How to get organized for a business trip

How to get organized for a business trip

Small business owners often struggle with getting and staying organized. The brainpower and time associated with the day’s ever-evolving task list leaves us with just enough energy to stay afloat. And typically, the things that get sacrificed in this commotion are the very processes and projects that are meant to keep us organized and confidently on track.

But, we now have a new year and a fresh start to get organized so that we can be our most productive selves in 2020. Here are some tips for making it happen.

1. Set aside the time to get organized

The first step in getting organized is making the time for it. This might seem like a no-brainer, but easier said than done. Keep reminding yourself that the time spent getting yourself in order for the year ahead will be exponentially rewarded later on.

Depending on your schedule, daily obligations, and current level of organization, set aside chunks of time that will work best for you. If you can focus 100% of your daily attention on planning your year, then block off an entire few days or weeks to dedicate to getting organized. If this is an unrealistic expectation for you, then set aside 2 hours each day, or most days, during the month of January to focus on big picture organization.

2. Take it one step at a time

Any project is easier to digest when broken into segments. Avoid getting overwhelmed by compiling an organization task list of specific goals with realistic deadlines. For example, start by organizing your workspace. Detail what all that entails (e.g. clean out drawers, shred old paperwork, take office supply inventory, arrange bookshelf, etc.) and then give yourself an attainable timeframe for completion. By decreasing clutter, which, research shows, increases stress and makes it hard to focus on getting things done, you’ll be more productive and won’t waste your time trying to locate things.

Once your physical space is organized you can move on to the nitty gritty of your business. Create (or revisit) a system for organizing your finances, refine your consulting curriculum, organize college notes from the past year, plan your marketing efforts for the coming year, pencil in a conference and college tour schedule, and so forth. Each sub-topic you focus on should include an even more specific task list and should receive a chunk of space on your calendar to tackle.

How to get organized for a business trip

3. Create a process for staying organized day to day

After spending an adequate amount of time focusing on the big picture organization for 2020, you’ll then want to implement daily and monthly schedules and task lists to keep you on track through the entire year.

Find a time, either the night prior or first thing in the morning, to set a daily task list. Remember to always leave plenty of time for day to day communication and tasks that will likely never make their way onto a list. Get yourself in a routine when it comes to logging and organizing student meeting notes, paperwork and files, college visit notes, and the like.

Keep yourself accountable and stick to your daily systems as much as possible. We all know that things come up that can easily knock us off course, so it’s important to schedule time each month-end to tie up any loose ends that might have been pushed to the side. Reflect on what you accomplished and prepare yourself for the month ahead.

4. Find the right system to help get you organized

Creating systems, or better yet, finding and implementing popular tools (including apps, software, etc.) are a great way to help keep you organized. These systems can have a major impact in streamlining your work and simplifying your processes. However, you’ll want to be careful here. If you are relying on too many, these systems themselves can become a disorganized burden. Emails, text communication, file sharing, invoicing, college data, college notes, application tasks and deadlines, and the list goes on. If you have a system for each, comprised of both online and offline methods, then keeping them all updated, organized, and communicating with each other becomes a full-time job in itself.

This is where CollegePlannerPro comes in. We’ve created a platform that provides you the toolkit necessary to manage all aspects of your business so you can stay organized without the hassle. Get rid of clunky paper files, ditch costly single-solution software tools, and access your account anywhere.

Are you ready to get your business organized this year? If so, we are excited to provide you with a special offer to help keep you motivated. If you get started with a new CollegePlannerPro account by January 31st you’ll not only receive a free 30-day trial, but also an additional month free to use in 2020.

Learn more about this offer here and let us help you make 2020 your most productive year yet.

How to get organized for a business trip

Business travel takes you not only away from the office, but also far from your usual routine. When you’re not sleeping in the same bed, eating the same food, or working at the same desk, it can be tough to get into your typical hard-working mindset.

Yet, in spite of the jet lag and the back-to-back meetings you probably have planned, there are some easy steps you can take to adjust, making any work trip a productive one. To learn more, I spoke with four successful road warriors who revealed their secrets for getting down to business quickly, staying focused, and producing great work—even when you’re on the go.

1. Let Technology be Your Assistant

Before you depart, decide which of your gadgets will serve you best on the trip, and pack accordingly. Do you need your laptop for heavy-duty writing projects, or will your smartphone and tablet be enough? Depending on the focus of your trip, you may be able to lighten your load and leave some devices at home.

Whatever you decide to bring, having access to reliable Wi-Fi is essential. Most major airlines offer this as an in-flight service, but double check availability and pricing before you book a flight. For frequent flyers, Amanda Augustine, job search expert for TheLadders, recommends purchasing a plan from a service like Gogo, an in-flight internet service that covers multiple airlines. Of course, you’ll need to work after your flight, too—so make sure to verify Wi-Fi availability at your hotel, conference center, and meeting space.

