How to get out of going to the dentist

In this article

In this article

In this article

  • Is the dentist’s office safe?
  • What to think before going to the dentist
  • What are the non-urgent treatments?
  • What is emergency treatment?

After asking dental practices to end non-urgent visits and surgeries for the COVID-19 pandemic, the American Dental Association (ADA) and CDC are now recommending dental teams to assess risks in their area against the need to provide patient care. Here’s what you should know about dental care as some cities and states reopen.

Is the dentist’s office safe?

You are in contact with germs every time you leave the house. However, all health care professionals should follow some safety guidelines. Your dentist and others who work with him should wash their hands and sterilize tools. Some tools and needles are never reused. But your dentist’s office may do even more to prevent the spread of COVID-19, like:

  • Disinfect all surfaces and tools more often
  • Clean, replace and cover tools between uses
  • Wear more protective clothing than usual
  • Cover your mouth with a rubber dam
  • Meeting space
  • Call us before your visit to find out about your health conditions
  • Check the temperature and other symptoms
  • Requires wearing a face mask
  • Ask about your latest trip
  • Ask if you have been among the people who have COVID-19
  • Tell me not to come first
  • Ask to limit the number of people you take with you, such as children
  • Did you wait outside for them to be ready for you?
  • Place the chairs 6 feet apart in the waiting room to keep your distance
  • Get rid of the usual things people touch in the waiting room, like toys and magazines

What to think before going to the dentist

The coronavirus that causes COVID-19 spreads through respiratory droplets. That’s what flies through the air when someone coughs or sneezes. If another person inhales it, he may get sick. It’s also in the mucus and saliva in your mouth and throat. Questi sono fluidi con cui il tuo dentista e i suoi strumenti possono entrare facilmente in contatto. Some dental appliances can splash these droplets.

Many dental offices aren’t designed for high levels of protection. That’s because many don’t have:

  • Isolation rooms for airborne infections
  • Rooms for a customer
  • Any or sufficient number of N95 bezels

Uninterrupted

What are the non-urgent treatments?

These are sometimes elective procedures. It’s dental work that doesn’t affect your health right now. In other words, you can put it off until later if you’re worried about COVID-19. Here are some examples:

  • teeth cleaning or exams
  • X-ray
  • Treatment of things that don’t hurt (cavities, tooth extraction)
  • Teeth whitening
  • Solving aesthetic problems
  • Check the braces

What is emergency treatment?

The ADA says something should be treated right away if it’s life-threatening or if it causes severe pain or a high risk of infection. Generally, your dentist decides what’s urgent. This can include:

  • Serious pain
  • Bleeding that won’t stop
  • Tissue that requires a biopsy
  • Swollen areas in or around the mouth (gums, face, or neck)
  • Broken teeth, especially if they cause pain or tissue damage
  • Signs of infection (pain and swelling)
  • Post-operative care that you cannot do alone
  • Temporary crown that has been lost or broken
  • Dental work related to cancer treatment
  • Dentures that are not functioning properly
  • Wires in the appliance that hurt
  • Trauma that can affect the ability to breathe

Call your dentist if you have any questions about dental care and if you should come for an appointment or wait later. If they can’t see you during an emergency, try an urgent care center. Don’t go to the ER unless your dentist isn’t available.

Let your dentist know if you have or think you have COVID-19. Common symptoms include fever, cough, and shortness of breath. They may take special measures to reduce the risk of spreading the virus. They’ll work with you and your doctor to get you the right care.

Tell your dentist if you start feeling sick with COVID-19 symptoms within 14 days of your visit. You may have been a carrier of the virus at the time and possibly spread it to other people.

Sources

CDC: Oral Health, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Protect Yourself; Dental settings ".

American Dental Association: "ADA esorta i dentisti a rinviare la chirurgia elettiva", "Cos’è un’emergenza dentale?" "Cos’è un’emergenza dentale?"

Dipartimento della salute di New York City: "Malattia sessuale e coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19)."

Dental Research JournalCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19): emerging and future challenges for dentistry and oral medicine.

Healthy mouth. org: Infection control.

Wisconsin Dental Association: "Domande frequenti sul coronavirus ADA".

Scuola di Odontoiatria dell’Università di Washington: "Informazioni importanti sul paziente".

Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine: "Nota ai pazienti: Coronavirus".

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR SOMETHING?

"How

When it comes to removing plaque, be sure to visit your dentist. But did you know that you can use many other natural methods and get rid of plaque at home.

