How to help a sick person feel better

Here you can get information about How to Help a Sick Person Feel Better. Fall is upon us, with winter to follow shortly after. Soon we’ll all be bundled up in our coats, scarves and hats, with dripping noses and chapped lips. Though seasonal changes bring joy and new adventures, they also tend to bring another component: sickness.

In the coming months, bugs, colds and flu are going to be floating around within the air and sticking to everything we come in contact with. When a lover or family member gets sick, it’s difficult to ascertain them lay in bed stifling their sniffles and running a fever. What are you able to do to form them feel better? Luckily, we’ve some ideas. Inspect these six ways to cheer up someone who is sick in these upcoming months.

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Listen first, then respond

The greatest thing you’ll do to comfort someone you’re keen on who isn’t feeling well is just to concentrate. Oftentimes when a lover or loved one is ill, we try so hard to form them feel better, that we push solutions they could not be comfortable with.

For example, maybe we expect it’s best that they stay up, when really they only want to sleep. The primary thing you’ll do to cheer someone up who isn’t feeling well is to truly hear what their needs and desires are before trying to satisfy them. Don’t simply tell them what they have. Ask questions and be a comforting ear to cheer them up, before trying to reply and “fix” their problems.

Take on their to-do list

Being sick are often incredibly stressful because our schedules are so full, so trying to require a day off makes things come to a grinding halt. Maintaining with kids, work and chores while you’re sick is exhausting. If this is often the case, hear what your beloved is stressed about, then ask if there’s anything you’ll begin their to-do list.

Maybe you’ll devour the kids from school in the week while he takes a nap. Or, perhaps you’ll stop by the office to drop off paperwork for her coworkers. Simple things like this may help enormously in taking the strain off of the ill person. Then, he or she will relax more and focus on recuperating , instead of worrying about everything else.

Bring food and drinks

When it involves sickness, food and hot drinks are a number of the simplest medicine. Ask what you’ll cook up for your beloved to cheer them up. Or, if food isn’t an honest option for his or her stomach at the instant , try a hot, refreshing beverage.

Herbal tea may be a great choice for comforting the ill and making him or her feel refreshed and rejuvenated. And in fact , water is usually an ideal choice. When we’re sick, it often leads to intense dehydration. Keep your friend or family member hydrated and feeling better by beverage consistently.

Do something simple they love

Being sick are often pretty boring. So, attempt to engage your loved one by watching a movie with him or her, reading a book together or playing a game. If it’s something they enjoy, and they’re up for, it’s an excellent option. Celebrate and confirm they don’t get too bored while they’re sick, and that they will start cheering up and feeling better quickly.

Give them space

Finally, one among the best things you can do for a sick friend or loved one is simply to offer them space. They probably don’t want to urge you sick, and having conversation with someone could also be pretty difficult at now . So, confirm all of their needs are met, then simply leave them alone. Once they have space and time to rest and relax, they’re going to start feeling even better.

With seasonal changes arising , illness is within the air. If your friends or relations get sick, try a number of the following pointers to cheer them up and make them feel better faster.

It seems like just about everyone has gone through the flu this year! Try out these 5 ways to feel better when you’re sick.

This article with 5 Ways to Feel Better When You’re Sick is part of a sponsored article written by me on behalf of SheSpeaks/P&G. #ReliefIsHere

Earlier this cold season I posted an article with 11 ways to avoid getting a cold or the flu, but what do you do when you’re already sick? When you have a virus, there’s no magical pill, but there are several ways to help yourself feel better and help alleviate those icky symptoms. Check out these 5 ways to feel better when you’re sick.

How to help a sick person feel better

1. Get as much rest as you can. When you rest, you give your body the ability to really concentrate on defeating the virus you caught instead of whatever activity you’d otherwise be doing. So whether it’s lounging on the couch watching TV or curled up in bed asleep, make sure to get as much rest as you can.

2. Stay well hydrated. Staying hydrated is important to do every day, but it’s even more important when you’re sick. Not only does it help your body function, but it also helps to thin mucous when you’re congested.

