How to help endangered animals

How to help endangered animals

I am the junior of FLMLA. I am really poor in English;therefore, i hope you can help me correct the problem you have found in this essay.

Essay Topic:Should more be done to protect and preserve endangered animals?

Endangered animals are kinds of animal that are being extinct from the world. They are vital to lives on the earth because animals’ extinction can ruin the ecosystem, cultural heritage and the economic. Nowadays people are going beyond their territory and destroy wild life for getting more space for housing, farming and industry. However, they should care more about animals and do their bests to save endangered species. There are around 3079 species of animals that are endangered. Furthermore, according to the source from The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (2000–2012), there are ten most endangered among those species such as Ivory- billed woodpecker, Amur leopard, Javan Rhinoceros, Northern sportive lemur, Northern right whale, the saola- an Asian unicorn, Siberian Tiger, Chinese giant salamander and the little dodo bird. These kinds of most endangered are being threatened to be extinction from the world. There are several reasons why we need to protect them from extinction.

One of the most important benefits of preserving the endangered animals is economic benefit. Endangered animals are considered as an important role in ecotourism. In most countries in the world, government makes more money from ecotourism. In addition, people nowadays seem to be more interested in choosing the ecotourism as their main holiday trips. Ladkin (1999) showed that in Australia and New Zealand, 32% of tourists long for the scenery, wild plants and wild life, as favorite part of their trips. In America, it was claimed that over 100 million people took part in wildlife activities, and 24.7 million were interested in bird watching. Such action has made over $20 billion in economic activity with an estimated growth of 30% per year. Furthermore, the ecotourism also takes part in increasing living standard of local people. For example, in Cambodia, local people living in areas such as fresh water dolphin’s shelters in Kratie province make money to support their daily lives by running restaurants, accommodations and selling souvenirs. If government invests more money on saving those endangered animals, the gross domestic product of the country will increase highly.

The endangered animals are counted as the significance in cultural heritage value of the country. Certain animals represent the country and bring the meaning to the people around them. Kangaroo is a real example of this, only in Australia, kangaroo is found. Moreover, people think that endangered animals have special spiritual, which scientist cannot explain. They believe in the animal and classify that endangered animal as their significance. In Thailand, elephant is considered sacred and symbolizes royalty. China, panda bear is Black and white also are depicted in yin yang symbols indicating the importance of balance between masculine and feminine energies The Panda as a totem also represents diplomacy because of the history of China gifting Giant Pandas as diplomatic gifts to other countries. As mentioned about, endanger animal is can be a part of the cultural of the country, which is classified their animal as a significance of their country.

The reason is endangered animals are very vital to the ecosystem. First, plant and animal species are the foundation of healthy ecosystems. Humans depend on ecosystems such as coast, grasslands and forests to purify their air, clean their water, and supply them with food. When species become extinct or endangered, it is an indicator that the health of these vital ecosystems is beginning to ruin. Second, All animals are part of an ecosystem. If some animals are extinct, it will affect to the entire ecosystem. For instant, losing some kinds of eagles could cause increase in snakes, so it could be a threat for human lives and other species. In addition, if animals that are endangered go extinct, the food chain will be unstable. Third, extinction some animals can ruin biodiversity. We will lose chance to discover new traditional medicines if biodiversity are destroyed. Moreover our next generation will do not know those animals that are extinct. In conclusion, all animals are very important to the ecosystem so we need to save and protect them.

