How to interview for a software engineering position

Come un ingegnere del software dovrebbe rispondere alla domanda del colloquio "Raccontami di te"

Penso che la domanda di gran lunga più comune in un’intervista sia "parlami di te".

Like someone who passed the HackReactor program, interviewed recruiters, and interviewed dozens of candidates himself, here are the most important things every candidate should remember.

Common misunderstandings

There are two common misconceptions about this question. The first misconception is that it’s not really an ‘interview question’, rather just an opportunity to make small talk with the interviewer to show them that you can build rapport. The second misconception is that this is your chance to show the interviewer that there is more to you than just being a developer. In fact, if someone in the community asks you “tell me about yourself,” your answer should probably include more than what your favorite frontend frameworks and sorting algorithms are, but you should focus on your technical strengths during the interview.

Many years ago I used to think this was a silly question interviewers would ask when they weren’t prepared to actually give an interview, and I would even get slightly offended. I would wonder “well doesn’t this interviewer have my resume? Did they even watch it? C’è così tanto della mia carriera e di chi sono come la persona che mi ha portato qui a questa posizione… da dove comincio?” Ma in effetti, questo è ciò che rende questa domanda interessante e utile per l’intervistatore. Out of everything from the candidates’ past, what are they going to choose to describe themselves in 30 seconds?

Your answer should inspire confidence in the job and skills you have chosen

The last thing you want after your answer is to leave your interviewer with doubts about the fact that you enjoy programming, and that it’s what you will continue to build your career in. In the past, when I have had the opportunity to conduct an interview, it was somewhat negative if the interviewee seemed eager to fill a leadership or more product-oriented role in the near future. Of course, there’s nothing wrong with aspiring to be in a leadership role, but it would make me second guess their true intentions and whether programming was something that they enjoyed and were invested in.

In response, I like to jump straight to my current strengths and my best choices for programming languages ​​and frameworks. I can work backwards by telling my current work, past roles and identifying each role as a constitutive element that has brought me to where I am today, with experience in those specific languages ​​/ frameworks around which I initially focused my response.

How to interview for a software engineering position

If you have previous professional experience that isn’t related to programming , there may still be value in mentioning them if you’re able to tie it back to how it makes you an even better programmer today. Here are some ways to associate other skills with your role as a developer:

  • Designer: Good understanding of user experience and ability to create beautiful user interfaces
  • Engineer (without software): Process, logic and problem solving skills
  • Product Manager: Organize the creation process, get feedback from users and put the elements together
  • Manager: Leadership for future Lead Engineer roles
  • Sales / Real Estate / Recruiter / Human Resources: Can relate to you and can collaborate as part of a team
  • Musician / Chef: Treat it as science as much as art
  • Writer: Writing blog posts and programming tutorials

If you’re looking for your first professional software engineer role and find you’re having trouble filling 30 seconds or your previous non-programming experience has dominated it, you can fill in more space by listing a sample project I’ve been working on.

Another benefit of including a project in the “tell me about yourself” answer is that it can easily switch to intuitive follow-up – tell me more about this project. It positions you to showcase a project that you’ve prepared yourself to talk about and once again show your excitement for future technologies you want to learn and general areas that you want to grow in. During the interview, it’s valuable to to demonstrate your willingness to adapt to the ever-evolving nature of programming. This part of the answer will be even stronger if you can link your excitement to learning about the technology the company is currently using. It will show that you’ve done your homework, and that you’re confident that even if you haven’t worked with a particular technology in the past, you can pick it up quickly.

Once you have given a solid overview of your technical ability and interests, I do think it’s nice to have a couple sentences on other interests/hobbies. There is a possibility that the interviewer may have common interests, whether it is a sports team or a destination. Having the ability to build rapport with an interviewer is always a plus and allows them to see if you’re someone they would enjoy working alongside.

How to interview for a software engineering position

Software engineers are responsible for developing, testing, implementing, and improving computer programs. If you’re interviewing for a software engineer position, it’s helpful to know what questions to expect.

Many of the interview questions will focus on your technical skills, such as the programming languages ​​you know. However, employers will also want to know your problem-solving and analytical skills. They will also want to know if you are adapting to the culture of the company.

By practicing the answers to the most common questions in an interview with a software engineer, you can show confidence and impress your employer in an interview.

Frequently asked questions for an interview with a software engineer

There are some interview questions that employers ask candidates in every industry. These range from questions about yourself (“tell me about yourself”) to your previous work experience (“tell me about your best boss”). Make sure you practice answering these frequently asked questions as they will likely come up during every interview.

