How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

While premature babies often need state-of-the-art medical care in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), there’s one special, simple service that only parents can provide: Kangaroo care, or skin-to-skin contact. This technologically simple intervention was developed in South America as a practical and affordable alternative to incubator care and offers surprisingly positive effects that improve the health of your premature baby. It’s a gentle, proven method to make your baby feel more secure and help you to bond. In fact it’s so effective, frequent skin-to-skin contact is often recommended for full-term infants, too.

Kangaroo Care Benefits

Kangaroo cure is powerful medicine! The heartbeat, the sense of smell and the rhythm of the voice and breath soothe your baby. When your baby feels your skin against his skin, his brain releases oxytocin (also known as “love hormone”), which in turn helps stabilize his cardiovascular system, reduces stress and makes him feel more calm and safer. An interesting recent study found that skin-to-skin care increases oxytocin levels not only in mothers but also in fathers and babies. Kangaroo care has been shown to help your little one:

  • Regulates body temperature (premature babies need help staying warm as they are low in body fat)
  • Feel less pain and stress during medical procedures such as blood sampling
  • To gain weight
  • Be successful in breastfeeding
  • Sleep more peacefully
  • Cry less often
  • He regulates his heart rate and breathing as his body adjusts to yours
  • Avoid getting infected
  • Leave the NICU first

A study of 10-year-old children who were cared for by kangaroos as babies found that they had better thinking skills and sleep habits and coped better with stress than children who weren’t on skin-to-skin care in infancy.

The same study confirmed the benefits mothers derive from kangaroo care: reduced anxiety, better attachment to their babies, and better relationships by age 10. In fact, there are many proven benefits for moms and dads who are involved in kangaroo care. Can:

Keep reading

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

  • Feel comforted during a stressful time
  • Feel more competent in caring for a fragile child
  • Enjoy the care that only you, not doctors or nurses, can provide
  • Feel a special closeness with your baby
  • Produce more breast milk (we only have it on of course!)

How to take care of a kangaroo

Once your baby is stable enough to leave the incubator (even while still being monitored by the machines), her nurses will help you and your partner hunt the kangaroo. Every primary caregiver, not just the mother, can provide skin-to-skin care for the baby. Avoid smoking, using perfumes or other scented products before your visit. Shower and make sure the skin on your chest is free of cuts and rashes so your baby won’t be exposed to germs. Wear loose-fitting clothing that fastens in front (including your bra — you’ll want to remove it or unfasten it).

In the nursery, you’ll sit in a comfortable chair, facing away from the rest of the room or placed behind a screen for your privacy. Just cuddle your baby against your bare chest, with a blanket draped over her back (she’ll wear just a diaper). Puoi abbottonare la maglietta per mantenerla comoda e a posto. When you’re snuggling, your baby’s doctor may recommend that you avoid stimulation like rocking or singing, depending on your baby’s particular condition. What your baby needs most right now is your warm skin against her. You can even take a little nap (since your baby’s nurse is handy to check on you both — though at home, you should never falling asleep while holding your baby because of the risk of SIDS in infants). Try to care for kangaroos for about an hour once a day. You can also work longer sessions of three to four hours, but be aware that your child will benefit from up to a few minutes of kangaroo care.

Keep kangaroo

While kangaroo care is most often encouraged during your baby’s hospital stay, it’s never a bad idea to keep providing it once you bring your little bundle home. Caring for kangaroos during the day (which can be exercised with the baby in the sling while other activities are in progress) can help the baby continue to gain weight, sleep healthier, and cry less. Try sticking it skin-to-skin while breastfeeding, bottle feeding, or during a relaxing after bath routine. Eventually, as your baby gets older, more active, and more interested in the world around him, caring for kangaroos will become more difficult, but instead you can enjoy playing together.

3 things to read next:

From the editorial team of What to Expect and Heidi Murkoff, the authorWhat to expect in the first year . The health information on this website is based on peer-reviewed medical journals and respected health care organizations and institutions, including ACOG (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists), CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), and AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) as well as What to expectbooks by Heidi Murkoff.

Jodi Dolezel, RN, is a NICU and Founder / CEO of Peekaboo ICU Baby.

