How to insert a tampon without pain

Tampons shouldn’t hurt when you use them. Learn why choosing the right tampon for the the different days of your flow is important for your comfort.

How to insert a tampon without pain

How to insert a tampon without pain

How to insert a tampon without pain

Related Articles

How to insert a tampon without pain

Which Absorbency is Right for Me?

From one day to the next, and even from morning to evening, the amount of menstrual blood your body sheds changes. Learn how to pick the right absorbency for your period.

How to insert a tampon without pain

How to Properly Insert a Tampon

Using a tampon for the first time can seem a little scary, but it’s really nothing to worry about. Check out this video to help you feel more confident about using a tampon.

Can I use a tampon if my period is almost over?

Tampons can be worn any time during your period, but chosing the right absorbency for your flow is key.

This is not intended to be medical advice. Everybody is different so please make sure to consult your physician if you’re having issues. Do not delay or refrain from seeking professional medical advice from your physician because of something you have read on this site.

Recommended Products

How to insert a tampon without pain

UbyKotex Teen® Pads – Extra Absorbency

Check out these smaller-sized pad with heavy-flow absorbency. U by Kotex Teen® Pads are totally perfect for your younger girls learning the ropes and have vibrant colors with cool patterns.

How to insert a tampon without pain

Cleanwear® Ultra Thin Pads Heavy Flow with Wings

Say hello to your new favorite pad for heavy flow days. U by Kotex® Cleanwear® Pads feature Xpress DRI® Core for crazy, fast absorption to help stop leaks.

How to insert a tampon without pain

Click® Tampons Super Compact

Go from compact to full-sized protection in one quick move with U by Kotex® Click® Tampons. Perfect for travel and pocket-sized, to go where U go!

How to insert a tampon without pain

Security® Ultra Thin Pads Long with Wings

This super-thin pad has some crazy fast absorption that you can trust. And with its added length and uniquely shaped wings. It’ll keep you comfortable while helping stop leaks dead their in tracks.

Don’t Like Surprises?

Tracking is simple! Use our FREE Period Calculator to figure out when your next period starts.

Get the latest news and updates from U by Kotex®

We’ll send you marketing communications regarding U by Kotex® and other Kimberly-Clark brands. You can unsubscribe at any time.

YOU’RE IN!

We have successfully received your information.

Check your inbox for future updates.

YOU’RE IN!

We have successfully received your information.

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®/™ Trademarks of Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. or its affiliates ©KCWW.

Your visit to this site is subject to the terms of our User Agreement.

‡ In the past year, due to lack of income, according to a 2018 survey conducted by YouGov on behalf of U by Kotex ® .

How to insert a tampon without pain

Going through your monthly periods is already an exhausting and painful task and the only thing that we like to focus on during our period week is to be as comfortable as possible. Everybody has their own preferences when it comes to using a pad or a tampon while menstruating.
Both these products have their own pros and cons and it all depends upon an individual’s personal choice. Now there might be some of you who have always wanted to try the tampon but never could. There might have been a number of reasons running through your mind like – is it safe, is it better than a pad, how to use it, etc. But I am sure that the foremost question is definitely about how to put in a tampon for the the first time without any pain. So, today we are going to answer this for you.
Let’s start with the basics.

What Is A Tampon?

Tampon is a cylinder-shaped product which is used to absorb your menstrual flow. Made out of soft cotton, a tampon is inserted in your vagina’s opening. Tampons are available at most of the pharmacies and they usually come in different absorbencies and sizes.

What Size Should A First Timer Buy?

Since you are a newbie at this, it would be best for you to buy the ‘slender size’. This is perfect when you have moderate to heavy menstrual flow as it is easier to insert this tampon.

How To Make Your First Time Painless

Trying out anything the first time makes you feel all jittery and nervous and that is how you would feel while trying out a tampon for the first time. However, we have some tips and tricks for you which can make your first experience a painless one.