2. Plan Everything

Even in the electronic age, long-time business approaches still apply. “Before you leave, put a list together of what you need to bring,” suggests Meryl Pearlstein, owner of MDP Publicity. Consider anything you could possibly need—from business attire and office supplies to cosmetics and battery chargers—so that all your must-haves are faithfully by your side, even miles away from home. Many road warriors also like to bring a few comforts from home (like a pillow from home or a favorite comfy sweatshirt) to help them adjust quickly to their home-away-from-home environments.

And since traveling never seems to go exactly as planned, make sure your to-bring list accounts for potential emergencies and delays. If you’re checking a bag, pack a change of clothes, a toothbrush, some makeup, and anything you’ll need for your first day of work inside your carry-on. (Or, learn how to pack more efficiently and take only a carry-on!)

In addition to the essentials, Dawn Wilcox, managing director of the Social Impact Practice at Allison+Partners, likes to keep a folder with her flight schedule and travel details in her carry-on for easy access. On that note, she also suggests always booking a direct flight instead of a connecting one. As fun as an extra six hours in the Las Vegas airport sounds, delays can seriously impact your mood, productivity, and meeting schedule.

3. Communicate to Your Office Before You Leave

One of the most difficult parts of business travel is keeping up with your normal workload when your day-to-day routine is suddenly nothing like normal. So, preparation is key to make sure everything at the office stays on track while you’re away.

Before heading out, meet with your project teams to get status updates and review upcoming deadlines. Augustine emphasizes that it’s extremely important to communicate to your team when you’ll be available by phone or checking your email, and when you’ll be totally unavailable. Also let everyone know how you’d like to be contacted in case of emergency (by text? By emails marked “Urgent?”), so you can address pressing issues between meetings.

Then, set your out-of-office message to indicate a point person for inquiries and set communication expectations (e.g., “If you have a question pertaining to the sales conference next month, please contact Amanda Johnston. I will respond to general inquiries when I return to the office on Monday.”)

4. Get Familiar With Your Destination

Before you actually arrive, find out where you’ll be staying and what’s nearby. Where’s the closest grocery store where you can grab some snacks? Is the conference center within walking distance? Pearlstein suggests figuring out how hard it’ll be to find a cab, particularly at night (if you’re not in a high-traffic area, it might be better to arrange for a car service).

Knowing this information before you arrive will save you valuable time when you get there—so you can settle in and get right to work. (But since you’ll probably still have to make some on-the-fly decisions, load up your phone or tablet with apps that make travel a lot easier, like OpenTable for dinner reservations and Uber for car service.)

5. Set To-Dos to do While in Route

Take advantage of your commuting time to be productive, instead of saving it for your destination. “Make a list of goals for what you’re going to do in transit,” recommends Randi Brill, CEO of Quarasan and founder of Teacher Peach in Chicago. “If you say, ‘I’ll do it when I get to the hotel,’” she adds, you probably won’t get to it—after a full day of traveling, you’ll be exhausted. But, don’t wear yourself out—Wilcox prefers to work during the first three quarters of her flight and then spend the last leg relaxing.

To help boost your productivity in-transit, consider signing up for hotel or airline loyalty programs or business credit cards that offer travel perks. Susan Baroncini-Moe, an Indianapolis business strategist and author of Business in Blue Jeans, uses her airline’s club lounges whenever possible, but “also invested in some high-quality noise-canceling headphones,” which help her work well in crowded spaces.

6. Find Your Focus

Once you land and check in, do whatever it takes to optimize your time and comfort, says Baroncini-Moe. Whether unpacking immediately helps you feel more organized, or stocking your mini-fridge with iced coffee gets you revved up to work, recognize what helps you feel settled in—and do it.

When you’re working in your hotel room, Pearlstein suggests sitting at a desk or table and setting it up to resemble your regular workspace: Unpack your laptop, find an outlet for your phone and computer chargers, connect to the Wi-Fi, organize your files, and arrange any office supplies you need. With your desk ready to go, you’ll have an easier time getting right to work when you pop into your hotel room between meetings.

But no matter how productive you are, it’s also important to figure out how to unwind at the end of a long day. Baroncini-Moe prefers to recharge with some alone time: A quiet dinner, good book, phone call with her husband, and meditation. When you find time to relax at night, you’ll be more alert, productive, and energized the next day.