Here are some of the most effective methods of removing plaque …

"How

Method 1: focus on the brushing technique

It’s about quality, not quantity. You can brush your teeth as much as you want, but if you don’t do it properly it’s just a waste of time. The American Dental Association (ADA) has recommended the following method as the most effective:

Hold the toothbrush at a 45 degree angle to the gumline. Point it up or towards your nose every time you brush your upper teeth; down or towards the chin when brushing the lower teeth. This angle also helps to clear the gum line, which many people lack.

Method 2: baking soda

According to Mother Nature. com, good old baking soda can also help remove plaque from teeth. Put some baking soda on a damp toothbrush and remove the plaque. You can also combine a pinch of salt and a tablespoon of baking soda and use this mixture to brush your teeth.

Method 3: apple cider vinegar

Apple cider vinegar has also been shown to be effective in removing plaque. Just dip your toothbrush in vinegar and brush your teeth. Rinse your mouth thoroughly with water to avoid damage to the tooth enamel.

Method 4

  • 4 tablespoons of sunflower seeds
  • 4 tablespoons of lime blossom
  • 1 liter of water
  1. Mix all the ingredients and simmer the mixture over low heat for half an hour.
  2. Brush your teeth with the mixture after meals.

Source: www. healthy food star. com
(Permission was obtained from the content owner)

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Dentophobia is defined as the extreme fear of going to the dentist. About 2.7% of men and 4.6% of women have dentophobia. Given the importance of good oral hygiene, fear of a dentist can have a serious impact on people’s health.

Often the result of dentophobia is that people only visit the dentist when the pain gets worse than the fear itself. The longer people avoid visiting the dentist, the greater their anxiety can be. This delay in visiting the dentist only makes your dental problems worse, which can lead to feelings of embarrassment and increased fear.

In this blog post, we’ll look at some of the common reasons why people fear going to the dentist. We’ll also outline some tips for overcoming these fears and advice if your children are afraid.

Why are people afraid of the dentist?

One possible reason people fear visiting a dental clinic is because of an unpleasant or painful past experience. This fear can come from childhood and build up steadily over the years. Hearing about failed dentist appointments, both on the news and from other people, can discourage people from going to the dentist.

Embarrassment is another possible reason, as is the feeling of ‘loss of control’ when sitting in a dentist’s chair. Another possible reason is people’s fear of medical procedures involving needles, which is known as trypanophobia.

Tips to overcome your fears

If you dislike the feeling of not having any control when sitting in a dentist’s chair, ask the dentist to explain each stage of the procedure before it happens. This at least gives you a sense of understanding and reduces the blind panic you may experience.

Agree with your dentist for a stop sign. It might just be raising your hand to let them know you need a break. Take a moment to catch your breath or rinse your mouth with water.

Another useful tip is to listen to music with headphones. This can muffle the noise from any equipment and distract you from your dentist’s work.

You can find a dentist friend in Hudson, Wisconsin at Bardill Dental. Click here for more detailed information.

Tips if your child is afraid

A child may fear visiting a dentist become it is an ‘unknown’, and therefore scary, place. Answer all their questions and calm down with reassuring answers.

If you have had any unpleasant experiences from visiting a dentist, don’t share them with your child. Purchase a child-friendly book that contains easy-to-understand information about dentist appointments and the importance of good oral hygiene.

Finally, never reward them for visiting the dentist. This can make them assume that a dental visit is something that needs to be ‘overcome’, which can suggest it will be unpleasant.

Overcome the fear of visiting the dentist

If you are afraid of the dentist, the above practical tips can help you overcome your uncertainty. Always speak to your dentist first if you feel nervous. They will understand this and take it slowly, remembering to keep calm during your visit.

Do you like this blog post about the fear of going to the dentist? Be sure to check out our other news articles today on the rest of our blog.

I recently went to the dentist with a dental abscess. They gave me antibiotics and told me to arrange a tooth extraction when I ran out of antibiotics. The problem, however, is that I have a lot of (and perhaps a little extreme) anxiety. When I am there my blood pressure always rises significantly. My Bishop was 179/120 and they told me if he was tall on my next visit they wouldn’t work on me. What can I do to lower it?
I have taken home blood pressure many times and even when I feel the most stressed and it is always fine so I just need some temporary medications. I asked if I could prescribe a sedative like valium like the previous dentist did, but she almost scoffed at the idea. And for those who might say go to another dentist, the problem is this is the only dentist in my area that I can afford, so I’m just here.