  1. The first step is to buy the right tampon depending upon your flow. If you usually have a light to normal flow, then you should not opt for the super-absorbent tampons. You should use it only if your flow is very heavy. Try to buy packs which have different absorbent tampons in it, so that you can use the correct one accordingly.
  2. The next step is to understand your anatomy. If you do not have a clear idea of where the tampon has to be inserted, then you will definitely have to endure unnecessary pain and discomfort. Your tampon should be inserted in your vaginal opening. Here is a quick way to find your vaginal opening:
  • Stand straight and place one of your legs on a chair
  • Now take a small mirror and hold it in such a way that you can see your private parts.
  • With the other hand you will have to gently spread the labia which are the fleshy folds around your vaginal opening. Make sure you do it gently as it is quite sensitive and can be harmed if you are too rough and tough.
  • Keeping the labia open, position the mirror in such a way that the area under the folds is clearly visible to you.
  • You will see a small hole which is the urethra and below that will be a split which is your vaginal opening.
  1. Remember how we ignore the small booklet of information that accompanies different products? Well in this case you better not ignore it! Please make sure that you read through those instructions to have a better understanding of the tampons. These booklets also come with illustrations which you can refer.
  2. Now that you have read the instructions, it’s time for you to relax. Yes, you heard us right! You need to relax your body completely and ensure that you don’t clench your muscles as it can make the entire process of inserting a tampon quite difficult.
  3. Wash your hands thoroughly and dry them completely before taking out the tampon from the package. Do not drop or place the tampon on any dirty surface.
  4. You can either use a tampon with a built-in applicator or a non-applicator tampon. Your position while inserting a tampon is very important, so ensure you opt for the most comfortable position. You can either do it while sitting down on the toilet with your legs apart or you can stand with one leg on top of the toilet seat.
  5. Once your are in your comfortable position, gently spread your labia so that you can place the tampon at your vaginal opening.
  6. If you are using an applicator, hold the tampon in such a way that your index finger is at the applicator’s end and your thumb and middle finger are at the center of the tampon. In a non-applicator, your finger will replace the applicator. For the tampon to slide in easily, you can use a water-based lubricant at the tampon’s tip.
  7. Gently slide in the tampon into your vaginal opening until your fingertips reach your vagina. Try to gently twist the tampon if you are facing any difficulty in inserting it. In an applicator tampon, use your index finger to push the the inner tube into your vagina.
  8. Remove the outer tube once the inner tube is safely inside your vagina. Also, ensure that the removal string is visible outside the opening of your vagina.
  9. Once the tampon is inside, you need to check whether it is placed correctly or not. To do this, you need to stand up or walk around a little. The correct insertion will ensure that there is no pain or discomfort, however, if you do feel any kind of discomfort then you will have to push the tampon further inside with the help of your finger.
  10. Remember to always change your tampon every 4-6 hours so that you don’t develop Toxic shock Syndrome (TSS). To remove the tampon, gently pull on the string which is hanging outside your vaginal opening.

Though inserting any kind of foreign material in your body results in pain, following these instructions can help in minimizing that pain for you. End of the day, remember that it is all about your comfort and choice. If after numerous attempts also you are unable to bear the pain while using a tampon, then we suggest you stick to using pads.

How to insert a tampon without pain

Tampons are one of the most preferred alternatives for women during periods. Wearing a tampon is more comfortable for swimming, extended office hours, or even for routine workouts. With the increase in the companies producing tampons for all sizes of women, it has undoubtedly become a go-to option for working women and university students. Inserting a tampon is easy, but removing it is a bit tricky. A lot of women struggle with removing it and also experience pain while getting the tampon out.

There are specific ways in which a tampon can be removed effortlessly without experiencing that pain. In this article, we will discuss the ways to remove the tampon along with the other vital information regarding it.

How to Take out a Tampon without It Hurting?

First method:

This method is for the situation when you know where the string of the tampon is. Follow these steps to get the tampon out with ease.