Finally, “Take advantage of the fact you’re traveling,” suggests Pearlstein. At the end of a trip to Vancouver, during a two-hour airport layover, Pearlstein decided to go on a speed-sightseeing tour of the city, returning just in time to catch her flight. Of course, the main reason for your trip is business—but that doesn’t mean you can’t see the sights, too.

How to get organized for a business trip

Business travel takes you not only away from the office, but also far from your usual routine. When you’re not sleeping in the same bed, eating the same food, or working at the same desk, it can be tough to get into your typical hard-working mindset.

Yet, in spite of the jet lag and the back-to-back meetings you probably have planned, there are some easy steps you can take to adjust, making any work trip a productive one. To learn more, I spoke with four successful road warriors who revealed their secrets for getting down to business quickly, staying focused, and producing great work—even when you’re on the go.

1. Let Technology be Your Assistant

Before you depart, decide which of your gadgets will serve you best on the trip, and pack accordingly. Do you need your laptop for heavy-duty writing projects, or will your smartphone and tablet be enough? Depending on the focus of your trip, you may be able to lighten your load and leave some devices at home.

Whatever you decide to bring, having access to reliable Wi-Fi is essential. Most major airlines offer this as an in-flight service, but double check availability and pricing before you book a flight. For frequent flyers, Amanda Augustine, job search expert for TheLadders, recommends purchasing a plan from a service like Gogo, an in-flight internet service that covers multiple airlines. Of course, you’ll need to work after your flight, too—so make sure to verify Wi-Fi availability at your hotel, conference center, and meeting space.

2. Plan Everything

Even in the electronic age, long-time business approaches still apply. “Before you leave, put a list together of what you need to bring,” suggests Meryl Pearlstein, owner of MDP Publicity. Consider anything you could possibly need—from business attire and office supplies to cosmetics and battery chargers—so that all your must-haves are faithfully by your side, even miles away from home. Many road warriors also like to bring a few comforts from home (like a pillow from home or a favorite comfy sweatshirt) to help them adjust quickly to their home-away-from-home environments.

And since traveling never seems to go exactly as planned, make sure your to-bring list accounts for potential emergencies and delays. If you’re checking a bag, pack a change of clothes, a toothbrush, some makeup, and anything you’ll need for your first day of work inside your carry-on. (Or, learn how to pack more efficiently and take only a carry-on!)

In addition to the essentials, Dawn Wilcox, managing director of the Social Impact Practice at Allison+Partners, likes to keep a folder with her flight schedule and travel details in her carry-on for easy access. On that note, she also suggests always booking a direct flight instead of a connecting one. As fun as an extra six hours in the Las Vegas airport sounds, delays can seriously impact your mood, productivity, and meeting schedule.

3. Communicate to Your Office Before You Leave

One of the most difficult parts of business travel is keeping up with your normal workload when your day-to-day routine is suddenly nothing like normal. So, preparation is key to make sure everything at the office stays on track while you’re away.

Before heading out, meet with your project teams to get status updates and review upcoming deadlines. Augustine emphasizes that it’s extremely important to communicate to your team when you’ll be available by phone or checking your email, and when you’ll be totally unavailable. Also let everyone know how you’d like to be contacted in case of emergency (by text? By emails marked “Urgent?”), so you can address pressing issues between meetings.

Then, set your out-of-office message to indicate a point person for inquiries and set communication expectations (e.g., “If you have a question pertaining to the sales conference next month, please contact Amanda Johnston. I will respond to general inquiries when I return to the office on Monday.”)

4. Get Familiar With Your Destination

Before you actually arrive, find out where you’ll be staying and what’s nearby. Where’s the closest grocery store where you can grab some snacks? Is the conference center within walking distance? Pearlstein suggests figuring out how hard it’ll be to find a cab, particularly at night (if you’re not in a high-traffic area, it might be better to arrange for a car service).

Knowing this information before you arrive will save you valuable time when you get there—so you can settle in and get right to work. (But since you’ll probably still have to make some on-the-fly decisions, load up your phone or tablet with apps that make travel a lot easier, like OpenTable for dinner reservations and Uber for car service.)

5. Set To-Dos to do While in Route

Take advantage of your commuting time to be productive, instead of saving it for your destination. “Make a list of goals for what you’re going to do in transit,” recommends Randi Brill, CEO of Quarasan and founder of Teacher Peach in Chicago. “If you say, ‘I’ll do it when I get to the hotel,’” she adds, you probably won’t get to it—after a full day of traveling, you’ll be exhausted. But, don’t wear yourself out—Wilcox prefers to work during the first three quarters of her flight and then spend the last leg relaxing.

To help boost your productivity in-transit, consider signing up for hotel or airline loyalty programs or business credit cards that offer travel perks. Susan Baroncini-Moe, an Indianapolis business strategist and author of Business in Blue Jeans, uses her airline’s club lounges whenever possible, but “also invested in some high-quality noise-canceling headphones,” which help her work well in crowded spaces.