Problem Answers (4)

Will the dentist take your blood pressure? Seriously? You had to act like a girl. Suck it in and relieve the pain (never use the childbirth argument again, ever). When it’s over, it’s over.

Useful advice only please.
In fact, the common procedure is to have a bp at the dentist. No action is required and I tolerate pain well. The problem is my blood pressure which I cannot control and is blocking my ability to have a dentist available.

Hi Knich: I can sympathize with you. I have panic attacks when I have to undergo a procedure such as a root canal treatment. I can’t imagine doing it before without lorazepam and my dentist is good at working with me. Hope you can look after your current dentist. I don’t know what my blood pressure is because my dentist doesn’t take it, but when I expect surgery my heart rate goes up, I have stomach cramps and extreme anxiety. You are not alone in this type of anxiety. If you could talk to your dentist, maybe the two of you could work out something to prepare you for the procedure.

How about calling your doctor and asking for Valium? If you explain what’s going on, they can help you.

Hi my daughter just went through this. She buys a blood pressure kit from Wal-Mart and records your blood pressure for a week 3 times a day. She makes an appointment with your primary care physician and explains to your dentist / blood pressure problem and show him your daily blood pressure readings.
So make a note to pass to the dentist that your doctor has seen you and that you don’t have the high blood pressure that caused you anxiety. Then give the dentist a note. Your doctor may also prescribe something to help you relax before your dental procedure. Good luck.

The World Health Organization says you should postpone your routine visits, but many dentists disagree.

"How

Deciding whether or not to go to the dentist now is a personal choice – this is what the WHO and the ADA have to say.

If you’ve never been a fan of going to the dentist, you may have an excuse to skip a routine visit this year, depending on your views on COVID-19 safety. La pulizia dei denti e i controlli sono importanti per mantenere la bocca sana ed evitare procedure costose come il trattamento del canale radicolare. But due to the coronavirus pandemic, there are conflicting guidelines on whether or not to see your dentist for non-urgent appointments.

WHO released a statement in August recommending that people skip dental checkups and routine cleanings during the COVID-19 pandemic. It says you should only visit your dentist for any necessary treatments, including if you have pain, an infection, or if you need immediate help. Nel frattempo, l’OMS consiglia di utilizzare le "consulenze a distanza" se non sei sicuro di visitare o meno un dentista.

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In risposta, l’American Dental Association ha rilasciato una dichiarazione in cui affermava di essere "fortemente" in disaccordo con i consigli dell’OMS sulle cure dentistiche e che andare dal dentista era essenziale. "L’odontoiatria è l’assistenza primaria a causa del suo ruolo nella valutazione, diagnosi, prevenzione o trattamento di condizioni orali che possono influire sulla salute sistemica", ha affermato in una dichiarazione il presidente dell’ADA, il dottor Chad P. Gehani, DDS.

While you should speak to your dentist before making quick decisions, the safety concerns surrounding visiting the dentist are unclear this year. I spoke to an orthodontist for more information on navigating this complicated (and personal) decision.

Why going to the dentist can be risky

“The relative safety of visiting the dentist right now is very important and individual. Negli stati in cui i casi di COVID-19 sono in aumento, il mio consiglio sarebbe di visitare il tuo dentista solo in caso di emergenza (dolore intenso o infezione), "ha affermato la dott. ssa Heather Kunen, DDS, MS e co-fondatrice di Beam Street.

According to a WHO report, the nature of oral health visits poses a risk of contracting the coronavirus for both patients and healthcare professionals due to the way experts believe the virus is transmitted. First, there is evidence that airway droplets from coughing, sneezing, and talking are spreading the virus. Because they work in your mouth and are in close contact with you (much closer to 6 feet), your dentist will be exposed to these droplets, along with your blood and saliva.

Second, the WHO suggests that the coronavirus can spread through the transmission of aerosols. Many common dental procedures, such as brushing teeth, create aerosols, putting workers at risk of contracting the virus.

It is important to speak to your dentist before making any oral hygiene decisions.

In addition to the risks to patients and workers listed above, you must keep in mind that you will not be able to wear a mask when visiting the dentist, which exposes you to the germs of others around you and allows you to spread germs. Since it is possible to contract the coronavirus and have no symptoms, you may unknowingly spread it the next time you visit your dentist or have it done by an asymptomatic doctor.