3. Eat plenty of bone broth or stock. Bone broths and stocks is some of the most healthy things you can consume. Not only will the warm steamy broth help you feel better and help ease a sore throat, but it’s also packed full of nutrients to help you get over the illness.

4. Behold, the power of steam! Whether it’s a steaming mug of tea with honey, a hot shower, or warm bath, steam can do wonders to help you feel better when sick. It can help ease sore throats and help you breathe easier when congested. Plus a hot shower or warm bath can also help relieve aches common with the flu.

How to help a sick person feel better

5. Use a medication to help alleviate your symptoms. Sometimes you just don’t have the time to lounge around and wait for sickness to pass. Luckily, there are a variety of medications available these days to help you feel better and get what you need to done. My go-tos have always been DayQuil and NyQuil. I love that DayQuil helps me to feel better and be able to concentrate on what I need to get done without feeling like I’m living in a haze. NyQuil is great for those nights where you feel super drainer but can’t sleep or constantly wake yourself up with a stuffy nose.

How to help a sick person feel better

Recently I was browsing the aisles of Walmart to stock up on some “flu feel betters” since Mr. Savvy’s office had an outbreak of the flu and was happy to see that Vicks DayQuil and Nyquil are now available in a new maximum strength Severe formula. The NyQuil formula also now has a decongestant! Now you can tell your cough, congestion, fever, sore throat and more to take a hike while you get back to your day.

The fall season is upon us, with winter to follow shortly after. Soon we will all be bundled up in our coats, scarves and hats, with dripping noses and chapped lips. Though seasonal changes bring joy and new adventures, they also tend to bring another component: sickness.

In the coming months, bugs, colds and flu will be floating around in the air and sticking to everything we come in contact with. When a friend or family member gets sick, it’s difficult to see them lay in bed stifling their sniffles and running a fever. What can you do to make them feel better? Luckily, we have some ideas. Check out these six ways to cheer up someone who is sick in these upcoming months.

1. Listen first, then respond.
The greatest thing you can do to comfort someone you love who isn’t feeling well is simply to listen. Oftentimes when a friend or family member is ill, we try so hard to make them feel better, that we push solutions they might not be comfortable with. For example, maybe we think it’s best that they sit up, when really they just want to sleep. The first thing you can do to cheer someone up who isn’t feeling well is to actually listen to what their needs and desires are before trying to fulfill them. Don’t simply tell them what they need. Ask questions and be a comforting ear to cheer them up, before trying to respond and “fix” their problems.

2. Take on their to-do list.
Being sick can be incredibly stressful because our schedules are so full, so trying to take time off makes things come to a grinding halt. Keeping up with kids, work and chores while you’re sick is exhausting. If this is the case, listen to what your loved one is stressed about, then ask if there’s anything you can take off their to-do list. Maybe you could pick up the kids from school this week while he takes a nap. Or, perhaps you could stop by the office to drop off paperwork for her coworkers. Simple things like this will help enormously in taking the stress off of the ill person. Then, he or she can relax more and focus on getting better, rather than worrying about everything else.

3. Bring food and drinks.
When it comes to sickness, comfort food and hot drinks are some of the best medicine. Ask what you can cook up for your loved one to cheer them up. Or, if food isn’t a good option for their stomach at the moment, try a hot, refreshing beverage. Herbal tea is a great choice for comforting the ill and making him or her feel refreshed and rejuvenated. And of course, water is always a perfect choice. When we’re sick, it often results in intense dehydration. Keep your friend or family member hydrated and feeling better by drinking water consistently.

4. Do something simple they love.
Being sick can be pretty boring. So, try to engage your loved one by watching a movie with him or her, reading a book together or playing a game. If it’s something they enjoy and they’re up for, it’s a great option. Have fun and make sure they don’t get too bored while they’re sick, and they will start cheering up and feeling better quickly.

5. Give them space.
Finally, one of the greatest things you can do for a sick friend or family member is just to give them space. They probably don’t want to get you sick, and having conversation with someone may be pretty difficult at this point. So, make sure all of their needs are met, then simply leave them alone. When they have space and time to rest and relax, they will start feeling even better.