6. Find Your Focus

Once you land and check in, do whatever it takes to optimize your time and comfort, says Baroncini-Moe. Whether unpacking immediately helps you feel more organized, or stocking your mini-fridge with iced coffee gets you revved up to work, recognize what helps you feel settled in—and do it.

When you’re working in your hotel room, Pearlstein suggests sitting at a desk or table and setting it up to resemble your regular workspace: Unpack your laptop, find an outlet for your phone and computer chargers, connect to the Wi-Fi, organize your files, and arrange any office supplies you need. With your desk ready to go, you’ll have an easier time getting right to work when you pop into your hotel room between meetings.

But no matter how productive you are, it’s also important to figure out how to unwind at the end of a long day. Baroncini-Moe prefers to recharge with some alone time: A quiet dinner, good book, phone call with her husband, and meditation. When you find time to relax at night, you’ll be more alert, productive, and energized the next day.

Finally, “Take advantage of the fact you’re traveling,” suggests Pearlstein. At the end of a trip to Vancouver, during a two-hour airport layover, Pearlstein decided to go on a speed-sightseeing tour of the city, returning just in time to catch her flight. Of course, the main reason for your trip is business—but that doesn’t mean you can’t see the sights, too.

How to get organized for a business trip

When it comes to traveling, it is not just about vacation. Many people have to travel for business on a regular basis. And planning a business trip takes more than packing and getting to a meeting. You need to organize yourself well.

Unlike leisure travel, business travel calls for more planning and a well-defined schedule, which must be followed in order.

In addition, it is very common that those who are traveling on business do not have much time to enjoy the city outside of their scheduled hours.

Therefore, going with structured planning will help you to enjoy the trip, even if it is on business.

Interested in planning your business trip? Here are some tips!

1. Business and leisure

A business trip is not like traveling for tourism! Keeping your travel goal in mind helps you stay focused and productive.

Of course, you can have some free time to go out and relax, but it is important to remember that you are not traveling to visit new places or rest, this must be done outside of working hours.

There are some things that can be done to make your business trip lighter and help you enjoy a little of the city you are in.

As working is the main goal, use lunch or dinner time to walk around and experiment the local cuisine, for example.

Even if the focus of your trip is to close work partnerships, nothing prevents you from getting to know your destination, even if it is quickly.

2. Business trip: Planning and organizing your suitcase

Packing your suitcase for a business trip is always a dilemma! After all, how do you know what to bring?

To start, checking your schedule will make you more prepared when choosing what to pack.

You can see how many meetings, events, formal dinners, and casual appointments are scheduled and you will be able to separate the appropriate styles.

Then, remember to check the weather forecast. We know that these things are never entirely certain, but it can help when separating each piece of clothing.

Neutral colors are wildcards in suitcases, especially when traveling on business. So, you can think of different combinations and optimize your bag.

And, of course, don’t forget any important work equipment. Pack your documents, folders, calendar and whatever else you need during your workdays away from home.

You may even be an expert in leisure travel, yet your experience will not be able to help you if something goes wrong and you are away from home for work.

We have gathered some tips that will help you, from knowing what is essential to take, to reduce the costs of a corporate trip. All very simple, but for sure, they are tips that will make your business trips less rushed and provide you with a much better experience.

So, find below some essential steps for you to plan your trip, enjoy, and still maintain your productivity.

3. Check all information and anticipate unforeseen events

Preparing in advance for a trip is always important. On a business trip, then, taking care of every detail is essential. After all, any unforeseen event can put your trip at risk.

Make your checklist to leave nothing behind. No leaving your notebook, phone and tablet behind! Cross out your list as you organize your things.

Before you leave, pay attention to your documents! If you are going on international trips, passports and visas must go in your handbag or in easily accessible pockets.

Remember to arrive at the airport in advance, it is recommended to arrive at least one hour before departure time for domestic flights and three hours for international flights.

4. Have an extra or portable battery for your cell phone

Even if you charge your phone the day before the trip, there is no battery that will last forever. Therefore, provide an extra battery or a portable charger for your electronics.

If your job depends solely and exclusively on technology, use it to your advantage and be prepared to avoid any setbacks.

Not to mention that this can help a lot if your hotel room doesn’t have enough plugs to charge all your equipment. Better safe than sorry!

5. Take plug adapters

And speaking of electronic devices, remember not to leave without plug adapters. You never know under what conditions you will find a hotel room.

So, when packing, have several plug adapters inside – so you won’t have any problems with batteries, for example.

