How to get a paternity test when the mother refuses

If an alleged father petitions the court and the judge grants the alleged father the opportunity to establish paternity by way of a DNA test. Technically, the mother must adhere to the court order. In the event, the opts to ignore the court order she can be held in contempt of court.

A mother can deny an alleged father the opportunity to perform a legal paternity test without a court order.This is due to the alleged father not being a custodial parent of the child. A Custodial parent by law has the right to make decisions in the best interest of the child.

Mothers are automatically deemed a custodial parent as soon as the child is born. Alleged fathers can be deemed a custodial parent if he is married to the mother when the child was conceived or by court order. It is important to note, even if an alleged father signs the acknowledgment of paternity form at the hospital and his name is on the birth certificate. The alleged father still does not have any rights to his child.

How long does it take to get a court-ordered paternity test?

The turn around time for court-ordered DNA test will depend on whether you perform the DNA test through the courts or through a private DNA testing service like IDTO DNA Paternity Testing Center.

The average turnaround for paternity tests executed through the courts is 6-8 weeks, sometimes longer. Please note, each state and county turnaround times may differ.

Paternity tests performed by IDTO DNA Center will take 2-3 business days from the date all samples are received by the lab.

Should a man be obligated to pay child support after a DNA test?

If an alleged father establishes paternity through the courts and a DNA test is performed. The court will seek mandate the biological father pay child support. Biological fathers who have not established paternity their child does not have any legal claim to any financial support.

Can a mother be arrested for denying a court-ordered paternity test?

A mother getting arrested for denying a court-ordered DNA test is a rear occurrence. If a mother refuses or ignores a court order the judge can fine the mother or, give her jail time. Denying a court order is known as being in contempt of the court. In most instances, the mother would be fined instead of being given jail time.

In order to receive a better grasp of how your state handles contempt of court issues. Please contact an attorney in your state for better clarity regarding your specific situation.

How to get a paternity test when the mother refuses

The Paternity test or a DNA test is conducted to check fatherhood and it is considered a Legal procedure. However, you need to know what to do if the mother refuses to take the paternity test. DNAs are taken in the form of samples from both the father and the child and sent to the lab for testing.

The interpretation is done based on the similarities in the two separate DNA samples. The more is the similarity, the closer the two individuals are related to each other. In the case of offsprings, there are more similarities than other paternal family members.

Whatever the reason the mother refuses to take a paternity test, keep reading this article to learn the process to follow in this situation.

Why conducting a paternity test is helpful?

A DNA paternity test is considered to be 100% accurate for determining the fatherhood of a person. The genetic materials are tested for a paternity test. Conducting a DNA paternity test can be helpful for many reasons such as:

  • Help to know the fatherhood of a person.
  • Claiming legal right for child support.
  • Claiming for child’s custody.
  • Getting benefits in Social Security benefits and inheritance.
  • Help to identify conditions that may affect a person’s long-term health.

How is the paternity test conducted?

How to get a paternity test when the mother refuses

In the process of conducting a DNA test or a paternity test, several steps are included. In the case of a legal process, the whole conducting process from taking samples to sending the samples to the lab is under the look of a supervisor who approves the testing after checking the Identity proof of all the participants.

After taking the samples, either blood samples or cheek swab samples, they are sent to the lab along with the necessary paperwork done by the supervisor.

This includes getting an appointment from the lab, taking the samples, sending it to the lab for testing, and receiving the result. The result of the DNA or paternity test is kept very confidential so they are updated on the participant’s personal account.

How to get permission for conducting a paternity test?

A DNA paternity test is very helpful for or getting surety about the biological father. In the case of both a mother who is unsure of her child’s father or if a father who is aiming to establish a paternity test can go through a completely legal process.