According to the dibate.org, 14 percent of reader thinks that taking more protect on endangered animals are worthless. Species become endangered species and endangered species becomes extinct are only a process of natural selection. Charles Darwin’s theory “survival of the fittest”, the “fittest” does not hinge on whether the species are weak, small, less than those who are strength, big or cunning , but “the fittest” means those who are able to pass on their genes to have baby and so on. Therefore, trying to save species that cannot survive in their own environment is rather the imprudent activity, because it is all part of evolution. However, another 86 percent of reader agrees to protect endangered animals because if all the endanger animals were dead, the food chain would collapse and many humans would become starvation. All most endangered animal are predictors. Predators can survive by hunting on other animals; they greatly effect on the food chain by checking the other animals if too ample in ecological system. In this system, predators play role in preserving biodiversity, which humans rely on for survival. Healthy ecosystem provide us with fresh water, trees and forests, natural pest control, climate regulation, healthy amounts of vegetation, and soil fertility. People should care and take more actions to conserve endanger animal in order to balance our ecology.

To conclude, there are many things that people should more be done to protect and preserve endangered animals as it could help not only Eco- system, but also economy and cultural heritage. Once a number of endangered animal are going to decrease, they will soon lead to be extinctive and other species are to going to be endangered more and more. At the same time, without animals, the world will change into another different aspect. That’s why, people, especially, government and NGO should take more specific actions to ensure the risk of losing them such as making educational campaign of animal preservation, promoting the importance of animal to the local citizen, and improving methods of feeding and caring endangered animals. Last but not least,` endangered animal protection and preservation represent responsibility of human as stewardship on conserving the nature. Therefore, if we cannot help them, we, at least, had better avoid destroying them.

1. Learn about endangered species in your area. Teach your friends and family about the wonderful wildlife, birds, fish and plants that live near you. The first step to protecting endangered species is learning about how interesting and important they are. Our natural world provides us with many indispensable services including clean air and water, food and medicinal sources, commercial, aesthetic and recreational benefits. For more information about endangered species, visit endangered.fws.gov and join our activist network to receive updates and action alerts.

2. Visit a national wildlife refuge, park or other open space . These protected lands provide habitat to many native wildlife, birds, fish and plants. Scientists tell us the best way to protect endangered species is to protect the places where they live. Get involved by volunteering at your local nature center or wildlife refuge. Go wildlife or bird watching in nearby parks. Wildlife related recreation creates millions of jobs and supports local businesses. To find a wildlife refuge near you, visit www.fws.gov/refuges/ To find a park near you, visit www.nps.gov To find a zoo near you, visit www.aza.org.

3. Make your home wildlife friendly. Secure garbage in shelters or cans with locking lids, feed pets indoors and lock pet doors at night to avoid attracting wild animals into your home. Reduce your use of water in your home and garden so that animals that live in or near water can have a better chance of survival. Disinfect bird baths often to avoid disease transmission. Place decals on windows to deter bird collisions. Millions of birds die every year because of collisions with windows. You can help reduce the number of collisions simply by placing decals on the windows in your home and office. For more information on what you can do, check out these tips from the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

4. Native plants provide food and shelter for native wildlife. Attracting native insects like bees and butterflies can help pollinate your plants. The spread of non-native species has greatly impacted native populations around the world. Invasive species compete with native species for resources and habitat. They can even prey on native species directly, forcing native species towards extinction. For more information about native plants, visit https://www.plantsocieties.org.

5. Herbicides and pesticides may keep yards looking nice but they are in fact hazardous pollutants that affect wildlife at many levels. Many herbicides and pesticides take a long time to degrade and build up in the soils or throughout the food chain. Predators such as hawks, owls and coyotes can be harmed if they eat poisoned animals. Some groups of animals such as amphibians are particularly vulnerable to these chemical pollutants and suffer greatly as a result of the high levels of herbicides and pesticides in their habitat. For alternatives to pesticides, visit https://www.beyondpesticides.org.

6. Slow down when driving. Many animals live in developed areas and this means they must navigate a landscape full of human hazards. One of the biggest obstacles to wildlife living in developed areas is roads. Roads divide habitat and present a constant hazard to any animal attempting to cross from one side to the other. So when you’re out and about, slow down and keep an eye out for wildlife.