With seasonal changes coming up, illness is in the air. If your friends or family members get sick, try out some of these tips to cheer them up and make them feel better faster.

How to help a sick person feel better

Our workplaces resound with the honks of blowing noses. Try to go to a movie and all you’ll be able to hear is coughing—and if you have kids, they’ve brought home at least four colds and probably a stomach virus by now.

Unfortunately, none of us are totally immune and even the healthiest among us will sometimes get sick.

When we get sick, we’re all told a bunch of ridiculous remedies that are sworn to make us better immediately. They won’t.

My doctor says that with medication it takes seven days to cure the common cold and without it, it’ll take a week to get better. The only cure is time. Sorry. There are, however, a lot of remedies that will provide some comfort, and I’d like to share my favorites in case you are under the weather.

Remember, I’m not a medical professional, so always check with your doctor if you’re not sure if something is safe or right for you.

1. Lemon Honey Tea: People believe this cures everything from strep to tuberculosis. It doesn’t cure anything, but it tastes good and soothes a sore throat better than pretty much anything else. I usually add a slice of ginger, especially if my stomach is acting up and I’ll sip this all day long when I have a cold or a flu.

2. Elderberry Syrup: I make sure I always have a bottle of this on hand because elderberry has been proven to shorten the duration of colds and flus and it’s an excellent immune booster. An added bonus is that it tastes fantastic (kids love it) and it’s great for coating a dry, sore throat. Take elderberry syrup straight or stir a couple teaspoons into boiling water for a pleasant tea.

3. Zinc Lozenges: Also proven to shorten the duration of the common cold. Try them and see if they work for you. Just be careful to suck the lozenges slowly and on a full stomach because zinc can make some people a little nauseated.

4. Slippery Elm: This herb has several uses and can be found in many forms from liquid, capsules to lozenges. Often it is a main ingredient in natural cough remedies because of its demulcent properties. That means it helps coat and protect the mucous membranes inside your body and that makes slippery elm perfect for a dry, hacking cough. During cold season I never go anywhere without my packet of slippery elm lozenges.

5. Epsom Salts Baths: Epsom salts always seem to make me feel better. Add at least a full cup to hot bathwater, and go for a long soak. I like my baths to be very hot and I prefer to add a few drops of essential oils so it smells good and I can pretend I’m in a spa. Lavender is my favorite. Epsom salts reduce inflammation and draw toxins out of your body, so if you only do one thing when you’re sick, try this.

6. Stick a Heating Pad in Your Bed: Under you, on your stomach, whatever. I like to rest my head on the heating pad when I get bad headaches and it really helps. Just don’t fall asleep and burn your face and then blame me. If you don’t have a heating pad, a hot water bottle is just as good.

7. Tiger Balm: This wonderful, clove-scented product is wonderful to massage into achy joints and I rub a dab on my temples or forehead if I have a headache, but watch out because sometimes the vapors can make your eyes water or cause temporary redness on your skin.

8. Smoothies make everything better: Throw some frozen fruit, a little juice, almond milk or coconut milk into a blender and slurp away. In our house, we like smoothies when we can’t stomach much else. Another big treat is to stir together a slushy out of fruit sorbet and lime flavored seltzer water.

9. Hot Yoga: Hot yoga does wonders for me when I have a head cold. I like to set up my mat next to the humidifiers and sprinkle of few drops of eucalyptus on my towel. Then, I take it very slowly and gently, modifying the asanas and taking plenty of breaks in child’s pose. Be careful to stay extra-hydrated and don’t practice if you have a fever, stomach bug or the flu. You want to avoid over-exertion and you don’t want to get your fellow yogis sick.

10. Asian Soups: Most people swear by chicken soup, but when I’m sick I like tom yum, pho and miso the best. The garlic, ginger, lemongrass and hot peppers really help to ease congestion and warm you up, plus they’re delicious.

11. Sunshine and Fresh Air: Never underestimate the healing powers of the outdoors. Take some time to sit outside in the sun or if you’re feeling up to it, go for a short, slow walk. If it’s cold outside, make sure you bundle up appropriately.

