How to hang things on a cement wall

How to hang things on a cement wall

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Great things were meant to be displayed. When the wall is cinder block, though, it can be a challenge to make those things stick. Because cinder block is hard like concrete, it’s no simple matter to nail or screw into it. Its surface is porous, so tape tends to pull away. Yet there are a number of temporary methods that help you attach—and later remove—those pictures, framed prints, cards, and posters. Plus, there are a few permanent ways to help you attach heavier items like shelves with relative ease.

Mounting Putty

Mounting putty is a sticky, clay-like material that comes in sticks or cubes. It’s rolled into balls by hand and used as a substitute for pushpins or tacks.

Mounting putty is especially good for cinder block walls because it is thick enough to fill in cinder block’s bumpy surface. It’s best for light-weight items up to an ounce or two like cards, posters, photos, and drawings. Because it can be mounded up, it can even hold light-weight decorative objects like coins or keys.

Mounting putty can be removed, leaving behind little to no oily residue. It can be reused a number of times.

Hardwall Hangers

Hardwall hangers are heavy-duty plastic hooks that come with several embedded metal pins for attaching items to cinder blocks, mortar, and other hard materials. The pins are stepped back and ready for hammering.

Hardwall hangers have weight limits ranging from 6 to 25 pounds and are best for items such as coats, umbrellas, mirrors, and large framed pictures. Hardwall hangers are used only for hanging items and cannot be used to mount a shelf.

Hardwall hangers are semi-permanent. So, with a claw hammer, it’s easy to pull out the plastic hook. Because the pins have no heads, the hook will pull straight out, leaving the pins behind. Removing the pins can take some effort, but if you manage to do so, you’re left with only a few small holes that can be patched over.

Hot Melt Glue

Glue guns heat up a solid glue stick that enters the gun from the back. With the push of a trigger, the user forces the melted portion through a nozzle and onto the surface you want to glue.

Though glue guns are most often used for hobbies and crafts, many users swear by them for sticking things to cinder blocks. Since hot glue warps paper, it’s best for sticking solid objects to cinder block rather than posters and pictures.

Curing time is fast: just a couple of minutes. The holding capacity of hot glue on the cinder block is only a few ounces. For extra holding capacity, look for construction-grade hot melt glue sticks. If you go that route, you’ll also need to purchase a high-temperature hot melt gun.

Self-Adhesive Hooks

Self-adhesive hangers are foam-backed devices that stick to a wall by peeling off the back protective coating to reveal the adhesive. They come in a variety of types: tiny hooks, picture hangers, broom hooks, utility hooks.

The thin foam backing helps the hooks stick to the cinder block. Most self-adhesive hooks are meant for light-weight items only, but some are rated up to 5 pounds for things like large framed canvas pictures. Be sure to clean the cinder block with rubbing alcohol first for maximum adhesion.

Landscape Block Adhesive

Adhesives tend to shy away from porous materials like cinder block. But landscape block adhesive loves to stick to cinder block and it stays stuck for a long time.

Landscape block adhesive is a paste-like heavy-duty exterior adhesive used for things like attaching block caps to retaining walls. But it can be used whenever you need a reliable cinder block adhesive.

Use landscape block adhesive for permanently attaching medium-weight items like shelves that are no more than 50 pounds. The downside of landscape adhesive is that it is difficult to remove from the wall. Even if you do pry off the item, you’re left with cured adhesive residue that’s hard to remove.

Concrete Screws

Concrete screws are sturdy, plastic-coated screws with chisel-type edges that cut threads into cinder block and other masonry materials. A hole 1/4 inch deeper than the concrete screw’s depth should be drilled first with a cordless drill or hammer drill.

Light-weight concrete screws 3/16 inch in diameter and 1 inch long have a shear (or breaking) strength rating of 720 pounds. It’s important to remember that these ratings apply only to the screws, not to the item being mounted or to the cinder block. But it’s safe to say that correctly-installed concrete screws in cinder block will be strong enough to hold up shelves or a small floating writing desk.