Conversely, going on a GP’s appointment is likely to be less of a risk as both the doctor and patient can move as far as possible and wear masks during most procedures.

Dentists have been using personal protective equipment such as gloves, masks and face shields for decades, but the FDA says personal protective equipment cannot completely eliminate the risk of virus transmission. "Negli stati in cui i casi si sono stabilizzati, le condizioni possono essere più sicure per le visite di emergenza e/o di routine, sebbene sia comunque necessario adottare adeguate precauzioni sui DPI", afferma il dott. Kunen.

If you are considered to be at high risk (for example, if you have pre-existing medical conditions or are over 65) or immunocompromised, you can suspend routine visits, regardless of the viral disease in your community. “These high-risk patients should only see the dentist when they feel pain or an infection. Nel complesso, consiglierei a ciascun paziente di chiamare il proprio medico per la migliore guida sugli appuntamenti in ufficio ", afferma il dott. Kunen.

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"How

"How

What dental offices do to protect patients

Many dental offices increase safety measures to protect patients and workers.

"Abbiamo installato nuovi sistemi di filtraggio dell’aria nel mio studio, posizionato ulteriori barriere tra le poltrone odontoiatriche, implementato maggiori DPI e ridotto il numero di pazienti autorizzati a essere nello studio contemporaneamente", afferma il dott. Kunen.

If you are visiting a dentist, you will likely need to answer questions about your health and contact anyone who may have the virus before your visit. Temperature controls are also common.

Whether or not you should go to the dentist is ultimately a personal decision. Knowing the potential risks, you should consider your comfort level in the circumstances and do what is best for you and your situation.

"Siamo ancora in una fase molto precoce nella comprensione di questo misterioso virus e penso che la sicurezza dell’ingresso nelle aree popolate non possa essere valutata adeguatamente", afferma il dottor Kunen. "Consiglio a quei pazienti che sono ancora molto preoccupati per la cattura del virus di attendere che le condizioni migliorino o finché non avremo una migliore comprensione del COVID-19".

"How

When life gets busy, it’s easy to miss visits to the doctor, but it’s important to stay healthy, especially your teeth. If you don’t see the dentist every six months, a lot of obvious things can happen to you, which makes it even more important to regularly clean and check your teeth, which is as unpleasant as going to the dentist. Skipping appointments can lead to more than just ruining the look of your teeth – it can cause problems that affect other parts of your body as well.

"Quando si tratta di prevenzione della salute orale, la chiave è la chiave", ha detto in una e-mail la coautrice di RealSelf, la dott. ssa Victoria Veytsman."Regular visits to the dentist for checkups and routine cleanings can prevent further problems in the future. Una pulizia regolare aiuta a prevenire la gengivite e l’accumulo di placca e i controlli possono rilevare la carie mentre sono appena agli inizi. A good oral care regimen includes seeing your dentist twice a year — this will ensure your mouth is healthy and prevent dreaded procedure like root canals in the future."

If you’ve overlooked your dentist, it might be time to make a call. Otherwise, you may be dealing with some of these 11 unpleasant symptoms that occur when you miss your dentist appointment.

1. Accumulation of plaque

One of the main things that can happen when you bypass the dentist is a buildup of plaque that hardens and turns into tartar. "Daily brushing and flossing removes a thin layer of film on the teeth, but a professional cleaning helps remove buildup in hard to reach areas," says Dr. Leslie Townsend, DDS. by email. "Skipping these cleanings, particularly when combined with poor oral hygiene, leaves the plaque undisturbed to accumulate on teeth."

2. Cariess

"Tooth decay can begin as simple as a small cavity, but left untreated, it can cause a slew of health issues," says Townsend. "This ranges from pain and bad breath, to full infection and eventual tooth loss." Detecting problems early can help stop the spread of tooth decay.

3. Loss of teeth

"A common misconception is that tooth loss is an issue for [only] older adults," says Townsend. "Unfortunately, according to the NIDCR, young adults age 20-34 have an average of five missing teeth. "Visits to the dentist can help detect and treat gum and bone recession, decay and other issues before they claim one or more of your precious teeth."

4. Gum disease

"Even if they don’t hurt, red and puffy gums are typically a sign of gingivitis," says Dr. Kyle Stanley by email. "If you’re not getting checked up regularly and this persists, you could be in for more serious and expensive issues down the road." If left untreated, gingivitis can develop into a more serious infection called periodontitis, which is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults, according to Healthline.