To get a DNA paternity test done, there are several pieces of information that a person needs to know before conducting the test. The process is carried out in the following manner:

  • To require the DNA test the parents should get in contact with a lawyer
  • The lawyer will help to draught and submit the proper petition to the court
  • Any one of the parents either the mother or the Father of the child can start the process of establishing paternity
  • Before submission of the petition to the court, it is served on the parties who are involved
  • Followed by the taking of samples and getting the results of the testing

It is applicable for any of the parents to start with the process. A man who claims to be the father of a child whose mother is married to another man can claim for the paternity test. Similarly, a mother who wants to claim child custody or get child support can claim for a paternity test.

What if the mother refuses the test?

Conducting a DNA paternity test is legal and can be conducted through a proper legal process. The process may or may not include getting consent from the court. It includes consent from both the legal parents or guardians.

In case if any one of the parents refuses, it will be difficult to conduct the paternity test. Since the paternity test requires written consent from both the legal guardians of the child who is supposed to be tested.

This condition applies to only those who are less than 18 years old. If the child is less than 18 years old then and the court asks for consent from both the parents in written form. But if the child is 18 years or older then written consent is not required for a paternity test.

In some cases, the lab approves the process of conducting a test without getting consent from both the parents to cut the cost for the testing but it is not much of a reliable and legal process to opt for. But in these conditions, it takes more time to analyze the samples.

In some cases, people secretly collect the samples and request DNA testing. It is not a very reliable source of testing because it may not be a totally legal procedure for conducting it.

Can paternity testing be conducted without the mother’s approval?

To conduct DNA testing, both the parents must approve of the testing. Though in case of a paternity test, the Mother’s DNA is not required, the consent of the mother in written form is required. In the case of a standard home paternity test kit, it is not compulsory to collect DNA samples from both the mother and father along with the child.

The mother can be left. It is up to the participant to decide whether to take the mother’s sample or not.

In case when the mother approves of the testing it is very much helpful to conduct the test more properly and legally. But if the mother does not approve it can still be conducted. Even without the mother sample, the correct testing result probability is still 99.99% and more.

A legal paternity test is a genetic test to determine whether a man is the biological father of a child. If a man is the biological father, the man is deemed by law to have “paternity.” Courts will order biological fathers (fathers who have paternity) to pay child support. Biological fathers may also file a petition with a court seeking to adopt the child. Biological fathers may also be given custody and visitation rights.

Can Potential Fathers Refuse to Take Paternity Tests?

The law cannot force a paternity test. This means that a potential father can refuse to submit to testing, even after the mother, child, and other potential fathers have been tested. However, the refusal is not without penalty. When a woman files a lawsuit seeking to establish paternity, the court orders the man to submit to testing. A man’s refusal to be tested can constitute contempt of court.

Contempt of court is punishable by jail time and fines. In addition, a man who refuses to take the test, and otherwise fails to respond to the lawsuit, can have a default judgment taken against them. A default judgment is one that automatically gives a plaintiff (in this case, the mother) the remedy they sought. Remedies include payment of child support. This means that, if a man refuses to submit to paternity testing, the court may order the man to make child support payments.

Can a Potential Father Request a Paternity Test?

A man who alleges that he is a child’s biological father may ask a court to permit him to undergo paternity testing. This request is typically made as part of a lawsuit filed by the man to establish paternity. Lawsuits brought to establish paternity are known as filiation proceedings.

State laws may limit a man’s ability to file a lawsuit to establish paternity. Many states do not permit a man to initiate filiation proceedings if the child has already been in a father-child relationship with their “current” father (who may be the woman’s husband or partner) for a period of years, usually five or more.

The father with whom the child currently resides with is referred to as the presumed father. A presumed father is a man who is the child’s father, for all legal purposes. Presumption of fatherhood, or presumption of paternity, is established when either the father is married to the child’s birth mother, or the father’s name appears on the child’s birth certificate. The law treats the presumptive father as the legal father, with custodial and legal rights and responsibilities, unless and until a man is able to establish paternity through the paternity test.

How Do I Get a Court-Ordered Paternity Test?