If it is an international trip, the universal adapter becomes even more useful.

6. Do you use a business card? Make sure you have enough before your trip

Taking a business trip is the best way to expand your professional network. In many cases, you can even get new customers and, of course, promote your brand.

For this, it is important that you always have a business card and that it is up to date.

7. Double-check your emails

During a business trip, it is necessary to be even more attentive to communication with the rest of the team.

Thus, you will be aware of what is happening even from afar and can be useful in case of any urgent demand.

Check your email a few times a day to make sure that there are no major changes that need to be made with your authorization. Also, let your team know about your availability to respond to emails during this time.

And in case of an emergency, advise that the contact is made by phone, but only in case of urgency. No one wants to be interrupted in the middle of a presentation to answer a call that could wait for an answer by email.

8. Maintain professional posture when traveling for business

As much as we always get some free time to get to know some places and have fun, it is important to maintain a professional attitude throughout a business trip.

Did you like the city, country, destination? How about scheduling a return trip to go on a tour and get to know every corner?

During a business trip, you will hardly be able to walk around, take photos or enjoy any tourist itinerary.

Above all, a business trip demands availability, responsibility and a lot of focus.

If your company is sending you to a place other than the usual workplace, there is a purpose to be fulfilled. So, focus on the purpose of your trip!

9. Building networks and making professional contacts

What better place to make professional contacts than on a business trip?

This is the perfect opportunity to network and go home with several contacts from influential people in your area.

Remember, later on, that all of these contacts can bring you new opportunities.

10. Strategic hotel location

The hotel where the team will be staying during a business trip must be strategically located close to the places of interest.

If you are going to participate in an event, for example, choose hotels that are close to the event’s place. If you are going to a corporate meeting, stay in a hotel that is close to the company.

That way, you can avoid the risk of being late to get there.

And Mundi can help you with this. We have many years of experience providing corporate clients with high-quality luxury transportation, fully trained chauffeurs, and a team of experts who will make sure every detail is according to each need, with personalized service.

Book with us and have an exceptional business travel experience.

How to get organized for a business trip

When it comes to traveling, it is not just about vacation. Many people have to travel for business on a regular basis. And planning a business trip takes more than packing and getting to a meeting. You need to organize yourself well.

Unlike leisure travel, business travel calls for more planning and a well-defined schedule, which must be followed in order.

In addition, it is very common that those who are traveling on business do not have much time to enjoy the city outside of their scheduled hours.

Therefore, going with structured planning will help you to enjoy the trip, even if it is on business.

Interested in planning your business trip? Here are some tips!

1. Business and leisure

A business trip is not like traveling for tourism! Keeping your travel goal in mind helps you stay focused and productive.

Of course, you can have some free time to go out and relax, but it is important to remember that you are not traveling to visit new places or rest, this must be done outside of working hours.

There are some things that can be done to make your business trip lighter and help you enjoy a little of the city you are in.

As working is the main goal, use lunch or dinner time to walk around and experiment the local cuisine, for example.

Even if the focus of your trip is to close work partnerships, nothing prevents you from getting to know your destination, even if it is quickly.

2. Business trip: Planning and organizing your suitcase

Packing your suitcase for a business trip is always a dilemma! After all, how do you know what to bring?

To start, checking your schedule will make you more prepared when choosing what to pack.

You can see how many meetings, events, formal dinners, and casual appointments are scheduled and you will be able to separate the appropriate styles.

Then, remember to check the weather forecast. We know that these things are never entirely certain, but it can help when separating each piece of clothing.

Neutral colors are wildcards in suitcases, especially when traveling on business. So, you can think of different combinations and optimize your bag.

And, of course, don’t forget any important work equipment. Pack your documents, folders, calendar and whatever else you need during your workdays away from home.

You may even be an expert in leisure travel, yet your experience will not be able to help you if something goes wrong and you are away from home for work.

We have gathered some tips that will help you, from knowing what is essential to take, to reduce the costs of a corporate trip. All very simple, but for sure, they are tips that will make your business trips less rushed and provide you with a much better experience.

So, find below some essential steps for you to plan your trip, enjoy, and still maintain your productivity.

3. Check all information and anticipate unforeseen events

Preparing in advance for a trip is always important. On a business trip, then, taking care of every detail is essential. After all, any unforeseen event can put your trip at risk.

Make your checklist to leave nothing behind. No leaving your notebook, phone and tablet behind! Cross out your list as you organize your things.

Before you leave, pay attention to your documents! If you are going on international trips, passports and visas must go in your handbag or in easily accessible pockets.

Remember to arrive at the airport in advance, it is recommended to arrive at least one hour before departure time for domestic flights and three hours for international flights.