  • Sit on the toilet seat with your feet apart. Relax your vaginal muscles. Do not try to contract it as it might make it difficult for you to remove the tampon.
  • You can also pee before removing the tampon as it will also help in relaxing the muscles and easing the entire process.
  • Now find the string of your tampon and try to pull it with your hand out in one go. If the tampon is wet enough and has been worn for eight hours, it will come out quickly.
  • In case you are finding it difficult to get the tampon out, it can be due to the fact it has been less than 4 or 6 hours.

If the tampon is not coming out easily, let it stay inside for more than 4 hours and then try again. Opt for low absorbency tampons or panty liners on the days when you have less flow. Try squatting, deep breaths and relaxing your muscles to make the removal process quick and comfortable.

Second method:

This procedure is for those times when you can’t find the string or tampon to remove it. Well, you don’t have to worry. Because a tampon cannot be lost in your body. It can go a little inside but will never be lost. Follow this procedure to find and pull the tampon out.

  • Wash your hands properly with the handwash to avoid any infection or germs while taking the tampon out.
  • Sit in the position that you do for inserting the tampon in. You can either sit on the toilet seat or stand on one leg placed on the toilet seat. Both of these positions are ideal for removing the tampon.
  • Now relax your vaginal muscles by reading a magazine or taking deep breaths. Remember that you shouldn’t get tensed or agitated during this time as it can cause a contraction in the muscles and make it difficult for you to get the tampon out.
  • Insert your pointer finger in your vagina to find the tampon or its string. Try and reach the string slowly.
  • Once you find the string or the tampon, insert the second index finger. With the help of both, these fingers start rotating the tampon inside the vagina in a circular motion. Doing such back and forth circular motion, pull the tampon out using both your fingers.

Quick Tip: Always wrap the tampon with a newspaper and dispose it off in the bin. Although a lot of companies mention that it is okay to flush the tampon, disposing of it is better.

Does it hurt to take a tampon out?

The most frequently asked question is if it hurts to take the tampon out. The answer to this is no; it doesn’t. A tampon is useful for women experiencing heavy to medium flow during their periods. If the tampon is not dry and placed without any trouble, it can be removed without any pain. Just relax and calm yourself while removing the tampon and it won’t hurt at all. Women all over the world use tampons because they are convenient to wear and remove.

When should you remove the tampon?

A tampon usually can last up to eight hours, depending on the blood flow. It is recommended to change the tampon after every eight hours to maintain good genital hygiene. Apart from that, you can look out for the following signs to know that it is time to remove the tampon:

  • Foul-smelling vaginal discharge
  • Redness or rashes around your genital area
  • Itching in vagina
  • Uncomfortable urination
  • Abdominal pain
  • Foul odor near the vagina
  • Swelling around vagina
  • Fever with 104 degrees Fahrenheit temperatureTampons are one of the most preferred alternatives for women during periods.
  • Wearing a tampon is more comfortable for swimming, extended office hours, or even for routine workouts.

If you notice anything unusual or one of such signs, it is good to remove the tampon as soon as possible. Keeping the tampon for a long time can cause Toxic Shock Syndrome ( TSS) that can cause fever and dizziness. Always remember to change and remove the tampons.

Concluding Remarks

Although it shouldn’t hurt while removing the tampon, if you find it difficult, you can ask your gynecologist to help you guide with it. Also, you can go for menstrual cups or sanitary pads if you are not comfortable with inserting and removing tampons. I hope this article helps you to get all the required information about tampon and its removal.

How to insert a tampon without painWowzers. Yes, I am going there with my own real life tampon tips and tricks.

Never used a tampon? Everybody gets creeped out having to start using a tampon for the first time. Most of us don’t even want to look down there. Relax. At first, shit down there does look scary. It’s not going away and, from this point onwards, you need to get to know your vadge. TAMPON TIP#1: A mirror and good light makes a good introduction.