7. Recycle and buy sustainable products. Buy recycled paper, sustainable products like bamboo and Forest Stewardship Council wood products to protect forest species. Never buy furniture made from wood from rainforests. Recycle your cell phones, because a mineral used in cell phones and other electronics is mined in gorilla habitat. Minimize your use of palm oil because forests where tigers live are being cut down to plant palm plantations.

8. Never purchase products made from threatened or endangered species. Overseas trips can be exciting and fun, and everyone wants a souvenir. But sometimes the souvenirs are made from species nearing extinction. Avoid supporting the market in illegal wildlife including: tortoise-shell, ivory, coral. Also, be careful of products including fur from tigers, polar bears, sea otters and other endangered wildlife, crocodile skin, live monkeys or apes, most live birds including parrots, macaws, cockatoos and finches, some live snakes, turtles and lizards, some orchids, cacti and cycads, medicinal products made from rhinos, tiger or Asiatic black bear.

9. Harassing wildlife is cruel and illegal. Shooting, trapping, or forcing a threatened or endangered animal into captivity is also illegal and can lead to their extinction. Don’t participate in this activity, and report it as soon as you see it to your local state or federal wildlife enforcement office. You can find a list of state wildlife departments at https://www.fws.gov/offices/statelinks.html.

10. Protect wildlife habitat. Perhaps the greatest threat that faces many species is the widespread destruction of habitat. Scientists tell us the best way to protect endangered species is to protect the special places where they live. Wildlife must have places to find food, shelter and raise their young. Logging, oil and gas drilling, over-grazing and development all result habitat destruction. Endangered species habitat should be protected and these impacts minimized.

By protecting habitat, entire communities of animals and plants can be protected together. Parks, wildlife refuges, and other open space should be protected near your community. Open space also provides us with great places to visit and enjoy. Support wildlife habitat and open space protection in your community. When you are buying a house, consider your impact on wildlife habitat.

There are various steps you can take to protect endangered species and their precious habitats. For example:

15 Actions to Protect Endangered Species

1) Learn about endangered species in your area. Teach your friends and family about the wonderful wildlife, birds, fish and plants that live near you. The first step to protecting endangered species is learning about how interesting and important they are. For more information about endangered species, visit endangered.fws.gov

2) Create a backyard wildlife habitat. Put bird feeders and other wildlife attractants, such as bird houses and baths.

3) Establish a pollinator garden with native vegetation in your yard. Native plants provide food and shelter for native wildlife. Attracting native insects like bees and butterflies can help pollinate your plants. Avoid planting invasive species. Non-native plants can overtake and destroy native species on which animals depend.

4) Minimize use of herbicides and pesticides. Herbicides and pesticides are hazardous pollutants that can affect wildlife at many levels. Reduce use of fertilizer. Excess fertilizer will likely wash into streams and rivers and may lead to amphibian deformities and deaths.

5) Reduce your use of water in your home and garden so that animals that live in or near water can have a better chance of survival. Don’t dump paint, oil or antifreeze or other chemicals, which pollute the water and can harm people and wildlife. Keep litter and pet waste out of the street drain, which often washes into rivers, lakes or the ocean.

6) Place decals on windows to deter bird collisions. Millions of birds die every year because of collisions with windows. You can help reduce the number of collisions simply by placing decals on the windows in your home and office.

7) Slow down when driving. Many animals live in developed areas and this means they must navigate a landscape full of human hazards. So when you’re out and about, slow down and keep an eye out for animals. Don’t litter because trash can attract wildlife to the roadside.

8) Recycle and buy sustainable products. Buy recycled paper and sustainable products like Forest Stewardship Council wood products and shade-grown coffee to save rainforests.

9) Don’t litter/otherwise destroy sensitive habitats, which may be home to native/visiting species that are endangered or threatened.

10) Organize or participate in a “clean up” campaign of an important habitat in your area. (Be sure to work with appropriate city officials/environmental organizations.)