4. Have an extra or portable battery for your cell phone

Even if you charge your phone the day before the trip, there is no battery that will last forever. Therefore, provide an extra battery or a portable charger for your electronics.

If your job depends solely and exclusively on technology, use it to your advantage and be prepared to avoid any setbacks.

Not to mention that this can help a lot if your hotel room doesn’t have enough plugs to charge all your equipment. Better safe than sorry!

5. Take plug adapters

And speaking of electronic devices, remember not to leave without plug adapters. You never know under what conditions you will find a hotel room.

So, when packing, have several plug adapters inside – so you won’t have any problems with batteries, for example.

If it is an international trip, the universal adapter becomes even more useful.

6. Do you use a business card? Make sure you have enough before your trip

Taking a business trip is the best way to expand your professional network. In many cases, you can even get new customers and, of course, promote your brand.

For this, it is important that you always have a business card and that it is up to date.

7. Double-check your emails

During a business trip, it is necessary to be even more attentive to communication with the rest of the team.

Thus, you will be aware of what is happening even from afar and can be useful in case of any urgent demand.

Check your email a few times a day to make sure that there are no major changes that need to be made with your authorization. Also, let your team know about your availability to respond to emails during this time.

And in case of an emergency, advise that the contact is made by phone, but only in case of urgency. No one wants to be interrupted in the middle of a presentation to answer a call that could wait for an answer by email.

8. Maintain professional posture when traveling for business

As much as we always get some free time to get to know some places and have fun, it is important to maintain a professional attitude throughout a business trip.

Did you like the city, country, destination? How about scheduling a return trip to go on a tour and get to know every corner?

During a business trip, you will hardly be able to walk around, take photos or enjoy any tourist itinerary.

Above all, a business trip demands availability, responsibility and a lot of focus.

If your company is sending you to a place other than the usual workplace, there is a purpose to be fulfilled. So, focus on the purpose of your trip!

9. Building networks and making professional contacts

What better place to make professional contacts than on a business trip?

This is the perfect opportunity to network and go home with several contacts from influential people in your area.

Remember, later on, that all of these contacts can bring you new opportunities.

10. Strategic hotel location

The hotel where the team will be staying during a business trip must be strategically located close to the places of interest.

If you are going to participate in an event, for example, choose hotels that are close to the event’s place. If you are going to a corporate meeting, stay in a hotel that is close to the company.

That way, you can avoid the risk of being late to get there.

And Mundi can help you with this. We have many years of experience providing corporate clients with high-quality luxury transportation, fully trained chauffeurs, and a team of experts who will make sure every detail is according to each need, with personalized service.

Book with us and have an exceptional business travel experience.

How often does life seem chaotic to you?

If you’re like me — running, founding or acquiring multiple businesses — it can look pretty chaotic sometimes.

Some of us are energized by the chaos. Others of us are totally thrown off by the chaos. For the entrepreneur, it’s important to make sense of the chaos in order to truly succeed.

Though some chaos will inevitably creep into any day, there are certain tricks and hacks that can keep you organized no matter what.

Super organized entrepreneurs review their goals every day.

The entrepreneur’s goals are guiding lights.

Every successful entrepreneur has goals, and the most successful entrepreneurs review their goals frequently.

Keeping your goals front and center allows you to weave through the chaos. It’s an introspective process that helps you hack at extraneous details. It can reveal what is important, what is a waste of time and what you should do about it all.

To instantly bring organization and clarity to your life, review your goals often.

Super organized entrepreneurs batch tasks.

“ Batching ” is collecting all of your similar tasks for the day (or week) and doing them all at once.

  • Email: Sit down and do it all at once.
  • Writing articles: Get it done in a single morning.
  • Writing your business plan: Take an afternoon and write it down.

Darren Rowse discovered this process in 2008. He explained ,

My week was a jumble of activities.

He would run from one task to another and never seemed to get anything done.

My life felt like a traffic jam,” he said, “with tasks coming from all directions.

After he learned to batch, he reports having become “10 times more productive.”

Batching can eliminate your disorganization in a one fell swoop.

They work on the one thing that will move their business forward.

For most entrepreneurs, there’s that one thing in your mind that you know you should do. You recognize its importance and even realize that it has the potential to change your business and dramatically move things forward.

The problem? You feel too disorganized to do it.

A simple way to usher organization into your life is to just do it. Every day when you wake up, resolve to do at least one task that will move your business forward.

Doing so will organize your thinking and your priorities. It will give you a clear and coherent vision for the success of your business.

Super organized entrepreneurs choose a few major tasks for the day.

Staying organized is as much about what you choose not to do as it is about what you choose to do.