Lyndsey Garbi, MD, is a dual board certified pediatrician in Pediatrics and Neonatology.

Tutti in gravidanza hanno una visione di ciò che accadrà e questa visione non include mai la terapia intensiva o i bambini prematuri. The feeling of losing a full term baby and being able to bond and care for that baby immediately is often combined with feelings of sadness and guilt. I bambini che necessitano di cure neonatali immediate vengono spesso prelevati rapidamente e i genitori possono sentirsi disconnessi dal loro nuovo bambino. With this separation comes uncertainty regarding the infant’s future health and developmental potential, and the immediate and long-term effects this separation from bonding with the family can have.

History

Kangaroo Care was originally developed in the early 1980s by two neonatologists in Bogota, Colombia, South America As the hospital couldn’t afford modern equipment like incubators to keep these premature babies warm, they used what they needed to keep the temperature body of these constant children, their mothers. The concept of Kangaroo Care was born.

At Kangaroo Care, mothers held their babies skin-to-skin on their chests 24 hours a day, slept with them, and let them suck their breasts.

A noticeable improvement was observed in these children. Not only did they survive, but they also thrived – they gained weight faster, maintained a constant temperature, their heart rate and breathing were regulated, and they were discharged home earlier.

Benefits

Since then, the Kangaroo Care concept has proven safe and very beneficial for even the youngest premature babies. Keeping your baby skin-to-skin is one of the best ways to engage in caring and bonding with your premature baby and help him grow. Babies are calmed by the presence of the mother and the mother-infant bond is improved. Because breast milk is readily available, kangaroos can often facilitate breastfeeding in babies who are old enough to start suckling. Kangaroo care can even improve a mother’s milk production.

Both mothers and fathers can benefit from a better bond with their baby. Parents often become more attuned to their baby’s needs and begin to feel more comfortable and confident in their ability to care for a premature baby. Kangaroo Care also helps reduce the stress associated with NICU for both parents and babies.

Science has shown that kangaroos develop best. Preterm infants who have this skin-to-skin connection with their parents gain weight faster, cry less, have a more stabilized body temperature, sleep better, breathe better, are often more alert, and have a more stable heart rate.

Kangaroo Care should be done at the optimal time for the baby and is often best combined with nursing time.

It’s best to select a time when your baby will be getting fed or hands-on care by the NICU team. If you are planning to breastfeed, this time will help your baby learn how to suckle and help with breastfeeding. The optimal extraction time is immediately after the Kangaroo Care session. Keep in mind the importance of the sleep cycle in premature babies. Ideally, you should set aside at least an hour of kangaroo sessions so as not to disrupt these important neurological development and growth cycles.

It is important to know that each NICU has their own Kangaroo Care protocol and when is the right time to start your baby’s skin-to-skin care. Ask your nurse when you can start this very important and exciting process and empower yourself and your baby with the healing power of touch.

Kangaroo Care is skin-to-skin contact between a mother or father and their premature baby. The method originated in Bogota, Colombia during the late 1970’s when incubators, warm beds and respirators were in short supply.

Two pediatricians led mothers to place babies on their breasts, cover them with towels, and use the mother’s body heat to warm and comfort their babies.

This technique was strongly reminiscent of kangaroo pups growing in the mother’s pouch after birth. Kangaroo care has become increasingly popular in recent years as it keeps stable premature babies warm and safe through skin contact with their mother or father. Since the kangaroo allows for early physical contact, it promotes a better bond between parent and child.

Kangaroo care method

Babies, usually premature, are placed on their mother’s or father’s undressed upper body for one to several hours, wearing only a diaper. Their bodies are covered with blankets, scarves or towels, and even very young premature babies are given a headdress. During the “kangaroo” the vital signs and behavior of the baby are monitored.

It is important to know if your baby is stable enough to survive the procedure (taking him out of the incubator and then putting him back in) without damage or stress. Then it is decided at what intervals – for example every day or every two days – the kangaroos are cared for.

Depending on the case, kangaroo care may begin sooner or later. An important condition for using the kangaroo method is the consent and education of the parents, the general condition of the child (circulatory and respiratory conditions must be stable) and an offer in the neonatal unit.