There is an art and science to inserting a tampon without pain. For all you Pub’rs (those of you knocking on puberty’s door), first timers and veterans, here’s some real talk about on what to expect.

We ALL have our own per formula. We all learn differently. Don’t we?

Personally, it was my best friend in high school (not my Mother) who introduced me to a cardboard tampon. She placed it in my hand, then I figured out the rest. Yeah, I read the tampon instructions on the box, but geesh, that adds more fear.

Knowing your Flow

Don’t you hate the bloody feeling of Niagara Falls in your bits every time you sit up, cough, or sneeze? So think about your flow.

PAUSE. Hold that thought.

During your cycle there are certain days to use a tampon. Sizing of tampon ranges from Super-to-super+, regular, and lite. Typically, DAY 1 and 2 are your heaviest days. That said, I would recommend a super absorbent tampon. Meaning, these are the days you bleed heavily and need extra coverage. On DAY 3 through 5, regular and lite sizes are good options. Again, know your flow. TAMPON TIP #2: You don’t want to use a super or super+ on Day 4 or 5.

Blood flow is less, so you don’t need as much absorbency. TAMPON TIP#3: if your tampon gets stuck, there are times where I have pee’d and forgot to remove the tampon, but it made the removal 10 times easier by falling or sliding out. After Day 5, are the drip drop days. A pantyliner is used to manage any unwanted surprises.

Man, that Hurts!

On Day 3 to 5, pulling out a tampon is trickier. Your vadge is a little drier as you near the end of your cycle. Every watch how a cork is being pulled out of a wine bottle? I rest my case. That’s it’s exactly how it feels slow, then POP, and exhale. So, don’t use a super-to-super+ on these days cause you’ll feel like your ripping out your insides.

Paper versus Plastic

I am going to start by saying cardboard is the absolute worst. To my eco-friendly conscious, more power to you. The beauty of plastic is that it just glides in due to the smooth rounded edge of the applicator. Cardboard has no rounded edges.

How to Insert a Tampon?

Math class wasn’t the only place you learned about 60, 90, 180 degree angles, but it’s key to inserting a tampon. Coughing out a tampon isn’t cute as your walking isn’t a good look.

Whether its lying down or sitting positions, knees up, or humped over the toilet. In the first three seconds, the slightest wrong angle gives you an unwanted nip (ouch!) especially if your using a cardboard applicator. Wait! Ever push a cotton applicator out too soon, then have to push it back, and re-insert it? Even worse when it’s your last tampon or the only other option is cardboard. TIP #4: Using lube or coco oil on the end of a tampon may help.

First-Timers

Lastly, Being a virgin and inserting a tampon have nothing to do with each other. Let me say this another way. Inserting a tampon is NOT the equivalent to having sex! It doesn’t feel like sex or what he would feel like either. One of the important things is to relax, practice and find a size that fits. If your tensing up, its because your scared or uncomfortable.

If you enjoyed this post, like or share it with your friends. What about you? Still terrified of tampons or you consider yourself a pro? Then, I want you to do two things.

Thing #1

Reply to this post or email me ([email protected]) and tell me what your struggling with right now. Even if it’s something really really small, don’t hesitate.

Thing #2

Why not take this to the comments, and let’s brainstorm together?

I look forward to hearing your motherfriggin real stories.

Whether you’re new to tampons or new to periods in general, using a tampon for the first time can seem kind of scary. It gets easier with practice, just like riding a bike- pinky swear. In this article, you’ll get some tips and tricks on how to insert a tampon in four easy steps.

How to insert a tampon without painImage created by Market Business News.

Step 1

First, you’re going to need a tampon. There are two general types: those with applicators, and those without.

Types of Tampons

Applicators help facilitate tampon insertion while keeping your fingers from getting as much blood on them. They are generally made from plastic or cardboard.

The interior component of this type of tampon is the same as the entirety of tampons without applicators. They are both typically made of compressed cotton with strings attached to make removal easier and less messy.