11) Never purchase products made from endangered species like ivory, coral and tortoise shell. Buy exotic plants and animals only from reputable stores.

12) Report any harassment of threatened and endangered species. You can find a list of state wildlife departments at http://www.fws.gov/offices/statelinks.html

13) Visit a national wildlife refuge, park or other open space. These protected lands provide habitat to many native wildlife, birds, fish and plants. Get involved by volunteering at your local park or wildlife refuge. To find a wildlife refuge near you, visit http://www.fws.gov/refuges/ To find a park near you, visit http://www.nps.gov To learn more and get involved, contact the Endangered Species Coalition at

14) Be Vocal. Write a letter to your local newspaper urging support of important species protection measures. E-mail your Congressional representatives asking them to support the Endangered Species Act.

15) Join others (and organize) in the annual Stop Extinction Challenge. Organized by Endangered Species Coalition (usually in August).

How to help endangered animals

Endangered animals are those with populations so small, they’re at risk of going the way of the wooly mammoth. According to experts, the earth is on the brink of a crisis, with more than 1 million species on track for extinction in the coming decades.

Each time a species disappears, the consequences are profound, leading to losses in crop pollination, water purification and more. Unfortunately, humans are to blame. This crisis is a result of more than a century of habitat destruction, over-harvesting, population growth, and other harmful practices.

If you want to make a change, discover what you can do to better protect endangered animals.

1. Encourage Volunteerism

If you want to take an active approach to save endangered animals, find a place where you can volunteer. Look for a wildlife conservation project where you can help species threatened by habitat loss and human influences, such as poaching.

    How to help endangered animalsHow to help endangered animals2. Patronize Sanctuaries

With the growing human population, the need for dedicated wildlife spaces is increasingly essential. Sanctuaries help conserve natural areas and the animals in them. These operations also take care of exotic creatures that have been injured in the wild or bought by consumers and subsequently abandoned.

When you visit a sanctuary, you fund the organizations that keep endangered species safe. While thousands exist across the U.S. and abroad, be sure only to patronize ones that treat animals with respect, not as props for entertainment. Sanctuaries should be a place for wildlife to retire, and visitors should not be able to walk around freely.

3. Adopt New Technology

With advances in technology, it’s easier than ever to support animals at risk of extinction. Donation software, for instance, gives donors the ability to pledge monetary support through text. Protecting endangered species can be as easy as making an online purchase.

Drones, in conjunction with cameras, sensors and GPS, are also being used to monitor animals and track changes to habitats. This technology reduces the time and effort needed for scientists to study endangered species, bringing humans closer to solutions that could stop extinction.

4. Live Sustainably

Many animals become endangered due to loss of habitat. To ensure you don’t contribute to this issue, it’s crucial to live and shop sustainably. Use recycled paper. Avoid buying furniture made from wood that originated from rainforests. As an alternative, look for bamboo or timber certified by the Forest Stewardship Council.

    How to help endangered animalsHow to help endangered animals5. Promote Activism

When you become an activist, you give a voice to the endangered animals who cannot speak for themselves. You have the power to spread the word about diminishing wildlife — to friends, families, schools, communities and anyone else who will listen.

Many activists orchestrate events in their hometown or school. For instance, you can ask others to sign a pledge to protect a specific species, such as amphibians, which have a higher rate of endangerment than any other group of animals. You can also plant milkweed and pollinator gardens that encourage local insect colonies.

6. Pressure Governmental Change

As a civilian, it can be hard to enact long-lasting change. However, you can pressure civil servants to be the voice of reason. Vote for representatives who hold similar values to your own, and donate to their campaigns. You can also write letters to current leaders in power.

How to help endangered animals

How to Better Protect Endangered Animals

In the coming decades, hundreds of species could go extinct. If we want to prevent this crisis, the time to take action is now. To do your part, follow the tips above. From volunteering to adopting new technology, we can take a stand and help endangered animals.