Advantages of the kangaroo method

Much scientific research demonstrates the positive influence of the “kangaroo” on the mental stability and health of premature babies. The physical closeness helps the parents to get to know their baby and their reactions better, the method promotes milk production, and strengthens the parents’ trust in their own competences.

Women who have used the kangaroo method tend to breastfeed longer and more often. Preterm babies who are given the kangaroo method soon after birth scream less and spend more time awake and in deep sleep. By six months of age, they come home earlier, scream less, and generally have less severe illnesses.

Parents’ self-confidence is also promoted: they have the right to do something good for their child at a time when they may feel limited to doing it in other respects. Kangaroo care improves the emotional mother-child relationship and addresses all the child’s senses: smell through the body scent of the parents; sense of balance through the movements of the parents; and tactile and acoustic stimulation by the parents’ voices. Grazie a questo, la madre/padre e il bambino si conoscono e i genitori rafforzano gli effetti positivi.

Additionally, kangaroo feeding also allows for early breastfeeding, stimulates the milk donor reflex, and leads to longer and more frequent breastfeeding.

According to scientists, kangaroo has several positive effects. The body releases the hormone oxytocin, which is considered an important component in the development of the mother-child bond. At the same time, the baby is acoustically stimulated and calmed by the voice of his mother or father, hears his heartbeat and sniffs the parents’ body. In addition, close contact between the mother and the baby serves to improve the breastfeeding relationship, often extending the time of breastfeeding.

Benefits długoterminowe

Benefits z opieki nad kangurami wydają się być długoterminowe. A study of premature babies and parents over the age of 20 found that kangaroo babies were, on average, less aggressive, impulsive, and hyperactive than those who spent most of their first few weeks in incubators. A total of 264 premature babies born between 1993 and 1996 with a birth weight of less than 1800 grams were included. The study compared two groups of newborns.

The control group consisted of infants who received conventional care in the first months of life, usually in an incubator. The second group consisted of underweight premature babies, which mothers often wore on bare skin, warmed and breastfed. The whole family was also involved and trained in the care of young children. 18 to 20 years after birth, the adolescents were intensively examined and questioned for three days.

Among the results published in the journalPediatrics is the fact that the mortality of kangaroo pups is significantly lower than that of the control group in the incubator. Their brains got stronger, especially in areas important for learning, and their IQ was also slightly higher 20 years later. The children in the kangaroo program had a better school career and were less absent from school.

On average, they also earned more as young workers. The researchers also attributed positive consequences to the fact that the parents of the kangaroo group were better informed about the needs of the children thanks to the accompanying training and were able to continuously implement this knowledge.

This particularly affected the poorest families with a lower level of education. The researchers found that, in the long term, daily activities at home had the greatest direct impact on the child.

The program, supported by Canadian researchers, also had a positive effect on entire families: their cohesion was better and the basic mood was more loving. In addition, it has been found that couples are more likely to stick together, even when the father carries his untimely offspring in a scarf.

The future of kangaroo care

According to data from the World Health Organization (WHO), a total of 15 million babies worldwide are born too early, before the 38th week of pregnancy, every year. The organization notes that the kangaroo method is effective, science-based, and can be used in all settings, from those with very limited access to those with unrestricted access to health facilities.

He goes on to say that minor effects such as mild cognitive deficits, weaker motor skills, hearing or vision problems, and reduced concentration may go unnoticed, but have a profound impact on the lives of families.

Kangaroo care can be helpful in preventing these challenges from occurring. Basically, by caring for kangaroos, parents can learn to deal with their frail little ones, overcome contact fears, and build a close bond with their baby.

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

While premature babies often need state-of-the-art medical care in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), there’s one special, simple service that only parents can provide: Kangaroo care, or skin-to-skin contact. This technologically simple intervention was developed in South America as a practical and affordable alternative to incubator care and offers surprisingly positive effects that improve the health of your premature baby. It’s a gentle, proven method to make your baby feel more secure and help you to bond. In fact it’s so effective, frequent skin-to-skin contact is often recommended for full-term infants, too.