Step 2

Regardless of which type of tampon you prefer, inserting them involves preparing your body the same way.

As far as body position goes, some prefer to insert tampons while sitting on the toilet due to the angle, while others prefer standing. Figuring out what works best for you may involve some experimentation since all vaginas are unique.

Part your outer labia with two fingers- generally using your non-dominant hand for this part is easiest.

If your inner labia are also blocking your vagina, you can spread those, too. This is mostly a matter of preventing anything from pinching or pulling, which isn’t common per se, but mistakes have been made.

Step 3

Position the tampon angled upwards and backward, pointing roughly towards your tailbone. This is a general recommendation because vaginas come in a variety of shapes and angles.

Start with aiming more or less towards your tailbone and adjust the angle as needed, following the natural trajectory of your vagina.

Step 4

This is where the paths diverge depending upon whether or not your tampon has an applicator.

Tampons with Applicators

For tampons with applicators, you should secure the tampon with at least two fingers on the grip ridges of the applicator. Then gently, but firmly push the tampon into your vagina until the grippy part of the applicator meets the vaginal opening.

Be mindful of the string at this stage. While tampons cannot get lost in the body, the string can sometimes get caught in the applicator and make disengaging it difficult. Just holding the string between two fingers or pinching it to the tip of the applicator can keep it aside.

Next, push the plunger until the cotton portion of the tampon is fully inserted. The tampon has been fully inserted and detached from the applicator if it doesn’t budge when you release the string and gently remove the applicator.

Tampons without Applicators

Keeping the string secured, push the tampon gently, but firmly into your vagina. You should typically insert it about twice the length of the cotton portion itself.

Regardless of which type of tampon you choose, you should not feel any discomfort once the applicator has been removed.

Troubleshooting

It’s okay if you don’t nail this on the first try. For the most part, inserting tampons is one of those lived experience lessons where you learn from your successes and mistakes. However, if you can learn from others’ mistakes, you may find these troubleshooting tips for pain and placement helpful in figuring out where the process went awry.

How Far is Far Enough?

One of the most common mistakes new tampon users make is not inserting the tampon far enough. Remember, you can’t insert it so far that it gets lost inside your body. When in doubt, push it back further rather than erring on the side of stopping short.

Tampons that haven’t been inserted far enough back in the vaginal canal can press against the pubic bone. This pressure can cause slight pain in general that tends to be sharper or stronger when sitting down. That is because the tampon effectively gets wedged between your pubic bone and seat while you sit.

You can test out whether you inserted the tampon far enough by sitting down until your legs form a lap. If you feel discomfort in that position, you may want to insert the tampon further.

If you still experience discomfort after trying these tips and consulting trusted older women in your life, you may want to talk to your doctor about dyspareunia.

Dyspareunia is a common issue experienced by people with vaginas and refers to vaginal pain experienced before, during, or after sex. It can also cause pain when tampons are inserted.

The good news is that if you do experience dyspareunia, talking to a doctor about it can help improve your quality of everyday life- including the ability to use tampons.

Recap

Using tampons for the first time can involve a little bit of the scientific method since vaginas are each slightly different from the next. Try the tips you picked up today and listen to your body. Troubleshoot if anything feels uncomfortable and give it another go. You’ve got this!

Health’s medical editor weighs in.

Q: All of the sudden it hurts to use tampons. What could be wrong?

Is your flow very light? Sometimes it’s slightly painful to insert or remove a tampon simply because your vagina is dry. You may also be drier after childbirth or during breast-feeding or perimenopause, when levels of estrogen are low. Using a lubricant should help relieve the dryness and make it easier for the applicator to slide in.

Alternatively, your pelvic muscles may not be relaxed enough while you put the tampon in or pull it out. See if it helps to take a deep breath, then completely release your pelvic muscles, before you fiddle with a tampon. Although it’s uncommon, some women have a condition known as vaginismus, which makes the muscles of the vaginal canal tense up, and they may feel a tearing or burning sensation if anything is inserted. Doing Kegel exercises often helps relax the pelvic floor. But for some women, vaginismus is related to underlying stress or anxiety about sex, and counseling may be helpful.