For a court order a paternity test, the man seeking to establish paternity must file a paternity petition in family court. If an individual cannot afford an attorney, and is interested in knowing how to get a court-ordered paternity test without a lawyer, the clerk of the court can assist with providing the filing documents. The clerk cannot give legal advice. At the paternity hearing, the judge hears evidence on the issue of paternity, and reviews the results of any paternity testing.

What Happens if the Father Doesn’t Show up for a Paternity Test?

If a man seeking to establish paternity does not attend the paternity test, the man is in contempt of the court order that required him to do so. The man may be held in contempt of court. In addition, if the man does not appear, the court may grant a default judgment against him. This means the court may dismiss his case.

Can a Mother Refuse a Paternity Test?

A mother may seek to have a man submit to a paternity test. If the test results reveal the man to be the biological father, the mother may seek child support from that person. However, for this to happen, the mother must cooperate during the testing process. If the court requires the mother to take the test, and the mother refuses, paternity will not be established. As a result, the mother’s claim for child support will be dismissed.

Can the Results of a Paternity Test Be Contested?

Court ordered paternity test results can be contested if there is evidence of fraud associated with the test results. Such fraud may include a father’s having another individual take the test, or tampering with the lab results. Additionally, the results may be contested if the father demonstrates that he is infertile or sterile, and thus is incapable of being the biological father.

Do I Need an Attorney for Assistance with Paternity Test Issues?

If you have an issue regarding establishment of paternity, you should contact a family lawyer. An experienced family attorney near you can explain your rights and responsibilities. This attorney can also assist you with filing paternity hearing documents, and can represent you in court.

How to get a paternity test when the mother refuses

This is a common question asked by many people in particular men. What should be noted is, A father being denied the right to perform a paternity test would depend on your relationship with the mother. For example, if you are married the state automatically deems you the legal father of the child. Therefore, you will be able to perform a legal paternity test without the mother’s consent.

If you are not married to the mother, being denied to perform a paternity test on the child is the mother’s right if she is the primary custodial parent. So, the answer to this question is YES. A mother can deny a legal paternity test but, it would depend on your relationship with the mother on whether you can perform a DNA test without the mother’s consent.

Can a father get a DNA test without the mother’s consent?

There are a couple of ways for a father to perform a paternity test without the mother’s consent.

1. Perform a peace of mind (non-legal) paternity test. This testing option cannot be used in court or for any legal reason.

2. The alleged father can force a mother to perform a paternity test by filing a petition with the court. If the judge or magistrate accepts your petition. The court will send the mother a court order. If the mother ignores the court order. She will be held in contempt of court. Please seek legal counsel in your state regarding penalties about being held in contempt of court.

How to get a court ordered paternity test without a lawyer?

One of the biggest misconceptions is that in order to get a court order to perform a DNA test you would need to hire a lawyer. Hiring a lawyer is optional, not mandatory. In order to attempt to get a judge to issue a court order.

An alleged father or, the mother must file a paternity petition with the court. If the court accepts the petition, a court ordered is issued. We always recommend that you speak with a Family Law professional to ensure you understand your state’s laws. before beginning this process.

If you are in need of a court-ordered paternity testing service please do not hesitate to contact our office today at 973-609-5102 to get started today.started.

Can you be forced to take a paternity test?

As we currently understand the paternity acknowledgment guidelines. No one can be forced to partake in performing a paternity test. Now, If you were issued a court order from a judge to perform a paternity test and you ignored the court order. Then you most likely will be held in contempt of court. This pertains to both alleged mothers and fathers.

If you would like to learn more about our DNA relationship testing services. Please do not hesitate to contact our office today at 973-609-5102 to get started.

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If a mother refuses to have a paternity test, what happens next?

Full Question:

Answer:

In most states, a paternity action takes the form of a civil lawsuit. Only certain persons or parties have legal standing to bring a paternity action, including the mother of the child; the mother of an expected child; a man alleging that he is the biological father of a child; a man alleging that he is the biological father of an expected child; the child; a personal representative of the child; the mother and father of a child (a voluntary action filed together); the mother and father of an expected child (a voluntary action filed together); a state social service agency, interceding in cases of child neglect or need; and a prosecutor’s office, interceding in cases of child neglect or need. An action for paternity may be filed by the child. In many states, after a child reaches the “age of majority,” he has another one to five years to seek the establishment of paternity.