Kangaroo Care Benefits

Kangaroo cure is powerful medicine! The heartbeat, the sense of smell and the rhythm of the voice and breath soothe your baby. When your baby feels your skin against his skin, his brain releases oxytocin (also known as “love hormone”), which in turn helps stabilize his cardiovascular system, reduces stress and makes him feel more calm and safer. An interesting recent study found that skin-to-skin care increases oxytocin levels not only in mothers but also in fathers and babies. Kangaroo care has been shown to help your little one:

  • Regulates body temperature (premature babies need help staying warm as they are low in body fat)
  • Feel less pain and stress during medical procedures such as blood sampling
  • To gain weight
  • Be successful in breastfeeding
  • Sleep more peacefully
  • Cry less often
  • He regulates his heart rate and breathing as his body adjusts to yours
  • Avoid getting infected
  • Leave the NICU first

A study of 10-year-old children who were cared for by kangaroos as babies found that they had better thinking skills and sleep habits and coped better with stress than children who weren’t on skin-to-skin care in infancy.

The same study confirmed the benefits mothers derive from kangaroo care: reduced anxiety, better attachment to their babies, and better relationships by age 10. In fact, there are many proven benefits for moms and dads who are involved in kangaroo care. Can:

Keep reading

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

  • Feel comforted during a stressful time
  • Feel more competent in caring for a fragile child
  • Enjoy the care that only you, not doctors or nurses, can provide
  • Feel a special closeness with your baby
  • Produce more breast milk (we only have it on of course!)

How to take care of a kangaroo

Once your baby is stable enough to leave the incubator (even while still being monitored by the machines), her nurses will help you and your partner hunt the kangaroo. Every primary caregiver, not just the mother, can provide skin-to-skin care for the baby. Avoid smoking, using perfumes or other scented products before your visit. Shower and make sure the skin on your chest is free of cuts and rashes so your baby won’t be exposed to germs. Wear loose-fitting clothing that fastens in front (including your bra — you’ll want to remove it or unfasten it).

In the nursery, you’ll sit in a comfortable chair, facing away from the rest of the room or placed behind a screen for your privacy. Just cuddle your baby against your bare chest, with a blanket draped over her back (she’ll wear just a diaper). Puoi abbottonare la maglietta per mantenerla comoda e a posto. When you’re snuggling, your baby’s doctor may recommend that you avoid stimulation like rocking or singing, depending on your baby’s particular condition. What your baby needs most right now is your warm skin against her. You can even take a little nap (since your baby’s nurse is handy to check on you both — though at home, you should never falling asleep while holding your baby because of the risk of SIDS in infants). Try to care for kangaroos for about an hour once a day. You can also work longer sessions of three to four hours, but be aware that your child will benefit from up to a few minutes of kangaroo care.

Keep kangaroo

While kangaroo care is most often encouraged during your baby’s hospital stay, it’s never a bad idea to keep providing it once you bring your little bundle home. Caring for kangaroos during the day (which can be exercised with the baby in the sling while other activities are in progress) can help the baby continue to gain weight, sleep healthier, and cry less. Try sticking it skin-to-skin while breastfeeding, bottle feeding, or during a relaxing after bath routine. Eventually, as your baby gets older, more active, and more interested in the world around him, caring for kangaroos will become more difficult, but instead you can enjoy playing together.

3 things to read next:

From the editorial team of What to Expect and Heidi Murkoff, the authorWhat to expect in the first year . The health information on this website is based on peer-reviewed medical journals and respected health care organizations and institutions, including ACOG (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists), CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), and AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) as well as What to expectbooks by Heidi Murkoff.

When my sweet Haley was 5 days old, I was released from the hospital. I only kept it once and only for a few minutes. As I was leaving, one of the NICU nurses asked me if I had already tried to hold the kangaroo. I had no idea what she was talking about.

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

Photo courtesy of Nicole Polk Photography

Kangaroo care or holding a kangaroo is when mom and baby (or dad and baby) sit, or rather lie, skin to skin. When your baby touches your skin, he is able to maintain his temperature much better and can often regulate his breathing and heart rate (this does not mean that he no longer needs neonatal care in the ICU, ventilators or machines. CPAP). In other countries where they don’t have access to isolettes, this is how they keep the babies warm. It also has benefits for mom. Not only is it a special time, it helps with bonding and with mom’s milk supply. Kangaroo care is not a new idea, it has been around for years.