If you would describe the pain as more of a stinging when you put a tampon in, it could be a sign of vulvodynia, a pain disorder that affects the vulva. Treatment varies from woman to woman: Some find relief by using a cold pack or taking a low-dose antidepressant. Switching to cotton menstrual products and underwear may also be worth a try. If you’re having trouble getting a tampon in at all, there’s also a possibility that you have a cyst, a small sac typically filled with fluid either on or in the vaginal lining. A cyst can form if the vaginal wall gets injured during childbirth or surgery, or due to a bacterial infection. It usually doesn’t cause much discomfort. If the cyst is small and isn’t really bothering you (aside from obstructing your tampon insertion a bit), you probably don’t need to treat it. Some vaginal cysts go away on their own. But if it’s growing in size or causing real pain, it could be infected and may need to be surgically removed.

Experiencing pain with tampon use could also indicate cervical inflammation, endometriosis or an infection caused by an STD. Clearly the answer isn’t black and white, so I would encourage you to stop using tampons if it’s uncomfortable and visit your gynecologist, who can perform a pelvic exam to get to the root of your pain and find a solution.

Health’s medical editor, Roshini Rajapaksa, MD, is assistant professor of medicine at the NYU School of Medicine.

Tampons shouldn’t hurt when you use them. Learn why choosing the right tampon for the the different days of your flow is important for your comfort.

How to insert a tampon without pain

How to insert a tampon without pain

How to insert a tampon without pain

Related Articles

How to insert a tampon without pain

Which Absorbency is Right for Me?

From one day to the next, and even from morning to evening, the amount of menstrual blood your body sheds changes. Learn how to pick the right absorbency for your period.

How to insert a tampon without pain

How to Properly Insert a Tampon

Using a tampon for the first time can seem a little scary, but it’s really nothing to worry about. Check out this video to help you feel more confident about using a tampon.

Can I use a tampon if my period is almost over?

Tampons can be worn any time during your period, but chosing the right absorbency for your flow is key.

This is not intended to be medical advice. Everybody is different so please make sure to consult your physician if you’re having issues. Do not delay or refrain from seeking professional medical advice from your physician because of something you have read on this site.

Recommended Products

How to insert a tampon without pain

UbyKotex Teen® Pads – Extra Absorbency

Check out these smaller-sized pad with heavy-flow absorbency. U by Kotex Teen® Pads are totally perfect for your younger girls learning the ropes and have vibrant colors with cool patterns.

How to insert a tampon without pain

Cleanwear® Ultra Thin Pads Heavy Flow with Wings

Say hello to your new favorite pad for heavy flow days. U by Kotex® Cleanwear® Pads feature Xpress DRI® Core for crazy, fast absorption to help stop leaks.

How to insert a tampon without pain

Click® Tampons Super Compact

Go from compact to full-sized protection in one quick move with U by Kotex® Click® Tampons. Perfect for travel and pocket-sized, to go where U go!

How to insert a tampon without pain

Security® Ultra Thin Pads Long with Wings

This super-thin pad has some crazy fast absorption that you can trust. And with its added length and uniquely shaped wings. It’ll keep you comfortable while helping stop leaks dead their in tracks.

Don’t Like Surprises?

Tracking is simple! Use our FREE Period Calculator to figure out when your next period starts.

Get the latest news and updates from U by Kotex®

We’ll send you marketing communications regarding U by Kotex® and other Kimberly-Clark brands. You can unsubscribe at any time.

YOU’RE IN!

We have successfully received your information.

Check your inbox for future updates.

YOU’RE IN!

We have successfully received your information.

Check your inbox for future updates.

®/™ Trademarks of Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. or its affiliates ©KCWW.

Your visit to this site is subject to the terms of our User Agreement.