A man is rebuttably presumed to be the father of a child born to a woman if he and the woman were married to each other and the child is born within 300 days after the marriage is terminated by death, annulment or dissolution or after entry of a judgment of separation. However, this may be rebutted by clear and convincing evidence, such as genetic testing, in a paternity action by a man claiming to be the biological father.

A court will not automatically order paternity tests simply because a paternity action has been filed. It will review the petition to determine if there is sufficient information contained therein to warrant or justify the compelling of such a test. If the court orders a paternity test, the mother, child, and alleged father will all be tested at a court-designated facility. A court determination of paternity is final, and a copy of the court’s order will be needed to establish the child’s rights, both present and future. If a person refuses to kae a paternity test, the court may hold the person in contempt, or a default (automatic) judgment may be entered against the person. If the mother refuses a test, the court may automatically order that paternity is not restablished, and therefore, no child support is due from the claimed father.

If a person is not the father, then he cannot be required to support the child. If he was married to the mother when the child was conceived, he signed a birth certificate, or if he signed an “acknowledgment of paternity” form, then he is presumed to be the father. Otherwise, child services, the state, or the mother must establish that he is the father.

If the mother refuses. However a mother s permission is not needed and the dna test could still be performed if the father has parental responsibility for the child.

How to get a paternity test when the mother refuses 730 Child Custody Evaluations What To Do How To Prepare Child Custody Quotes Child Custody Parenting Plan Custody

Samples can just be analysed from the alleged father and the child.

How to get a paternity test when the mother refuses

How to get a paternity test if the mother refuses. What if the mother or father refuses to participate in the paternity test. Chances are good the court will automatically order that because paternity has not been definitively established she is not entitled to receive child support from the alleged father. However things could get complicated if she refuses.

Explain that it s best for her and the child if they know who the father is and get the right support for the child. If the mother of the child refuses to sign the voluntary declaration of paternity the father may have to file for an order of paternity from the court. A mother could refuse a peace of mind paternity test.

Suggested steps for legal dna testing. It is rather easy to do a paternity test when the mother accepts. In other words a mother could be forced to undertake a paternity dna test.

If the mother of your child refuses to get a paternity test there are a few things you can do. Try to explain your situation to the mother before you seek legal aid since this can make things more complicated. They should be attempted in the following order.

Similarly if an unmarried father refuses to support his child financially the mother can seek a paternity order from the court. We have listed the different methods to do a dna test when the mother refuses from simplest to most complicated. How to get a court ordered paternity test.

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How to get a paternity test when the mother refuses

When an unmarried couple has a child, the child’s birth is all that is required to establish the mother as the legal parent of that child. However, the situation is different when it comes to the child’s father. The best way to establish paternity is to sign a voluntary acknowledgement of paternity, which ensures that the father is named on the birth certificate. If that is not done, it may be necessary to request an order of paternity from the court to establish parentage at some stage in the future.

Why Is It Important to Establish Paternity?

Paternity is automatically established if the parents are married to each other when the child is born, but not if the parents are not married to each other. Establishing the father’s paternity as soon as possible after the child is born protects the mother, the father and the baby. It helps to ensure that the child receives financial support from the father and is eligible to receive benefits through the father, such as health benefits and life insurance benefits. Most importantly, it greatly reduces the possibility of the father being denied custody or visitation in any future court proceedings.

How to Establish Paternity

Under U.S. Department of Health and Human Services regulations, all states must offer unmarried parents the opportunity to establish paternity by voluntarily signing an acknowledgment of paternity. This may happen at the hospital when the child is born or at a later time. The form must be signed by both parents. The only other requirement is that the father presents photo ID to the birth registrar before he signs the form.