Summary

How to help endangered animals

Share this Image On Your Site

1. Learn about endangered species in your area. Teach your friends and family about the wonderful wildlife, birds, fish and plants that live near you. The first step to protecting endangered species is learning about how interesting and important they are. Our natural world provides us with many indispensable services including clean air and water, food and medicinal sources, commercial, aesthetic and recreational benefits. For more information about endangered species, visit endangered.fws.gov and join our activist network to receive updates and action alerts.

2. Visit a national wildlife refuge, park or other open space . These protected lands provide habitat to many native wildlife, birds, fish and plants. Scientists tell us the best way to protect endangered species is to protect the places where they live. Get involved by volunteering at your local nature center or wildlife refuge. Go wildlife or bird watching in nearby parks. Wildlife related recreation creates millions of jobs and supports local businesses. To find a wildlife refuge near you, visit www.fws.gov/refuges/ To find a park near you, visit www.nps.gov To find a zoo near you, visit www.aza.org.

3. Make your home wildlife friendly. Secure garbage in shelters or cans with locking lids, feed pets indoors and lock pet doors at night to avoid attracting wild animals into your home. Reduce your use of water in your home and garden so that animals that live in or near water can have a better chance of survival. Disinfect bird baths often to avoid disease transmission. Place decals on windows to deter bird collisions. Millions of birds die every year because of collisions with windows. You can help reduce the number of collisions simply by placing decals on the windows in your home and office. For more information on what you can do, check out these tips from the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

4. Native plants provide food and shelter for native wildlife. Attracting native insects like bees and butterflies can help pollinate your plants. The spread of non-native species has greatly impacted native populations around the world. Invasive species compete with native species for resources and habitat. They can even prey on native species directly, forcing native species towards extinction. For more information about native plants, visit https://www.plantsocieties.org.

5. Herbicides and pesticides may keep yards looking nice but they are in fact hazardous pollutants that affect wildlife at many levels. Many herbicides and pesticides take a long time to degrade and build up in the soils or throughout the food chain. Predators such as hawks, owls and coyotes can be harmed if they eat poisoned animals. Some groups of animals such as amphibians are particularly vulnerable to these chemical pollutants and suffer greatly as a result of the high levels of herbicides and pesticides in their habitat. For alternatives to pesticides, visit https://www.beyondpesticides.org.

6. Slow down when driving. Many animals live in developed areas and this means they must navigate a landscape full of human hazards. One of the biggest obstacles to wildlife living in developed areas is roads. Roads divide habitat and present a constant hazard to any animal attempting to cross from one side to the other. So when you’re out and about, slow down and keep an eye out for wildlife.

7. Recycle and buy sustainable products. Buy recycled paper, sustainable products like bamboo and Forest Stewardship Council wood products to protect forest species. Never buy furniture made from wood from rainforests. Recycle your cell phones, because a mineral used in cell phones and other electronics is mined in gorilla habitat. Minimize your use of palm oil because forests where tigers live are being cut down to plant palm plantations.

8. Never purchase products made from threatened or endangered species. Overseas trips can be exciting and fun, and everyone wants a souvenir. But sometimes the souvenirs are made from species nearing extinction. Avoid supporting the market in illegal wildlife including: tortoise-shell, ivory, coral. Also, be careful of products including fur from tigers, polar bears, sea otters and other endangered wildlife, crocodile skin, live monkeys or apes, most live birds including parrots, macaws, cockatoos and finches, some live snakes, turtles and lizards, some orchids, cacti and cycads, medicinal products made from rhinos, tiger or Asiatic black bear.

9. Harassing wildlife is cruel and illegal. Shooting, trapping, or forcing a threatened or endangered animal into captivity is also illegal and can lead to their extinction. Don’t participate in this activity, and report it as soon as you see it to your local state or federal wildlife enforcement office. You can find a list of state wildlife departments at https://www.fws.gov/offices/statelinks.html.