12. Moisturize: When you have a bad cold or the flu, your nose is going to get raw and red. You’ll have miserably chapped lips, so don’t neglect these parts of your body. Lanolin is a miracle moisturizer and you can find it in tubes in the breastfeeding supply section of most large stores. Dab it on your nose for instant pain relief. Vegan alternatives that are equally excellent for chapped skin are rosehip seed oil, coconut oil and argan oil, and beware of most commercial lip balms because they contain ingredients that can actually dry your skin more. Avoid any product containing castor oil when your lips are chapped.

13. TV—You’re sick: This is the perfect excuse to sit around and do nothing but watch movies. Alas, I have a three year old so I don’t get to do this much, but I can dream. One day she’ll be old enough to appreciate Wes Anderson with Mommy.

14. Turmeric: This root, and the spice made from it, contains strong anti-inflammatory properties. Work fresh or dried turmeric into your diet however and whenever you can, every day. Try this yummy warm beverage when you aren’t well.

15. Burning Essential Oil: When someone in my house is sick I like to put eucalyptus, peppermint or lavender oil in my oil burner and light it up. It freshens the house, promotes a healing atmosphere and soothes the sinuses.

16. Eucalyptus Spray: I use this kind, but there are many, or you can make your own by placing eucalyptus oil and water in a spray bottle. I’m addicted to it. I spray it on myself, in the air, in the shower, over my bath when I’m soaking, in the car. I love it.

17. Fresh Eucalyptus: You can usually find fresh bunches of eucalyptus wherever flowers are sold. Lightly crush the leaves and stems to release their oils and then hang the branches upside down in your shower.

18. Give yourself permission to be sick: We live in a hectic society and most of us don’t take enough time to settle down and rejuvenate our bodies and our spirits. When we get sick, we feel guilty if we need to stop running around, or if we have to say no or cancel obligations, but taking a break to heal is essential and you deserve this down time.

19. Don’t blame yourself: You didn’t do anything wrong to cause yourself to get sick and guilt will make you feel worse. It’s not because you didn’t exercise or meditate enough or take the right combination of supplements. Sometimes we just get sick. End of story. This is your time to be ill and understand that it is temporary and soon you will be well again and back to your regularly scheduled activities.

The only thing worse than being sick is when your SO is under the weather. And no, not because you might catch whatever they have. If the person you care about most is feeling crappy, then you probably can’t help but feel their pain. There are plenty of things you can do to make an ailing SO feel better — like bring them soup, watch their favorite movies with them, or give them a foot massage — but sometimes even a simple text can make them smile. Coming up with texts to send your partner when they’re sick can be tricky, but there are better ways to check in on your SO than texting, "How are you feeling?" once an hour.

Comforting a sick person over text doesn’t require professional medical training. Sometimes all it takes is finding little ways to let them know you’re thinking about them and that you care. Only you can know what sort of gesture your partner will appreciate most, but almost anyone on bedrest could use a message that will make them smile. And not to be insensitive, but your partner might just be contagious, so sending a text might be your best move anyway. Here are just a few comforting messages to make your sick partner feel better over text in no time.

Everyone needs some sympathy when they’re sick, but a little levity might do your partner more good than your pity will. Sending goofy memes, GIFs, and selfies could do a lot to bolster your SO’s spirits, and if those don’t do the trick, perhaps try one of these light-hearted texts instead.

  • Could you hurry up and get better so we can go back to making out?
  • On a scale of 1 to 10, how contagious are you? I just want to know if I should wear a mask when I come over.
  • Sorry if this is super sappy, but I’d do anything to make you feel less crappy.
  • How do you make a tissue dance? You put a little boogie in it. Hope you’re feeling less stuffed up today.
  • Don’t get me wrong, you still look super cute when you’re sick, but healthy is definitely a better look for you. Get better soon for both of our sakes!
  • “I love you even when you’re sick and look disgusting.” — Love Actually, but also me to you RN.
  • Shorty, I’ma only tell you this once, you the illest… but srsly, get better soon.
  • I hope you make haste in obtaining a deep hole in the ground filled with water. (Translation: Get well soon.)
  • Hey, why don’t cows get sick? Because they have strong immoooonue systems. LOL.