In some states, this is a requirement before an unmarried father’s name can be included on a child’s birth certificate. A voluntary declaration of paternity signed by both parents and sent to the appropriate agency, such as the local vital statistics unit, has the same legal effect as a court order, which means it is sufficient to establish the father’s rights. This also ensures that the child’s original birth certificate includes the father’s name.

If you cannot establish paternity at the hospital when the child is born, the acknowledgement of paternity form is available from your state’s office of vital records, local health department clinics, child support offices and departments of social services.

Presumed Parentage Laws

When trying to establish paternity, the situation may be complicated if there is already a presumed father of the child. Presumed parentage laws vary by state.

In California, a person is presumed to be a child’s father if he was married to the child’s mother when the child was conceived or born; he attempted to marry the mother even if the marriage was not valid and the child was conceived or born during the marriage; he married the mother after the birth of the child and agreed either to support the child or have his name on the child’s birth certificate; or he welcomed the child into his home and openly acted as if the child was his own.

Presumed Parentage Laws in Different States

Whether there is a presumed parent or not affects time limits for establishing paternity. For example, in Texas, a paternity suit can be brought at any time if the child does not already have a presumed father – even when the child is an adult. However, if the child has a presumed father, the paternity suit must be brought within four years of the child’s birth unless the presumed biological father and mother did not live together or engage in sexual relations during the likely time of conception or if the presumed father was tricked into believing he was the father.

Other states have different rules and time limits to establish a presumed father. In most states, a presumption of paternity can only be rebutted by a court adjudication, by the filing of a valid denial of paternity by the presumed father, or by a valid acknowledgment of paternity filed by another father. In some states, such as California, a child can end up with more than two legal parents, if the court finds this situation to be in the child’s best interests.

How to Get a Court-Ordered Paternity Test

If the mother of the child refuses to sign the voluntary declaration of paternity, the father may have to file for an order of paternity from the court. Similarly, if an unmarried father refuses to support his child financially, the mother can seek a paternity order from the court. If the father is not named on the birth certificate, and there is no signed acknowledgement of paternity, the court can order genetic testing to confirm paternity before making an order in respect of child support.

A DNA test may also be ordered if the unmarried father is trying to get custody or visitation rights with the child. Before those rights can be granted, he must be established as the father of the child. Once a father’s paternity is established, he has a legal responsibility for the child, and his legal rights to the child are equal to those of the mother.

The Steps for a Court-Ordered Paternity Test

The first step toward getting a court-ordered paternity test is to file the correct form with the court. Depending on your state, this form may be called a Petition to Establish Parental Relationship, a Petition to Establish Paternity or a Petition to Adjudicate Parentage. You can get this form from the clerk’s office at the district court in your county. Complete it in full, hand it in to the clerk’s office and pay the filing fee. This varies by state, so ask the clerk’s office for the amount of the current fee.

The court will provide the parties with all DNA test rules and information needed to get the tests done. The child, mother and father are all tested, which generally involves taking a swab from the inside of the cheek. The samples are sent for lab testing, and results are usually available within a few weeks. Each state has its own requirements for proof of paternity from genetic tests. In many states, only test results of 99 percent or higher are accepted as proof of paternity. In Virginia, the threshold is 98 percent.

Fees and Outcomes for Paternity Testing

If your local department of child support services performs the test, normally there is no charge to either party, although if the tested man is found to be the father he may have to pay the fee. If a court orders testing, the court will also decide who will pay the fee, which could be several hundred dollars. DNA tests carried out at home or in a private medical facility are not accepted by the court.

If DNA testing proves that the man is the biological father of the child, the court will make an order adjudicating parentage. This order makes him the legal father and adds his name to the child’s birth certificate. The court can then make orders in respect to custody, visitation and child support. The court will only make an order it deems to be in the child’s best interests. It may also change the child’s last name to the father’s name, although in some cases the child retains the mother’s last name.