  • Why should we hire you?
  • What are your greatest strengths?
  • What are your biggest weaknesses?
  • What were your duties in your previous job?
  • How do you cope with pressure and stress?

Interview questions on technical skills

Typically, interviewers are eager to know your technical skills (e. g. what programs and languages ​​you know). Before the interview, review the job offer to make sure you know the technical requirements of the job. Make sure you are familiar with the programs and other technical skills required for the position.

Some of these technical questions will be simple questions about your technical knowledge and experience and how you perform specific technical tasks. They won’t necessarily have a clear, right or wrong answer.

  • What programming languages ​​did you use?
  • Describe the process you use to write the code snippet, from requirements to delivery.
  • What software engineering books have you read that you would recommend to someone in the industry?
  • How do you make sure your code can handle different types of error situations?
  • How do I find a bug in a large code file that cannot be ignored?
  • How do you design scalable applications? Guide us through your process.

Others will be quiz-like questions. Many will have a clear answer, some will have a yes or no answer, and others will require that you demonstrate a specific understanding of the concepts. They are designed to test your knowledge of specific aspects of software engineering.

  • What is the difference between a mutex and a semaphore? Which one will you use to secure access to an incremental operation?
  • What is the difference between re-engineering and reverse engineering?
  • What is the difference between local and global variables?
  • What is the philosophy of Agile software?
  • List one or two examples of how an application can predict user behavior.

Interview questions about the right skills

Some of the questions will focus on other non-technical skills required of software engineers. These skills include problem solving, logic, and analytical thinking.

Additionally, as most software projects run on tight deadlines, interviewers will want to find out how you’re doing on time, manage your time, and report failures and delays to project managers and team members.

Some of these questions will be behavioral interview questions. A behavioral interview question is one in which the person asks you about your previous work experience. For example, an employer might ask, “Tell me about a situation where you struggled to meet the deadline” or “Describe a time when you used logic to solve a complex problem at work.”

A similar type of question is the situational interview question. A situational question is one in which the person asks how you would deal with a hypothetical work situation. For example, an employer might ask, “What would you do if a member of your team didn’t complete their portion of the project on time?”

Whether you’re answering behavioral or situational questions, use the STAR interview technique. To describe situationyou were inside, he explainstaskit had to be done and detailedTo share you took to accomplish that task (or solve that problem). So describe results of your To shares.

To prepare for these questions, match your skills with the requirements of the job. Review the skills listed in the job posting. So think about the cases where you have demonstrated these skills in the workplace.

  • What would you do if a colleague asked you to check their code and it was full of bugs?
  • Describe your ideal level of interTo share with coworkers that would allow you to achieve the most success.
  • Tell me about how you worked with colleagues to solve a problem at work.
  • Parlami di una situation in cui dovevi risolvere un problema ma non avevi tutte le informazioni di cui avevi bisogno a portata di mano.
  • Imagine your manager wants to buy new office software but you believe this will reduce productivity. What are you doing?

Corporate culture questions

Employers want to know that you will be suitable not only for the job, but also for the company. You will likely receive questions about the type of work environment you enjoy and whether you will fit in well with the culture of the company.

To prepare for these questions, check out the company before the interview. Be honest, but also try to point out that you would be a good fit for the company.

Come un ingegnere del software dovrebbe rispondere alla domanda del colloquio "Raccontami di te"

Penso che la domanda di gran lunga più comune in un’intervista sia "parlami di te".

Like someone who passed the HackReactor program, interviewed recruiters, and interviewed dozens of candidates himself, here are the most important things every candidate should remember.

Common misunderstandings

There are two common misconceptions about this question. The first misconception is that it’s not really an ‘interview question’, rather just an opportunity to make small talk with the interviewer to show them that you can build rapport. The second misconception is that this is your chance to show the interviewer that there is more to you than just being a developer. In fact, if someone in the community asks you “tell me about yourself,” your answer should probably include more than what your favorite frontend frameworks and sorting algorithms are, but you should focus on your technical strengths during the interview.

Many years ago I used to think this was a silly question interviewers would ask when they weren’t prepared to actually give an interview, and I would even get slightly offended. I would wonder “well doesn’t this interviewer have my resume? Did they even watch it? C’è così tanto della mia carriera e di chi sono come la persona che mi ha portato qui a questa posizione… da dove comincio?” Ma in effetti, questo è ciò che rende questa domanda interessante e utile per l’intervistatore. Out of everything from the candidates’ past, what are they going to choose to describe themselves in 30 seconds?