Choosing too many “priorities” for the day will crush you and leave you gasping for relief. Before you know it, your day will crumble into a pile of disorganized chaos.

The secret to staying on track?

Select a few things that you need to get done for the day. Maybe it’s a single task — an article, a marketing plan, one step in a new hire, etc., — that you must get done.

Leo Babauta refers to these tasks as “Big Rocks.” They are “the major things you want to get done this week.”

Unfortunately, “These Big Rocks get pushed back from week to week because we never have time to do them — our days fill up too quickly. Too often we overstep the Big Rocks only to look back nostalgically.

How do you avoid this problem? By planning your week with the Big Rocks first.

Super organized entrepreneurs delegate.

In fact, the art of delegation may be the difference between entrepreneurs who flounder and entrepreneurs who succeed.

BBC reports that “delegating gets harder to do the higher someone goes up the corporate ladder.” For the entrepreneur delegation can be even more difficult.

The Harvard business review provides a helpful process to move from anti-delegator to master delegator.

  1. Understand why you’re not delegating.
  2. Measure how you’re doing.
  3. Choose the right people.
  4. Integrate delegation into what you already do.
  5. Ask others to hold you accountable.
  6. Really let go.
  7. Learn from experience.

Here are some of the things that entrepreneurs must learn to delegate.

  • Anything you don’t enjoy doing.
  • Anything you don’t do well.
  • Anything that will help to increase cash flow.
  • Anything that is getting in the way of growing your business.
  • Anything that is process-oriented (easy to do) but time consuming.
  • Anything you want a team member or aspiring leader to learn to do.

If you run all your tasks through this delegation matrix, you may discover you’re left with very little to do.

What does this mean? Have you delegated too much? No indeed. Instead you’ve unlocked the secret of master entrepreneurship. You’ve freed yourself of administrative minutiae and can take your business to extraordinary new heights.

Conclusion

Entrepreneurs must be organized. Does this mean that they always iron their shirts in a certain way and live life by a routinary schedule?

Maybe not, and that’s okay.

The point is that an entrepreneur organizes his or her life around what’s important — growing the business and achieving dreams.

If you attempt this task without a thought as to organization, you’ll fail. If you guide your task with an organized mindset, you will succeed.

What are your entrepreneurial organization hacks?

How to get organized for a business trip

Traveling is one thing that company and business owners cannot avoid. Company employees will have to travel every once in a while, in order to attend conferences, meet clients and even supervise a company’s worksite. Without proper planning, it can get confusing for these employees to understand their assignments and the timelines allotted to them. The best way to solve this is through the use of a business travel itinerary template.

Using such a template will allow the organizing of travel plans into schedules that are precise and easy to understand.

Business Travel Itinerary Template

How to get organized for a business trip

5 Day Business Trip Planner Template

Business meeting itinerary template is used when you are planning on attending a meeting. The template contains the reasons for attending that particular meeting, venue, the time and the date. It ensures that the attendee has all the information that he or she needs to know about the meeting. The information is organized in a precise manner and hence it makes it easier for the attendee to read and understand it easily.

Editable Sample Travel Itinerary for Excel

Basic Business Itinerary Gridsheet Template

Business Safety Travel Itinerary Template

Business Tour Sample Itinerary

Business Travel Checklist Itinerary Template

Business Travel Checklist

Business Travel Itinerary Sample

Business travel itinerary template (DOC)

Business Travel Itinerary Example

Business Travel Itinerary Template For Word

Business Travel Itinerary (PDF Format)

The template is based on Excel. It allows you to record all the details about the business trip you are organizing. Recording these details will allow everyone who is being involved in the trip to understand what they should expect during the travel period.

Business Trip Itinerary for Excel

The template has an itinerary on its front page and more pages that contain meeting schedules and details for each day of your trip. Since all details are available in a single document, it is easier for you to plan ahead of each meeting. When you are attending multiple meetings in different locations, it can become difficult to keep track of time and locations solely by memorizing them. The meeting schedule included in the template can come in handy in solving this problem for you.

Business Trip Itinerary With Meeting Schedule

Business Vacation Itinerary Template

Detailed Business Program Travel Itinerary

The template is designed in such a way that it includes all the basic details that a traveling executive needs. When an executive is traveling, there some details that he or she needs to know during the travel period. To ensure that this happens, executive travel itinerary template allows for easy organization and presentation of these details.

Detailed Travel Itinerary Information Template

Personal Travel Itinerary Template

Individual Tailored Business Travel Itinerary

Printable Business Travel Checklist Template

Printable Business Vacation Itinerary

Sample Business Travel Itinerary

Simple Business Travel Itinerary Template

How do You Make a Travel Itinerary?