Some of the benefits of hand-shared kangaroo care to hold include:

  • Regulates heart rate, temperature and breathing
  • Improve head circumference, weight gain and height
  • Stabilization of organ function and self-regulation capacity
  • Less pain and less crying
  • Facilitates better sleep patterns
  • Avoid getting infected
  • Benefitsa di una migliore alimentazione grazie alla maggiore produzione di latte materno
  • Be more likely to breastfeed
  • Enjoy a shorter hospital stay

I remember two special moments from my time in intensive care. One of these was the first time I tried to breed Haley’s kangaroos. She was so small and I was afraid to hug her. My nurse sensed my concerns. She turned my seat away from Haley’s monitors. She told me, “You don’t need to worry about the monitors, that’s my job. Sit back and enjoy your daughter. I sat with my little daughter for an hour; I started to feel like her mother. It was amazing.

If I can offer any advice I’d like to say first, move the chair away from the monitor. Don’t look at it. Worrying about your baby’s stats will interfere with your bonding time. Sit back and enjoy your baby. Take it all. She talks to them silently. Tell them how much you love them. Believe me, you will not regret it!

My second memory is the day Haley left CPAP. She wasn’t scheduled to come off that day. There was an error and her sprint time (her time without CPAP) was up when I got there. She also had the photos scheduled for the day, so they let her keep shooting a little more. I asked the kangaroo with her for the second part of the photos and the doctor agreed that she might not move a little longer because she was fine. The pictures were done, but I wasn’t ready to leave. The nurse walked over and saw how good Haley was lying on top of me, so they gave us more time. The doctor jokingly teased that if I stayed all the time, she wouldn’t have to go back to CPAP, but after four hours I had to go home. I kissed her reluctantly and put her back in solitary confinement. When we got back that night, the doctor told us that Haley wasn’t going to have CPAP. I think she tried to tell us that she was done. They don’t normally do this, but they decided to see how she would do without it. It was an incredible miracle. I think three hours of kangaroo care helped!

Of course, this is an unusual case. It won’t happen this way for most babies. What I want you to know is that taking care of kangaroos really helps. It makes a big difference with our premature babies. These special moments of bonding with mom (or dad) are so important. When babies are relaxed, their brains and bodies can develop and grow. It is important to give your baby enough time when holding a kangaroo. Most followers recommend at least an hour. This helps them fall asleep to a restful and restful sleep, allowing them to reap the maximum benefits from this special intake.

We made a goal that the kangaroo would keep Haley every day. When they gave us the ok to do it twice a day, I was taking one time and my husband another. She really helped him bond with Haley and her bond with him. I have pictures of them sleeping together in the ICU. They were both so relaxed. So my second tip is to do it often. It’s good for you and good for your baby. And third, let your spouse be involved. Haley and her father are very close. I think it all started with NOTHING. She took the time to experiment and bond with the kangaroos.

My best memories in ICU are holding my baby. I will never forget those moments. I hope you have these moments.

Image courtesy of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) via Flickr

Maggie Fox’s excellent NBC News article provides an excellent report on the long-term effects of kangaroo care over a 20-year period. Experts found that instead of being left in incubators, babies who were kept standing next to their bare skin and breastfed grew up with fewer social problems. They were also far less likely to die prematurely.

Kangaroo care was first practiced in Colombia. Now, the team of experts who were the first to prove it was safe has conducted a 20-year follow-up to see how the children behave as they grow up. They found 494 of the original 716 babies who were born prematurely between 1993 and 1996 and were randomly assigned to mother kangaroo care or standard care.

"Gli effetti della cura di una madre-canguro in un anno sul QI e sull’ambiente domestico erano ancora presenti 20 anni dopo sulle persone più vulnerabili, e i genitori che si prendevano cura di una madre-canguro erano più premurosi e premurosi", la dott. ssa Nathalie Charpak e colleghi della Kangaroo Foundation di Bogotà, in Colombia, hanno scritto nel suo rapporto.

“At the age of 20, the young participants in the care of ex-kangaroo mothers, especially in the poorest families, had a less aggressive drive, were less impulsive and hyperactive. They showed less antisocial behavior, which could be related to separation from the mother after birth ”. they added.