Your answer should inspire confidence in the job and skills you have chosen

The last thing you want after your answer is to leave your interviewer with doubts about the fact that you enjoy programming, and that it’s what you will continue to build your career in. In the past, when I have had the opportunity to conduct an interview, it was somewhat negative if the interviewee seemed eager to fill a leadership or more product-oriented role in the near future. Of course, there’s nothing wrong with aspiring to be in a leadership role, but it would make me second guess their true intentions and whether programming was something that they enjoyed and were invested in.

In response, I like to jump straight to my current strengths and my best choices for programming languages ​​and frameworks. I can work backwards by telling my current work, past roles and identifying each role as a constitutive element that has brought me to where I am today, with experience in those specific languages ​​/ frameworks around which I initially focused my response.

How to interview for a software engineering position

If you have previous professional experience that isn’t related to programming , there may still be value in mentioning them if you’re able to tie it back to how it makes you an even better programmer today. Here are some ways to associate other skills with your role as a developer:

  • Designer: Good understanding of user experience and ability to create beautiful user interfaces
  • Engineer (without software): Process, logic and problem solving skills
  • Product Manager: Organize the creation process, get feedback from users and put the elements together
  • Manager: Leadership for future Lead Engineer roles
  • Sales / Real Estate / Recruiter / Human Resources: Can relate to you and can collaborate as part of a team
  • Musician / Chef: Treat it as science as much as art
  • Writer: Writing blog posts and programming tutorials

If you’re looking for your first professional software engineer role and find you’re having trouble filling 30 seconds or your previous non-programming experience has dominated it, you can fill in more space by listing a sample project I’ve been working on.

Another benefit of including a project in the “tell me about yourself” answer is that it can easily switch to intuitive follow-up – tell me more about this project. It positions you to showcase a project that you’ve prepared yourself to talk about and once again show your excitement for future technologies you want to learn and general areas that you want to grow in. During the interview, it’s valuable to to demonstrate your willingness to adapt to the ever-evolving nature of programming. This part of the answer will be even stronger if you can link your excitement to learning about the technology the company is currently using. It will show that you’ve done your homework, and that you’re confident that even if you haven’t worked with a particular technology in the past, you can pick it up quickly.

Once you have given a solid overview of your technical ability and interests, I do think it’s nice to have a couple sentences on other interests/hobbies. There is a possibility that the interviewer may have common interests, whether it is a sports team or a destination. Having the ability to build rapport with an interviewer is always a plus and allows them to see if you’re someone they would enjoy working alongside.

How to interview for a software engineering position

Software engineers are responsible for developing, testing, implementing, and improving computer programs. If you’re interviewing for a software engineer position, it’s helpful to know what questions to expect.

Many of the interview questions will focus on your technical skills, such as the programming languages ​​you know. However, employers will also want to know your problem-solving and analytical skills. They will also want to know if you are adapting to the culture of the company.

By practicing the answers to the most common questions in an interview with a software engineer, you can show confidence and impress your employer in an interview.

Frequently asked questions for an interview with a software engineer

There are some interview questions that employers ask candidates in every industry. These range from questions about yourself (“tell me about yourself”) to your previous work experience (“tell me about your best boss”). Make sure you practice answering these frequently asked questions as they will likely come up during every interview.

  • Why should we hire you?
  • What are your greatest strengths?
  • What are your biggest weaknesses?
  • What were your duties in your previous job?
  • How do you cope with pressure and stress?

Interview questions on technical skills

Typically, interviewers are eager to know your technical skills (e. g. what programs and languages ​​you know). Before the interview, review the job offer to make sure you know the technical requirements of the job. Make sure you are familiar with the programs and other technical skills required for the position.

Some of these technical questions will be simple questions about your technical knowledge and experience and how you perform specific technical tasks. They won’t necessarily have a clear, right or wrong answer.

  • What programming languages ​​did you use?
  • Describe the process you use to write the code snippet, from requirements to delivery.
  • What software engineering books have you read that you would recommend to someone in the industry?
  • How do you make sure your code can handle different types of error situations?
  • How do I find a bug in a large code file that cannot be ignored?
  • How do you design scalable applications? Guide us through your process.

Others will be quiz-like questions. Many will have a clear answer, some will have a yes or no answer, and others will require that you demonstrate a specific understanding of the concepts. They are designed to test your knowledge of specific aspects of software engineering.

