge Swatch

The first step in the knitting process is making the gauge swatch. This is done to test how many stitches your will require to knit the headband. Cast on and knit around ten stitches in around ten rows. Now measure the knitted piece. In our example, the piece measured 10 centimeters or approximately 4 inches in length.

How to knit a headbandHow to knit a headband: The stitch gauge determines how many stitches your DIY headband will need. (Photo: © Utopia)

Now measure out how wide your knitted headband will need to be to cover your ears. Our example saw 4 inches fit perfectly over the wearer’s ears – therefore there were no further measurements necessary. If your wool doesn’t quite cover your ears, you’ll have to calculate how many more stitches you’ll need to have your headband fit right. Here’s an example:

Calculation Example:

  • 10 stitches = 4 inches
  • X stitches = 6 inches (required width)

Here you’d need 5 more stitches – so 15 in total – to correctly fit your knitted headband. It may be a good idea to add an extra stitch so you land at an even number of stitches.

2. How to Knit your Headband: Knit a Garter Stitch

So now you’ve calculated your total number of stitches, it’s time to get knitting. Knit the first and last stitches for the ends and knit all others to the right. Keep knitting just like this on through the next row. The best thing about this knitted headband: you’re only stitching to the right. This will make for a pretty Garter pattern!

Continue knitting until the headband fits about halfway around your head. Keep in mind that the wool will stretch slightly once you put it on.

3. There’s a Twist

Once you’ve knitted your headband so that it fits halfway around your head, pick up half of the stitches (5 in our example) with a stitch holder. Knit the remaining stitches as you would otherwise, then knit using the stitch holder.

Now comes the twist. It may look a bit funky at the beginning, but rest assured, that’s normal! Just keep knitting. It’ll begin to take shape momentarily.

4. The Last Step: Knit it Together!

Keep knitting to the right until the headband fits around your head. Now cast off the stitches, leave a long tail for seaming and knit the two ends together. If you use the so-called kitchener stitch, you’ll hardly even notice the seam. Learn how to use it for knitting your headband here.

Utopia’s tip: Knitted headbands are great gifts. Nothing sends the message “I’m thinking of you” like a homemade present you take precious time to make. Be sure to keep things waste free by employing some creative and sustainable gift wrapping ideas.

Read more:

This instructional guide on how to knit a headband was translated from German to English. You can view the original here: Stirnband stricken: Do-it-Yourself.

It’s getting cold outside. You want your ears to be warm but you also want to look cute.

Try a headband! I’ve rounded up the best headband patterns from across the web and they are all free patterns.

This collection includes easy and simple headbands that are suitable for beginners as well as projects that are a bit more challenging including cables and Fair Isle.

Some headbands are knitted in-the-round on circular needles while others are knit back and forth on straight needles.

You’ll find ear warmers using a variety of weights from double knit to bulky yarns.

How to knit a headband

#1. Fresia Headband Free Knitting Pattern

Whip up cute headband knitting patterns with just one ball of Berroco Coco! Add a twist, or don’t—the choice is yours!

Get Berroco Coco Yarn for this project

How to knit a headband

#2. Hot Mess Headband Free Knitting Pattern

Is your hair a mess? Not anymore! The Hot Mess Headband is here to save you and your hair from a bad day. Add this cute little accessory to any outfit for a touch of color and cute. The Hot Mess Headband will keep your ears warm and make you the snappiest girl on the street. One skein project!

There’s also a free tutorial for this headband to help you through any tricky parts.

Designed by Heather Walpole

How to knit a headband

#3. Easy Headband (Ear Warmers) Free Knitting Pattern

Very easy rib-knit headband (ear warmers) to use on walks or bike rides. Just add or subtract 4 stitches to make smaller or larger headband. Headband is knitted in the round and suitable for men or women.

Designed by Laura’s Knits

How to knit a headband

#4. Leopard Print Headband Free Knitting Pattern

Worked in two-color stranded knitting, the fierce look of this headband is complete with duplicate stitches in a third color, making the piece really leopard-like.

How to knit a headband

#5. Horseshoe Cabled Headband Free Knitting Pattern

A traditional horseshoe cable provide the perfect texture for this cozy headband wrap with 2-button closure. Uses bulky weight yarn.

Designed by Sarah Gettel

How to knit a headband

#6. Stranded Colorwork Headband Free Knitting Pattern

Knitting perfectly neat stranded colorwork is a skill that requires a bit of practice. This is the perfect small project for working on your technique as it’s relatively fast to make. The colorwork chart eases you in with two colors in each round and then steps things up with three colors in each round. When you’re all done, you’ll have a cheerful headband to keep your ears warm on a winter day. Uses sport weight yarn.

Designed by Andi Satterlund

How to knit a headband

#7. Vanessa Headband Free Knitting Pattern

The Vanessa headband is very cozy for those cold winter days when you need some protection for your head and ears. If you wish, you can also wear your Vanessa headband as a cowl. Very versatile little knitted piece! Includes instructions to make a narrow or wide version. Uses bulky weight yarn.

Designed by Nancy Ricci

How to knit a headband

#8. Headband with a Twist Free Knitting Pattern

The headband is knit back and forth in the English rib, which is very warm and comfortable to wear. It has a twist in the middle – not only this looks classy, but it’s also a clever way to hide the seam. Uses DK weight yarn.

Designed by Mirella Moments

How to knit a headband

#9. Moss Stitch Bow Headband Free Knitting Pattern

Here’s what, designer, Stefanie Fail has to say about her project. “After seeing a crochet version of this little headband, I created a knit version and used moss stitch to give it a bit of texture. I originally created the headband, but the bow can be used in many ways. Necklaces, bowties, etc….”