10. Protect wildlife habitat. Perhaps the greatest threat that faces many species is the widespread destruction of habitat. Scientists tell us the best way to protect endangered species is to protect the special places where they live. Wildlife must have places to find food, shelter and raise their young. Logging, oil and gas drilling, over-grazing and development all result habitat destruction. Endangered species habitat should be protected and these impacts minimized.

By protecting habitat, entire communities of animals and plants can be protected together. Parks, wildlife refuges, and other open space should be protected near your community. Open space also provides us with great places to visit and enjoy. Support wildlife habitat and open space protection in your community. When you are buying a house, consider your impact on wildlife habitat.

According to the Making Peace with Nature UN report released last month, one million of the world’s estimated 8 million species of plants and animals are threatened with extinction, driven by a number of factors relating to the climate emergency, habitat loss, and pollution.

Transforming humankind’s relationship with the planet and all its inhabitants is vital if we’re to leave a world worth living in for future generations. But what can any single individual do to help alleviate these seemingly inordinate challenges? We all have the power to prevent biodiversity loss and protect endangered animals every day by where we go, what we do, and what we consume.

Let wild animals be wild

We’re all dying for that once-in-a-lifetime vacation experience interacting with nature. Unfortunately, studies show that it’s animal lovers who most often (unwittingly) contribute to animal suffering. Whether it’s riding elephants in Asia (the Asian elephant has been listed as “endangered” on the IUCN Red List since 1986, and their population has declined by at least 50 percent over the last three elephant generations) or going to see a captive orca show at a marine mammal park (the Southern Resident orcas who live off the US Pacific coastline are critically endangered) our patronage of captive animal entertainment presents a real threat to their wild counterparts.

While animals held captive for entertainment are typically bred in captivity (and spend their entire lives there), their gene pool is usually supplemented with wild-caught species adding to the decline of wild populations. Furthermore, studies suggest that seeing animals in captivity gives a false sense of security about their vulnerabilities in the wild—adding to the removal of, or lack of support for, protections for animals in the wild.

Picture this

World Animal Protection’s report A Close Up on Cruelty demonstrated the disastrous consequences of tourists wanting that perfect animal selfie. An alarming 61% of the species identified in the report as being offered for photos and other direct contact activities are provided international legal protection by the Convention on the Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). World Animal Protection’s study found that the most common species used for selfies in the Amazon were Pink river dolphins and sloths, both of which have some conservation listings in the wild. Pink river dolphins are typically baited with fish and surrounded by noisy groups of tourists. Meanwhile, hundreds of sloths are taken from the wild each year to be used as photo props for tourists, where they are constantly surrounded by noise and poorly handled by both guides and tourists alike.

When you are traveling, follow World Animal Protection’s Wildlife Selfie Code to ensure that you’re not contributing to their suffering or population decline.

Wild animals don’t belong in your home

The hundreds of millions of birds, mammals, fish, and reptiles traded worldwide as exotic pets are typically bred in captivity, but as World Animal Protection’s report Suffering in Silence highlighted, their populations are usually supplemented with animals who are stolen from the wild. According to CITES, over three million individual ball pythons—the most common exotic pet snake species—have been exported from West Africa since the first recorded live commercial export in 1975. The huge number of animals being caught to meet the variety of consumer demands is considered a major potential threat.

Once the novelty of owning a wild animal wears off, they are often dumped outside, presenting a threat to native wildlife. Most invasive fish and wildlife populations have been established through the escape or intentional release of captive exotic animals. In fact, invasive species are the second leading cause of animal population decline and extinction worldwide. They have contributed directly to the decline of 42% of threatened and endangered species in the United States and cost an estimated $120 billion each year to detect, collect, and remove.