Concrete screws require specific-sized drilled holes to accommodate the size of the fastener being used. Most brands of concrete screws will specify the size of drill bit required on the packaging, and some brands even include the correct size bit in the package.

Expansion Bolts

Expansion or toggle bolts have a spring-loaded wing section that compresses to fit into a hole. The hole must terminate in an open cavity. Once the bolt’s wing is completely within the cavity, it springs open and holds the bolt in place.

Since cinder blocks are hollow inside, they are an ideal match for expansion bolts. The bolt must be at least 2 inches long to clear the cinder block’s outer wall and reach the inner cavity.

Once the bolt is in place, it is extremely strong, and it’s capable of holding up shelves packed with heavy items.

How to hang things on a cement wall

How to hang things on a cement wall

How to hang things on a cement wall

If you had asked me what I thought would be challenging about living in Italy before we moved here, I would’ve said something like, “Getting too fat from eating a lot of pasta,” or “learning how to drive in what is essentially a daily commute of Mario Kart” (all things that turned out to be valid concerns). What I did not expect would be difficult, among many others thing (i.e. how to pee in a squatty potty or how to get mundane tasks done around the Italian nap schedule), was hanging shit on walls.

Italian homes, at least where we live in northern Italy, are made of concrete, not the soft, friendly sheetrock walls from back home. Initially, this doesn’t seem like an issue, until you go to hang a beautiful photograph of you and your husband on your honeymoon, go to drive a nail into the wall, and are met with the wall crumbling around your now bent-beyond-usability nail. This is what happens when you try to hang stuff up the American way into concrete walls — the wall literally just falls apart.

Because I have an aversion to white walls and Pinterest dreams of gallery walls on every bare surface, this was not going to do. Over the years, I’ve honed a few ways to hang things on these walls — everything from tiny calligraphy prints to giant maps to heavy shelves filled with books. And because this is a question I’m constantly asked from visitors of my home, who have met the faults of their concrete walls with disappointing results — well, I wanted to help y’all cure the white wall blues, too.

How to hang things on a cement wall

How to hang things on a cement wall

How to hang things on a cement wall

YOU’LL NEED:

for unframed things

for light things

  • very tiny nails or concrete nails
  • hammer

for heavy things

  • screw
  • anchor
  • drill (hammer drill works best)
  • masonry drill bits
  • screwdriver or screwdriver bit for drill
  • optional: wall spackle/putty & spackling knife, plus pliers if you mess up for the anchors

DO THIS

Washi tape tips: I like to buy decorative washi tape, but because concrete walls are textured and cold, it can sometimes take some trial and error to find some that will actually stick. Function over form is sometimes key here — find a brand you like and literally stick with it.

Tips for hanging light things: When I say tiny nails, I mean really tiny nails. The problem with pounding nails into the concrete walls is that they crumble away, but the tinier — and especially shorter — the nail is, the less likely you’ll have a problem since you hammer less. You can also find what we call “concrete nails” in the hardware store, which are plastic hooks with a tiny nail that you drive through it. The only downside I’ve found to this is that the hooks often aren’t very functional, and can’t really hang most picture frames up. The concrete nails can actually hold quite heavy things, but good luck finding a hook that will clip into the back of anything you own.

For heavy things, from mirrors to large canvases to shelves:

  1. For heavier objects, the anchor + screw method is your savior. Though hammer drills are best because they’re more powerful, any drill will do — however, you will need masonry drill bits to get the job done, and if you don’t have a hammer drill, a little bit of muscle.
  2. Once you’ve found the spot on the wall that you need to drill into, pick the correct bit, put it into your drill and begin drilling into the wall. This process may take some time — and if you see orange dust coming out of the wall, this is perfectly normal. You may also find that you have to drill through two layers, with a hard layer about halfway through your job. This is also normal.
  3. Drill the hole so it is large enough to comfortably insert your anchor — the anchor should be snug, but you shouldn’t have to hammer it in too hard, or it may collapse. It’s fine if you need to lightly hammer the anchor into position. If you hammer too hard and damage the anchor by crushing it, that’s fine — just pull it out with needle-nose pliers, make your hole slightly larger, and insert another anchor.
  4. If you accidentally drill your hole too large — don’t worry. This happens often with concrete, since it crumbles away so easily. You can use wall spackle around your anchor and put it into the wall that way — just make sure it dries before you insert the screw.
  5. Using a screwdriver or the screw bit on your drill, screw the screw into place in the anchor, leaving a bit coming out of the wall so you have a surface on which to hang your photo. If you are hanging a shelving bracket, place the bracket between the anchor and the screw and then drill the screw into place.
  6. If you want to remove the screw (or even a nail!) from the wall, unscrew the screw, remove the drill bit with needle-nose pliers, and fill the hole with wall spackle with a putty knife.
  7. Hang your artwork and step back in admiration!

Decorating a cement wall i complicated if you don’t have the right tool. Fortunately, there are a few good practice that do not require expenive, hard-to-find tool. Chooe a wall hook that withtand

Content

  • Steps
  • Warning
  • What you need

Decorating a cement wall is complicated if you don’t have the right tools. Fortunately, there are a few good practices that do not require expensive, hard-to-find tools. Choose a wall hook that withstands 8 pounds (3.6 kg) for hanging light items, a 25 pound (11 kg) staple wall hook for hanging decorations over 25 pound (11 kg).

Steps

Method 1 of 3: Attach a wall hook

Choose a wall hook to hang objects weighing up to 8 pounds (3.6 kg). Since the back of the hook has super glue, there’s no need to punch the wall. First, weigh the item to choose the right hook.

  • Wall hook products vary in size and indicate the maximum weight that can be held. The largest wall hook can withstand forces up to 8 pounds (3.6 kg), while the smallest can withstand only 1 pound (0.45 kg) suspension.
  • Use 2 hooks at the same time if the item is wired or has a hook on the back attached.

Press firmly for about 30 seconds so that the hook is firmly attached to the wall. Peel off the protective paper on the back of the hook, pull it out slowly, and press firmly against the wall hook. Hold for about 30 seconds, then release.

Wait 30 to 60 minutes for the glue to dry. After the glue dries, you can hang the item on the hook.

  • If the item causes the wall hook to come off even after you have waited for the glue to dry, check the specifications to see if the hook you are using can withstand the weight of the item to be hung.

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Method 2 of 3: Use a wall-mount pin

Purchase a 25 pound (11 kg) staple wall hook. This type of hook is specially designed for cement wall and brick wall. Each hook consists of four extremely strong pins that are fixed to the wall.

  • You need a hammer to close the staple hook.
  • Use 2 hooks to hang the same object if necessary and be sure to prepare support equipment.

Mark the point where you want to mount the hook on the wall. If the object has steel wire in the back, pay attention to the slack when choosing a hanging position. Check by stretching the middle point of the string towards the top of the object. Measure the distance from the bottom of the object to where the midpoint of the wire reaches when fully stretched.

  • If you use 2 pin hanger hooks, measure the distance between the two built-in hooks on the back of the object or the width of the object and divide it by 3. Either of these results helps you determine the distance between the two required points. marked on the wall.

Use a hammer to push each small pin to the wall through the available holes. Press the hanger against the wall so that the center of the base coincides with the marked position. Use one hand to hold the hook firmly and with the hammer handle the four pins respectively to the wall (close half of the pins). Release your hand to hold the hanger and see if the hook is in place. Finally, use a nail hammer to dig into the wall.

  • To avoid hitting your hammer with your hammer, you need to be extremely gentle in the first few beats. When you feel the pin is firmly attached to the wall, release your hand holding the hanger and tap the hammer against the nail to close the note.

Attach the steel wire or item hanger to the hook. Stand back to see if the object is suspended. Align more if needed and enjoy the results. advertisement

Method 3 of 3: Install the expansion screw

Choose a expansion screw to hang items heavier than 25 pounds (11 kg). The expansion screws are usually made of plastic and are used for screwdriving. You need the drill and the drill bit of the same size as the expansion screw.