  • What is the difference between a mutex and a semaphore? Which one will you use to secure access to an incremental operation?
  • What is the difference between re-engineering and reverse engineering?
  • What is the difference between local and global variables?
  • What is the philosophy of Agile software?
  • List one or two examples of how an application can predict user behavior.

Interview questions about the right skills

Some of the questions will focus on other non-technical skills required of software engineers. These skills include problem solving, logic, and analytical thinking.

Additionally, as most software projects run on tight deadlines, interviewers will want to find out how you’re doing on time, manage your time, and report failures and delays to project managers and team members.

Some of these questions will be behavioral interview questions. A behavioral interview question is one in which the person asks you about your previous work experience. For example, an employer might ask, “Tell me about a situation where you struggled to meet the deadline” or “Describe a time when you used logic to solve a complex problem at work.”

A similar type of question is the situational interview question. A situational question is one in which the person asks how you would deal with a hypothetical work situation. For example, an employer might ask, “What would you do if a member of your team didn’t complete their portion of the project on time?”

Whether you’re answering behavioral or situational questions, use the STAR interview technique. To describe situationyou were inside, he explainstaskit had to be done and detailedTo share you took to accomplish that task (or solve that problem). So describe results of your To shares.

To prepare for these questions, match your skills with the requirements of the job. Review the skills listed in the job posting. So think about the cases where you have demonstrated these skills in the workplace.

  • What would you do if a colleague asked you to check their code and it was full of bugs?
  • Describe your ideal level of interTo share with coworkers that would allow you to achieve the most success.
  • Tell me about how you worked with colleagues to solve a problem at work.
  • Parlami di una situation in cui dovevi risolvere un problema ma non avevi tutte le informazioni di cui avevi bisogno a portata di mano.
  • Imagine your manager wants to buy new office software but you believe this will reduce productivity. What are you doing?

Corporate culture questions

Employers want to know that you will be suitable not only for the job, but also for the company. You will likely receive questions about the type of work environment you enjoy and whether you will fit in well with the culture of the company.

To prepare for these questions, check out the company before the interview. Be honest, but also try to point out that you would be a good fit for the company.

Hi, I’m Brian, a former senior software engineer and now software engineering advisor at S. I work with hundreds of software engineers to help them find their dream job. Check out this article for questions to ask at your next software engineering interview.

Updated in 2021

Many preparations require comprehensive answers to both the technical intelligence of software engineering and behavioral questions. You practice Leetcode and memorize your presentation in the elevator, all so you can confidently respond when you walk into the interviewer’s room.

But what happens when you get to the end of the conversation and they ask you if you have any questions for them. Many people get stuck because they forget to plan this episode. Or they just choose to just do it. However, this is a great opportunity that will be wasted as asking good questions can often give you the final push when it comes to interviewer feedback.

As a senior software engineer and now mentor here at S, I’ve interviewed hundreds of candidates throughout my career. If they ask good questions, I always mark them in my notes, as do the rest of the interviewers. We consider these questions when determining whether a candidate will accept and remain interested in a long-term role. These questions influence the decision to move forward and / or expand the offer.

That’s why we’ve compiled the top 10 questions software engineers should ask in interviews to make sure they show interest and enthusiasm for the role.

Questions to ask in a software engineering interview

  1. What are your current challenges in the team?
  2. How can I best contribute to solving these challenges in my role as an interviewer?
  3. What opportunities do I have to learn new languages ​​or technologies related to the work you do here?
  4. Is the technical office more team or autonomous?
  5. How many suggestions can I expect from my supervisor and how much ownership can I expect for my projects?
  6. I have read this [latest company information]. How does this affect [mission, engineering team work, etc.]?
  7. What are your favorite aspects of working at [the company]?
  8. What was the hardest part of your day at [the company]?
  9. How can my work directly affect the company’s mission [company mission]?
  10. If I were to start on the engineering team tomorrow, what would my first task be?

Presenting prepared questions will reduce stress when you get to the end of the conversation. It will also ensure that the interviewer has a positive impression of your interest in the company and the role. The questions that show your willingness to learn, your motivation to work hard, and your enthusiasm for the company and mission are really helpful for interviewers in judging whether you fit the culture.

S is a career accelerator that works with students and individual professionals to help them find their dream job in the tech industry. Dzięki tym wskazówkom i wskazówkom stypendyści naszego programu podwoili swoje results rozmów kwalifikacyjnych.

If you want to work with any of our mentors 1-on-1 to get help with your software engineer interviews or with any other aspect of the job search, become a S fellow.