Paternity testing can quickly turn into a heated discussion between a mother and the man in her life that she believes to be the father of her child, especially when that man denies that the child is his. Under Arizona law, if the child is born to parents that are not married, there is no presumption regarding the identity of a biological father. Paternity of the child is the only way to establish that a man is the biological father of a child. Child support, custodial rights and legal obligation for the child are not established until legal paternity has been confirmed. If both parents are willing to establish paternity, there are legal agreements and tests they can complete to get this information. However, sometimes the father may deny a paternity test for many reasons. In this case, there is action that the mother of the child can take in order to confirm if the man is or is not the father of her child.

If both parents cannot agree privately to voluntarily establish paternity through DNA testing because the father denies a paternity test, the mother can file necessary documents through the court in order to begin a case. These documents can be processed during pregnancy or after birth before the child turns 18 years old. These documents include a written “complaint,” to be given to the Clerk of the Superior Court, and must include the names and social security numbers of the mother and the alleged father. The mother will then have it served to the alleged father who will be ordered by the court to take a paternity test.

If the father then agrees to take a paternity test as a result of court order, the man is presumed to be the father if the test is at least 95% positive in determining paternity. If the alleged father continues to deny genetic testing, a court trail may be necessary. If you have found yourself in the position of filing a request for a court trial, consult a Glendale paternity lawyer at The Sampair Group to assist you in the process.

If the genetic testing comes back with results that the man is not the father, he has no legal responsibility to the child unless he otherwise chooses to establish legal responsibility. If genetic testing establishes that the man is the biological father of the child, the court will issue an order establishing legal paternity. This order will include child support responsibilities (both past payments that were not made and future payments to be made until the child is 18 years old) as well as other costs including medical insurance coverage and other fees from the child’s birth. The court may also begin an order for the process of custodial rights and child visitation agreements between each parent.

If you and an alleged parent of your child are experiencing conflict involving your family and paternity disputes, contact our attorneys at The Sampair Group to speak about your case today.

How to get a paternity test when the mother refuses

DNA tests serve many purposes in today’s society, including but not limited to growing family trees, identifying archeological remains, solving cold cases, and tracking down long-lost relatives. By far one of the most far reaching impacts of DNA tests, however, is their ability to establish paternity and therefore ensure that the right man is held financially accountable for his child.

The rate of children being born into fatherless families has soared since the 1970s, with approximately 1 million more children being born out of wedlock each year. With more and more people having children out of wedlock these days, the need for paternity testing has become urgent, and the need for court intervention almost equally so. Family courts take the welfare of children very seriously, and the needs of those children always trump any repercussions that test results may have on the mother or alleged father. If a mother or alleged father refuses to agree to or take a paternity test, the oppositional party may face legal consequences.

Who Can Order a Court-Ordered Paternity Test?

One of three people or entities may initiate paternity proceedings in the state of Florida:

  • The mother;
  • The alleged or presumed father;
  • The Child Support Division of the State.

The mother and alleged father may file before the child is even born so that they can decide whether or not a Voluntary Acknowledgement of Paternity is even necessary. A child may also initiate paternity proceedings so long as he or she does so once he or she has reached the “age of majority,” which is 18, and before he or she turns 23.

What if the Mother or Father Refuses to Participate in the Test?

Generally speaking, a mother cannot refuse a paternity test, as there is no good reason for her to do so. That said, if ordered by the courts, it is not wise for any alleged father to refuse a test, either. If an alleged father refuses to take a paternity test, he can be held in contempt of court, which is a crime that carries hefty fines and possible jail time. Paying the fine and serving the time does not mean that the whole ordeal is over with for the father either. The family law judge may still enter a judgement against the man and order him to pay child support.

What if the Mother and Alleged Father Were Married at the Time of Conception or Birth?

In Florida, the “presumption of paternity” exists when a man’s name is listed on the child’s birth certificate as the father or when a child is born to a married couple. The married man remains the presumed father even if there is clear and convincing evidence that the wife was having an affair at the time of conception. A presumed father may attempt to disestablish paternity, which begins with requesting that the Court order a DNA paternity test.

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