  • You can purchase a mechanical kit that includes hatch screws, screws and the right size drill bit.
  • Hang 1 object with two expansion screws if needed.

Hammer drills are best. You can use a conventional electric drill with a drill, but the drilling speed is relatively slow and can cause the wall to leak a much larger hole than expected. Buy or borrow a hammer drill if you can.

  • You can rent hammer drills at your home hardware retailer, Lowe’s home repair supply chain systems, Home Depot building materials supermarket or repair shop. Remember to call before coming.

Drill screw holes. Measure carefully and mark the screw position. Place the drill bit in place of the need to drill. Make sure to hold the machine firmly and check that your drill bit, handle, and arm are parallel to the floor. Drill with strong pressure into the wall and stand.

  • For cement walls, it is best to drill at the slowest speed.

Insert the expansion screw into the hole and cover it with a hammer. The expansion screw should fit snugly against the drill hole, but it should not be too tight to avoid hitting the hammer hard. If the hole is too small, replace the drill with a larger diameter and drill again.

Insert the screw into the hatch. Use a screwdriver or screwdriver in the drill set to tighten screws. Stop your hand before the screw is deep in the wall because you need to hook the wire or hang the item over the protruding part of the screw body. Hang things up, align them to balance and enjoy the fruits of your own labor. advertisement

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Painted concrete walls can be a pain to hang posters from, but it’s not impossible! Make sure the surface is clean so dirt and grime don’t affect how well the posters stick to the wall. Choose an adhesive that suits your needs and hang the posters so they’re even.

How to hang things on a cement wall

How to hang things on a cement wall

How to hang things on a cement wall

Tip: If there’s stubborn or hard to remove grime or residue on the wall, use a sponge with a scrubbing surface or a soft-bristled brush to scrub it away.

Learn how to hang pictures without nails and make your life a whole lot easier. Everyone enjoys beautiful pictures on the wall. But taking them down or moving them leaves you with unsightly holes in the wall. These tips will eliminate the problem for good!

  • Can you really hang pictures without damaging walls?
  • How to hang pictures on drywall without holes
  • Hanging pictures on brick walls without drilling — yes, it’s possible too

Can you really hang pictures without damaging walls?

Adding personal touches to your home is what makes it cozy, special, and welcoming. Most homeowners opt for wall art. It can come in the form of actual artwork you purchased, or precious family memories, framed and proudly displayed.

Sure, wall art looks great when you hang it. But should you ever decide to move it, you’ll inevitably be left with unsightly holes in the walls. Rather than ruin your walls each and every time, why not choose a more elegant method to display art; one that keeps your walls looking like new?

This is also convenient for the homeowner who doesn’t have the right toolkit, including the proper nails, hammer, and wire, all of which are necessary to hang pictures in the traditional way.

How to hang pictures on drywall without holes

So how can you bypass hammer and nails? With a little investigating into how to stick pictures on walls without nails, you’ll find products for this exact purpose. One, for example, is a peel and stick wall mount specifically designed for hanging framed photos on drywall. This will eliminate the need for hammer and nails, keeping your walls looking great even if you decide to move your frame. These products are single use and are easy to remove, generally in two quick actions. First you remove the plastic cover then all you do is pull the exposed tab down and the mount will come loose. You’re done!

Before attaching the wall art, ensure your picture frame is free from any cracks or breaks. For any picture frame that needs repair, reach for Loctite Stik’N Seal Indoor Adhesive. This is a premium all-purpose adhesive that dries clear and without the nasty fumes of some other glues, making it safe for indoor use.

Hanging pictures on brick walls without drilling — yes, it’s possible too

While wood and drywall are typical interior wall materials, some homes feature exposed brick walls as well. When homeowners want to hang pictures on the latter, their first reaction is typically to drill holes right into the brick. The problem with this approach is that it is permanent and can’t be undone without replacing the entire brick. You’ll also need a specific drill bit to tackle the job.