You know what they say: A spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down, and sending your partner a super-sweet text is sure to ease their pain. Don’t be afraid to get a little sappy — even if you and your partner aren’t touchy-feely types, sending one of these adorable texts will probably make their day regardless.

  • Thinking about you sick in bed makes my heart ache. I really hope you’re feeling better soon.
  • Please enjoy this TikTok of a dog sneezing. Hopefully it makes you smile.
  • If hugs and kisses were medicine, then I would send you infinite Xs and Os.
  • Guess what? Even when you’re sick, you’re still the cutest person I know.
  • Even though I’m not with you, I hope you know I’ll be thinking about you and hoping you get better all day long.
  • If I had one wish, it would be to have you feeling 💯 again.
  • Wishing I could kiss you through the phone.
  • Sending you good vibes and infinite kiss emojis 😘.

Funny texts and sweet texts go a long way towards lifting your SO’s spirits, but if you really want to help your partner out, then send them a text asking about practical matters. They’re probably not up for talking on the phone, but if you text to ask what you can do, you can figure out a concrete way to do them a favor (and you’ll save them from having to ask you themselves).

  • Do you need any errands done? Let me take something off your plate while you rest up and get better.
  • Need more tissues? Medicine? Gatorade? Make a list of everything you need and I’ll bring it over.
  • Are you up for a movie marathon? Pick your three favorites and we can watch them together.
  • What is bothering you the most right now? Let me ask around and see if anyone has any advice on how to alleviate that symptom.
  • Is there anything I can do to make you feel better? Just say the word.
  • I’m ordering Uber Eats for you. Pick a food genre and your dream meal will arrive shortly.
  • If you’re up for a FaceTime, I’m down to let you complain as much as you’d like.
  • Want me to come over and play personal assistant? I’m happy to help you out with anything you need.

You might actually have a medical degree, but even if you don’t, you can make a sick partner smile by sending a simple, thoughtful text. Your partner is sure to remember the gesture and return the favor next time you’re feeling under the weather.

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated by Elite Daily Staff.

You wake up with a sore throat. Then come the coughing, sneezing, and sniffling. There’s no denying it — you’re sick. Sadly, there’s no quick cure for the common cold or the flu. But you can find relief faster with these smart moves.

Take it easy. When you’re sick, your body works hard to fight off that infection. It needs more energy than usual. Make rest your top priority. Stay home from work or school, and put your daily routine on hold until you feel better.

Go to bed. Curling up on the couch helps, but don’t stay up late watching TV. Skimping on sleep makes your immune system weak, making it harder to fight germs. Head to bed early, and take naps during the day. Are your symptoms keeping you up at night? Try using an extra pillow to raise your head. It can ease sinus pressure and help you breathe easier.

Drink up. Getting plenty of fluids thins your mucus and breaks up congestion. It also prevents the headaches and fatigue that dehydration causes. Keep a glass or reusable bottle on hand, and refill it with water. Skip caffeinated sodas, coffee, and alcohol, which can dry you out.

Gargle with salt water. It’s a good way to soothe a throbbing throat. The salt water eases swelling and loosens mucus. Stir one-quarter to one-half teaspoon of salt into a cup of warm water until it’s dissolved, and gargle a few times a day.

Sip a hot beverage. It’s comforting to curl up with a mug of tea. Plus, research shows that the heat can also ease cold symptoms such as sore throat and fatigue. Try sipping non-caffeinated herbal tea, lemon water, or warm broth.

Have a spoonful of honey. This sticky stuff can coat your throat and soothe a cough. In one study, kids who ate about half a tablespoon of honey at bedtime slept more soundly and coughed less than those who got a placebo medicine. Stir it into a cup of decaf tea or lemon water. One warning: Don’t give honey to babies younger than 1 year old.

Take a hot shower. Breathing in steam may moisten a scratchy throat and nose, as well as loosen your congestion. Although the research is mixed on whether this remedy works, there’s no harm in trying it. The heat can also help relax any aching muscles.