Another bizarrely popular exotic pet species is the tiger. People typically purchase tigers as cubs when they are small and easy to handle, forgetting or not realizing that they grow to a dangerous size, and when they become too large to handle, they are typically dumped at roadside zoos or left in backyards to spend their adult years in a cage. Tigers are considered endangered in the wild. In fact, there are more tigers in captivity in the US than there are tigers anywhere in the wild.

Go plant-based

One animal who has received a great deal of attention over the last year because of the role they were suspected of playing in the outbreak of COVID-19 is the pangolin. Known as “the world’s most trafficked animal,” pangolins are critically endangered, partly, because their scales, which are used in traditional medicine (TM), are thought to help unblock blood clots and promote blood circulation, among other uses. However, increasingly TM practitioners are turning to plant-based alternatives to wild animal preparations and advocating for an end to the exploitation of wildlife for medicine.

While the proportion of the audience reading this who uses TM products is probably small, every one of us can help endangered animals every time we sit down to eat. Deforestation and habitat destruction are perhaps the biggest causes of species extinction, and much of this is driven by our insatiable demand for animal protein.

The UN is one of a growing number of international bodies calling for an extensive shift away from animal agriculture, in order to preserve biodiversity. You can play your part by committing to eat less meat. It’s perhaps the most simple, but the most effective, single-action any one of us can take to help protect endangered animals and their habitats.

Sign-up to our mailing list

If you’re willing to do more to help endangered animals, please join our mailing list to discover weekly actions you can take to help improve the lives of all animals. It’s free, fun, and rewarding. Change starts today.

How to help endangered animals

Preservation of the environment has been a trending topic in recent years as part of the discussion surrounding climate change. When habitats and ecosystems suffer, so do the species that live in them. From fundraising for animal charities to raising awareness about how to prevent animal extinction, we can all do our part in protecting the animals and wildlife in the world we live in. Wondering how to help endangered species? Learn more below.

Five startling endangered animal facts

An animal is endangered when the wild population has dropped so low that the species is at risk of extinction. Here are some quick facts about endangered species and protection efforts you should know:

  • Under the U.S. Endangered Species Act of 1973 , it is illegal to hunt, capture, or harm any endangered animal.
  • According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature , globally there are 7,510 endangered or critically endangered animal species as of March 2019.
  • Removing an animal from the endangered list is possible, though takes many years. For example, the bald eagle was removed from the list in 2007, after more than 40 years of conservation efforts. support over 100,000 species, including more than fish, yet are among the world’s most endangered habitats.
  • As a result of climate change, between 30-50% of all species could face extinction by 2050.

Seven easy ways you can protect the wildlife

If you’re looking for how to save animals, there are countless things we can each do to protect the environment and the animals we share it with. From endangered species to rescue animals, there are many ways to help those in need. If you’d like to make an impact at home and abroad, take a look at some fun ways you can protect wildlife and species.

1. Plant native wildlife to attract pollinators

In many areas of the United States, bee populations are rapidly dwindling to the brink of extinction. Yet bees aren’t the only pollinators at risk—many types of hummingbirds make the endangered species list as well.

You can start a fundraiser to gather donations for purchasing native plant species, and can make a day of planting wildlife with your friends or family. This is both a good bonding activity and can go a long way toward restoring their habitat.

2. Start a recycling initiative

About 91% of all plastic products are not recycled . This contributes to the nearly 5.25 trillion pieces of trash that are currently polluting the Earth’s oceans, harming the wildlife that calls the ocean home. If you’re wondering how to protect endangered species in ways that have an almost immediate impact, collecting waste is a great place to start. Donate your time to recycling programs in your area, or start one of your own.

3. Host a community fundraising event

Work with your local community by hosting a fundraising event. Charge a small entry fee and decide on prizes. Make a donation using the proceeds to a charity that helps save endangered animals, and let participants know. Some great fundraising event ideas include hosting a party or banquet, a car wash (or dog wash), or a charity sports event.