‡ In the past year, due to lack of income, according to a 2018 survey conducted by YouGov on behalf of U by Kotex ® .

Most women would probably agree that the monthly menstrual cycle isn’t something to look forward to. Pains, aches, mood swings and lethargy certainly aren’t a whole lot of fun, but for a lot of women, there are other period woes to take into consideration. Although they may not like to talk about it (or don’t know where to go for advice), the reality is that whenever they try to insert a tampon, the tampon feels like it’s hitting a wall.

If you are struggling to insert tampons during your period, you’ll already know that you can’t force it. This results in pain, anxiety and frustration, followed by negative associations with tampon use and eventually, a ‘vicious cycle’. It may help to try and get to the bottom of why you can’t insert tampons, as well as learning about how you can overcome the problem. This article aims to help you with both, so read on for some useful tips:

Why does your tampon feel like it’s hitting a wall?

There can be several reasons why inserting a tampon is difficult. One of the most common reasons is vaginismus. Vaginismus is a condition in which your vaginal muscles will tighten involuntarily, causing spasms and pain. If you have any anxiety or a negative association with penetration, this tightening and spasming is an automatic response to your anxious thoughts and feelings.

If you try to physically push past this reaction, you are likely to experience even more pain, and the chances are, your tampon will still feel like it’s hitting a wall no matter how hard you push it. If you think you could have vaginismus, it will help to learn how to relax your vaginal muscles. This condition can lead to complications in intimate relationships; it can also severely affect your confidence, so it is really important to seek vaginismus treatment.

Another possible reason it’s difficult to put a tampon in could be vaginal stenosis. Stenosis means the abnormal narrowing of a bodily passage, so vaginal stenosis is basically the narrowing and/or shortening of your birth canal. This commonly happens due to chemotherapy or radiotherapy treatments, and if you have it, you’ll know that inserting tampons can be tricky and painful.

What to do when your tampon feels like it’s hitting a wall

Frustrating as it may be, there are solutions. Whether you have vaginismus, vaginal stenosis or just some anxiety around tampon use, you could try the following strategies:

Try using small tampons with applicators

Even if you have a heavy flow, you’re better off trying to insert a small tampon to get you used to it. You may find it easier to buy applicator tampons, as they are much easier to insert. Try applying a little bit of water-based lubricant to the tip of the applicator to ease insertion.

Don’t be afraid to try alternatives

If you’re still finding that your tampon is hitting a wall, you may be better of using sanitary pads until you’ve received some proper treatment. Alternatively, you could try Mediterranean sea sponge tampons (menstrual sponges) which are much softer and may be easier to insert.

Practice using vaginal dilators

So many women have successfully used vaginal dilators to overcome vaginismus and vaginal stenosis. Even if you’re just a little nervous about penetration, dilators can help. They are very easy to insert (compared to dry, bulky tampons) and can get you used to the idea of penetration – in your own time and at your own pace. Why not try a Neodymium vaginal dilator starter kit to get you on the right track?

How to insert a tampon without pain

VuVa Starter Kit available at www.vuvatech.com

The bottom line is that you should never force the issue. If you constantly feel like your tampon is hitting a wall, there will be an underlying problem that you’ll need to seek treatment for. Remember that sexual health practitioners have seen it all before; they’re in that line of work because they want to help, and they know how to make you feel comfortable. We wish you the best of luck in your process… you can do it! Feel free to ask us any questions you may have and we’ll give you whatever insights we can.

How to insert a tampon without pain

VuVa Dilators sets are available at www.vuvatech.com. Made in the USA.

Tara Langdale Schmidt is the inventor of the VuVa Dilator Company. She has pelvic floor dysfunction herself and wanted to create a dilator set that is made in America that women can trust. VuVatech has been in business since 2014 and has helped over 40,000 women all over the globe. She patented the Neodymium Vaginal Dilator, that is clinically proven to help with blood flow and nerve pain.