L’Organizzazione Mondiale della Sanità (OMS) promuove un approccio più semplice e a bassa tecnologia con l’assistenza medica moderna, o invece di essa in alcuni contesti poveri. WHO has stated the following about this cure:

“Caring for a kangaroo mother means caring for premature babies who are brought skin to skin with the mother. It is an effective and easy-to-use method for promoting the health and well-being of preterm and term babies. the main characteristics are: early, continuous and long-lasting skin-to-skin contact between mother and child; exclusive breastfeeding (preferably); starts in the hospital and can be continued at home; small children can be discharged earlier; mothers in the home need adequate support and follow-up. It is a gentle and effective method of avoiding the anxiety that is usually experienced in a busy ward with premature babies. Nearly two decades of implementation and research have shown that caring for a kangaroo mother is more than an alternative to incubator care. “

The Complete Guide to Baby Care

While mothers-to-be eagerly await the imminent birth of their little one, they should also be advised that it is possible to give birth well before the expected date, for no apparent reason.

Pregnant women who give birth before the 37th week of gestation will give birth to premature babies. Parents will have to put extra effort into caring for a premature baby.

Immediately after delivery, your baby will be admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for specialist care and attention. The baby will last in hospital up to the mother’s original predicted date of delivery, usually in an incubator that will provide them with the highest degree of protection. Since most of the baby’s initial days of life are spent in the hospital, the bonding that needs to occur between a newborn child and mother does not happen. This natural bond plays an important role in a child’s healthy development, both emotionally, mentally and physically.

Nowadays, more and more hospitals are encouraging mothers to have premature kangaroo babies. This practice was started in the early 1980s and has grown in popularity ever since.

Kangaroo care, what is it?

Kangaroo care provides premature babies with natural body heat from skin-to-skin contact with their mother. As soon as the baby has stabilized and is able to breathe on his own, the medical team will encourage the mother to hold the baby on her bare skin, with the baby wearing only a diaper. The baby is held in an upright position, against the mother’s bare chest, preferably between their breasts. About two to three hours spent like this each day will help create a closer bond between mother and baby.

Holding your baby like this can improve your preterm baby’s health even more.

– Stabilized heart and breath rates – A preemie infant when placed close to their mother’s chest, studies done have showed – much less oxygen requirement by the baby; the ability to breathe independently appears faster; less frequent cases of apnea and bradycardia; and a more stabilized heart rate.

– Improved body temperatures – It was found that the direct warmth derived from the mother’s body was sufficient to increase the baby’s body temperature naturally. It was also noted that when the baby’s body felt cold, the mother’s body temperature would rise up naturally to warm up the infant, and vice versa.

– Rapid weight gain – A premature baby is placed in an incubator in the ICU, where it is not possible for the baby to rest completely. Half of the time spent there goes to cry. When placed against the mother’s body warmth, the baby is able to get deep sleep, channelizing its energy for more important things, like proper and rapid development of body systems.

– Will start breastfeeding spontaneously – Kangaroo care for premature babies will allow them to initiate breastfeeding at a faster rate than preterm babies always placed in an incubator. With the baby placed closer to mom’s chest, access to the mother’s breast is made easy. The baby will naturally come to the breast and start sucking on its own.

– Shorter hospital stay – Caring for premature babies in this way will quickly stabilize all of their vital signs, allowing them to be discharged home much earlier than expected.

Caring for a premature baby doesn’t have to be as tiring as you might think.

I said it was Ollie who did Kangaroo Care for me, unlike me who did it to him. It felt more than right, as many preemie moms I wasn’t allowed to hold him until three weeks after he was born.

I wanted to hug my baby, but what I had to do was much more healing for me as a mom than just holding him in my arms. I have to keep it straight, skin to skin.

The first day I held my baby will be forever etched in my heart and memory. This simple contact quickly became my primary defense against early postnatal depression. I felt my soul heal with every breath we took. I didn’t ask questions and just took what I could get, I was therefore surprised to find out later all that we were unconsciously doing for our son.