4. Create a fundraiser to support wildlife programs

Crowdfunding can be one of the simplest and most effective ways to help protect endangered species. First, choose an organization with active programs that help protect wildlife. Start by sharing your fundraiser with family and friends, and encourage people in your network to share on social media. Make it clear in your fundraiser which nonprofit will receive the donation, national or global, and how the organization will use those funds to help wildlife. Some fun ideas for a nonprofit fundraiser include hosting a charity sale, partnering with a local radio station or news channel to raise awareness, or organizing a benefit dinner.

5. Sponsor an animal

Another great way to protect animals threatened with extinction and save wildlife is to sponsor an animal. Both the World Wildlife Fund and the World Animal Foundation offer easy virtual adoption packages that benefit endangered species. Share your new adoption on social media to encourage those in your network to sponsor an animal, too.

6. Clean up your local parks

Start an initiative to clean up your local parks and other outdoor spaces you enjoy, such as wetlands, beaches, forests, or rivers. Additionally, starting a fundraiser to support outdoor clean-up means you can raise money for things like dog waste stations at trailheads, or trash and recycling bins at popular parks. This is a great way to save the natural wildlife and species in your area. Removing invasive species from these areas is also important and will help you save animals in your area.

7. Educate others about eco-friendly products

Many household cleaning products pose a threat to the environment . Whether that’s due to the evaporation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere, or toxic runoff into aquatic environments, the products we use can make an impact. Offer to speak at community centers or colleges about how to save endangered animals with eco-friendly products, or start a fundraiser to purchase eco-friendly cleaning supplies to donate to local schools or animal shelters.

See how others are fundraising

Take a look below at some examples of animal fundraisers highlighting how to help endangered species. The successful fundraisers below used GoFundMe for their online fundraising.

Preserving sea turtles in Costa Rica

As a college junior, Lisa raised over $2,000 to fund a summer internship focused on sea turtle conservation in Costa Rica. Lisa spent the summer working with marine biologists to build hatcheries to protect turtle eggs from predators. She also helped count and tag sea turtles for monitoring and cleaned up the beach habitats.

Raising money for Wildlife ACT

Kate raised almost double her $1,300 donation goal for Wildlife ACT, a South Africa-based organization dedicated to poaching prevention and animal conservation. Thanks to generous donors, Kate was able to spend two weeks assisting rangers with tracking and monitoring animals, and providing veterinary support.

Start protecting endangered wildlife today

We all want to do our part to preserve the planet, and protecting endangered species is one important way to do that. If you’re wondering how to help endangered species or even how to start, crowdfunding can be an easy, safe, and effective way to raise money for your favorite charity or organization. Now that you know how we can help endangered animals, start a wildlife fundraiser today and see what kind of impact you can make.

How to help endangered animalsMountain gorillas, blue whales, komodo dragons and some types of bears are dying off. And it’s not just animals who live in far-off countries who are in danger.

Do you know what it means if an animal is “endangered”? It means that there are not many of that type of animal left in the world, and one day, they might all be gone, which is called becoming “extinct”. Dinosaurs, for example, are extinct.

How to help endangered animals

How do animals become extinct?

They lose their habitat, which means that there’s nowhere for them to live. For example, many animals make their homes in the rain forests that are being cut down. Once all the trees are gone, there will be nowhere for these animals to live, so they will die.

Some animals, like chimpanzees, are becoming extinct because people kill them to eat them.

Animals are taken from the wild and sent to circuses and zoos, leaving fewer animals in nature to carry on the species.

Some people shoot animals for fun. This is called “big game hunting”, and if enough animals are killed this way, some animals could become extinct.

Elephants are taken from the wild and forced to drag heavy machines to help people cut down forests. This is called “logging”.

How to help endangered animals

Think About It

1. Think about ways that people can help endangered animals. Is there anything you can do?

2. Do you care whether or not an animal becomes extinct? Why or why not?

3. If a species is not considered “endangered”, should we still protect that species?