But this isn’t the only option. Hanging pictures on brick walls without drilling is easy, even if you’re dealing with an oversized photo or irregular-shaped decor. Any brick or masonry work tends to be quite unique, so the last thing you want to do is permanently damage it with holes.

Now, if you’re trying to hang a photo or artwork on a brick or concrete wall, and you’re looking for something that provides ultimate strength, then Loctite Stik’N Seal Extreme Conditions is your solution. This glue is resistant to moisture, UV, ozone, vibration, extreme temperatures, cracking, and peeling. It has a high initial grab, which means it dries very fast and will hold its position. This product will fix your picture on the wall, whether it’s an interior or exterior surface!

Now that you’re ready to cover your walls with memories:

Here is where you can grab the best adhesives to keep your picture frames and walls looking great!

From TVs, mirrors, pictures, and more. If you need to hang something on the wall, this is how to do it.

How to hang things on a cement wall

If you’re looking to spruce up your space with photos, curtains, or some other wall decorations but aren’t sure where to start, we’re here to help.

Hanging pictures on a wall isn’t a one-nail-and-done affair—it may be tempting to stick a thumbtack in your wall but if you want to do the job right so that heavier objects are supported and secure, this is what you’ll need to get it right. You need to think about what materials your walls are made of (plaster, drywall, brick) and choose the best hardware for the given material. Here are eleven things (and their corresponding anchors or fasteners) you’ll need to turn your house into a cozier and more functional home whether it’s with framed family photos, tapestries, or a new curtain set.

How to hang things on a cement wall

Step 1: Determine your surface. Most houses will have drywall, but many built before 1950 used lath and plaster, which is harder than drywall, brittle, and much thicker. You can feel the difference, but if you’re still not sure, a pushpin will go into drywall. It won’t go into plaster.

Step 2: Find the studs. Whether you’re hanging a kitchen cabinet or a coat hook, your best option is to attach things to a stud. If you’re working with plaster, this can be tough, since the fasteners used to attach the lath will throw off a stud finder. One way to cheat is to look for a light switch. Most are mounted inside the first stud by the door frame. (The box holding its wiring needs to be attached to something sturdy.)

Take off the switch plate and you can see which side of the stud the box is mounted on by spotting the screws. Most wall framings set studs every 16 inches, so you should be okay to measure from there, but double-check with a pilot hole. You need to drill through the plaster and into the wood framing. Expect your bit to take a beating from the harder material. While most drywall is 3/8 or 1/2 inch thick—and thus works with 1 1/4-inch screws for light loads—plaster can range from 3/4 inch to 1 1/4 inches thick, so you may need screws up to 2 1/2 inches long.

If you’re working with drywall, you have a few more options:

Scan the wall with a stud finder. These devices detect either the edge of the stud or its center.

Use the back of your knuckle and rap horizontally along the wall at 1-inch intervals. The noise should go from hollow to solid when you get to the stud.

Run a powerful rare-earth magnet along the wall. It will stick where a screw or nail is driven. This is also a good way to find metal studs, used in many apartment and commercial buildings and not easily located by a stud finder. If you’re hanging anything of significant weight (over 10 pounds), reinforce it with a section of 2 x 4 to spread out the weight along the stud and keep the metal from twisting.

Step 3: Check for Air Ducts, Pipes, and Wires. The easiest option is to use a professional-duty stud sensor, which often has settings to detect energized wires and buried pipes. If you’re finding a lot of wires, cut power at the service panel before drilling holes or doing any disruptive work. When boring between studs, drill a hole through the drywall, stop the moment it breaks through, and poke a pencil or other probe into the hole before proceeding. You can also get an approximate idea where pipes and wires are by looking in the attic and basement to see where they run up or down through the framing.

If you have a lot of wall fastening to do in an old house or in walls crowded with pipes and wires, consider buying a cordless inspection camera such as the DeWalt DCT410S1. It lets you see inside wall cavities, and its wireless screen can be removed, allowing better visibility in a tight spot or odd location, such as the back of a closet.