5. Halitosis

All that plaque and tartar can lead to foul-smelling breath. "Even in the absence of periodontal disease, there can be halitosis, or bad breath, due to their presence in the mouth," says dentist Dr. Frank Farlly. "This bad breath is caused by build up of the end products of their digestive cycle, such as sulphur."

6. Drop out

One of the most obvious consequences of missing a dentist appointment is the presence of multiple cavities due to the accumulation of bacteria. "It’s very easy to fill a small cavity," says Dorfman. "But if you don’t go to the dentist, that small cavity will turn into a big cavity, which can lead to a root canal or crown…essentially, a much bigger problem."

7. Discoloration on the teeth

All of this buildup on the teeth can also have unpleasant aesthetic effects. "Teeth become dark and yellow due to stains from food, decay, smoking, etc.," says Stanley. Regular cleaning can help protect your teeth from discoloration.

8. Oral cancer

Oral cancer isn’t just unattractive – it can be life-threatening. "The best prognosis for a cure is always going to be early detection," says dentist Dr. Bill Dorfman by email. "Your dentist should do an oral cancer screening every six months."

9. Disease in the body

Neglect your mouth and you will increase the risk of developing other diseases that affect all parts of the body. "Oral health is directly correlated to other systems of the body, as well as a surprising range of illnesses such as breast cancer, diabetes, heart disease, stroke and many others," says Townsend. "Think of your mouth as the gateway to your body."

10. Abscesses & Pus

"It’s not uncommon for abscesses and pus to also go unnoticed," says Stanley. "Without getting checked up regularly and getting x-rays, it’s possible for abscesses and other infections to continue to grow."

11. White coated tongue

Bacteria that accumulate in the mouth not only cause bad breath, but can also build up and form a white film on the tongue. If this condition persists for several weeks, it is definitely time to see your dentist.

As annoying as going to the dentist, your overall health depends on those visits, so don’t skip it.

Dentophobia is defined as the extreme fear of going to the dentist. About 2.7% of men and 4.6% of women have dentophobia. Given the importance of good oral hygiene, fear of a dentist can have a serious impact on people’s health.

Often the result of dentophobia is that people only visit the dentist when the pain gets worse than the fear itself. The longer people avoid visiting the dentist, the greater their anxiety can be. This delay in visiting the dentist only makes your dental problems worse, which can lead to feelings of embarrassment and increased fear.

In this blog post, we’ll look at some of the common reasons why people fear going to the dentist. We’ll also outline some tips for overcoming these fears and advice if your children are afraid.

Why are people afraid of the dentist?

One possible reason people fear visiting a dental clinic is because of an unpleasant or painful past experience. This fear can come from childhood and build up steadily over the years. Hearing about failed dentist appointments, both on the news and from other people, can discourage people from going to the dentist.

Embarrassment is another possible reason, as is the feeling of ‘loss of control’ when sitting in a dentist’s chair. Another possible reason is people’s fear of medical procedures involving needles, which is known as trypanophobia.

Tips to overcome your fears

If you dislike the feeling of not having any control when sitting in a dentist’s chair, ask the dentist to explain each stage of the procedure before it happens. This at least gives you a sense of understanding and reduces the blind panic you may experience.

Agree with your dentist for a stop sign. It might just be raising your hand to let them know you need a break. Take a moment to catch your breath or rinse your mouth with water.

Another useful tip is to listen to music with headphones. This can muffle the noise from any equipment and distract you from your dentist’s work.

You can find a dentist friend in Hudson, Wisconsin at Bardill Dental. Click here for more detailed information.

Tips if your child is afraid

A child may fear visiting a dentist become it is an ‘unknown’, and therefore scary, place. Answer all their questions and calm down with reassuring answers.

If you have had any unpleasant experiences from visiting a dentist, don’t share them with your child. Purchase a child-friendly book that contains easy-to-understand information about dentist appointments and the importance of good oral hygiene.

Finally, never reward them for visiting the dentist. This can make them assume that a dental visit is something that needs to be ‘overcome’, which can suggest it will be unpleasant.

Overcome the fear of visiting the dentist

If you are afraid of the dentist, the above practical tips can help you overcome your uncertainty. Always speak to your dentist first if you feel nervous. They will understand this and take it slowly, remembering to keep calm during your visit.