Come un ingegnere del software dovrebbe rispondere alla domanda del colloquio "Raccontami di te"

Penso che la domanda di gran lunga più comune in un’intervista sia "parlami di te".

Like someone who passed the HackReactor program, interviewed recruiters, and interviewed dozens of candidates himself, here are the most important things every candidate should remember.

Common misunderstandings

There are two common misconceptions about this question. The first misconception is that it’s not really an ‘interview question’, rather just an opportunity to make small talk with the interviewer to show them that you can build rapport. The second misconception is that this is your chance to show the interviewer that there is more to you than just being a developer. In fact, if someone in the community asks you “tell me about yourself,” your answer should probably include more than what your favorite frontend frameworks and sorting algorithms are, but you should focus on your technical strengths during the interview.

Many years ago I used to think this was a silly question interviewers would ask when they weren’t prepared to actually give an interview, and I would even get slightly offended. I would wonder “well doesn’t this interviewer have my resume? Did they even watch it? C’è così tanto della mia carriera e di chi sono come la persona che mi ha portato qui a questa posizione… da dove comincio?” Ma in effetti, questo è ciò che rende questa domanda interessante e utile per l’intervistatore. Out of everything from the candidates’ past, what are they going to choose to describe themselves in 30 seconds?

Your answer should inspire confidence in the job and skills you have chosen

The last thing you want after your answer is to leave your interviewer with doubts about the fact that you enjoy programming, and that it’s what you will continue to build your career in. In the past, when I have had the opportunity to conduct an interview, it was somewhat negative if the interviewee seemed eager to fill a leadership or more product-oriented role in the near future. Of course, there’s nothing wrong with aspiring to be in a leadership role, but it would make me second guess their true intentions and whether programming was something that they enjoyed and were invested in.

In response, I like to jump straight to my current strengths and my best choices for programming languages ​​and frameworks. I can work backwards by telling my current work, past roles and identifying each role as a constitutive element that has brought me to where I am today, with experience in those specific languages ​​/ frameworks around which I initially focused my response.

How to interview for a software engineering position

If you have previous professional experience that isn’t related to programming , there may still be value in mentioning them if you’re able to tie it back to how it makes you an even better programmer today. Here are some ways to associate other skills with your role as a developer:

  • Designer: Good understanding of user experience and ability to create beautiful user interfaces
  • Engineer (without software): Process, logic and problem solving skills
  • Product Manager: Organize the creation process, get feedback from users and put the elements together
  • Manager: Leadership for future Lead Engineer roles
  • Sales / Real Estate / Recruiter / Human Resources: Can relate to you and can collaborate as part of a team
  • Musician / Chef: Treat it as science as much as art
  • Writer: Writing blog posts and programming tutorials

If you’re looking for your first professional software engineer role and find you’re having trouble filling 30 seconds or your previous non-programming experience has dominated it, you can fill in more space by listing a sample project I’ve been working on.

Another benefit of including a project in the “tell me about yourself” answer is that it can easily switch to intuitive follow-up – tell me more about this project. It positions you to showcase a project that you’ve prepared yourself to talk about and once again show your excitement for future technologies you want to learn and general areas that you want to grow in. During the interview, it’s valuable to to demonstrate your willingness to adapt to the ever-evolving nature of programming. This part of the answer will be even stronger if you can link your excitement to learning about the technology the company is currently using. It will show that you’ve done your homework, and that you’re confident that even if you haven’t worked with a particular technology in the past, you can pick it up quickly.

Once you have given a solid overview of your technical ability and interests, I do think it’s nice to have a couple sentences on other interests/hobbies. There is a possibility that the interviewer may have common interests, whether it is a sports team or a destination. Having the ability to build rapport with an interviewer is always a plus and allows them to see if you’re someone they would enjoy working alongside.

Being a developer is an exciting opportunity to learn about the tech industry and learn about innovative technologies firsthand. If you’re considering a career as a developer, then you might be wondering what to expect from the interview and how you can set yourself up for success.

These are some of the most common questions you may come across in an interview.

1. How do you contact the team?

This question is considered a “fit” question and it’s designed to get a sense of the type of work environment you prefer to work in. Although culture fit questions are common in all types of interviews, the fit questions you’re likely to encounter during a tech interview are generally targeted towards getting a sense of how well you work with other team members and how comfortable you are working on software engineering processes on a team — including things like code review, version control and communication. To answer this question effectively, it’s important to talk about your prior experience of working with a team (either at a previous job or on a class project) and to explain how you approach working with others.