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

How to take care of a kangaroo

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

Skin contact is easy to manage, all you need to do is:

  • Find a comfortable seat for you as you will need to keep your baby upright, your comfort is very important.
  • Your baby should only wear a diaper.
  • Place the baby upright on his bare chest. Make sure his legs are comfortable in the frog position.
  • Cover yourself and your baby with a kangaroo care sheet or scarf.
  • Hug him for at least 20 minutes and enjoy!

Benefits of Kangaroo Care

How to give kangaroo care to preemies

Benefits płynące z pielęgnacji kangurów zostały szeroko przebadane.

The fact is thatkangaroo care works! It works for parents, it works for children and it works for hospitals! Initially, this was practiced in Colombia, where hospitals did not have enough incubators for their premature babies.

Doctors then began sending premature babies home and asking their parents to serve as a human incubator. Not only this work, the children cared for by the kangaroos have grown up frequently! It has been such a success that hospitals around the world have started implementing this practice!

Some of the advantages are:

Kangaroo Care Supports the growth of the child

For adults it may seem like a big deal, but premature babies have to expend a lot of calories to regulate their temperature.

When a parent has skin-to-skin contact with their child, that parent:regulation of the baby’s body temperature.

The calories your baby saves through this simple activity are critical to his growth. Kangaroo cared babies increase their weight dramatically better than their peers who don’t have skin to skin contact.

Kangaroo Care lays the foundation for breastfeeding

Babies who are kept daily by their mothers in kangaroo care for long periods are more prone to spontaneous breastfeeding.

This may be due to the stimulation caused by the proximity of the milk smell.

Conversely, moms who have regular skin contact for long periods of time have increased milk secretion. Having a baby so close to your butt stimulates milk production!

If you have low milk flow, you might consider having a minimum of 2 hours of skin-to-skin contact for a week.This is a win-win situation!

Kangaroo Care improves baby’s breathing and heart rate

Children relieve stress by being cared for by kangaroos.

The constant beating of a parent’s heart causes them to fall asleep in a deep sleep, and their bodies remember the time in the womb.

All of this helps your baby to regulate his heart rate and stabilize his breathing. When my son was in ICU, I only kept him skin to skin for four hours a day due to my crazy schedule. And my husband had to get back to work early, so he only had to queue on weekends.

When we got home we had to keep Ollie in the kangaroo’s care 24 hours a day.

It was difficult to sit all day holding my baby (even though my husband, mother and I changed), but we noticed an improvement in the beginning.

In ICU, Oliver would turn purple every time he nursed, which was downright scary. He had episodes of desaturation, and the nurses couldn’t lower his cannula settings much.

After only a few days at home under the care of the kangaroos, everything changed dramatically. She began to better coordinate her sucking and breathing pattern and began to breathe more evenly.

Improve the child’s relationship with others

My husband took great care of the kangaroos during the day. He loved it.

Her relationship with Oliver became much stronger. My parents have had skin contact too often. And today we are all very close.

Primarilyhelped my husband understand that he can do a lot for our baby.

Sometimes, because moms are giving birth, are pregnant, and are breastfeeding, fathers can feel alienated. At first, it was my husband’s case. Don’t get me wrong, he adored our son from before he was born, but he just didn’t feel what he could do for him.

That is, until he took care of the kangaroos!

It helped me with postpartum depression

True, I’m talking about my specific case, but it really was.

For me, postnatal depression was very different from full-term pregnancies. I just didn’t know it was going to hit me. Naive, I know …

When my son was in ICU, I had to be strong. I had no other choice.

I didn’t have time to be depressed and just “stopped”. I didn’t realize that when I unpaused myself 2 months later, the waves of repressed depression would come crashing down.

They did it. And it was really difficult.

Nothing has helped me as much as keeping Oliver in the care of a kangaroo. Being so close to me and seeing him so calmly reminded me of our pregnancy.

Most premature babies are sad that their pregnancy is “incomplete”. This is my case too, but the bond we had when we did skin to skin was deep and brought us both back to when it was in my belly.

And that got rid of the depression.

This is Wrap!

Kangaroo care may seem scary at first, at least to me.

It’s hard to manipulate a seemingly fragile baby surrounded with wires and settle her into our chest. But once we have it under control, it’s worth it. Benefits płynące z „skóry do skóry” towarzyszyły nam do tej pory.

Did you take care of the kangaroos? Tell us your experience in the comments section.