Do you like this blog post about the fear of going to the dentist? Be sure to check out our other news articles today on the rest of our blog.

"How

When life gets busy, it’s easy to miss visits to the doctor, but it’s important to stay healthy, especially your teeth. If you don’t see the dentist every six months, a lot of obvious things can happen to you, which makes it even more important to regularly clean and check your teeth, which is as unpleasant as going to the dentist. Skipping appointments can lead to more than just ruining the look of your teeth – it can cause problems that affect other parts of your body as well.

"Quando si tratta di prevenzione della salute orale, la chiave è la chiave", ha detto in una e-mail la coautrice di RealSelf, la dott. ssa Victoria Veytsman."Regular visits to the dentist for checkups and routine cleanings can prevent further problems in the future. Una pulizia regolare aiuta a prevenire la gengivite e l’accumulo di placca e i controlli possono rilevare la carie mentre sono appena agli inizi. A good oral care regimen includes seeing your dentist twice a year — this will ensure your mouth is healthy and prevent dreaded procedure like root canals in the future."

If you’ve overlooked your dentist, it might be time to make a call. Otherwise, you may be dealing with some of these 11 unpleasant symptoms that occur when you miss your dentist appointment.

1. Accumulation of plaque

One of the main things that can happen when you bypass the dentist is a buildup of plaque that hardens and turns into tartar. "Daily brushing and flossing removes a thin layer of film on the teeth, but a professional cleaning helps remove buildup in hard to reach areas," says Dr. Leslie Townsend, DDS. by email. "Skipping these cleanings, particularly when combined with poor oral hygiene, leaves the plaque undisturbed to accumulate on teeth."

2. Cariess

"Tooth decay can begin as simple as a small cavity, but left untreated, it can cause a slew of health issues," says Townsend. "This ranges from pain and bad breath, to full infection and eventual tooth loss." Detecting problems early can help stop the spread of tooth decay.

3. Loss of teeth

"A common misconception is that tooth loss is an issue for [only] older adults," says Townsend. "Unfortunately, according to the NIDCR, young adults age 20-34 have an average of five missing teeth. "Visits to the dentist can help detect and treat gum and bone recession, decay and other issues before they claim one or more of your precious teeth."

4. Gum disease

"Even if they don’t hurt, red and puffy gums are typically a sign of gingivitis," says Dr. Kyle Stanley by email. "If you’re not getting checked up regularly and this persists, you could be in for more serious and expensive issues down the road." If left untreated, gingivitis can develop into a more serious infection called periodontitis, which is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults, according to Healthline.

5. Halitosis

All that plaque and tartar can lead to foul-smelling breath. "Even in the absence of periodontal disease, there can be halitosis, or bad breath, due to their presence in the mouth," says dentist Dr. Frank Farlly. "This bad breath is caused by build up of the end products of their digestive cycle, such as sulphur."

6. Drop out

One of the most obvious consequences of missing a dentist appointment is the presence of multiple cavities due to the accumulation of bacteria. "It’s very easy to fill a small cavity," says Dorfman. "But if you don’t go to the dentist, that small cavity will turn into a big cavity, which can lead to a root canal or crown…essentially, a much bigger problem."

7. Discoloration on the teeth

All of this buildup on the teeth can also have unpleasant aesthetic effects. "Teeth become dark and yellow due to stains from food, decay, smoking, etc.," says Stanley. Regular cleaning can help protect your teeth from discoloration.

8. Oral cancer

Oral cancer isn’t just unattractive – it can be life-threatening. "The best prognosis for a cure is always going to be early detection," says dentist Dr. Bill Dorfman by email. "Your dentist should do an oral cancer screening every six months."

9. Disease in the body

Neglect your mouth and you will increase the risk of developing other diseases that affect all parts of the body. "Oral health is directly correlated to other systems of the body, as well as a surprising range of illnesses such as breast cancer, diabetes, heart disease, stroke and many others," says Townsend. "Think of your mouth as the gateway to your body."

10. Abscesses & Pus

"It’s not uncommon for abscesses and pus to also go unnoticed," says Stanley. "Without getting checked up regularly and getting x-rays, it’s possible for abscesses and other infections to continue to grow."

11. White coated tongue

Bacteria that accumulate in the mouth not only cause bad breath, but can also build up and form a white film on the tongue. If this condition persists for several weeks, it is definitely time to see your dentist.

As annoying as going to the dentist, your overall health depends on those visits, so don’t skip it.