Take an over-the-counter remedy. You may find relief with one of these medications. Take them as directed, and don’t give them to children under age 6 without your pediatrician’s OK.

  • Pain reliever for fever and aches. Doctors usually recommend acetaminophen. If you’re taking another cold medicine, though, check that it doesn’t already have the drug. It’s a common ingredient in many OTC remedies, but getting too much can be dangerous. So check the label and ask the pharmacist how much is safe to take at one time.
  • Lozenges for a sore throat. They have herbs and other ingredients that can soothe the stinging.
  • Decongestant for stuffiness. This medicine shrinks blood vessels in your nose so your airways can open up. But the liquid or pill form may make you feel jittery. Using decongestant sprays and drops too much can cause more congestion, so don’t use them for more than 3 days.
  • Expectorant to thin mucus. It can help loosen some of that thick discharge.
  • Antihistamine to dry up a runny nose. This drug blocks the chemical in your body that causes sneezes and sniffling.

Taking a decongestant and an antihistamine together may be more helpful than taking either one alone.

Use a saline spray or flush. Over-the-counter saltwater sprays make your nostrils moist, which makes it easier to blow your nose. You may also want to try nasal irrigation. That’s when you gently pour a saline solution into one nostril and let it flow out of the other. It washes away dried mucus so you can breathe easier. You can buy sinus rinses or use a bulb syringe or neti pot. If you do it yourself, always make the saltwater solution with distilled or cooled, boiled water.

Eat chicken soup. Mom was right: This sick-day staple really can make you feel better. Research shows that chicken soup can calm inflammation in your body. This may ease some of your symptoms, such as aches and stuffiness. What’s more, this meal also has liquid and calories to give your body energy.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Michael W. Smith, MD on July 19, 2021

Shimona B. Thakrar, DO, pediatric hospitalist, Baylor Scott & White Medical Center.

CDC: “Common Colds: Protect Yourself and Others,” “Antibiotics Aren’t Always the Answer.”

American Journal of Preventive Medicine: “Prevention of upper respiratory tract infections by gargling: a randomized trial.”

Mayo Clinic: “Cold remedies: What Works, What Doesn’t, What Can’t Hurt.”

Rhinology: “The effects of a hot drink on nasal airflow and symptoms of common cold and flu.”

Pediatrics: “Effect of Honey on Nocturnal Cough and Sleep Quality: A Double-blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study.”

American Academy of Pediatrics, HealthyChildren.org: “Botulism,” “Withdrawal of Cold Medicines.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Common Cold and Upper Respiratory Illness.”

American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery: “Antihistamines, Decongestants, and Cold Remedies.”

University of Michigan Health System: “Saline Sprays and Irrigation.”

FDA: “Is Rinsing Your Sinuses Safe?”

Chest: “Chicken Soup Inhibits Neutrophil Chemotaxis In Vitro.”

When Anna Grace Downs was in the intensive care unit being treated for COVID-19 the nurses, nursing assistants and technicians offered comfort and support when no one could visit her. Even though friends and family couldn’t physically be there, they found other ways to comfort her while she was in the hospital and afterward.

“My own personal world was rocked, as my dad would say,” the 26-year-old medical student in Lexington, Kentucky, told TODAY. “When you’re that sick, it’s really hard to even process what is going on. Since I’ve been home that has given me time to process what happened and how quickly it happened and everything.”

Even a short text could boost her mood.

“So many people have reached out and have made my recovery so much easier,” she told TODAY via Facebook Messenger.

Downs and others who have recovered from coronavirus share things that loved ones did for them that helped them during their illnesses.

Download the TODAY app for the latest coverage on the coronavirus outbreak.

1. Meal and grocery delivery

Making meals and eating is often the last thing on the minds of people recovering from COVID-19. Yet, they still need food.

“When I was in the hospital, I wasn’t thinking about that because my meals were coming to me,” Danielle Sol, 35 of Long Island, told TODAY, who along with her husband had coronavirus. “Once I got home that first night my friend Erica said ‘Oh I ordered food for you. It will be there in 30 minutes.’”

And, she had just delivered a baby so meals were a welcome relief.