2. Parlami di una situation in cui dovevi costruire qualcosa e poi supportarlo.

Another common question you’re likely to encounter during a tech interview, this question is designed to test your understanding of the challenges engineers face when building technology for other people. The key to responding correctly is to show that you understand how to get feedback from end users and stakeholders, and that you know how to incorporate it into your product. From an engineering perspective, many employers want to see that you’re “thinking 100 steps ahead” but “building 10 steps ahead” — in other words, that you’re thinking ahead but not overengineering today.

3. Tell me about the project you were working on and explain how and why you decided to design it the way you did.

This question aims to test your critical thinking and problem-solving skills by asking you to describe the path you took when designing a specific project. When answering this question, it’s important to outline the steps you took in proceeding with the project and to explicitly state why you made certain decisions. For example, what trade-offs did you consider when making these decisions? Mention it and don’t forget to justify why you chose the path you have chosen. This will show the hiring manager that you’re thoughtful about your decisions, aware of possible drawbacks and that you take calculated risks when necessary.

4. What projects do you work on in your spare time?

Being a great developer means developing your skills by constantly learning new things. The best way to do this is to research the projects yourself. When hiring managers ask this question, it’s because they want to know that you’re passionate about the work you do and that you’re learning about new technologies by working on one or more side-projects. A great way to answer this question is by referring to something you’re developing (or have developed) and highlighting the reason why the project is important to you. Are you trying to solve a specific problem or are you excited to try a new programming language? Mention that and explain how it connects to the work you’ll be doing in the role you’re interviewing for.

Advice for professionals: If you’re not currently working on any projects of your own but you’re collaborating on projects on an open source platform like Github, be sure to mention that. This is a great way to demonstrate that you’re involved in ongoing projects in the industry and eager to learn more.

5. Tell me about a completely failed project.

Talking about your failures is never fun but being able to show that you’ve learned from them is extremely important, particularly when it comes to being an engineer. This is because failure is a crucial part of the programming process and being able to demonstrate that you’re resilient and able to iterate quickly will go a long way towards impressing the interviewer and showing them that you’re able to work well in an agile environment.

Interviewing for a job as a developer may seem a little intimidating at first, but knowing what to expect and how to prepare your answers will definitely impress your hiring manager and be a step closer to landing a job.

Then, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs, such as How to Succeed in Remote or Virtual Work, and find answers to frequently asked questions during an interview, such as Tell Me About You.

Some time ago I applied for a job (Principal Software Engineer) for Microsoft, at Cambridge, Microsoft Research Center.

Principle The level of Software Engineer at Microsoft is very decent, high level which is higher than L5 (Senior SWE) on Google and (SDE III, Senior SDE L6) on Amazon.

How to interview for a software engineering position

The big IT giants have their own recruiting teams and I was contacted by a Microsoft Recruiter. The first call was more-or-less a introductory call to know about each other and I was introduced the tasks that Microsoft do in Cambridge and the specific role. Two weeks later, a phone call arrives.

In fact, this is a programming conversation where you have to be with your computer. You need to have a video camera set up like you do during the interview, you and the interviewer can see and talk.

It is recommended to test the connection, camera and microphone in advance. And it uses LAN as WIFI which is unstable which was in my case. My interview was not smooth as it was very slow, possibly due to the Wi-Fi connection.

The interviewer, who has been a chief software engineer at Microsoft for over 20 years, asked me a few simple questions at the beginning, such as: What is your favorite programming language and why? If you were to present a topic at the annual Microsoft Developer Conference Build, what would you introduce and use the online whiteboard (in your browser) to give a brief introduction. My presentation title was: How to improve communication speed between nodes in the blockchain?

From hardware, OS, API, applications, which tech stack do you feel best? and why? This question is to test how you fit into Microsoft teams.

What was your last piece of software your ‘ve written? (not a snippet of disposable test and code). I mentioned my Chrome extension for downloading videos.

And also what kind of C ++ programmer you describe: C ++ programmer, C programmer but uses C ++ syntax etc. My answer is: I use C functions and modern C ++ as STL containers.

The interview lasts exactly 45 minutes (okay). There is a coding exercise with an online coding collaboration tool (see below). The tasks are described here (seems easy). Be careful to test your code and find extreme cases. Remember to use modern C ++.

How to interview for a software engineering position

As with other interviews, I had the opportunity to ask a few questions at the end of the interview. Overall it was a fun interview experience!