Creating a travel template is not as hard as many people usually think. This guide will help you go through this process easily. Follow the steps outlined here and you should have your travel/vacation itinerary with you within a short period of time.

Step #1: Collect All the Information You Need for Your Trip

The information to collect may include flight numbers and hotels in which you can reside in during your travel period. Also, include the approximate fees that you expect to pay so that you can be able to plan your budget for the trip.

Step #2: Organize Your Travel Essentials

After you have collected all the information you need, the second step involves organizing that information on your itinerary. This is important because it will help you to keep your itinerary simple, clear, and concise.

Step #3: Map Your Stops

This step involves determining the locations which you would like to visit during your trip. You should organize these stops in such a way that it saves you time while you are commuting to these locations. Locations that are adjacent to each other should be placed together on your Itinerary.

Step #4: Add Activities

After you have determined the locations you will have to visit, you need to include the activities that you will be doing at each location. This will help you to have a clear goal for stopping in each location and hence minimizing time wastage.

Step #5: Create Your Budget

A budget should help you in determining the amount of money that you need during your trip. This can prevent you from overusing your money by keeping your spending at the bare minimum.

Step #6: Make Your Itinerary Flexible

Allow room for exploration. This will make your trip more rewarding. Also, you should always remember that your travel itinerary is supposed to act only as a guide to keep you on track. Hence, allowing you some time to do other things which are not on the itinerary is not bad at all.

A travel itinerary template is a very important document. It will allow you to save your time, money and also avoid any confusion during your travel period. Creating a travel itinerary doesn’t have to be hard too. Following the steps, we have outlined in this article will make the process easier for you. On your next business trip try using a travel itinerary to make your travel experience better.

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By Amanda Grey | Published 10/28/2004 | Business Issues | Recommendation:
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How to get organized for a business trip

If you’re anyway like me, you sit at a desk where several piles of documents balance precariously between the stapler and the telephone. OK, so maybe the piles are more or less arranged into personal (phone bills, kids’ school reports and bank statements) and professional (glossaries, invoices and outstanding bills), but eventually, you get some downtime and settle down to do the filing.

What about your hard drive? If it were piled on your desk, would you be able to find that document you translated for a client two months ago? Would you be able to find the phone when it rang?? After five years as a freelancer, I have realised that file organisation is one of the keys to efficient and speedy work.

Although most of us have managed to cut out the paper copies involved with a translation job, files can still pile up on your hard drive: original version, first draft, second version with additions by the client, unclean version, final delivered version, reference document, corresponding invoice, translation memory, etc. Getting all this organised after the fact can take up a lot of time, and slow down the work process.

Setting up, and sticking to, a system is the key. While there is software out there that can do the job for you (Translation Office 3000 is one of the good ones), a simple system of creating and naming folders is free and can be entirely personalised to your own way of working.

One of the first things to do is start an Excel spreadsheet, where you enter each job as it comes in, allocating a job number that can eventually be used as an invoice number. Including the arrival date, delivery date, number of words, tariff and payment date can enable you to produce statistics that may be something of an eye-opener. There is no limit to the columns of information you can include. For example, it is possible to make a graph of your activity showing the times of the year you are busiest and the times when it’s better to be off on an island topping up your tan!

If every file you receive gets dumped into your “My Documents” folder with its original filename, I bet you look at the list several months later and wonder what the hell *that* file is? Only by opening it do you realise that it is taking up unnecessary space on your drive.

I use a system where I have one folder per client, with a three-letter code for the client’s name. Each job gets assigned to a new folder within the client folder, given a number and four sub-folders, for the original version, unclean or interim versions, reference material and the final delivered version. The folder structure may look something like this:

My Documents/ABC/004/Source/original_version.doc
My Documents/ABC/004/Reference/cosmetics.glo
My Documents/ABC/004/Final/translated_version.doc

This makes it much easier to save files to a “logical” place, where the actual filename is relatively unimportant. And it means you can keep the original filename allocated by the client. Even if some folders remain empty, they do not take up space, and you can be certain to find files months or even years later.

Another useful feature is the Properties window for a document. Get into the habit of entering a few keywords and even your job number and client name in the properties of the document (File –> Properties). This information will be displayed in Windows Explorer just by placing the cursor over the filename – no need to open up the document to know what it contains. The properties window also gives you the total time spent editing a file (in the statistics tab) – interesting from a translator’s point if you are charging per hour.

Later, when you really get down to the spring cleaning, it will be easier to delete unwanted files, zip up whole folders to save space and for backup onto CD (you do backups, don’t you?) and merge TM’s, glossaries, etc.

I am sure there are as many systems out there as good translators. I only wish I had had the benefit of ProZ when I was starting out – it would have saved me a load of time!