“I cannot tell you how amazing that was that I didn’t have to think about how are we going to eat,” she said.

Downs agreed. People dropped off food to her parents when she was in the hospital and that continued when she returned. But she especially appreciated the meals her mom prepared as she recovered at home.

“When I was still in isolation, my mom would cook and arrange food on a tray for me and my dad would bring it up to me, and that made me feel special and cared for while I was stuck in my room,” she said.

Mallory Pease, who like Sol had coronavirus and gave birth, said that “meals in labeled containers (or containers you can throw away)” and grocery drop offs made her recovery easier.

2. Calls, video chats, texts, window visits

Even a text “hello” goes a long way.

“A lot of people were hesitant to reach out to me because they didn’t want to bother me, but even if I couldn’t respond to texts or talk for long, it meant a lot to me,” Downs said.

At first, Sol didn’t want people to say too many nice things because it would cause her to burst into tears. Once she felt less emotional, the kind words helped her as she recovered.

“Hearing them tell me that they were proud of me … it really makes you think, ‘Yeah, I can do this,’” Sol said.

People visited Peace and her daughter Alivia and stood outside the window to see them. Just a few minutes of face-to-face time invigorated her.

“The window visits helped a lot just to see people in real life and not on a screen. It was just a relief to be near people you love and see their faces. It is exciting to see each other,” she said via text.

3. TV and movie suggestions

It might sound simple but recovering from coronavirus requires loads of rest and a lot of alone time. Having good TV and movie recommendations helps isolated, convalescing people pass the time.

“It was very lonely,” Pease told TODAY. “I would just wake up, eat dinner and go to bed. I had zero energy.”

No one wants to be the “sick person” and live the rest of his/her life managing and coping with a serious illness, such as Parkinson’s, cancer, diabetes or even dementia.

The right words of encouragement for sick person will give them a break from constantly worrying about their illness, whether they will make it or not; it can even ease the sick person’s pain for a few moments.

Finding the right words of encouragement can be tricky because there is a lot of sensitivity to be given to the message. Saying the wrong thing can cause the sick person to fret or feel even worse.

Here are more than 25 examples of the most appropriate words of encouragement for sick person.

14 words of encouragement for sick person who just got diagnosed with a terrible illness

Who wants to hear that they are terribly sick? You can imagine how the sick person must feel after receiving this news.

There’s not much you can do, but be kind and share good thoughts. Here are 13 words of encouragement for sick person who just got diagnosed with a terrible illness:

How to help a sick person feel better

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio under pexels license

02 “Don’t be sad about what you can’t change. I want you to find comfort in knowing that this is something you can manage. You can work towards staying healthy.

Plus, you’re not alone. Whenever you stumble, I will be there to pick you up.”

It is good to say these words of encouragement for sick person when the diagnosis has made him/her feel depressed.

This will help to change negative thoughts while letting him/her know that you are there for support.

How to help a sick person feel better

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio under pexels license

When patients are diagnosed with certain conditions, their first thought is the worst-case scenario, even if there is a low mortality rate for the condition they have.

This reassures the sick person, and it lets him/her know that this is not something that has to be tackled alone.

How to help a sick person feel better

Photo by Jack Sparrow under pexels license

This is a good thing to say because a sick person may really want to vent emotions, but he/she likely does not want to put the burden on anyone else.

Offering your ear can help the person feel like he/she has someone for encouragement.

How to help a sick person feel better

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10 “There’s no doubt in my mind that you’re freaking our right now, and I don’t blame you. First, you need to let it all out.

Once that’s over, let’s talk about how we can get past this together because being sad about it won’t change anything. We will find a way to get over this together.”

How to help a sick person feel better

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11 “It’s been a while since you’ve been suffering with this illness, and I’m so happy that today you’ve gotten some good news.

While it wasn’t the answer you were looking for, I’m glad because you’ve started the process.

You can do it now that you know which route to take to get your health back on track.”

It is good to say this to someone who has been to several different doctors and has been trying for a while to find out what is wrong.

This positive outlook is good because it reminds the person that, even though the diagnosis may be bad, it allows him/her to get the right treatments and start the healing process.

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