Step 4: Fasten the Stud. Use screws, not nails, since screws can always be backed out with minimal damage if you hit an obstruction. Nails can go right through, and then you might further damage the wall surface when you pull them out. Instead of drywall screws, use self-drilling screws with a large, flat washer head and coarse threads that are meant to bite into softwood lumber. They’re easier to drive, and the flat head acts like a clamp, evenly distributing force as the screw is driven. It works better than the bugle-shaped head of a drywall screw.

Never use a screw longer than is absolutely necessary, in order to avoid hitting buried pipes and wires. For most drywall jobs, that means 1 1/4 inches. This size is much stronger than you think. Some can withstand thousands of pounds of force.

Step 5: If You Hit Something. Stop. Never push through, assuming that you’re breaking through flashing or a knot in the wood. There’s a good chance that you’re about to pierce some ductwork or ruin your drill bit against a metal protector plate over a pipe or cable. Back it up and try another spot.

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HardiePlank is a type of lap siding that contains cement fibers, making it extremely durable. It can be cut and drilled like wood, but you’ll need to use a masonry bit to drill this tough board. Lightweight items, such as a soilless hanging basket weighing less than one pound, can be attached anywhere on the siding. For heavier items, like hanging baskets containing soil and plants, you need to use a stud finder to make sure to attach it to a stud, or the weight will pull the screws out of the Hardie board, dropping your baskets to the ground.

Make baskets lighter by placing a 2- to 3-inch layer of styrofoam in the bottom, reducing the amount of soil needed. Choose lightweight plastic containers instead of heavier pottery.

Hang baskets at a height that will complement the plant types in them. For baskets with trailing plants, hang above eye level. Hang baskets with tall plants in the center and shorter plants near the edge at or below eye level.

Select where you want to hang your basket. Locate a stud behind the Hardie plank using a stud finder. Mark the stud location at the height you wish to install the bracket. James Hardie Building Products recommends keeping nails or screws at least 3/8 inch from the end of a plank.

Measure the diameter of the basket you intend to hang. Divide the diameter in two and add 3 inches to the result. Use a hanging basket bracket at least this long, so the basket will hang vertically and not against the siding.

Place the bracket on the Hardie plank at the marked location. Adjust it to the desired height. Mark the hole locations on the Hardie plank. Remove the bracket and set aside.

Don safety glasses, gloves and ear plugs.

Drill pilot holes, at each mark, one-quarter to one-half inch deep, to make it easier to insert screws and prevent cracking the siding.

Align the bracket holes with the pilot holes in the siding. Insert the screws and tighten securely using a drill with screwdriver bit attached.

How to hang things on a cement wall

How to hang things on a cement wall

How to hang things on a cement wall

If you had asked me what I thought would be challenging about living in Italy before we moved here, I would’ve said something like, “Getting too fat from eating a lot of pasta,” or “learning how to drive in what is essentially a daily commute of Mario Kart” (all things that turned out to be valid concerns). What I did not expect would be difficult, among many others thing (i.e. how to pee in a squatty potty or how to get mundane tasks done around the Italian nap schedule), was hanging shit on walls.

Italian homes, at least where we live in northern Italy, are made of concrete, not the soft, friendly sheetrock walls from back home. Initially, this doesn’t seem like an issue, until you go to hang a beautiful photograph of you and your husband on your honeymoon, go to drive a nail into the wall, and are met with the wall crumbling around your now bent-beyond-usability nail. This is what happens when you try to hang stuff up the American way into concrete walls — the wall literally just falls apart.

Because I have an aversion to white walls and Pinterest dreams of gallery walls on every bare surface, this was not going to do. Over the years, I’ve honed a few ways to hang things on these walls — everything from tiny calligraphy prints to giant maps to heavy shelves filled with books. And because this is a question I’m constantly asked from visitors of my home, who have met the faults of their concrete walls with disappointing results — well, I wanted to help y’all cure the white wall blues, too.